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Encyclopedia > Early Cyrillic alphabet

The original Cyrillic alphabet was a writing system developed in Macedonia and in the First Bulgarian Empire in the tenth century to write the Old Church Slavonic liturgical language. The First Bulgarian Empire was founded in 681 AD in the lands near the Danube delta and disintegrated in 1018 AD by annexion to the Byzantine Empire. ... ( 9th century - 10th century - 11th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Old Church Slavonic (Old Bulgarian or Old Slavic) is the first literary Slavic language, developed from the Slavic dialect of Thessaloniki (Solun) by the 9th century Byzantine missionaries, Saints Cyril and Methodius. ... A sacred language is a language, frequently a dead language, that is cultivated for religious reasons by people who speak another language in their daily life. ...


With Christianity having been made the official state religion in 864, Knyaz (Prince) Boris I commissioned the creation of the alphabet. Clement of Ohrid developed the alphabet and named it after his teacher, St. Cyril, a missionary who, along with his brother, Methodius, is credited for inventing the Glagolitic alphabet, an earlier Slavic alphabet and an influence on this one. The alphabet also shows influence from the Greek, Latin, and even the Hebrew alphabet. Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Events Khan Boris I of Bulgaria is baptized an Orthodox Christian. ... Boris I Michail or Boris I Michael (Bulgarian Борис I Михаил)(d. ... Saint Clement of Ohrid Saint Clement of Ohrid (Bulgarian: , IPA: ) (ca. ... City motto : Coordinates Municipality : Ohrid municipality Elevation 695 m Population 55 749 Time zone  - Standard  - Summer (DST) CET (UTC+1) CEST (UTC+2) Founded Area code +389 46 Postal code 6000 Car plates OH Official Website www. ... Saint Cyril (Greek: Κύριλλος , Church Slavonic: Кирилъ) (827 - February 14, 869) was a Byzantine Greek monk, scholar, theologian, and linguist. ... Saint Methodius (Greek: Μεθόδιος; Church Slavonic Мефодии) (b. ... The Glagolitic alphabet or Glagolitsa is the oldest known Slavic alphabet. ...  Countries where a West Slavic language is the national language  Countries where an East Slavic language is the national language  Countries where a South Slavic language is the national language The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages), a group of closely related languages of the Slavic peoples and a subgroup... The Latin alphabet, also called the Roman alphabet, is the most widely used alphabetic writing system in the world today. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ...


In the following centuries, the Cyrillic alphabet adapted to changes in spoken language, developed regional variations to suit the features of national languages, and was subjected to academic reforms and political decrees. Variations of the Cyrillic alphabet are used to write languages throughout Eastern Europe and Asia. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current national boundaries: Russia (dark orange), other countries of the former USSR (medium orange),members of the Warsaw pact (light orange), and other former Communist regimes not aligned with Moscow (lightest orange). ... World map showing the location of Asia. ...

