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Encyclopedia > Easter Monday


Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures, especially Roman Catholic cultures. Easter Monday in the Roman Catholic liturgical calendar is the second day of the octave of Easter Week. In the Eastern Catholic Byzantine Rite and the Eastern Orthodox Church, Easter Monday is called Bright Monday. In Poland and parts of the United States, Easter Monday is called Dyngus Day. This article is about the Christian festival. ... For other uses, see Holiday (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... Octave in liturgical usage has two senses. ... The Byzantine Rite, sometimes called Constantinopolitan, is the liturgical rite used (in various languages) by all the Eastern Orthodox Churches and by several Eastern Catholic Churches. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ...


Formerly, the post-Easter festivities involved a week of secular celebration, but this was reduced to one day in the 19th century. Events include egg rolling competitions and, in predominantly Roman Catholic countries, dousing other people with water which traditionally had been holy water blessed the day before at Easter Sunday Mass and carried home to bless the house and food. This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Egg roll at the White House lawn, 1929 Egg rolling, or an Easter egg roll is a traditional game with eggs played at Easter. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... This article is about water that has been blessed. ... Look up blessing in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Contents

Poland

Dyngus Day or Wet Monday (Polish Śmigus-dyngus or Lany Poniedziałek) is the name for Easter Monday in Poland. In the Czech Republic it is called Velikonoční pondělí or Pomlázka. Both countries practice a unique custom on this day.


In Poland, traditionally, early in the morning boys awake girls by pouring a bucket of water on their head and striking them about the legs with long thin twigs or switches made from willow, birch or decorated tree branches (palmy wielkanocne); however, the earliest documented[citation needed] records of Dyngus Day in Poland are from the 15th century, almost half a millennium after Poland adopted Christianity. Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... Species Many species; see text and classification Birch is the name of any tree of the genus Betula, in the family Betulaceae, closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ...


Benedykt Chmielowski in Nowe Ateny cite after "Carolo Berthold" that this ritual was already in custom in 750, 250 years before Poland officially adopted Christianity. Nałęcz – Chmielowski coat of arms Benedykt Joachim Chmielowski Born in Łuck 1700 1763) – Polish priest. ...


One theory is that Dyngus originates from the baptism on Easter Monday of Mieszko I (Duke of the Polans, c. 935 - 992) in 966 AD, uniting all of Poland under the banner of Christianity. Reign ca. ...


Early in the Colombian evolution of the tradition, the Dyngus custom was clearly differentiated from Śmigus: Dyngus was the exchange of gifts (usually eggs, often decorated like pisankas), under the threat of water splashing if one party did not have any eggs ready, while Śmigus (from Śmigać, to whoosh, ie make a whipping noise) referred to the striking. Ukrainian pysanky Pisanka (plural: Pisankas, Pisanki) is an ancient Slavic art of egg decorating. ...


Later the focus shifted to the courting aspect of the ritual, and young unmarried girls were the only acceptable targets. A boy would sneak into the bedroom of the girl he fancied and awaken her by drenching her with multiple buckets of water. Politics played an important role in proceedings, and often the boy would get access to the house only by arrangement with the girl's mother.


Throughout the day, girls would find themselves the victims of drenchings and leg-whippings, and a daughter who was not targeted for such activities was generally considered to be beznadziejna (hopeless) in this very coupling-oriented environment.


Most recently, the tradition has changed to become fully water-focused, and the Śmigus part is almost forgotten. It is quite common for girls to attack boys just as fiercely as the boys traditionally attacked the girls. With much of Poland's population residing in tall apartment buildings, high balconies are favorite hiding places for young people who gleefully empty full buckets of water onto randomly selected passers-by.


Another related custom, unique to Poland is that of sprinkling bowls (garce) of ashes on people (starts men on women) or houses, celebrated a few weeks earlier at the "półpoście." This custom is almost forgotten, but still practiced on the area around borders of Mazuria and Masovia.

Handmade whip decorated with ribbons called pomlázka
Handmade whip decorated with ribbons called pomlázka

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2112 × 2816 pixel, file size: 1. ... For other uses, see Whip (disambiguation). ...

