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Encyclopedia > East Anglia
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Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. Cambridgeshire is to the west and Essex to the south.
Norfolk and Suffolk, the core area of East Anglia. Cambridgeshire is to the west and Essex to the south.

East Anglia is a region of eastern England, named after one of the ancient Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, which was named after the homeland of the Angles, Angeln in northern Germany. The kingdom consisted of Norfolk and Suffolk ("North folk" and "South folk") but the region's boundaries are vague. File links The following pages link to this file: East Anglia Categories: GFDL images ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... A map showing the general locations of the Anglo-Saxon peoples around the year 600 Britain and Ireland around the year 802 Heptarchy (Greek: seven + realm) is a collective name applied to the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of the south and east of Great Britain during late antiquity and the early... Map of Schleswig-Holstein Modern Angeln, also known as Anglia (German: Angeln, Danish: Angel, Latin: Anglia, English: may follow German or Latin), is a peninsula in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, protruding into the Bay of Kiel. ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ...


It includes the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk, with part or all of the pre-April 1, 1974 Cambridgeshire. Some people include Essex—sometimes only the northern part—and a small part of southern Lincolnshire bordering The Wash. Some of the area is characterised by its flatness, consisting of fenland and reclaimed marshland, though much of Suffolk and parts of Norfolk are gently rolling hills. April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ... The Wash, as seen looking west from Heacham, Norfolk The Wash is also the name of a 2001 film. ... A fen is a sere, a phase in the natural ecological succession from the open water of a lake to (for example) woodland. ... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ...


The principal East Anglian cities include Norwich (the nominal capital), Ipswich and Cambridge. Peterborough and Colchester are often classified as East Anglian cities though Colchester and Ipswich are technically towns. The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky The main square of the Catalan city of Sabadell during a popular celebration. ... Norwich is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England. ... Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting Ipswich (pronounced Ip-Switch) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... The City of Peterborough is a cathedral city and unitary authority in the East of England. ... Colchester is a town and is the main settlement of the Essex borough of Colchester in the East of England. ... Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ...


East Anglia forms part of the East of England administrative region. In the European nomenclature of territorial units for statistics East Anglia is a region comprising Norfolk, Suffolk, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) is a geocode standard for referencing the administrative division of countries for statistical purposes. ...

Contents

Geography

Despite water playing a significant role in the Fen and Broads landscapes, some parts of the region are classified as semi-arid due to their exceptionally low rainfall. During the summer months, tinder-dry conditions are frequently experienced, resulting in many field and heath fires. Daily temperature maxima range from 5-10 degrees Celsius in the winter to 20-25 degrees Celsius in the summer, although temperatures have been known to reach 35 degrees Celsius in recent years. Sunshine totals tend to be higher towards the coastal areas.


Farming and horticulture have proven very successful in this fertile country. The landscape has been heavily influenced by Dutch technology, from the influx of clay pantiles to the draining of the fens. It has a wide range of small-scale holiday destinations ranging from traditional coastal resorts (Great Yarmouth, Lowestoft), through historic towns such as Bury St Edmunds, Cambridge, Ely and King's Lynn to the modern holiday villas of Center Parcs set in Thetford Forest. The Royal Air Force constructed many airfields during World War II and a few of these remain in use. One, near Norwich, has become Norwich International Airport, a civilian airfield to serve the city. Farmlands in Hebei province, China. ... The Latin words hortus (garden plant) and cultura (culture) together form horticulture, classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... The Gay Head cliffs in Marthas Vineyard are made almost entirely of clay. ... The name pantiles originally referred to a form of tile used in paving. ... Great Yarmouth, often known to locals simply as Yarmouth, is an English coastal town in the county of Norfolk. ... Statistics Population: 57,746 (2001 Census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TM548933 Administration District: Waveney Shire county: Suffolk Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Suffolk Historic county: Suffolk Services Police force: Suffolk Constabulary Fire and rescue: Suffolk Ambulance: East of England Post... Map sources for Bury St Edmunds at grid reference TL8564 Bury St Edmunds is a town in the county of Suffolk, England, with a population of 35,015 (2001 census). ... This article is about Cambridge, England; see also other places called Cambridge. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... Kings Lynn as viewed from across the River Great Ouse Kings Lynn is a town and port in the English county of Norfolk. ... Center Parcs is a European network of holiday villages which includes a UK based company which runs holiday villages in Britain and a sister enterprise that operates in numerous locations in Europe. ... Map sources for Thetford at grid reference TL8783 Thetford is a town in the Breckland area of Norfolk, England. ... The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... For other uses, see Airport (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Norwich International Airport (IATA: NWI, ICAO: EGSH) also just Norwich Airport, is an airport about 5km (3 miles) from the centre of the city of Norwich, Norfolk. ...