Contents

The alphabet

Image Unicode Name
(Cyrillic)
Name
(translit.)
Name
(IPA)
Trans. IPA Origin Notes
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Azu.png А а АЗЪ azǔ [aʒŭ] a [a] Greek alpha Α, α
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Buky.png Б б БѸКЫ bukū [buky], [bukŭi] b [b] Greek beta Β, β
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Viedi.png В в ВѢДѢ vědě [vædæ] v [v] Greek beta Β, β
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Glagoli.png Г г ГЛАГОЛИ glagoli [glagoli] g [g] Greek gamma Γ, γ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Dobro.png Д д ДОБРО dobro [dobro] d [d] Greek Delta Δ, δ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yesti.png Є є ЄСТЬ estǐ [ɛstĭ] e [ɛ] Greek epsilon Ε, ε
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Zhiviete.png Ж ж ЖИВѢТЄ živěte [ʒivætɛ] ž, zh [ʒ] Glagolitic zhivete Ⰶ ?
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Dzelo.png Ѕ ѕ ЅѢЛО dzělo [ʣælo] dz [dz] Greek ligature stigma Ϛ, ϛ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Zemlia.png З з ЗЄМЛIА zemlja [zemlja] z [z] Greek zeta Ζ, ζ See note 1
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Izhe.png И и ИЖЄ iže [iʒɛ] i [i] Greek eta Η, η
Image:Early Cyrillic letter I.png І і / Ї ї И i [i] i, I [i] Greek iota Ι, ι
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Kako.png К к КАКО kako [kako] k [k] Greek kappa Κ, κ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Liudiye.png Л л ЛЮДИѤ ljudije [ljudijɛ] l [l] Greek lambda Λ, λ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Myslite.png М м МЫСЛИТЄ mūslite [myslitɛ]/[mŭislitɛ] m [m] Greek mu Μ, μ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Nashi.png Н н НАШЬ našǐ [naʃĭ] n [n] Greek nu Ν, ν
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Onu.png О о ОНЪ onǔ [onŭ] o [o] Greek omicron Ο, ο
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Pokoi.png П п ПОКОИ pokoi [pokoj] p [p] Greek pi Π, π
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Ritsi.png Р р РЬЦИ rǐci [rĭʦi] r [r] Greek rho Ρ, ρ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Slovo.png С с СЛОВО slovo [slovo] s [s] Greek lunate sigma Ϲ, ϲ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Tvrido.png Т т ТВРЬДО tvr̥do [tvr̥do] t [t] Greek tau Τ, τ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Uku.png Ѹ ѹ ѸКЪ ukǔ [ukŭ] u [u] Greek omicron-upsilon ΟΥ, ου See note 2
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Fritu.png Ф ф ФРЬТЪ fr̤̥tǔ [fr̤̥tŭ] f [f] Greek phi Φ, φ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Khieru.png Х х ХѢРЪ xěrǔ [xærŭ] x [x] Greek chi Χ, χ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Otu.png Ѡ ѡ ОТЪ otǔ [otŭ] ō, w [oː] Greek omega Ω, ω
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Tsi.png Ц ц ЦИ ci [ʦi] c [ʦ] Glagolitic tsi Ⱌ ?, from Hebrew final tsadi ץ‎
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Chrivi.png Ч ч ЧРЬВЬ čr̤̥vǐ [ʧr̤̥vĭ] č, ch [ʧ]
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Sha.png Ш ш ША ša [ʃa] š, sh [ʃ] Glagolitic sha Ⱎ, from Hebrew shin ש (possibly through Coptic shai Ϣ)
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Shta.png Щ щ ШТА šta [ʃta] št, sht [ʃt] Ш-Т or Ш-Ч ligature, after Glagolitic shta Ⱋ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yeru.png Ъ ъ ѤРЪ jerǔ [jɛrŭ] ǔ, u: [ŭ] after old Bulgar letter
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yery.png Ы ы ѤРЫ jerū [jɛry] ū [y], or possibly [ŭi] ЪI or ЪИ ligature
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yeri.png Ь ь ѤРЬ jerǐ [jɛrĭ] ǐ, i: [ĭ] after old Bulgar letter
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yati.png Ѣ ѣ ЯТЬ jatǐ [jatĭ] ě [æ] after Bulgar letter
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yu.png Ю ю Ю ju [ju] ju [iu] I-ОУ ligature, dropping У
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Ya.png Я я (И)Я ja [ja] ja [ia] I-А ligature
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yusu Maliy.png Ѧ ѧ ѦСЪ ęsǔ [ɛ̃sŭ] ę, ẽ [ɛ̃] after Bulgar letter See note 3
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yusu Maliy Yotirovaniy.png Ѩ ѩ ѨСЪ jęsǔ [jɛ̃sŭ] ję, jẽ [jɛ̃] I-Ѧ ligature See note 4
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yusu Bolshiy.png Ѫ ѫ ѪСЪ ǫsǔ [ɔ̃sŭ] ǫ, õ [ɔ̃] after Bulgar letter See note 5
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Yusu Bolshiy Yotirovaniy.png Ѭ ѭ ѬСЪ jǫsǔ [jɔ̃sŭ] jǫ, jõ [jɔ̃] I-Ѫ ligature See note 6
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Ksi.png Ѯ ѯ КСИ ksi [ksi] ks [ks] Greek xi Ξ, ξ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Psi.png Ѱ ѱ ПСИ psi [psi] ps [ps] Greek psi Ψ, ψ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Fita.png Ѳ ѳ ФИТА fita [fita] θ, th, T, F [t]/[θ]/[f] Greek theta Θ, θ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Izhitsa.png Ѵ ѵ ИЖИЦА ižica [iʒiʦa] ü [ɪ], [y] Greek upsilon Υ, υ
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Ye.png Ѥ ѥ (И)Ѥ jeː [jɛ] je [iɛ] І-Є ligature
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Dierv.png Ћ ћ ГѤРВ gerv, gjerv [ʤɛrv], [djɛrv] đ, dj [ʤ], [dj] Serbian tshe Ћ, ћ See note 7
Image:Early Cyrillic letter Tvrido Otu.png Ѿ ѿ ОТЪ otǔ [otŭ] ōt, wt [otŭ] Ѡ-Т ligature
Image:Early Cyrillic letter O.png See note 8

