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Encyclopedia > Earthsea
Cover to 1991 Bantam Books paperback edition of A Wizard of Earthsea, illustrated by John Jude Palencar
Cover to 1991 Bantam Books paperback edition of A Wizard of Earthsea, illustrated by John Jude Palencar

Earthsea is a fictional realm created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story "The Word of Unbinding", published in 1964, but that became more famous in her novel A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968. The books that follow A Wizard of Earthsea are The Tombs of Atuan, The Farthest Shore, Tehanu, Tales from Earthsea and The Other Wind. All are set in the world of Earthsea, as are (to date) seven short stories by Le Guin two of which are not collected in any of these books. Image File history File links Wizardearthsea. ... Image File history File links Wizardearthsea. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Bantam Books is a major U.S. publishing house owned by Random House and is part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... John Jude Palencar (Born 1957) is a fantasy/science-fiction cover artist with an impressive list of over 100 books whose covers have been adorned by his art, including Eragon by Christopher Paolini, the 2003 New York Times Bestseller. ... A fictional universe is a cohesive fictional world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsələ ˌkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... The Word of Unbinding (1964) is a short story by Ursula K. LeGuin. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968, is the first of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968, is the first of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... The Tombs of Atuan is the second of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... The Farthest Shore is the third of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Tehanu was the fourth of Ursula Le Guins Earthsea books. ... Tales from Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in 2001, is a collection of short stories from Le Guins Earthsea universe. ... The Other Wind is the Sixth and (so far) last of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ...

Contents

Geography

Map of Earthsea

The world of Earthsea is one of sea and islands: a vast archipelago of hundreds of islands surrounded by uncharted ocean. It is uncertain whether or not there are other landmasses, though reference is made to lands "beyond the west" where the dragons have their realm. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 726 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2323 × 1918 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 726 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2323 × 1918 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ...


The term "archipelago" is used to refer only to the central grouping of islands around Havnor and the Inmost Sea. The outlying islands are loosely grouped into four "Reaches" (West, North, South and East), and the Kargad Lands, four large islands to the north-east inhabited by the war-like nation of Kargs. Some of the islands described in the stories include Havnor and Roke in the Inner Sea; Gont in the northeastern Archipelago, and Atuan, one of the Kargad lands. The Kargs are a fictional people in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea book series. ...


Peoples and cultures

The cultures of Earthsea do not directly resemble those of our world, except insofar as there are general resemblances to any literate pre-industrial civilization. Technologically, Earthsea appears to be an early Iron Age society, with bronze still much used in places where iron is scarce. (Ged's father was a bronze-smith.) Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Ged is the main protagonist in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea book series. ...


Otherwise, individual cultural elements in Earthsea can be compared with Earth cultures, without permitting any complete identification. Like the peoples of the Pacific islands or the Mediterranean basin, they have a way of life based on contact with the sea. However, on many of the larger islands like Havnor, Gont, and Way, people can live a totally inland life. No archipelago on Earth has the mix of island sizes, close grouping, and distance from continental landmasses that Earthsea does; its largest island, Havnor, which measures about 380 miles N-S and E-W is only slightly larger than Mindanao, and the other islands are smaller. However, they are usually larger and much more closely grouped than the atolls of the Pacific. For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... The Islands of Earthsea are the several islands that make up the lands of the largely oceanic fantasy world of Earthsea in the stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. ... The Islands of Earthsea are the several islands that make up the lands of the largely oceanic fantasy world of Earthsea in the stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. ... The Mergui Archipelago The Archipelago Sea, situated between the Gulf of Bothnia and the Gulf of Finland, the largest archipelago in the world by the number of islands. ... Mindanao is the second largest and easternmost island in the Philippines. ...


The overall climate of Earthsea is temperate, comparable to the mid-latitudes (over a distance of about 1800 miles) of the Northern hemisphere. There is a yearly transition from warm summers to cold and snowy winters, especially in northern islands like Gont and Osskil. In the southern regions of Earthsea it can be much warmer. For the usage in virology, see temperate (virology). ...


Earthsea, with the exception of the Kargad lands, is a literate society using a writing system called the "Hardic runes"; the nature of the writing system is uncertain. The name suggests the Germanic runes, but there are supposed to be at least several thousand runes in use, suggesting a logographic system similar to Chinese. Rune redirects here. ... Egyptian hieroglyphs, which have their origins as logograms. ...