Elsewhere in Europe

In Slovakia and the Czech Republic, traditionally, early in the morning, boys awake girls by pouring a bucket of water on their head. This practice is possibly connected to a pre-Christian, pagan fertility rite, that seems originated from the similar older customs as the Ancient Roman Lupercalia. The Lupercalia was a very ancient, possibly pre-Roman pastoral festival, observed on February 13 through February 15 to avert evil spirits and purify the city, releasing health and fertility. ...


Also, splashing water, and a special handmade whip decorated with ribbons called pomlázka (Slovak: korbáč) is used on females in the morning. The boys usually accompany the whipping with a special Easter carol and then are given a decorated hard-boiled egg (a ribbon, or possibly a snifter of liquor). The girls would reward the boys who sprinkle with coins or Easter eggs. In the afternoon, females can douse males with cold water. In some other parts of Slovakia boys use water or perfume to splash the girls and then girls whip boys on Tuesday. For other uses, see Whip (disambiguation). ... Look up Carol, carol in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Easter eggs
Easter eggs

For Easter Monday in Hungary, perfume or perfumed-water is used. The girls would reward the boys who sprinkle with coins or Easter eggs. Image File history File links Vejce. ... Image File history File links Vejce. ... For other uses, see Perfume (disambiguation). ... For a hidden feature or message, see Easter egg (media). ...


Along with Good Friday, Easter Monday is a public holiday in historically-Protestant countries such as Germany, Denmark, Sweden and certain British Commonwealth countries such as Australia. Good Friday and Easter Monday are Bank Holidays in the United Kingdom and in Canada, making a four-day weekend. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


United States

Though not largely observed in the United States, the day remains informally observed in some areas such as the state of North Dakota, and some cities in New York, Michigan, and Indiana. Easter Monday was a public holiday in North Carolina from 1935 to 1987. Official language(s) English Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Area  Ranked 19th  - Total 70,762 sq mi (183,272 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 340 miles (545 km)  - % water 2. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Traditionally Polish areas of the country such as Chicago observe Easter Monday as Dyngus Day. In the United States, Dyngus Day celebrations are widespread and popular in Buffalo, New York, Wyandotte, Michigan, La Porte and South Bend, Indiana. For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... Wyandotte is a city in Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... La Porte (French for The Door) is a city in La Porte County, Indiana, of which it is the county seat. ... South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ...


In Buffalo's eastern suburbs, Dyngus Day is celebrated with a level of enthusiasm that rivals St. Patrick's Day. Common tradition is to buy pussy willow (Salix discolor) to display in the home; this is tied to the "striking" custom from Poland, where goat willow, the European type of pussy willow, was traditionally used for whipping the legs of girls. St. ... Binomial name Salix discolor L. The Pussy Willow, (Salix discolor), is a small, weak-wooded tree, often grown for cut flowers. ... Binomial name Salix caprea L. The Goat Willow (Salix caprea), also known as the Pussy Willow or Great Sallow, is a common species of willow native to Europe and northwestern Africa. ...

Dyngus Day 2008 at the West Side Democratic Club in South Bend, Ind. (Pict. from R to L: Chelsea Clinton, Bill Clinton, Joe Kernan, and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend

In South Bend, Indiana, the day is often used to launch the year's political campaign season (particularly among Democrats)- often from within the West Side Democratic Club, the M.R. Falcons Club, and local pubs and fraternal halls, where buying drinks is favored over handshaking. Notable politicos who have celebrated Dyngus Day in South Bend include the late Robert F. Kennedy, Joe Kernan, Evan Bayh, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, and Bill Clinton. Chelsea Victoria Clinton (born February 27, 1980) is the daughter and only child of former U.S. President Bill Clinton and current New York Senator and 2008 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Joseph Eugene Kernan (born April 8, 1946), widely known as Joe Kernan, is an American politician who became the Governor of Indiana on September 13, 2003 upon the death of Frank OBannon. ... Kathleen Kennedy Townsend Kathleen Hartington Kennedy Townsend (born July 4, 1951) was lieutenant governor of the U.S. state of Maryland from 1995 to 2003. ... South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Joseph Eugene Kernan (born April 8, 1946), widely known as Joe Kernan, is an American politician who became the Governor of Indiana on September 13, 2003 upon the death of Frank OBannon. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Kathleen Kennedy Townsend Kathleen Hartington Kennedy Townsend (born July 4, 1951) was lieutenant governor of the U.S. state of Maryland from 1995 to 2003. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ...


