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Encyclopedia > East St. Louis, Illinois
East St. Louis
City
Country United States
State Illinois
County St. Clair
Coordinates 38°36′56″N 90°07′40″W / 38.61556°N 90.12778°W / 38.61556; -90.12778
Area 14.4 sq mi (37.3 km2)
 - land 14.0 sq mi (36 km2)
 - water 0.4 sq mi (1 km2), 2.78%
Population 31,542 (2000)
Density 2,242.9 /sq mi (866 /km2)
founded June 6, 1820
Government Council-Manager
Mayor Alvin Parks, Jr
Timezone CST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Postal code 62201 62202 62203 62204 62205 62206 62207
Area code 618
Location of East St. Louis within Illinois
Location of Illinois in the United States
Website: www.cesl.us

East St. Louis is a city located in St. Clair County, Illinois, USA, directly across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 31,542, less than half its peak in 1950. Like many larger industrial cities, it has been severely affected by loss of jobs in the restructuring of the railroad industry and deindustrialization of the Rust Belt in the second half of the 20th century. Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... List of cities in Illinois, arranged in alphabetical order. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... St. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The council-manager government is one of two main variations of representative municipal government in the United States. ...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7...  CST or UTC-6 The Central Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting six hours from UTC during standard time (UTC-6) and five hours during daylight saving time (UTC-5). ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... St. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... St. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Manufacturing Belt, highlighted in red The Rust Belt, a term coined from Manufacturing Belt, is an area in parts of the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States of America. ...


One of the highlights of the city's waterfront is the Gateway Geyser, the tallest fountain in the United States. Designed to complement the Gateway Arch across the river in St. Louis, it shoots water to a height of 630 feet (190 m), the same height as the Arch. The Gateway Geyser, located on the riverfront of the Mississippi River in East Saint Louis, Illinois, is the worlds tallest fountain. ... The Old Courthouse sits at the heart of the city of Saint Louis, with the arch to the east, near the rivers edge. ... St. ...

Contents

History

Native Americans long inhabited both sides of the Mississippi River at this point. Mound builders of the Mississippian culture constructed mounds at what became St. Louis and East St. Louis, as well as the large settlement of Cahokia to the north of East St. Louis near present day Collinsville, Illinois. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States and their history after European contact, chiefly in what is now the United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... The Mound Builders were Archaic and Woodland Pre-Columbian Native American cultures. ... The Mississippian culture was a mound-building Native American culture that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 to 1500 A.D., varying regionally. ... The Gateway Arch, shown here behind the Old Courthouse, is the most recognizable part of the St. ... Cahokia is the site of an ancient Native American city near Collinsville, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. ... East St. ... Collinsville is a city in Madison County, Illinois and partially in St. ...


East St. Louis lies within the American Bottom area of the present day Metro-East area of St. Louis, Missouri. East St. ... The American Bottom is a flood plain of the Mississippi River in southwestern Illinois, extending from Alton, Illinois, to the Kaskaskia River. ... Metro-East is a region in Illinois that comprises the eastern suburbs St. ... St. ...


After European settlement, East St. Louis' original name was "Illinoistown."[1]


Several destructive tornadoes have hit East St. Louis, the deadliest being the St. Louis-East St. Louis Tornado of 1896, which killed at least 255, injured over 1000, and incurred an estimated $2.9 billion in damages (1997 USD).[2] 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The St. ...

The Great Railroad Strike of 1877 and the St. Louis commune

A period of extensive industrial growth followed the American Civil War. Industries located in East St. Louis to make use of the local availability of Illinois coal as fuel. Another early industry was meatpacking and stockyards, concentrated in one area to limit their nuisance to other jurisdictions. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Coal Example chemical structure of coal Coal is a fossil fuel formed in ecosystems where plant remains were saved by water and mud from oxidization and biodegradation. ... The meat packing industry is an industry that handles the slaughtering, processing and distribution of animals such as cattle, pigs, sheep and other livestock. ... A stockyard is a place for the sale and shipping of livestock. ...


In the expansion, many businessmen became overextended in credit, and a major economic collapse followed the Panic of 1873. This was due to railroad and other manufacturing expansion, land speculation and general business optimism caused by large profits from inflation. The economic recession began in the East and steadily moved west, severely crippling the railroads, the main system of transportation. In response to the difficulties, railroad companies began dramatically lowering workers' wages, forcing employees to work without pay, and cutting jobs and the amount of paid work hours. These wage cuts and additional money-saving tactics used by the industry prompted strikes and unrest on a massive scale. Run on the Fourth National Bank, No. ...