Unicode is an industry standard allowing computers to consistently represent and manipulate text expressed in any of the worlds writing systems. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... Transliteration is the practice of transcribing a word or text written in one writing system into another writing system. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A (А, а) is the first letter of the Cyrillic alphabet. ... Alpha (uppercase Α, lowercase α) is the first letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Look up Б, б in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Beta (upper case Î’, lower case β) is the second letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ve (Ð’, в) is the third letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the sound . ... Beta (upper case Î’, lower case β) is the second letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Look up Г, г in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Gamma (uppercase Γ, lowercase γ) is the third letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... De (Д, д) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet. ... Look up Δ, δ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ye, or E (Е, е), is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet. ... Look up Ε, ε in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Zhe (Ж, ж) is the letter of Cyrillic alphabet which represents the voiced postalveolar fricative (listen), similar to the s in the English word treasure. Zhe is the 7th letter of the Bulgarian and Belarusian alphabets, the 8th letter in the Macedonian, Russian and Serbian alphabets, and the 9th in the Ukrainian... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Dze (Ð…, Ñ•) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, used in the Macedonian language; it is, however, much older and is found in the original Slavonic alphabet. ... Look up stigma on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ze (З, з) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the consonant /z/. Its easily confusable with the number 3, for example the stages of the N1 rocket. ... Zeta (upper case Ζ, lower case ζ) is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... I or Y (И, и) is a letter in the Cyrillic alphabet, pronounced in Russian, or in Ukrainian. ... Look up Η, η in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... I (І, Ñ–) (also called decimal I, or dotted I) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, used in the Belarusian and Ukrainian languages. ... Yi (Ї, ї) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, used in the Ukrainian language. ... Look up Ι, ι in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ka (К, к) is a letter in the Cyrillic alphabet. ... For other uses, see Kappa. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... El (Л, л) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet. ... Look up Λ, λ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Em (М, м) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the consonant /m/. Code positions This article is a substub, the first step on the way to becoming a full article. ... Look up Îœ, μ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Look up Н, н in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Nu. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... O (О, о) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the vowel /o/. Categories: Cyrillic letters | Substubs ... Look up Ο, ο in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Pe (П, п) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the consonant /p/. It arose directly from the Greek letter Pi (Π, Ï€). The shape of capital printed Pe can be described as a square with the bottom line missing, not to be confused with El (Cyrillic), which has a curved left. ... For other uses, see Pi (disambiguation) Pi (upper case Π, lower case Ï€ or Ï–) is the sixteenth letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Er (Р, р) is the eighteenth letter of the Cyrillic alphabet. ... Rho (upper case Ρ, lower case ρ) is the 17th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up Σ, σ, Ï‚ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Te (Т, т) is the letter representing the consonant /t/ in the Cyrillic alphabet. ... Look up Τ, Ï„ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Uk (, ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet. ... Look up Ο, ο in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Upsilon (upper case , lower case ) is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... EF can refer to multiple things: Fermi energy (EF) The IATA code for Far Eastern Air Transport Earth First! movement, in environmentalism EF Education language