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Encyclopedia > Earthenware

Earthenware is a common ceramic material, which is used extensively for pottery tableware and decorative objects. Although body formulations vary tremendously between countries, and even between individual makers, a generic composition is 25% ball clay, 28% kaolin, 32% quartz, and 15% feldspar. Earthenware is one of the oldest materials used in pottery. While red earthenware made from red clays is very familiar and recognizable, white and buff colored earthenware clays are also commercially available and commonly used. Okinawa pottery I took this picture around 1993 and contribute it to the public domain. ... Fixed Partial Denture, or Bridge The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word κεραμικός (keramikos). ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... The Gay Head cliffs in Marthas Vineyard are made almost entirely of clay. ... Kaolin Kaolinite (Aluminium Silicate Hydroxide) Kaolinite is a mineral with the chemical composition Al2Si2O5(OH)4. ... Quartz is one of the most common minerals in the Earths continental crust. ... Lunar Ferroan Anorthosite #60025 (Plagioclase Feldspar). ... Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ...


In industrial pottery, earthenware is typically bisque (or "biscuit") fired to between 1000 and 1150 degrees Celsius (1800 and 2100 degrees Fahrenheit, and glaze fired from 950 to 1050 °C (1750 to 1925 °F). In studio pottery the bisque firing is lower than the glaze firing: bisque 900 to 1050 °C (1650 to 1920 °F ) and glaze 1040 to 1150 °C (1900 to 2100 °F). The higher firing temperatures that fuse the body and glaze of other ceramics, will generally cause earthenwares to bloat. After firing the body is porous and opaque with colours ranging from white to red depending on the raw materials used. Bisque can refer to: A fired piece of unglazed clay; see Bisque (pottery). ... Celsius is, or relates to, the Celsius temperature scale (previously known as the centigrade scale). ... Fahrenheit is a temperature scale named after the German physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), who proposed it in 1724. ... // Studio pottery is a branch of pottery that has in the last fifty years undergone a bit of a revolution. ...


Earthenware may sometimes be as thin as bone china and other porcelains, though it is not translucent and is more easily chipped. Earthenware is also less strong, less tough, and more porous than stoneware - but its low cost and easier working compensate for these deficiencies. Due to its higher porosity, earthenware must usually be glazed in order to be watertight. Bone china is type of porcelain body first developed in the Britain in which calcined ox bone, bone ash, is a major constituent. ... Fine China redirects here. ... A pore, in general, is some form of opening, usually very small. ... A Staffordshire stoneware plate from the 1850s with transferred copper print - (From the home of JL Runeberg) Stoneware is a category of clay and a type of pottery distinguished primarily by its firing and maturation temperature (from about 1200°C to 1315 °C). ... Used in geology, building science and hydrogeology, the porosity of a porous medium (such as rock or sediment) is the proportion of the non-solid volume to the total volume of material, and is defined by the ratio: where Vp is the non-solid volume (pores and liquid) and Vm... Madonna with Child and Angels, ceramica glaze by Renaissance artist Andrea della Robbia. ...


The word "earthenware" is very interesting since it encompasses the words "ear", "earth", "hen", "then", "war", and "are" inside of it.

Contents

Types of earthenware

Creamware is a cream-coloured earthenware created about 1750 by the potters of Staffordshire, England, which proved ideal for domestic ware. ... Delftware panel. ... Faience or faïence is the conventional name in English for fine tin-glazed earthenware on a delicate pale buff body. ... Majolica is earthenware with a white tin glaze, decorated by applying colorants on the raw glazed surface. ... A 16th century black Raku-style chawan, used for thick tea (Tokyo National Museum) Rakuyaki (樂焼き) or Raku (樂) is a form of Japanese pottery characterized by low firing temperatures (resulting in a fairly porous body), lead glazes, and the removal of pieces from the kiln while still glowing hot. ... Terra cotta is a hard semifired waterproof ceramic clay used in pottery and building construction. ...

See also

Unfired green ware pottery on a traditional drying rack at Conner Prairie living history museum. ... Fine China redirects here. ...

References

  • An Introduction To The Technology Of Pottery. 2nd edition. P.Rado. Pergamon Press. 1988
  • Whitewares: Production, Testing And Quality Control. W.Ryan & C.Radford. Pergamon Press. 1987
  • Hamer, Frank and Janet. The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques. A & C Black Publishers, Limited, London, England, Third Edition 1991. ISBN 0-8122-3112-0.

External link

  • Digital Version of "A Representation of the manufacturing of earthenware" -- 1827 text on the manufacture of earthenware

  Results from FactBites:
 
ArtLex on Earthenware (408 words)
A clay body based on ball clay is known as white earthenware.
Faience, terra cotta, and majolica are examples of earthenware.
Otto Natzler (Austrian, 1908-2007), Gertrud Natzler (Austrian, 1908-1971), Bowl, 1943, earthenware, turquoise overflow lava glaze, height 3 7/16 inches (8.75 cm), diameter 8 1/2 inches (21.5 cm), Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
Earthenware Information (234 words)
Earthenware is one of the oldest materials used in pottery.
Earthenware is typically bisque (or "biscuit") fired at a temperature of around 1000 to 1150 degrees Celsius (1800 to 2100 degrees Fahrenheit), and glaze fired (the final firing) at around 950 to 1050°C (1750 to 1925°F).
Earthenware may sometimes be as thin as bone china and other porcelains, though it is not translucent and is more easily chipped.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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