While most of the strikes in the eastern cities during 1877 were accompanied by violence and mayhem, the late July 1877 St. Louis strike was marked by a bloodless, efficient and quick take-over of commerce and transportation in the area by dissatisfied workers. By July 22, the St. Louis Commune began to take shape as representatives from almost all the railroad lines met in East St. Louis. They soon elected an executive committee to command the strike and issued General Order No. 1, halting all railroad traffic other than passenger and mail trains. John Bowman, the mayor of East St. Louis, was appointed arbitrator of the committee. He helped the committee select special police to guard the property of the railroads from damage. The strike and the new de facto workers' government, while given encouragement by the largely German-American Workingmen's Party and the Knights of Labor (two key players in the organization of the Missouri general strike), were run by no organized labor group. St. ... Dr. John Bowman Winifred (born 1942) is an Irish historian and broadcaster. ... German Americans (German Deutschamerikaner) are citizens of the United States of ethnic German ancestry and currently form the largest ancestry group in the United States, accounting for 17% of the U.S. population. ... The Working Mens Party was the first labor union in the United States, located in Philadelphia. ... Knights of Labor seal The Knights of Labor, also known as Noble and Holy Order of the Knights of Labor, was founded by seven Philadelp tailors in 1869, led by Uriah S. Stephens. ...


The strike reached the business sector by closing packing industry houses surrounding the National Stockyards. At one plant, workers allowed processing of 125 cattle in return for 500 cans of beef for the workers. The strike continued to gain momentum, with different regions and workers asking to join in. Though the East St. Louis strike continued in an orderly fashion, across the river there were isolated incidents of violence. Harry Eastman, the East St. Louis workers' representative, addressed the mass of employees: "Go home to your different wards and organize your different unions, but don't keep coming up here in great bodies and stirring up excitement. Ask the Mayor, as we did, to close up all the saloons... keep sober and orderly, and when you are organized, apply to the United Workingmen for orders. Don't plunder ... don't interfere with the railroads here ... let us attend to that".[citation needed] This article is about the neighborhoods in Oklahoma City. ...


On July 28 the strike was peacefully ended when US troops took over the Relay Depot, the Commune's command center.[3]

The East St. Louis riots of 1917

East St. Louis in 1917 had a strong industrial economy boosted by World War I. Many workers entered the military and the other workers who were left went on strike. The war prevented immigration from Europe. Major companies recruited black migrants from the South to work at the Aluminum Ore Company and the American Steel Company. They were available because the US Army initially rejected many black volunteers in the years before an integrated military.[4] Resentment on both sides and the arrival of new workers created fears for job security and raised social tensions. At a white labor meeting on May 28, men traded rumors of black men's and white women's fraternizing. Three thousand white men left the meeting and headed as a mob for the downtown, where they randomly attacked black men on the street. They destroyed buildings and physically attacked people, and, according to Jonathan Kozol's book Savage Inequalities, the mob "killed a 14-year-old boy and scalped his mother. before it was over 244 buildings were destroyed."[5]. The governor called in National Guard to prevent further rioting, but rumors continued to circulate about an organized retaliation from the blacks. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Savage Inequalities is a book written by Jonathan Kozol in 1991 that discusses the disparities in education between schools of different classes and races. ... The United States National Guard is a reserve forces component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ...


On July 1, 1917, a black man attacked a white man. Whites drove by shooting in retaliation. When police came to investigate, the black attacker proceeded to fire on the police and wounded at least one. The next morning, thousands of white spectators marched into the black section of town. The rioters burned entire sections of the city and shot blacks as they escaped the flames. They also lynched several blacks.


Although the governor had called in the National Guard to try to control the situation, several accounts reported that they joined in the rioting. The mob included "ten or fifteen white women, [who] chased a negro woman at the Relay Depot in broad daylight. The girls were brandishing clubs and calling upon the men to kill the woman." 2 The woman was a known prostitute frequented by white men.