The Norfolk and Suffolk Broads form a network of waterways between Norwich and the coast and are popular for recreational boating. A recent bid to have them declared a National park failed, as it would have meant conservation becoming more important than navigation rights. It has been suggested that Norfolk_Broads be merged into this article or section. ...


The University of East Anglia is located in Norwich. Norwich is the largest settlement in East Anglia. Ipswich is the largest town in East Anglia. The East of England regional assembly is based in Bury St. Edmunds. The University of East Anglia (UEA) is a campus university located in Norwich, Norfolk, England, founded as part of the British Governments New Universities programme in the 1960s. ... Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting Ipswich (pronounced Ip-Switch) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. ... Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a residential community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... Statistics Population: 35,015 (2001 Census) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL855645 Administration District: St Edmundsbury Shire county: Suffolk Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Suffolk Historic county: Suffolk Services Police force: Suffolk Constabulary Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: East of England...


Heraldry

Possibly the best candidate for arms of East Anglia are those of the Wuffingas dynasty: three crowns in a blue shield, the colour of the Swedish flag, superimposed on a St. George's cross. In fact, that device was created in homage to an old legend of the three crowns of East Anglia, and the blue colour represents the Anglo-Scandinavian heritage of much of East Anglia. The East Anglian flag as it is known today was invented by George Henry Langham and adopted by the London Society of East Anglians. It was first mentioned in print in 1900 and was flown locally in various places in Norfolk, but was not known widely even at the time it was invented. The crowns also appear in the arms of the borough of Bury St. Edmunds and the University of East Anglia.[1][2] The Wuffings were the ruling dynasty of East Anglia. ... The St Georges cross, a red cross on a white background, is the national flag of England and has been since about 1277. ...


History

The Kingdom of the East Angles, formed about the year 520 by the merging of the North and the South Folk, was one of the seven Anglo-Saxon heptarchy kingdoms (as defined in the 12th century writings of Henry of Huntingdon). For a brief period following a victory over the rival kingdom of Northumbria around the year 616, East Anglia was the most powerful of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England, and its king Raedwald was Bretwalda (overlord of the Anglo-Saxons kingdoms). But this did not last: over the next forty years, East Anglia was defeated by the Mercians twice, and it continued to weaken relative to the other kingdoms until in 794, Offa of Mercia had its king Æthelberht killed and took control of the kingdom himself. A map showing the general locations of the Anglo-Saxon peoples around the year 600 Britain and Ireland around the year 802 Heptarchy (Greek: seven + realm) is a collective name applied to the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of the south and east of Great Britain during late antiquity and the early... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... For Earl Henry, father of two Scottish kings, see Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon Henry of Huntingdon (c. ... Section from Shepherds map of the British Isles about 802 AD showing the kingdom of Northumbria Northumbria is primarily the name of a petty kingdom of Angles which was formed in Great Britain at the beginning of the 7th century, from two smaller kingdoms of Bernicia and Diera, and... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Rædwald (d. ... Bretwalda is an Anglo-Saxon term, the first record of which comes from the late ninth-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. ... The Kingdom of Mercia at its greatest extent (7th to 9th centuries) is shown in green, with the original core area (6th century) given a darker tint. ... Offa (died July 26/29, 796) was the King of Mercia from 757 until his death. ... Æthelberht (died May 20, 794 at Sutton Wells, Herefordshire) was king of East Anglia. ...