Ethnic Groups

The people of Earthsea, are for the most part "red-brown" in coloring, like Native Americans; in the South and East Reach and on Way they are much darker brown, but with straight black hair, like some South Asians; in Osskil they have a more central or eastern European look, and the Kargs resemble predominantly blond northern Europeans (a possible allusion to the historical Vikings). In other respects the Kargs seem to resemble the Incas[citation needed]. Native Americans redirects here. ... The term Asian can refer to something or someone from Asia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... The Kargs are a fictional people in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea book series. ... The name Viking is a loan from the native Scandinavian term for the Norse seafaring warriors who raided the coasts of Scandinavia, Europe and the British Isles from the late 8th century to the 11th century, the period of European history referred to as the Viking Age. ... For other meanings of Inca, see Inca (disambiguation). ...


Le Guin has criticised what she describes as the general assumption in fantasy, that characters should be white and the society should resemble the Middle Ages (for example in this speech). In Tehanu, Archipelagan men wonder if Tenar is "white all over" - an ironic inversion of the kind of sexual/racial curiosity often exhibited by white men at black women. Tehanu was the fourth of Ursula Le Guins Earthsea books. ... The Tombs of Atuan is the second of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ...


History

The Creation of Éa is a 31-stanza poem, the oldest part of Earthsea's oral tradition. It describes how Segoy raised the islands of Earthsea from the Ocean by naming them in the true speech. In Earthsea, Éa is everything that exists on the earth. ...


Little is known of the original inhabitants of Earthsea, but scattered legends suggest that humans and dragons were once one race. The ancient Pelnish lore and Kargad legends describe an agreement between them (called the Vedurnan or Verw Nadan) to separate because of their differing temperaments and goals.


Early in the history of humans on Earthsea, the largest and most powerful realm was centered on the islands of Enlad and Éa although this realm did not rule all of Earthsea, and it is unclear whether other realms existed. Later, as more of Earthsea came under the dominion of the Kings of Enlad, the center of the Kingdom moved from Enlad to the largest island, the more central Havnor. This dynasty of Great Kings ruled all or almost all of Earthsea but ended soon after the death of Erreth-Akbe, and the kingdom fragmented into many separate principalities and domains. By the time of Ged and the beginning of the series, this state of affairs had persisted for millennia, though the emergence of a new King had been prophesied. Erreth-Akbe is a character in the fictional world of Ursula LeGuins Earthsea books. ...


Some approximate dates in the history of Earthsea are[1]:

Year Event
unknown The Making:Segoy raise the islands of Earthsea
unknown Vedurnan,The separation of dragons and men: the dragons gave up everything they own except the old speech and move to the west of the west; Men remain on Earthsea but lost their old speech.
-1250 Rune Makers invent runes to capture the old speech and the art of naming, and set up the dry land in the land of west, where the dragon lives. They build a wall to stop the dragons or living men from going in. The Rune maker are exiled in Karglands.
1 Morred came to throne.
3 Morred marries Elfarran the fair
8 Waste of Enlad. Isle of Soléa (the first land Segoy raised) sinks by spell of the Enemy of Morred (name unknown). Death of Morred and Elfarran the Fair.
150 Akambar moves the King's court to Havnor.
350-450 Raids from Dragons and Kargs increase. Ath writes the book of names. Ath killed by the dragon Orm
430 Maharion comes to the throne.
430-40 Maharion and Erreth-Akbe (Hero-mage and Companion) defeated the invading Kargs led by King Thoreg of Hupun.
440 Maharion went fighting the Dragons. Erreth-Akbe goes to Hupun on Karego-At, carrying the Morred's ring (later Ring of Erreth-Akbe), to establish peace with King Thoreg. High Priest Intathin of the House of Tarb opposes treaty and challenges Erreth-Akbe to duel, defeating him and breaking the Ring and keeping both.
448 Erreth-Akbe killed by Dragon Orm, who was also killed.
448 Death of Maharion in battle against Lord Gehis of the Havens. The line of Morred lost. The beginning of the Dark Age, where warlords rule Earthsea.
600 The creation of the hand, a group of mages and witches on Roke and the inmost Isles. (The Finder)
650 Founding of School of magic on Roke (The Finder)
665 Roke attack by the Warlord Losen of Havnor's mages lead by mage Early(Terial). Death of Losen and the end of his kingdom. (The Finder)
730 First Archmage elected; females forbidden to teach on Roke .
840 One of the Priest-Kings declares himself Godking in Awabath and rules over the four lands of Kargad. Rebellion From the House of Thoreg.
961 Birth of Ogion the Silent, on Gont. Ogion is later apprenticed to mage Heleth.
975-85 The Godking defeated the rebelling House of Thoreg, putting its last two descendants on an island, with a half of Erreth-Akbe's ring.
1000 Birth of Duny, later named Ged, in Ten Alders, Gont. His mother dies one year later.
1004 Heleth and Ogion stop an earthquake on Gont. (The Bones of the Earth)
1007 Duny started learning the old speech and spells with his witch aunt.
1010 Birth of Tenar in hamlet west of Entat, fifth child of an apple orchard worker, on the day of death of Arha, First Priestess of the Nameless Ones.
1012 Kargish attack on East Port and the east of Gont. Duny foils raid and defeat them on Ten Alders by calling a thick fog over the village; news of his deed spreads over Gont. Five days later, Ogion visits him.
1013 Duny named by Ogion as Ged and is apprenticed to him. They travel backto Ogion's hut in Re Albi. Ged use Sparrowhawk as his usename.
1014 Ged left Ogion to study Roke (Spring). He made friends with Vetch, a student there. Vetch and Jasper (another student) becomes sorcerers (Autumn). He spend a year in the Isolate Tower learning the old speech (Winter).
1015 Ged acquired a pet Otak (Spring). Ged tries to summon the spirit of Elfarran in a bet with Jasper and release a shadow beast. The Archmage Nemmele died spending all his power saving Ged and driving the shadow beast out of Roke. Gensher of Way chosen as new Archmage (Summer). Tenar bought to the tombs of atuan to become Arha, first preistess.
1016 Ged leaves healing chamber. His fealty was refused by Gensher but he still let him study in Roke. Vetch earns his staff and leaves Roke to the East Reaches. Jasper didn't earn his staff and leaves Roke.
1017 Ged is made sorcerer and Gensher accepted his fealty.
1018 Ged earns his mage staff and leaves Roke to be mage of Low Torning of the Ninety Isles.
1019 Ged defeated the Dragons of Pendor (Autumn). Roke masters summon mage wind to stop him from returning to Roke with the shadow. Travel to Osskil, encounters a human possessed by the shadow (a gebbeth), who killed the pet otak. Ged escape to the Court of the Terrenon. Was offered to read the Terrenon stone to find ways of defeating the Shadow. Ged refused and escaped in the form of a falcon when the masters of Terrenon trapped him. Ged flies to Re Albi and was saved by Ogion. Recovered and set sail to chase the Shadow. Shipwrecked near Karego-At. Washed to an Island where the last descendant of the house of Thoreg were exiled. Given a half of Erreth-Akbe's ring (unknown of what it actually is to him then). Build boat Lookfar. Travelled to the East Reaches and met up with Vetch on Iffish, sails with him past the furthest Island in search of the Shadow. Defeat the Shadow by naming it by his own name (Winter).
1019 - 1026 Ged travels to the Dragon's run and becomes a dragonlord. Dragon Orm Embar identifies Erreth-Akbe's ring to him. Ged went in search for the other half of the ring.
1024 Tenar past womenhood and become One priestess of the Tomb and Atuan.
1025 Tenar enters the Labyrinth of the tomb for the first time.
1026 Ged travels to the tombs of Atuan and enters the Labyrinth. Tenar discover him trapped there. Ged discovered the other half of Erreth-Akbe's ring. Tenar and Ged escaped Atuan. The ring is made whole and brought to Havnor. Tenar went to Gont to live with Ogion.
1029 Mariage of Tenar and Flint, a farmer.
1034 Birth of Lebannen (Arren) on Enlad
between 1034-1045 Ged defeated the sorcerer Cob.
1043 Therru (Tehanu) borned.
1045 Archmage Gensher died. Ged chosen as the new archmage. Ged and master patterner of Roke, Thorion defeated mad mage Irioth.
1049 Death of Flint, Tenar's husband.
1050 Attack on Therru, she is badly burned and was taken by Tenar.
1051 Ged and Arren set out from Roke seeking the cause of the failure of magic in the Reaches (early spring). They found that a mysterious mage figure who summons the dead and the living is causing the failure of magic. Wandering along the South and West Reaches to find the mage. They meet raft people in the West (summer). Meanwhile spells begin to fail everywhere, even on Roke, and both people and dragons lose their sense. Ged and Arren are guided to Selidor by the dragon Orm Embar; there Orm Embar is killed by the mage Cob. Ged defeats Cob in the Dry Land, healing the breach between the death & life, but spending his mage power in the process. The dragon Kalessin carries the two back to Roke, where Arren is revealed as the King Lebannen. Ged retires to Gont, where he reunites with Tenar and they marry. Death of Ogion the Silent. No new archmage is chosen; Azver the Patterner makes a prophecy made relating to 'a woman on Gont'. (Autumn) Coronation of Lebannen, first king of All the Isles in Havnor since the year 448.
1052 Kalessin flies to Gont and defeats Erisen, one of Cob's protégés, who had tried to kill Ged and Tenar. Naming of Therru by Kalessin, who named her Tehanu and call her his daughter.
1058 Dragon Irian went to Roke as a woman. She killed Thorion.
1061 Thol, a warlord from Hur-at-Hur, declares himself High King of the Four Kargad Lands; the Kargish people rise against the Godking who flees to Atuan and is killed.
1061 Dragons began invading the Archipelago. Alder(Hara) went to Ged for help on dreaming about the dry land. He was sent to Havnor by Ged. The dragon council held with Irian and Tehanu. The wall surrounding the dry land destroyed. Marriage of Labennon and Seserakh, daughter of Thol, High King of the Kargs.