Recent history

East St. Louis was named an All-America City in 1958, having retained prosperity through the decade as its population reached a peak of 82,295 residents. Through the 1950s and later, the city's musicians were an integral creative force in blues, rock and roll and jazz. Some left and achieved national recognition, like Ike and Tina Turner and jazz great Miles Davis, who was born in nearby Alton and grew up in East St. Louis. Many were featured on the PBS series River of Song in 1999, covering music of cities along the Mississippi River. All-America City Program Logo The All-America City Award is given by the National Civic League annually to ten cities in the United States. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... Alton is the name of several places: United Kingdom Alton, Derbyshire, England Alton, Hampshire, England Alton, Staffordshire, England Alton, Wiltshire, England Canada Alton, Ontario Altona, Ontario Alton, Nova Scotia North Alton, Nova Scotia South Alton, Nova Scotia Altona, British Columbia Altona, Manitoba Old Altona, Manitoba Alton, Quebec United States Alton...


The city was dramatically affected by mid-century deindustrialization and restructuring. As a number of local factories began to close because of changes in industry, the railroad and meatpacking industries also were cutting back and moving jobs out of the region. This led to a precipitous loss of working and middle-class jobs. The city's financial conditions deteriorated. Elected in 1951, Mayor Alvin Fields resorted to ill-judged funding procedures to try to buy the city out of its financial morass. The scheme increased the city's bonded indebtedness and the property tax rate. More businesses closed as workers left the area to seek jobs in other regions. Crime increased as a result of poverty and lack of opportunities. The city was also left with expensive clean-up of brownfields, areas with environmental contamination by heavy industry that make redevelopment more difficult.


Street gangs such as the War Lords, Black Egyptians, 29th Street Stompers and Hustlers appeared in city neighborhoods. Like other cities with endemic problems by the 1960s, East St. Louis suffered riots in the latter part of the decade. In September 1967, rioting occurred in the city's South End. Also, in the summer of 1968, a still-unsolved series of sniping attacks took place. These events contributed to residential mistrust and adversely affected the downtown retail base and the city's income.


Construction of freeways and urban sprawl contributed to East St. Louis' decline as well. The freeways cut through and broke up existing neighborhoods and community networks. The freeways also made it easier for residents to commute back and forth from suburban homes, so more people moved up to newer housing. East St. Louis adopted a number of programs to try to reverse decline — the Model Cities program, the Concentrated Employment Program and Operation Breakthrough. The programs were not enough to offset the industrial restructuring.-1...


In 1971, James Williams was elected as the city's first black mayor. Faced with overwhelming economic problems, he was unable to stop the city's decline and depopulation.[citation needed] By the election of Carl Officer as mayor (the youngest in the country at that time at age 25) in 1979, many said the city had nowhere to go but up, yet things grew worse. Middle-class whites and blacks left the city. People who could get jobs simply went to where there was work and a decent quality of life. Because the city had been obliged to cut back on maintenance, sewers failed and garbage pickup ceased. Police cars and radios stopped working. The East St. Louis Fire Department went on strike in the 1970s.


Before Gordon Bush was elected mayor in 1991, the state imposed a financial advisory board to manage the city in exchange for a financial bailout. State legislative approval in 1990 of riverboat gambling and the installation of the Casino Queen riverboat casino provided the first new source of income for the city in nearly 30 years. This article is about casinos for gaming. ...


The past decade can be characterized as one of redevelopment and renewal.[citation needed] In 2001 the city completed a new library. It also built a new city hall. Public-private partnerships have resulted in a variety of new retail developments, housing initiatives, and the St. Louis Metrolink light rail, which have sparked renewal. Access to the Metrolink from the East Side has become a controversy in the Saint Louis Metro Area, as a 2008 article in the Riverfront Times stated that it has resulted in skyrocketing crime rates on the west side of the River in affluent suburbs.[6] MetroLink is a light rail transit system in the Greater St. ... Light rail is a particular class of urban and suburban passenger railway that utilizes equipment and infrastructure that is typically less massive than that used for metro systems and heavy railways. ... The Riverfront Times (also known as the RFT; also known as the Hippie Times) is a popular alternative newsweekly in St. ...


The city, now small in terms of population, is a prime example of drastic urban blight. Sections of "urban prairie" can be found where vacant buildings have been torn down and whole blocks became overgrown with vegetation. Much of the territory surrounding the city remains undeveloped, bypassed for growth in more affluent suburban areas. Many old, "inner city" neighborhoods abut large swaths of corn and soybean fields or otherwise vacant land. In addition to agricultural uses, a number of truck stops, strip clubs, and semi-rural businesses surround blighted areas in the city as well. Urban prairie is a term to describe what is occurring to the core areas of many North American cities as urban sprawl takes hold. ... The term inner-city is often applied to the poorer parts at the centre of a major city. ... This article is about the maize plant. ... Soy redirects here. ...


