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Encyclopedia > Earl Bostic

Earl Bostic (April 25, 1913October 28, 1965) was an American jazz and rhythm and blues alto saxophonist. April 25 is the 115th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (116th in leap years). ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States around the start of the 20th century. ... Rhythm and blues (also known as R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... A saxophonist is a musician who plays the saxophone. ...


Bostic was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He turned professional at age 18 when he joined Terrence Holder's band. He made his first recording with Lionel Hampton in 1942 where he played along with Red Allen, J.C. Higginbotham, Sid Catlett, Teddy Wilson and Hampton. Before that he performed with Fate Marable on New Orleans riverboats. Bostic graduated from Xavier University in New Orleans. He worked with territory bands as well as Arnett Cobb, Hot Lips Page, Rex Stewart, Don Byas, Charlie Christian, Thelonious Monk and other jazz luminaries. In 1938, and in 1944, Bostic lead the house band at Small's Paradise. During the early 1940's, he was a well respected regular at the famous jam sessions held at Minton's Playhouse. He formed his own band in 1945, and turned to rhythm and blues in the late 1940s. His biggest hits were "Temptation," "Sleep," "Flamingo," "You Go to My Head" and "Cherokee." At various times his band included Jaki Byard, John Coltrane, Benny Golson, Blue Mitchell, Stanley Turrentine, Tommy Turrentine, Keter Betts, Sir Charles Thompson, Teddy Edwards, Tony Scott, Benny Carter and other musicians who rose to prominence in jazz. Bostic held his musicians to a high standard and demanded that they read music faultlessly. He was influenced by the great Sidney Bechet. John Coltrane in turn was influenced by Earl Bostic. James Moody said that Bostic was the chief influence on John Coltrane. Moody mentioned that "Bostic knew his instrument inside out, back to front and upside down." Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Lionel Hampton with George W. Bush Lionel Leo Hampton (April 20, 1908, Louisville, Kentucky – August 31, 2002 New York City), was a jazz bandleader and percussionist. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... Henry Red Allen (January 7, 1906 - April 17, 1967) was an influential jazz trumpeter. ... J. C. (Jack) Higginbotham (1906–1973) was an American jazz trombonist. ... Sidney Catlett (born January 17, 1910 in Evansville, Indiana and died March 25, 1951 Chicago, Illinois) was a jazz drummer often referred to as Big Sid Catlett because of his large frame. ... Theodore Shaw Teddy Wilson (born November 24, 1912 in Austin, Texas-died July 31, 1986 in New Britain, Connecticut) was a United States jazz pianist. ... Fate Marable (2 December 1890 - 16 January 1947) was a jazz pianist and bandleader. ... Arnett Cobb (10 August 1918–24 March 1989) was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Oran Thaddeus Page (27 January 1908 in Dallas, Texas - 4 November 1954 in New York City), jazz trumpeter, singer, bandleader, better known as Hot Lips Page by the public, and Lips Page by his fellow musicians. ... Rex Stewart (1907–1967) was an American jazz cornetist best known for his work with the Duke Ellington orchestra. ... Carlos Wesley (Don) Byas (October 21, 1912-August 24, 1972) was a popular African-American jazz musician born in Muskogee, Oklahoma in the United States. ... Charlie Christian (29 July 1916 – 2 March 1942) was an American jazz guitarist. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... Minton’s Playhouse is a jazz club and bar located on the first floor of the Hotel Cecil at 210 West 118th Street in Harlem. ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Jaki Byard (June 15, 1922 - February 11, 1999) was a jazz piano player. ... John William Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967), nicknamed Trane, was an American jazz saxophonist and composer. ... Benny Golson (born January 25, 1929) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist, composer, and arranger. ... Richard Allen (Blue) Mitchell (March 13, 1930 – May 21, 1979) was an American jazz, rhythm and blues, soul, rock, and funk trumpeter. ... Stanley William Turrentine (April 5, 1934 – September 12, 2000) was an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Thomas Walter Turrentine, Jr. ... Keter Betts (July 25, 1928 – August 6, 2005) was an American jazz bassist. ... Charles Phillip Thompson (born 1918), who recorded and performed as Sir Charles Thompson, is an American swing and bebop pianist, organist and arranger. ... Theodore Marcus Teddy Edwards (April 26, 1924 – April 20, 2003) was an American jazz tenor saxophonist based on the West Coast of the US. Edwards was born in Jackson, Mississippi. ... See also Tony Scott for the American clarinet jazz musician. ... Bennett Lester Carter (August 8, 1907 – July 12, 2003) was an American jazz alto saxophonist, trumpeter, composer, arranger, and bandleader. ... Sidney Bechet Sidney Bechet (May 14, 1897 – May 14, 1959) was a jazz saxophonist, clarinetist, and composer. ... James Moody (born March 26, 1925) is a jazz saxophone and flute player. ...


