FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
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Encyclopedia > East Frisian language
East Frisian (Seeltersk)
Spoken in: Germany
Region: Lower Saxony
Total speakers: 2,000
Ranking: Not in top 100
Genetic classification: Indo-European

 Germanic
  West Germanic
   Frisian
    East Frisian

Official status
Official language of: Germany
Regulated by: --
Language codes
ISO 639-1 --
ISO 639-2 gem
SIL FRS

  Results from FactBites:
 
Saterland Frisian language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (860 words)
East Frisian used to be spoken in East Frisia (Ostfriesland), the region between the Dutch border and the river Weser, in the German state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen).
Today, the East Frisian language is no longer spoken within the historical borders of East Frisia, yet a large number of the inhabitants of that region still consider themselves Frisians and refer to their dialect of Low German as Freesk.
The last remaining living remnant of East Frisian is an Ems Frisian dialect called Sater Frisian or Saterlandic (its native name being Seeltersk), which is spoken in the Saterland area in the Verwaltungsbezirk Oldenburg, to the south of East Frisia proper.
Language - MSN Encarta (1253 words)
Language family trees show the relationships among languages; the oldest traceable ancestor language is shown at the top of the tree, and the bottom branches show the distance of relationship among current living members of the family.
The best-known language family is the Indo-European family, which represents about 1.6 billion people and includes most of the languages of Europe and northern India and several languages of the region in between.
Basque is an isolate, or a language with no known relatives; and Finnish, Estonian, Saami, and Hungarian are the westernmost members of the Finno-Ugric branch of the Uralic family (which also includes various languages of the Ural Mountains region and Siberia).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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