In August 2008 at a RoCorp chemical plant, there was spillage of a toxic industrial material that seriously sickened several people and caused at least two area emergency rooms to be quarantined. The incident involved a release of nitroaniline.[7] The term nitroaniline can refer to the following chemical compounds: 2-Nitroaniline 3-Nitroaniline 4-Nitroaniline Categories: Hidden categories: | | ...

Geography

East St. Louis township.

East St. Louis is located at 38°36'56" North, 90°7'40" West (38.615550, -90.127825).[8]


According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 14.4 square miles (37.4 km²), of which, 14.1 square miles (36.4 km²) of it is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km²) of it is water. The total area is 2.56% water. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ...


East St. Louis usually experiences cold winters and hot summers. On July 14, 1954 the temperature at East Saint Louis reached 117 °F (48 °C), the highest temperature ever recorded in Illinois.

Transportation

East St. Louis is home to four St. Louis MetroLink stations; East Riverfront, 5th & Missouri, Emerson Park, and JJK Center. MetroLink is a light rail transit system in the Greater St. ... East Riverfront is a St. ... 5th & Missouri is a MetroLink station located in East St. ... Emerson Park is a St. ... Jackie Joyner-Kersee Center is a St. ...


Interstate 55, Interstate 64, Interstate 70, and US Highway 40 run concurrently through East St. Louis and are linked to St. Louis by the Poplar Street Bridge. Prior to its decommissioning, the fabled Route 66 also shared a concurrence with these Interstate highways. In addition, US Highway 50 also shared a concurrence prior to its being rerouting and concurrence with Interstate 255. Interstate 55 (abbreviated I-55) is an interstate highway in the central United States. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 64 Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 70 (abbreviated I-70) is a long interstate highway in the United States that runs from Interstate 15 about a mile from Cove Fort, Utah to a Park and Ride in Baltimore, Maryland. ... U.S. Route 40 is an east-west United States highway. ... The Poplar Street Bridge, offically the Bernard F. Dickman Bridge, is a 647 foot (197m) long deck girder bridge across the Mississippi River between St. ... U.S. Highway 66 or Route 66 was a highway in the U.S. Highway system. ... U.S. Route 50 is a major east–west route of the U.S. Highway system, stretching just over 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from Ocean City, Maryland on the Atlantic Ocean to West Sacramento, California. ... Interstate 255 (abbreviated I-255) is a bypass route of Interstate 55 near St. ...

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1870 5,044
1880 9,185 82.1%
1890 15,169 65.1%
1900 29,734 96.0%
1910 58,540 96.9%
1920 66,785 14.1%
1930 74,397 11.4%
1940 75,603 1.6%
1950 82,366 8.9%
1960 81,728 −0.8%
1970 70,029 −14.3%
1980 55,239 −21.1%
1990 40,921 −25.9%
2000 31,542 −22.9%
Est. 2007 28,996 [9] −8.1%


As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 31,542 people, 11,178 households, and 7,668 families residing in the city. The population density is 2,242.9 people per square mile (866.2/km²). There are 12,899 housing units at an average density of 917.2/sq mi (354.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.74% African-American, 1.23% Caucasian, 0.19% Native American, 0.08% Asian-American, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 0.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.73% of the population. The United States Census of 1870 was the ninth United States Census. ... The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census conducted by the Census Bureau during June 1880. ... 1890 Census form The Eleventh United States Census was taken June 2, 1890. ... The twelfth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau on 1 June 1900,1 determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21. ... The Thirteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21. ... The Fourteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15. ... The Fifteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from , 1930, determined the resident population of the United States to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13. ... The Sixteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7. ... The Seventeenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 150,520,798, an increase of 14. ... The Eighteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 179,323,175, an increase of 18. ... The Nineteenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 203,302,031, an increase of 13. ... The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ... The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9. ... (Redirected from 2000 United States census) The United States 2000 census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), are self-identification data items in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify, and indicate whether or not they... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There are 11,178 households out of which 33.2% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 21.9% are married couples living together, 40.6% have a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% are non-families. 27.8% of all households are made up of individuals and 10.4% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 3.80 and the average family size is 4.02. Matrimony redirects here. ...