schools, in education EF lens mount, Canons auto-focus lens mount Electric field, in physics Exafarad, an SI unit of electric capacitance Ejection fraction... Look up Φ, φ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Kha, or Ha, (Х, х) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the voiceless velar fricative /x/ (pronounced like the ch in German Bach). It is derived from the greek letter chi. ... Look up Χ, χ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Omega (Ѡ, ѡ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet, descended from the Greek Omega (Ω, ω). These early letters were called Archaic letters. ... Look up Ω, ω in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Tse (Ц, ц) is a letter in the Cyrillic alphabet. ... (also spelled Tzadi or Sadhe) is the eighteenth letter in many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew ‎ and Arabic alphabet ‎. Its oldest sound value is probably IPA: , although there is a variety of pronunciation in different modern Semitic languages and their dialects. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Che (Ч, ч) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the consonant cluster /tS/ or /tS/ (like the ch in change). Categories: Cyrillic letters | Stub ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Sha (Ш, ш) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the consonant sound or . ... Shin (also spelled Å in or Sheen) is the twenty-first letter in many Semitic abjads, including Phoenician, Aramaic, Hebrew and Arabic (in abjadi order, 12th in modern order). ... The Coptic alphabet is an alphabet used for writing the Coptic language. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Shcha or Shta (Щ, щ) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the consonant // or // in Russian, // or // in Ukrainian, and the consonant // in Bulgarian. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The letter (Ъ, ÑŠ) of the Cyrillic alphabet is known as the hard sign (твёрдый знак ) in the modern Russian alphabet and as er golyam (ер голям, big yer) in the Bulgarian alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Yery (Ы, Ñ‹) is a letter in the Cyrillic alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Soft Sign (Ь, ÑŒ) is a letter in the Cyrillic alphabet (Russian: мягкий знак (mÄ­ahkiy znak) [], Ukrainian: м’який знак (miakyy znak) [], Belarusian: мяккі знак (miakki znak) []). It is named so because it usually indicates softening, or palatalization, of the preceding consonant or of the group of them. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Yat or Jat (, ) is the name of the thirty-second letter of the old Cyrillic alphabet, or of the sound it represents. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Yu (Ю, ю) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the iotated vowel /ju/. In common with many Cyrillic letters, it was derived from a digraph, being a ligature of Izhe (then І) or Izhei (then Н, both now И) and Uk (Ѹ, no longer in the alphabet). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Little Yus (, ) and Big Yus (, ), or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Little Yus (, ) and Big Yus (, ), or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Little Yus (, ) and Big Yus (, ), or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Little Yus (, ) and Big Yus (, ), or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ksi (Ñ®, ѯ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet, descended from the Greek letter Xi. ... Look up Ξ, ξ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Psi (Ñ°, ѱ) is a letter in the early Cyrillic alphabet, derived from the Greek letter psi (Ψ, ψ). It represents the sound /ps/, as in English naps, and was used largely in loan words from foreign languages. ... Look up Ψ, ψ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Fita (Ѳ, ѳ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet, descended from the Greek Theta. ... Look up Θ, θ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Izhitsa (Ñ´, ѵ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet. ... Upsilon (upper case , lower case ) is the 20th letter of the Greek alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... E iotified (Ѥ, ѥ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Tshe (Ћ, Ñ›) is 23rd letter of the Serbian Cyrillic alphabet. ... Tshe (Ћ, Ñ›) is 23rd letter of the Serbian Cyrillic alphabet. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ot (Ѿ, Ñ¿) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet, a ligature of the letters Omega and Te. ... MO MO MO MO File links The following pages link to this file: Early Cyrillic alphabet User:Mzajac/cyrillic Talk:Early Cyrillic alphabet/Alphabet table ...