Starting in 2004, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Indiana began celebrating Dyngus Day at the request of South Bend students. The event includes free Polish sausage for students as well as a free concert. Wet Monday is also celebrated at Jonathan Edwards College, one of the residential colleges at Yale University, when each year the freshman class storms the college with water weapons, where upperclassmen are ready to defend the college and ensure no one goes home dry. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology (abbreviated RHIT), formerly Rose Polytechnic Institute, is a small, private, non-sectarian college specializing in teaching engineering, mathematics, and science. ... Terre Haute (IPA: ) is a city in Vigo County, Indiana near the states western border with Illinois. ... Jonathan Edwards College, Winter 2004 Jonathan Edwards College is a residential college at Yale University. ... Yale redirects here. ...


The Easter Monday holiday in North Carolina stemmed from the tradition in the early 20th century of state government workers taking the day off to attend the annual baseball game between North Carolina State College (Now North Carolina State University) and nearby Wake Forest College (now Wake Forest University and moved to Winston-Salem, NC). The holiday was enacted in 1935 and remained until 1988, when the official state holiday was moved to Good Friday to match the rest of the nation. Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Winston-Salem is a city located in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ...


Elsewhere in the world

In Guyana, people fly kites, which are made on Holy Saturday. Holy Saturday is the day before Easter in the Christian calendar. ...


In Egypt, the ancient festival of Sham El Nessim (Arabic: شم النسيم, literally meaning "smelling of the air") is celebrated on the Coptic (i.e. Eastern) Easter Monday, though the festival dates back to Pharonic times (about 2700 BC). It is celebrated by both Egyptian Christians and Muslims as an Egyptian national holiday rather than as a religious one. Traditional activities include painting eggs and eating fish that has been buried underground. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Christ - Coptic Art Coptic Orthodox Christianity is the indigenous form of Christianity that, according to tradition, the apostle Mark established in Egypt in the middle of the 1st century AD (approximately AD 60). ... Eastern Christianity refers collectively to the Christian traditions and churches which developed in Greece, Russia, Armenia, the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, northeastern Africa and southern India over several centuries of religious antiquity. ... The pyramids are the most recognizable symbols of the civilization of ancient Egypt. ...


Official holiday

Easter Monday is an official holiday in the following countries:

[--168. ... Motto: Unity, Work, Progress Anthem: Cântico da Liberdade Capital Praia Largest city Praia Official language(s) Portuguese (official) and nine Portuguese Creoles Government Republic  - President Pedro Pires  - Prime Minister José Maria Neves Independence from Portugal   - Recognized July 5, 1975  Area    - Total 4,033 km² (165th)   1,557 sq mi... Smigus Dyngus (shming-oos-ding-oos) is an unusual tradition of Easter Monday. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The location of the FBiH entity as part of the state of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Europe. ... This article is about the country in Europe. ... Not to be confused with Republika Srpska. ... Family Day is the name of a statutory holiday in Israel and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Ontario and Saskatchewan, and a public holiday in South Africa. ... Autonomous communities of Spain. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the country in the Caribbean; for the Catholic saint, see Saint Lucy Saint Lucia is an island nation in the eastern Caribbean Sea on the boundary with the Atlantic Ocean. ... Saint-Pierre and Miquelon (French Saint-Pierre et Miquelon) is a French overseas collectivity consisting of several small islands off the eastern coast of Canada near Newfoundland. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the country. ... The United States Virgin Islands is a group of islands in the Caribbean that is a dependency of the United States. ... The Independent State of Samoa (conventional long form) or Samoa (conventional short form) is a country comprising a group of islands in the South Pacific Ocean. ...

See also

This article is about the Christian festival. ... Good Friday, also called Holy Friday or Great Friday, is the Friday preceding Easter Sunday. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Public Holidays Act, 1994 (36 of 1994, South Africa) (PDF) (1994-12-07). Retrieved on 2006-04-05.
“PDF” redirects here. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Easter Monday is the day after Easter Sunday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures.
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