The independence of the East Anglians was restored by a successful rebellion against Mercia (825–827), in course of which two Mercian kings were killed attempting to crush it. On November 20, 870 the Danes killed King Edmund and took the kingdom, which they named East Anglia (see Ivar the Boneless). The Saxons retook the area in 920, only to lose it again in 1015–1017, when it was conquered by Canute the Great and given as a fiefdom to Thorkell the Tall, who was made Jarl of East Anglia in 1017. November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events February 28 - End of the Fourth Council of Constantinople. ... Edmund the Martyr (circa 840 - November 20, 870) was a King of East Anglia. ... Ivar the Boneless (Ivar inn beinlausi) (c. ... Canute (or Cnut) I, or Canute the Great (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki, Danish: Knud den Store, Norwegian: Knut den mektige, Swedish: Knut den store) (ca. ... Under the system of feudalism, a fiefdom, fief, feud or fee, often consisted of heritable lands or revenue-producing property granted by a liege lord in return for a form of allegiance, originally often to give him the means to fulfill his military duties when called upon. ... Thorkell the High (Old Norse Þorkell hávi) was a Jomsviking, a son of the Scanian chieftain Strutharald and the brother of Sigvald Jarl. ...


Much of East Anglia (including parts of Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire, west Norfolk, and Suffolk), consisted of marshland and bogs until the 17th century despite the construction of early sea barriers by the Roman Empire. During the 17th century the alluvial land was converted into arable land by means of systematic drainage using a collection of drains and river diversions. Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. ... Lincolnshire (abbreviated Lincs) is a county in the east of England. ... Norfolk (pronounced IPA: ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ... This article is about marsh, a type of wetland. ... Virgin boreal acid bogs at Browns Lake Bog, Ohio A bog is a wetland type that accumulates peat, a deposit of dead plant material. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Alluvium is soil land deposited by a river or other running water. ... In geography, arable land is a form of agricultural land use, meaning land that can be (and is) used for growing crops. ...


East Anglia was a rich area of the country up until the effects of the Industrial Revolution moved manufacturing to the Midlands and north - the earnings being based on wool and textiles.


References

  1. ^ Flag.
  2. ^ Arms.

See also

The East Anglian Railway Museum is located at Chappel and Wakes Colne railway station in Essex, situated on the Great Eastern Railway line from Marks Tey to Sudbury. ... Unofficially, a number of football clubs located in East Anglia vie for being the Pride of Anglia. ... The Kingdom of the East Angles (one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the so-called Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy) was founded in the 6th century. ... Ralph de Guader (otherwise Radulf Waders or Ralph Wader) (c. ...

external links

  • East Anglia Social Forum
  • EASF radical history wiki
The Heptarchy
East Anglia | Essex | Kent | Mercia | Northumbria | Sussex | Wessex

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: East Anglia (2506 words)
Norfolk (pronounced IPA:) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England.
Cambridgeshire (abbreviated Cambs) is a county in England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the northeast, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west.
Norfolk (pronounced NOR-fk) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England.
East Anglia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (683 words)
East Anglia is a region of eastern England, named after one of the ancient Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, which was named after the homeland of the Angles, Angeln in northern Germany.
The Kingdom of the East Angles, formed about the year 520 by the merging of the North and the South Folk, was one of the seven Anglo-Saxon heptarchy kingdoms (as defined in the 12th century writings of Henry of Huntingdon).
Much of East Anglia (including parts of Cambridgeshire, Lincolnshire, west Norfolk, and Suffolk), consisted of marshland and bogs until the 17th century despite the construction of early sea barriers by the Roman Empire.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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