Notes

  1. Zemlya: The first form developed into the second.
  2. Ouku: The first form developed into a vertical ligature, shown in the second form.
  3. Ęsǔ: In Russian, this glyph is called ЮСЪ МАЛЫЙ (jusǔ malūj).
  4. Jęsǔ: In Russian, this glyph is called ЮСЪ МАЛЫЙ ЙОТИРОВАННЫЙ (jusǔ malūj jotirovannūj). This glyph is rare.
  5. Ǫsǔ: In Russian, this glyph is called ЮСЪ БОЛЬШОЙ (jusǔ bol'šoj). This glyph is rare in Russian, but commonly used in Old Bulgarian.
  6. Jǫsǔ: In Russian, this glyph is called ЮСЪ БОЛЬШОЙ ЙОТИРОВАННЫЙ (jusǔ bol'šoj jotirovannūj). This glyph is rare in Russian, but commonly used in Old Bulgarian.
  7. Đerv: This letter is present in the Glagolitic alphabet, but its sound had disappeared by the time Cyrillic started to be used. In Russian, Gherv or Dzherv is only used in modern scientific texts where Cyrillic is used to transliterate Glagolitic; the character is found in some Balkan languages, notably the languages of the former Yugoslavia.
  8. Ornate omega: The name of this glyph is unknown; it would seem to be used in interjections, especially before vocatives.

Ze (З, з) is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet, representing the consonant /z/. Its easily confusable with the number 3, for example the stages of the N1 rocket. ... Uk (, ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet. ... In writing and typography, a ligature occurs where two or more letterforms are written or printed as a unit. ... Little Yus and Big Yus , or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Little Yus and Big Yus , or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Little Yus and Big Yus , or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Little Yus and Big Yus , or Jus, are the letters representing two Common Slavonic nasal vowels, in the early Cyrillic and Glagolitic alphabets. ... Tshe (Ћ, Ñ›) is 23rd letter of the Serbian Cyrillic alphabet. ... Tablet inscribed with the Glagolitic alphabet The Glagolitic alphabet or Glagolitsa is the oldest known Slavonic alphabet. ... ... Serbo-Croatian (srpskohrvatski or hrvatskosrpski) is a name for a language of the Western group of the South Slavic languages. ... Omega (Ѡ, ѡ) is a letter of the early Cyrillic alphabet, descended from the Greek Omega (Ω, ω). These early letters were called Archaic letters. ... The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the person being addressed, found in Latin among other languages. ...

Numerals, diacritics and punctuation

Each letter also had a numeric value, inherited from the corresponding Greek letter. A titlo over a sequence of letters indicated their use as a number. See Cyrillic numerals, Titlo. Titlo is an extended diacritic symbol first used in old Cyrillic manuscripts, e. ... Cyrillic numerals was a numbering system derived from the Cyrillic alphabet, used by South and East Slavic peoples. ... Titlo is an extended diacritic symbol first used in old Cyrillic manuscripts, e. ...


Several diacritics, adopted from Polytonic Greek orthography, were also used (these may not appear correctly in all web browsers; they are supposed to be directly above the letter, not off to its upper right): Example of a letter with a diacritic A diacritical mark or diacritic, also called an accent, is a small sign added to a letter to alter pronunciation or to distinguish between similar words. ... It has been suggested that Diacritics (Greek alphabet) be merged into this article or section. ...