In the city the population is spread out with 32.8% under the age of 18, 9.7% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.5% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 31 years. For every 100 females there are 81.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 72.5 males.


The median income for a household in the city is $21,324, and the median income for a family is $24,567. Males have a median income of $27,864 versus $21,850 for females. The per capita income for the city is $11,169. 35.1% of the population and 31.8% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 48.6% of those under the age of 18 and 25.2% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Per capita income means how much each individual receives, in monetary terms, of the yearly income generated in their country. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...

Education

The city is served by the East St. Louis School District 189 [3]. East St. ...


All residents are zoned to East St. Louis High School. East Saint Louis Sr. ...

Notable people

East St. Louis in popular culture

  • In an episode of Leave It to Beaver, Hugh Beaumont (Ward Cleaver) mentioned that Barbara Billingsley (June Cleaver) was the "Former Belle of East St. Louis."
  • In The Simpsons episode "They Saved Lisa's Brain," the local chapter of Mensa takes over the government of Springfield and improves the city to 299th place on America's list of 300 most livable cities, displacing East St. Louis. According to the DVD commentary for this episode, this joke caused a lot of controversy. In later episodes, the show has been kinder to the city: Homer plans a trip there through AAA, and the family takes a discount route that includes East St. Louis when they head to Brazil.
  • Aaron McGruder and Reginald Hudlin penned a 2004 graphic novel Birth of a Nation, in which they theorize what would happen if the 2000 Florida election debacle had instead happened in East St. Louis, resulting in ESL seceding from the nation and creating its own called "Republic of Blackland."[11]
  • Comic book author Dennis O'Neil of St. Louis based The Question's fictional Hub City on East St. Louis.[11]
  • Duke Ellington and Bubber Miley wrote a song, "East St. Louis Toodle-Oo", which also appeared on the Steely Dan album Pretzel Logic.
  • In and episode of That '70s Show Kitty Foreman, outraged over her husband Red Foreman and son's friend Steven Hyde selling Heart medication, says that they have "turned my living room into East St. Louis."
  • The first chapter of Jonathan Kozol's book Savage Inequalities has to do with the East St. Louis Educational system.

Film

  • In the films Going My Way (1944) and The Bells of St. Mary's (1945), the character of Father Charles O'Malley (played by Bing Crosby) was from East St. Louis. He sang the "East St. Louis High" alma mater ("Hail alma mater, thy time-honored halls shall echo with our praise till we die, and round our hearts are the ivy-covered walls of East St. Louis High.") in Going My Way.
  • In the 1983 comedy National Lampoon's Vacation, The Griswolds were thought to accidentally drive through East St. Louis and get their car stripped while asking for directions. From viewing the film they do cross the Mississippi River and enter St. Louis then get their car stripped.
  • The 1992 film Trespass takes place almost entirely in East St. Louis.