His virtuosity is documented in records such as Up There In Orbit, Earl's Imagination, Apollo Theater Jump, All On, Artistry by Bostic, Telestar Drive, Liza, Lady Be Good and Tiger Rag. Bostic was a master of the blues and he used this skill in a variety of musical settings. Although Bostic recorded many commercial albums, some notable jazz based exceptions on the King label include Bostic Rocks Hits of the Swing Age, Jazz As I Feel It and A New Sound. U.S. King Records logo King Records was a United States based record label, headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, started in 1943 by Syd Nathan, specializing in country music, at the time still known as Hillbilly music. King advertised If its a King, Its a Hillbilly -- If its...


Bostic's King album titled Jazz As I Feel It featured Shelly Manne on drums, Joe Pass on guitar and Groove Holmes on organ. Bostic recorded the King Album "A New Sound" about one month later again, featuring Holmes and Pass. These recordings allowed Bostic to stretch out beyond the 3 minute limit imposed by the 45 RPM format. Bostic was pleased with the sessions which highlight his total mastery of the blues but they also foreshadowed musical advances that were later evident in the work of John Coltrane and Eric Dolphy. Shelly Manne (June 11, 1920–September 26, 1984), born Sheldon Manne in New York, New York, was an American jazz drummer. ... Joe Pass (born Joseph Anthony Passalaqua, January 13, 1929, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA, died May 23, 1994, Los Angeles, California), was a jazz guitarist. ... Richard Arnold (Groove) Holmes (1931 – 1991) was an American jazz organist who performed in the soul jazz genre. ... John William Coltrane (September 23, 1926 – July 17, 1967), nicknamed Trane, was an American jazz saxophonist and composer. ... Eric Allan Dolphy (June 20, 1928 – June 29, 1964) was a jazz musician who played alto saxophone, flute and bass clarinet. ...


He wrote arrangements for Paul Whiteman, Louis Prima, Lionel Hampton, Gene Krupa, Artie Shaw,Hot Lips Page, Jack Teagarden and Alvino Rey. 1928 Columbia Records label with caricature of Paul Whiteman Paul Whiteman (March 28, 1890 – December 29, 1967) was a popular american orchestral leader. ... Louis Prima and Keely Smith singing for the radio in the 1950s Louis Prima (December 7, 1910 – August 24, 1978) was an American entertainer, singer, actor, and trumpeter. ... Lionel Hampton with George W. Bush Lionel Leo Hampton (April 20, 1908, Louisville, Kentucky – August 31, 2002 New York City), was a jazz bandleader and percussionist. ... Gene Krupa Gene Krupa (January 15, 1909 – October 16, 1973) was a famous and influential American jazz and big band drummer, known for his highly energetic and flamboyant style. ... Artie Shaw (May 23, 1910, New York, New York – December 30, 2004, Thousand Oaks, California) was an accomplished American jazz clarinetist, composer, bandleader and author of both fiction and non-fiction. ... Oran Thaddeus Page (27 January 1908 in Dallas, Texas - 4 November 1954 in New York City), jazz trumpeter, singer, bandleader, better known as Hot Lips Page by the public, and Lips Page by his fellow musicians. ... Weldon Leo Jack Teagarden Trombonist (1905-1964) Weldon Leo Jack Teagarden (August 20, 1905 in Vernon, Texas - January 15, 1964) was an influential jazz trombonist and vocalist. ... Alvino Rey, born Alvin McBurney, was an American-born Swing era musician, often credited as the father of the pedal steel guitar. ...