Punctuation marks: The acute accent (   ) is a diacritic mark used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin and Greek scripts. ... Unicode is an industry standard allowing computers to consistently represent and manipulate text expressed in any of the worlds writing systems. ... The acute accent (   ) is a diacritic mark used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin and Greek scripts. ... The grave accent ( ` ) is a diacritic mark used in written Greek until 1982 (polytonic orthography), French, Catalan, Welsh, Italian, Vietnamese, Scottish Gaelic, Norwegian, Portuguese and other languages. ... The grave accent ( ` ) is a diacritic mark used in written Greek until 1982 (polytonic orthography), French, Catalan, Welsh, Italian, Vietnamese, Scottish Gaelic, Norwegian, Portuguese and other languages. ... Kamora is a brand of coffee liqueur produced in Mexico. ... Palatalization means pronouncing a sound nearer to the hard palate, making it more like a palatal consonant; this is towards the front of the mouth for a velar or uvular consonant, but towards the back of the mouth for a front (e. ... A breve (Latin brevis short, brief) is a diacritical mark Ë˜, shaped like a little round cup, designed to indicate a short vowel, as opposed to the macron Â¯ which indicates long vowels. ... The spiritus asper (rough breathing) or dasy pneuma (Greek: dasu, δασύ) is a diacritical mark used in Greek. ... The spiritus lenis (soft breathing) or psilon pneuma (Greek: psilón, ψιλόν) is a diacritical mark used in Ancient Greek. ... Titlo is an extended diacritic symbol first used in old Cyrillic manuscripts, e. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A numeral is a symbol or group of symbols that represents a number. ... In linguistics, a, diaeresis, or dieresis (AE) (from Greek (diaerein), to divide) is the modification of a syllable by distinctly pronouncing one of its vowels. ...

An interpunct is a small dot used for interword separation in ancient Latin script, being perhaps the first consistent visual representation of word boundaries in written language. ... The term comma has various uses; comma is the name used for one of the punctuation symbols: , The term comma is also used in music theory for various small intervals that arise as differences between approximately equal intervals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The colon (:) is a punctuation mark, visually consisting of two equally sized dots centered on the same vertical line. ... The question mark(?) (also known as an interrogation point, query,[1] or eroteme) is a punctuation mark that replaces the full stop at the end of an interrogative sentence. ... A semicolon (  ;  ) is a punctuation mark. ... an exclamation mark An exclamation mark, exclamation point or bang, !, is usually used after an interjection or exclamation to indicate strong feeling. ...

See also

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early Cyrillic alphabet

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Bosancica is a script, that was used in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Croatia (Dalmatia and Dubrovnik). ... The Old Russian language adopted the Cyrillic alphabet, approximately during the tenth century and at about the same time as the introduction of Eastern Christianity into the territories inhabited by the Eastern Slavs. ...

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NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Cyrillic alphabet (2427 words)
The theory is further supported by the fact that the Cyrillic alphabet replaced almost completely the Glagolitic one in northeastern Bulgaria as early as the end of the 10th century, whereas the Ohrid Literary School—where Saint Clement worked—continued to use the Glagolitic alphabet until the 12th century.
Although Cyril is almost certainly not the author of the Cyrillic alphabet, his contributions to Glagolitic alphabet and hence to the Cyrillic alphabet are still recognised, as the latter is named after him.
Cyrillic upper- and lowercase letter-forms are not as differentiated as in Latin typography.
Cyrillic alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2873 words)
The plan of the alphabet is derived from the early Cyrillic alphabet, itself a derivative of the Glagolitic alphabet, a ninth century uncial cursive usually credited to two brothers from Thessaloniki, Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius.
The alphabet was disseminated along with the Old Church Slavonic liturgical language, and the alphabet used for modern Church Slavonic language in Eastern Orthodox rites still resembles early Cyrillic.
Cyrillic uppercase and lowercase letter-forms are not as differentiated as in Latin typography.
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