Aihal is the true name of a fictional character in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea fantasy series. ... Ged is the main protagonist in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea book series. ... Cover to 1991 Bantam Books paperback edition of A Wizard of Earthsea, illustrated by John Jude Palencar Earthsea is a fictional realm created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story The Word of Unbinding, published in 1964, but that became more famous in her novel A Wizard of...

Magic in Earthsea

One of the most distinctive aspects of the Earthsea universe is Le Guin's magic system. Magic is a central part of life, and magic appears in all parts of Archipelago civilization, from weather workers on ships, fixers who repair boats and buildings, entertainers and court sorcerers, and most important of all, the staff-carrying Wizards who are trained on Roke. In general, magic is usually the result of inborn talent, and with the exception of witches, mostly restricted to men. Not to be confused with Magic (illusion). ... otheruses|Magician}} The Enchanted Garden of Messer Ansaldo by Marie Spartali Stillman: a magician makes his garden bear fruit and flowers in winter. ... The Islands of Earthsea are the several islands that make up the lands of the largely oceanic fantasy world of Earthsea in the stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. ...


Le Guin imagined the magicians of Earthsea as purveyors of an unknown science, and a strong theme of the stories is the connection of power and responsibility. There is often a Taoist message: 'good' wizardry tries to be in harmony with the world and to right wrongs, while 'bad' wizardry, such as necromancy, is unbalanced and must be resolved or lead to catastrophe. Taoism (or Daoism) is the English name referring to a variety of related Chinese philosophical traditions and concepts. ... Necromancy (Greek νεκρομαντία, nekromantía) is a form of divination in which the practitioner seeks to summon operative spirits or spirits of divination, for multiple reasons, from spiritual protection to wisdom. ...


Magic on Earthsea is verbal: All objects have a true name, in an old language still spoken by the dragons which is known simply as the Old Speech. By using this language, it is possible to have power over an object or living thing. To protect themselves from this, most characters have two names: one for everyday use and one, the true name, known only to select close friends and family members – sometimes no-one. For example, Sparrowhawk (use name) is known as Ged (true name) only to those closest to him. However, spells that works in the archipelago change in the Reaches Ged is the main protagonist in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea book series. ...


One vital aspect of magic is that it is impossible to lie in the old language, so that magic works by forcing the universe to conform to the words spoken by the mage. For example, to say "I am an eagle" in the old language means that the speaker becomes an eagle, so that the statement is no longer false. The consequences of this are dealt with in the most recent Earthsea novel, The Other Wind. The Other Wind is the Sixth and (so far) last of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ...


Examples of magic in the Earthsea series include:

  • Quelling an earthquake or opening the earth
  • Calling and commanding animals. Living or dead people may also be called or controlled
  • Transforming yourself or another into an animal or spirit
  • Preventing an individual from moving
  • Walking in the land of the dead
  • Controlling the weather in a vicinity
  • Making highly realistic illusions
  • Finding hidden or lost things or uncovering knowledge previously unknown
  • Turning invisible and walking through walls
  • Moving objects with the mind
  • Controlling the elements (earth, water, air and fire) and secondary elements (ice, electricity, stone and tempurature)
  • Out of body experiences
  • Telepathy

The School of Magic on Roke Island

Roke Island is the magical heart of Earthsea and is protected by potent spells and a magical wind and fog that ward off evil. It contains several places of power, such as Roke Knoll and the Immanent Grove. In Ursula K. Le Guins Earthsea series of novels, Roke Knoll is a hill near the center of the island of Roke, the headquarters of wizardry. ... In Ursula K. Le Guins Earthsea series of novels, the Immanent Grove appears to be a small grove of trees near the center of the island of Roke, the headquarters of wizardry. ...