Crime

East St. Louis has one of the highest crime rates in the United States. According to FBI's data of 2007, its murder rate hit 101.9 per population of 100,000, surpassing that of cities such as Compton, California (40.4 per pop. 100,000), Gary, Indiana (48.3 per pop. 100,000), New Orleans, Louisiana (37.6 per pop. 100,000), Richmond, Virginia (38.8), Baltimore, Maryland (43.3), Camden, New Jersey (40.0), Detroit, Michigan (47.3), and Washington, D.C. (29.1), as well as that of its neighbor St. Louis (37.2). FBI data also shows East St. Louis' high rate of rape, which exceeded 250 per population of 100,000. For the first female director of Public Health, see Sara Josephine Baker. ... Henry Albert Hank Bauer (born July 31, 1922 in East St. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Erin Brown (b. ... James Scott Bruske (born October 7, 1964, in East St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 6, 19, 31, 35, 42 Name San Diego Padres (1969–present) Other nicknames The Pads, The Friars, The Fathers, The Dads Ballpark PETCO Park (2004–present) Qualcomm Stadium (1969-2003) a. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article is about the contemporary American major league baseball team. ... Homer Giles Bush (born November 12, 1972 in East St. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Major league affiliations American League (1977–present) East Division (1977–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Toronto Blue Jays (1977–present) Other nicknames The Jays Ballpark Rogers Centre (1989–present) Formerly named SkyDome (1989-2005) Exhibition Stadium (1977-1989) Major league titles World Series titles (2) 1992 â€¢ 1993 AL... Major league affiliations National League (1993–present) East Division (1993–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 42 Name Florida Marlins (1993–present) Other nicknames The Fish Ballpark Dolphin Stadium (1993–present) a. ... James Scott (Jimmy) Connors (born September 2, 1952 in East St. ... Jerry Francis Costello (born September 25, 1949), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1988, representing the 12th District of Illinois. ... Bryan Cox was a linebacker in the NFL. He is currently on the New York Jets coaching staff. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... Katherine Dunham in 1956 Katherine Mary Dunham (22 June 1909 – 21 May 2006) was an African-American dancer, choreographer, songwriter, author, educator and activist who was trained as an anthropologist. ... West Indies redirects here. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Harry Edwards is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley and author of The Revolt of the Black Athlete. ... LaPhonso Darnell Ellis (born May 5, 1970 in East St. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... Born January 3, 1962 ) East St. ... NFL logo The National Football League (NFL) is the largest and most popular professional American football league in the world, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966–1969) Eastern Division (1966–1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC East (1970–present) Current uniform Team colors Aqua, Coral, Navy, White Mascot T. D. Personnel Owner H. Wayne Huizenga (50%) and Stephen M. Ross (50%) General Manager... Russell Gunn (born 1971 in Chicago) is an American contemporary Neo-bop jazz musician, known primarily for his trumpet playing and Grammy nominated recording, He grew up in East St. ... Terry Hanson, is an American on-air personality of The John Boy and Billy Big Show, a nationally syndicated radio show. ... Dawn Harper (born May 13, 1984) from East St. ... Hurdling is running over obstacles. ... Beijing 2008 redirects here. ... Dana Howard (born February 27, 1972 in East St. ... Reginald Alan Hudlin (born December 15, 1961) is an American writer and film director. ... Jackie Joyner-Kersee (born March 3, 1962) is a retired American athlete, ranked amongst the all-time greatest heptathletes. ... Heptathlon podium at the European Athletics Indoor Championships 2009 in Turin Womans Heptathlon, Long Jump Section, A/B Group; Beijing 2008 Olympics Jessica Ennis in the Osaka World Athletics Championships 2007 womens heptathlon Lilly Schwarzkopf in the Osaka World Athletics Championships 2007 womens heptathlon Nataliya Dobrynska in... Al Joyner was born January 19, 1960 in East St. ... Michael Mike Stephen Magac (born May 25, 1938 in East St. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... Steelers redirects here. ... Cuonzo LaMar Martin (born September 23, 1971 in St. ... The Memphis Grizzlies are a National Basketball Association team based in Memphis, Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Missouri State Bears and Lady Bears are the athletic teams representing Missouri State University. ... Donald F. McHenry (October 13, 1936 (unconfirmed)-- ) was the Ambassador and U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations from September 1979 until January 20, 1981. ... UN redirects here. ... Darius LaVar Miles (born October 9, 1981 in Belleville, Illinois) is an American professional basketball player for the NBAs Portland Trail Blazers. ... Eugene B. Redmond (born 1937 St. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ... Frank Rigney was a tackle for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in the Canadian Football League. ... The Winnipeg Blue Bombers are a Canadian Football League team based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... The Grey Cup circa 2006. ... The Canadian Football Hall of Fame is a not-for-profit corporation located in Hamilton, Ontario that celebrates great achievements in Canadian football. ... Tina Turner (born Anna Mae Bullock) November 26, 1939) is an 11 time Grammy Award-winning (sharing three), American Singer, Dancer, Record Producer, Executive Producer, Film Producer, Actress, Writer, Performer, Songwriter, Author and occasional Painter whose career has spanned from 1956 to present. ... Ike Turner (born Ike Wister Turner, November 5, 1931 – December 12, 2007) was an two-time Grammy Award-winning American musician, bandleader, talent scout, and record producer, best known for his work with his then wife Tina Turner as one half of the Ike & Tina Turner duo. ... Unladylike is an St. ... Def Jam Recordings is an American based hip-hop record label that operates as a part of The Island Def Jam Music Group, which is owned by Universal Music Group. ... Bill Walker (October 7, 1903 - June 14, 1966) was a former professional baseball player. ... Kellen Boswell Winslow (born 1957 in St. ... Chargers redirects here. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Shelley Winters (August 18, 1920 – January 14, 2006) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Born April 18, 1959 ) East St. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... Robert Wrigley is a contemporary American poet. ... For other uses, see Leave It to Beaver (disambiguation). ... Hugh Beaumont, American actor, director, and Methodist minister, 1909-1982 Eugene Hugh Beaumont (February 16, 1909 - May 14, 1982) was an American actor, television director, and Methodist minister. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... They Saved Lisas Brain is the twenty-second episode of The Simpsons tenth season. ... Mensa is the largest, oldest, and most famous high-IQ society in the world. ... Springfield is the fictional city in which the animated American sitcom The Simpsons is set. ... A major selling point of DVD video is that its storage capacity allows for a wide variety of extra features in addition to the feature film itself. ... Aaron McGruder (born May 29, 1974 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American cartoonist best known for writing and drawing The Boondocks, a Universal Press Syndicate comic strip about two young African-American brothers from inner-city Chicago now living with their grandfather in a sedate suburb. ... Reginald Alan Hudlin (born December 15, 1961) is an American writer and film director. ... Floridas presidential election of 2000 was highly controversial (see the Florida election results section of the 2000 U.S. presidential election article for details). ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... The Question is an American comic book superhero. ... This article is about the American Jazz composer and performer. ... James Bubber Miley (April 3, 1903 - May 20, 1932) was an early jazz trumpeter, specializing in the use of the plunger mute. ... Steely Dan is a Grammy-Award winning American jazz rock band centered on core members Walter Becker and Donald Fagen. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... That 70s Show is an American television sitcom that centered on the lives of a group of teenagers living in the fictional town of Point Place, Wisconsin, from May 17, 1976 to December 31, 1979. ... Savage Inequalities is a book written by Jonathan Kozol in 1991 that discusses the disparities in education between schools of different classes and races. ... Going My Way, a 1944 Academy Award winning film directed by Leo McCarey and starring Bing Crosby. ... The Bells of St. ... Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... // January 19 - Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer acquires beleaguered concurrent United Artists. ... Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... Look up Action film in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Escape from New York is a 1981 science fiction/action film directed and scored by John Carpenter. ... For other persons named John Carpenter, see John Carpenter (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Number of inmates. ... // February 11 - The Rolling Stones concert film Lets Spend the Night Together opens in New York North Americas Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi Tootsie Trading Places, starring Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy WarGames, starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy Superman III Flashdance Staying Alive Octopussy Mr. ... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... National Lampoons Vacation is a 1983 comedy film directed by Harold Ramis and starring Chevy Chase, Beverly DAngelo, Randy Quaid, and Anthony Michael Hall. ... The year 1992 in film involved many significant films. ... Trespass was a 1992 movie directed by Walter Hill. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Nickname: Location of Compton in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Government  - Mayor Eric Perrodin Area  - Total 10. ... Gary redirects here. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Baltimore redirects here. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Detroit redirects here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