Bostic was famous as a peerless jammer and held his own against Charlie Parker. The alto saxophonist Sweet Papa Lou Donaldson recalled seeing Parker get burned by Bostic during one such jam session. Art Blakey remarked that "Nobody knew more about the saxophone than Bostic, I mean technically, and that includes Bird. Working with Bostic was like attending a university of the saxophone." Victor Schonfield pointed out that "...his greatest gift was the way he communicated through his horn a triumphant joy in playing and being, much like Louis Armstrong and only a few others have done." He was able to control the horn from low B flat up into the altissimo range years before other saxophonists dared to stray. Bostic was able to play melodies in the altissimo range with perfect execution. He could play wonderfully in any key at any tempo over any changes. Benny Golson mentioned that "He could start from the bottom of the horn and skip over notes, voicing it up the horn like a guitar would. He had circular breathing before I even knew what circular breathing was-we're talking about the early '50s. He had innumerable ways of playing one particular note. He could double tongue, triple tongue. It was incredible what he could do, and he helped me by showing me many technical things." In 1951, Bostic successfully toured with Dinah Washington on the R&B circuit. Bostic was always well dressed and articulate during interviews. Always the consummate showman, he appeared on the Soupy Sales TV show and performed the Soupy Shuffle better than Soupy while playing the saxophone. Bostic was known to drive audiences into a frenzy with fantastic stop time chorus after chorus. Charles Bird Parker, Jr. ... Lou Donaldson (born November 1, 1926) is a jazz alto saxophonist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Benny Golson (born January 25, 1929) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist, composer, and arranger. ... Dinah Washington (August 29, 1924 – December 14, 1963) was a blues, R&B and jazz singer. ... Soupy Sales (born Milton Supman, January 8, 1926, in Franklinton, North Carolina) is an American comedian and actor. ...


His popular hits such as "Flamingo", "Harlem Nocturne", "Temptation", "Sleep" and "Where or When" showed off his characteristic growl on the horn. He adopted a danceable beat for these commercial successes while employing less notes than on his jazz based recordings. Gene Redd on vibes provided an important background for Bostic's hits. Bostic used a Beechler mouthpiece with a tenor saxophone reed on his Martin Committee model alto sax.


Bostic's signature hit, "Flamingo" was recorded in 1951 and remains a favorite among followers of Carolina Beach Music in South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia. Their style of Beach Music is heavily influenced by Rhythm-and-Blues music from the 40's, 50's and 60's. A popular dance to Bostic's tunes, and other Beach Music songs, is the "Shag", which borrows heavily from the "Jitterbug". Many Shag contests continue to be held along the "Grand Strand" of the Myrtle Beach area in South Carolina, as well as other beach music venues in the Mid-Atlantic states. Bostic recorded for Cincinnati-based King Records, a small label that was well known for releasing "R and B" and Bluegrass records. In fact, the biggest star on the King label was "the Godfather of Soul", James Brown. Bostic was also popular among R&B and jazz followers in the United Kingdom, thanks to his records that were released on the Parlophone label. James Joseph Brown (May 3, 1933[2] – December 25, 2006), commonly referred to as The Godfather of Soul and The Hardest Working Man in Show Business, was an American entertainer recognized as one of the most influential figures in 20th century popular music. ...


During the early 1950's Bostic lived with his wife in fashionable Addisleigh Park in St Albans Queens where many other jazz stars made their home.


Bostic's recording career was diverse and it includes jump blues, big band jazz, early rock and roll, purely commercial sides, and soul/jazz organ quintets.


Bostic was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma; and died from a heart attack in Rochester, New York, while performing with his band in 1965. His widow, Hildegarde, was still living in San Francisco as of the mid-1990s. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ...


External links

  • Earl Bostic's IMDB profile
  • [1]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Earl Bostic - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (449 words)
Earl Bostic (April 25, 1913 – October 28, 1965) was an American jazz and rhythm and blues alto saxophonist.
Bostic's signature hit, "Flamingo" was recorded in 1951 and remains a favorite among followers of Carolina Beach Music in South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia.
Bostic was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma; and died in Rochester, New York while performing with his band in 1965.
bostic (2605 words)
Earl Bostic was born in 1913 in that state that produced so many founding members of the rock 'n roll age, Oklahoma - Tulsa to be exact.
As the record makes Earl Bostic a recognizable R and B star, he is seriously injured in an automobile accident in Georgia that December, and faces a long stay in the hospital.
Much of early 1957 was inactive for Earl Bostic because of his medical condition, and the recordings were releases of tunes recorded in previous sessions(including a King LP called "Earl Bostic For You" #503).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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