The school of Roke was set up by Elehal and Yahan of Roke, and Medra of Havnor, as a center of learning against feuding warlords who used magicians to do harm. The school rapidly grew in power and influence, until it effectively acted as a central government for the Archipelago. By gathering young people with magical potential and teaching them magic, the school controlled and guided their powers. With the new king, Lebannen, the school has waned in strength. A warlord is a person with power who has de facto military control of a subnational area due to armed forces loyal to the warlord and not to a central authority. ...


Teaching in the school is carried out by a variety of Masters, each with a specialty:

  • Master Windkey, who teaches weather control
  • Master Hand, who teaches illusions
  • Master Herbal, who teaches healing
  • Master Changer, who teaches transformation
  • Master Summoner, who teaches calling
  • Master Namer, who teaches the True Speech
  • Master Patterner, who teaches meaning and intent
  • Master Finder, who teaches seeking and returning
  • Master Doorkeeper, who watches the gates and protects the school
  • Archmage, who leads the school

The position of Finder was abolished by the first Archmage, Halkel, and replaced with that of Chanter, who teaches music and chanted spells. Halkel also banned women from the school.


The internal structure of the Roke school seems to be modeled on that of a Medieval monastery, while in its social and political influence, the Archmage is roughly equivalent to a Pope (and on his death, a succesor is chosen in a conclave). Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Pope (from Latin... con·clave (knklv, kng-) n. ...


The world of the dead

The world of the dead – "The Dry Land" – A realm of shadow, dust, where nothing changes and "lovers pass each other in silence". It was a place where it was always night and no wind blows within the land. Although the sky was filled with stars, they were small, cold, and did not move. The constellations in the sky were not the ones that the people of Earthsea recognise from the living world. People crossed over from the land of the living to the land of the dead by stepping over a low stone wall on the crest of a hilltop. On the other side the souls of the dead wandered, never recognizing or caring for one another. At the bottom of the valley of the dead (known as the dry land) was the dry river, and beyond that lay the mountains of Pain, the only way back to the land of the living once one went too far from the wall. This article is about the time of day. ... This article is about the astronomical object. ... This article is about the star grouping. ...


It is revealed in The Other Wind that the world of the dead was a failed attempt by mages to achieve immortality for the Hardic peoples. The mages stole half of the land "west of west" from the dragons as a paradise in which their souls would dwell. When they walled off the land, however, its beauty vanished, it fell under eternal night, the wind cease blowing, and the immortal souls that went there existed without any meaning. In one of the final scenes of the cycle, the wall around the world of the dead is destroyed, freeing the lost souls to rejoin the cycle of death and rebirth. The Other Wind is the Sixth and (so far) last of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... This article is about living for infinite period of time. ... A compass rose with west highlighted This article refers to the cardinal direction; for other uses see West (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... Paradise, Jan Bruegel Paradise is an English word from Persian roots that is generally identified with the Garden of Eden or with Heaven. ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ...


In a Q&A with Ursula Le.Guin, she stated that the idea of the dry land came from the "Greco-Roman idea of Hades' realm, from certain images in Dante, and from one of Rilke's Elegies."[2] For frequently asked questions about Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:FAQ FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) are a series of questions and answers all pertaining to a certain topic. ... Hades, Greek god of the underworld, enthroned, with his bird-headed staff, on a red-figure Apulian vase made in the 4th century BC. For other uses, see Hades (disambiguation). ... DANTE is also a digital audio network. ... Rainer Maria Rilke (born 4 December 1875 in Prague; died 29 December 1926 in Val-Mont (Switzerland)) was an important poet in the German language. ...


Dragons and dragonlords

The dragons usually keep to themselves far to the West of Earthsea, but they sometimes attack inhabited islands in search of food or treasure and must be driven back by wizards. In A Wizard of Earthsea, the young Ged guesses a dragon's true name and forces him to promise not to attack people again. For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968, is the first of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ...