East Saint Louis and Opa Locka, Florida have the highest crime rates in the United States (Opa Locka had the absolute highest crime rate in 2003 and 2004 for cities of any population.) Location in Miami-Dade County and the state of Florida U.S. Census Bureau map showing city limits Coordinates: Country State Counties United States Florida Miami-Dade Incorporated 1926 Government  - Mayor Joseph L. Kelley Area  - City 11. ...


The following table shows East St. Louis's crime rate in six crimes that Morgan Quitno uses for its calculation for "America's most dangerous cities" ranking, in comparison to the national average:[12] Year: 2006 number of crimes per 100,000. Morgan Quitno Press is an research and publishing company based out of Lawrence, Kansas. ...

Crime East Saint Louis National average
Murder 101.9 5.6
Rape 251.3 32.2
Robbery 1,347.0 195.4
Assault 5,847.3 340.1
Burglary 2,442.8 814.5
Automobile theft 2,067.5 526.5

References

  • Heaps, Willard Allison. "Target of Prejudice: The Negro." Riots, U.S.A., 1765–1970. New York: The Seabury Press, 1970. 108–117.
  • Kozol, Jonathan. "Life on the Mississippi." Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools. Crown, 1991. 7–39. ISBN 0-517-58221-X
  • "Race Rioters Fire East St. Louis and Shoot or Hang Many Negroes; Dead Estimated at from 20 to 76." New York Times 3 July 1917.

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