Dragons in Earthsea are neither good nor evil by human standards, but always extremely dangerous. There are several references to the dire consequences of looking a dragon in the eye and Ged avoids doing so on several occasions. Most dragons in the books are of positive, though not benevolent, nature. Legends tell that dragons were once of the same race as man, in the end them choosing the sky while man chose land. For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ...


They consider men to be uninteresting, short-lived mayflies and view all but a select few in that manner. In The Tombs of Atuan, the priestess Tenar asks Ged what a dragonlord is; Ged replies that to be a dragonlord one does not need mastery of dragons, but to be "one the dragons will speak with". A dragon will do one of two things with men – eat them or talk to them. The former is far more common. Dragons are very rarely ridden by men, though Kalessin allows Ged and Lebannen to ride him after they emerge from the Dry Land, when both are extremely weakened. The Tombs of Atuan is the second of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Roman Catholic priest A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ...


When dragons do speak, they are worth listening to, as they have long lifespans and the opportunity to gain great wisdom. Dragons speak only in the Language of the Making, from which the language of wizardry is derived. Though they cannot lie, they are able to mislead the unwary because it is their native tongue and while no wizard can live long enough to fully master it, they can twist it to their will. Indeed, much of the true speech remains unknown to humans. Dragons have a strange connection to the true tongue; one wizard described it by saying they live in it as a fish lives in water. In Tehanu, Ged says that perhaps dragons do not learn the old speech. Rather, it seems to be inherent in them and they simply 'are' the language. Dragons being powerfully magical creatures, this is possible. Men are incapable of lying while speaking in the old speech. Tehanu was the fourth of Ursula Le Guins Earthsea books. ...


Only wizards are capable of defeating dragons. The most famous example is the duel between Erreth-Akbe and the dragon Orm, in which each slew the other, their bones laying centuries after on the western most shore of Earthsea. Many centuries later in the same place on the Selidor ther was another duel between the dragon Orm-Embar and Cob.


Religion in Earthsea

The people of the Archipelago do not worship any gods, but there are many references to the "Old Powers" of the Earth, which are beings that have existed since before Segoy raised up the lands. It is revealed in Tales from Earthsea that once, the women of power (mages) spoke with and learned from the Old Powers, but in Ged's age, they are considered evil. Most of these powers exist in another plane of existence. In a Wizard of Earthsea, Ged accidentally releases a creature of shadow from that realm, while attempting to summon a spirit from the dead. Some of the Old Powers that are present on Earthsea include "The Nameless Ones" in Atuan and the Terrenon in Osskil. Tales from Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in 2001, is a collection of short stories from Le Guins Earthsea universe. ... A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968, is the first of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Ged is the main protagonist in Ursula Le Guins Earthsea book series. ... Shadows on pavement A shadow is a region of darkness where light is blocked. ... The English word spirit comes from the Latin spiritus (breath). // The English word spirit comes from the Latin spiritus, meaning breath (compare spiritus asper), but also soul, courage, vigor, ultimately from a PIE root *(s)peis- (to blow). In the Vulgate, the Latin word translates Greek (πνευμα), pneuma (Hebrew (רוח) ruah), as...


Gods are worshipped in the Kargad Lands. The oldest gods are "The Nameless Ones", who are worshipped at "the Place" in Atuan. They watch over a labyrinth beneath "the Place" where no one can safely walk besides the First Priestess and her eunuch. The First Priestess is chosen to serve them when she is five years old. When the girl turns six, she is 'eaten' by the Nameless Ones and becomes Arha, which literally means "The Eaten One". When Arha dies, the other priestesses of "the place" search the land to find a girl who was born the night Arha died. If that baby lives until she is five years old without being blemished by any major illness, she is deemed to be Arha-Reborn and is taken to "the Place" to be the new First Priestess.


The Twin-Gods Wuluah and Atwah are said to be sons of the Old Powers. They are warrior-gods and their symbol is a double arrow. Their original place of worship was at the Kargad city of Awabath before it became the seat of the God-Kings. There is a Temple of the God-Brothers at "the place".


The God-Kings are actually mortals who rule the Kargad Lands from Awabath. The dynasty began with "priest-kings", but they now consider themselves gods. There is a temple to the God-King at "the Place". It is the most opulent temple there. The last God-King was overthrown in a civil war by Thol of Hur-at-Hur and fled to "the Place" in Atuan, where he was killed by a priest-eunuch.


The Earthsea canon

Short stories

The Word of Unbinding (1964) is a short story by Ursula K. LeGuin. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The Winds Twelve Quarters is a collection of short stories by Ursula K. Le Guin first published by Harper & Row in 1975. ... The Rule of Names (1964) is a short story by Ursula K. LeGuin, set in the world of Earthsea. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Tales from Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin, first published in 2001, is a collection of short stories from Le Guins Earthsea universe. ... This article is about the year. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

Novels

A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968, is the first of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tombs of Atuan is the second of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Farthest Shore is the third of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Tehanu was the fourth of Ursula Le Guins Earthsea books. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The Other Wind is the Sixth and (so far) last of a series of books written by Ursula K. Le Guin and set in her fantasy archipelago of Earthsea. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ...

Chronology

The internal chronology of the stories is different from the publication order. It is, with some uncertainties:

  • "The Word of Unbinding" (uncertain)
  • "The Finder"
  • "Darkrose and Diamond"
  • "The Rule of Names" (uncertain)
  • "The Bones of the Earth"
  • A Wizard of Earthsea
  • The Tombs of Atuan
  • "On the High Marsh"
  • The Farthest Shore
  • Tehanu
  • "Dragonfly"
  • The Other Wind

The stories "The Word of Unbinding" and "The Rule of Names" have no clear place in the chronology, and are not entirely consistent with the other stories. Nothing absolutely prevents "The Word of Unbinding" from taking place at any time before The Other Wind, but the differences in magical terminology, the presence of the otherwise unknown "trolls" (whom Le Guin notes "became extinct in Earthsea at some point"), and the character of the evil wizard Voll the Fell suggest that it might be appropriately placed either before the time of Morred, or later, in the Dark Times after the death of Maharion and before the founding of the school on Roke; in either case before "The Finder". "The Rule of Names" can also be considered, in a way, an early draft of The Farthest Shore, dealing with some of the themes which stand at the center of the later book.


"The Rule of Names" apparently takes place some time in (about) the century before A Wizard of Earthsea; Le Guin writes that the main character "must have been on Sattins Island some decades or centuries before Ged found him.... on the Isle of Pendor". But that could place the story before or after "Darkrose and Diamond," which is "at any time during the last couple of hundred years in Earthsea". "The Rule of Names" has some plot links to A Wizard of Earthsea, while "Darkrose and Diamond" is an entirely independent story, so it may make more sense to read "The Rule of Names" second.


"The Bones of the Earth" takes place early in Ged's lifetime, ten years before his apprenticeship to Ogion, and is closely linked to A Wizard of Earthsea.


The events in Tehanu partially overlap those in The Farthest Shore, but nothing would be gained by reading them in reverse order; some parts of Tehanu assume, or are illuminated by information from The Farthest Shore.


Awards

The series has won numerous literary awards, including the 1990 Nebula Award for Best Novel for Tehanu, the 1972 Newberry Silver Medal Award for The Tombs of Atuan, the 1972 National Book Award for Children's Books for The Farthest Shore, and the 1979 Lewis Carroll Shelf Award for A Wizard of Earthsea. Winners of the Nebula Award for Best Novel. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the most outstanding American book for children. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... The Lewis Carroll Shelf Award was given annually from 1970 to 1979 to books deemed to possess enough of the qualities of Alice in Wonderland to enable them to sit on the same book shelf. ...


Earthsea in other media

Radio

A BBC-produced two-hour radio dramatisation of A Wizard of Earthsea was originally broadcast on Radio 4 on 26 December 1996. This adaptation was narrated by Dame Judi Dench, with Michael Maloney as Ged, and used a wide range of actors with different regional and social accents to emphasize the origins of the Earthsea characters (for instance, Estarriol and others from the East Reach were played by actors with Southern Welsh accents). The adaptation was highly praised and was subsequently released on audio cassette. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Dame Judith Olivia Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA, (born 9 December 1934), usually known as Dame Judi Dench, is an Academy Award, Golden Globe, Tony, three-time BAFTA, and six-time Laurence Olivier Award-winning English actress. ... Michael Maloney (born June 19, 1957), is a British actor. ... This article is about the country. ...


Television

The U.S.-based Sci Fi Channel broadcast a three-hour loose adaptation for television of A Wizard of Earthsea and The Tombs of Atuan in December 2004, and was broadcast on Channel 4 in the UK in Easter 2005 in two parts. Titled Legend of Earthsea, even before its transmission it angered Earthsea purists – not to mention the author herself [3] – with the announcement that Ged (and the vast majority of the other characters) would be played by a Caucasian and with the dramatis personae posted on the official website (see below), which featured non-canon characters called "The Archmagus" and "King Tygath", "Diana", "Penelope", and "Marion", and several references to "Kargide" (not Kargad, Karg, or Kargish) characters. The religious practices of Atuan were misportrayed, and the celibacy of Earthsea wizards overlooked as Ged and Tenar become sexually involved. SCI FI (originally The Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel when part of a longer phrase) is an American cable television channel, launched on September 24, 1992, specializing in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ... ← - 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in December • 30 Artie Shaw • 29 Julius Axelrod • 28 Jacques Dupuis • 28 Jerry Orbach • 28 Susan Sontag • 26 Reggie White • 26 Sir Angus Ogilvy • 23 P. V. Narasimha Rao • 23 Doug Ault • 19 Renata Tebaldi • 16... This article is about the British television station. ... Earthsea DVD Cover The Legend of Earthsea miniseries (later shortened to Earthsea), adapted quite loosely from the award-winning Earthsea novels by Ursula K. Le Guin, premiered as a two-night television event on the Sci-Fi Channel in December 2004. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Dramatis personae is a Latin phrase (literally the persons of the drama) for the characters in the plot of a play, and is used to refer collectively to the characters represented in a dramatic work (various forms of theater, but also on screen) to be played by the acting cast...


Le Guin was not involved in the production in any way. She did, however, publish the following remarks on her website:

I can only admire Mr [Executive Producer Robert] Halmi's imagination, but I wish he'd left mine alone... I wonder if the people who made the film of The Lord of the Rings had ended it with Frodo putting on the Ring and ruling happily ever after, and then claimed that that was what Tolkien "intended..." Would people think they'd been "very, very honest to the books?" [4]

Anime

Gedo Senki -Tales from Earthsea Poster
Gedo Senki -Tales from Earthsea Poster

Studio Ghibli's 2006 film, Gedo Senki — Tales from Earthsea, is loosely based in the Earthsea mythology. It was directed by Gorō Miyazaki, the son of Hayao Miyazaki. In the past, Le Guin had rejected Hayao Miyazaki's offer to create a film based on the series, but due to her love of his films, Le Guin granted Studio Ghibli the rights. The story is based mainly on elements of the third and fourth novels of Earthsea. Tales from Earthsea , loosely Geds War Chronicles) is a feature anime film from Studio Ghibli, released in Japan on July 29, 2006,[1] to be distributed in the USA by Walt Disney Pictures and in Australia by Madman Entertainment. ... Image File history File links Gedo6sn. ... Image File history File links Gedo6sn. ... Studio Ghibli, Inc. ... Tales from Earthsea , loosely Geds War Chronicles) is a feature anime film from Studio Ghibli, released in Japan on July 29, 2006,[1] to be distributed in the USA by Walt Disney Pictures and in Australia by Madman Entertainment. ... Gorō Miyazaki (宮崎吾朗, Miyazaki Gorō) was born on January 21, 1967 in Tokyo, Japan, the son of Japanese animation director Hayao Miyazaki. ... Hayao Miyazaki ) (born January 5, 1941 in Tokyo, Japan) is the prominent director of many popular animated feature films. ...


See also

This is a list of the names of characters in the stories about the fantasy world of Earthsea, written by Ursula K. Le Guin. ... The Islands of Earthsea are the several islands that make up the lands of the largely oceanic fantasy world of Earthsea in the stories of Ursula K. Le Guin. ...

References

  1. ^ Time line of Earthsea
  2. ^ Ursula Le Guin Q&A
  3. ^ LeGuin, Ursula, "A Whitewashed Earthsea", web page at http://www.slate.com/id/2111107/, retrieved 2007-05-06
  4. ^ A Reply to Some Statements Made by the Film-Makers of the Earthsea Miniseries Before it was Shown

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tales from Earthsea // Nausicaa.net (72 words)
Based on the Earthsea series by Ursula K. Le Guin.
A more sensible translation is "Ged's war chronicle" or "Ged's history of the war".
The official English title is "Tales from Earthsea".
Earthsea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3144 words)
Earthsea is a fictional realm created by Ursula K. Le Guin for her short story "The Word of Unbinding", published in 1964, but that became more famous in her novel A Wizard of Earthsea, first published in 1968.
The world of Earthsea is one of sea and islands: a vast archipelago of hundreds of islands surrounded by uncharted ocean.
Earthsea, with the exception of the Kargad lands, is a literate society using a writing system called the "Hardic runes"; the nature of the writing system is uncertain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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