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Encyclopedia > ETH Zurich
ETH Zürich
ETH Zürich Logo
Established 1855
Type Public
Endowment 1,2 billion CHF [1]
Staff 6,009
Students 12,705
Location Zurich, Switzerland
Campus Urban
Affiliations IDEA League, IARU
Website www.ethz.ch

The ETH Zurich, often called Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, is a science and technology university in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. Its full name is Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, with ETHZ also being a common unofficial abbreviation. Locals sometimes refer to it by the name Poly, from its original name Eidgenössisches Polytechnikum or Federal Polytechnic Institute. Image File history File links Eth_logo. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ISO 4217 Code CHF User(s) Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Campione dItalia Inflation 1. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Location within Switzerland   Zürich[?] (German pronunciation IPA: ; usually spelled Zurich in English) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and capital of the canton of Zürich. ... An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The IDEA League is a loose alliance of four of Europes best technical universities. ... The International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU) was launched in January 2006 as a leading co-operative network of 10 international research-intensive universities. ... This page as shown in the AOL 9. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Location within Switzerland   Zürich[?] (German pronunciation IPA: ; usually spelled Zurich in English) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and capital of the canton of Zürich. ...


The ETH is an internationally oriented university. It is a member of the IDEA League and the International Alliance of Research Universities IARU. The IDEA League is a loose alliance of four of Europes best technical universities. ... The International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU) was launched in January 2006 as a leading co-operative network of 10 international research-intensive universities. ...

ETH Zurich Main Building
ETH Zurich Main Building

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Ethzurich. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Ethzurich. ...

History

ETH Zürich Zentrum
ETH Zürich Zentrum

The ETH was founded in 1854 by the Swiss Confederation and opened its doors in 1855 as a polytechnic institute (Eidgenössische Polytechnische Schule). It comprised in the beginning six departments: architecture, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, chemistry, forestry, and a catch-all department for mathematics, natural sciences, literature, and social and political sciences. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1215x1800, 1655 KB) This is a picture of the ETH facing the Limmat River, it is my own work --ArchonMeld 02:44, 7 July 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1215x1800, 1655 KB) This is a picture of the ETH facing the Limmat River, it is my own work --ArchonMeld 02:44, 7 July 2006 (UTC) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Mechanical engineers design and build engines and power plants. ... Chemistry (from Greek χημεία khemeia[1] meaning alchemy) is the science of matter at the atomic to molecular scale, dealing primarily with collections of atoms, such as molecules, crystals, and metals. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, known today as the father of geometry; shown here in a detail of The School of Athens by Raphael. ...


The ETH is a federal institute (i.e., under direct administration by the Swiss government), whereas the University of Zurich (founded in 1833) is a cantonal institution. The decision for a new federal university was heavily disputed at the time, because the liberals pressed for a "federal university", while the conservative forces wanted all universities to remain under cantonal control, with the goal of giving liberal thoughts no refuge. In the beginning, both universities were co–located in the buildings of the University of Zurich. The University of Zurich (in German: Universität Zürich) is the largest university of Switzerland, in the city of Zurich. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The main building of the ETH was built 1861 to 1864 under Gustav Zeuner; the architect was Gottfried Semper, who was a professor for architecture at the ETH at the time. The south wing of the building was allocated to the University of Zurich until the university's own new main building was constructed (19121914). At about the same time, Semper's ETH building was enlarged and also got its impressive cupola. 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Gustav Anton Zeuner, born 30 November 1828 in Chemnitz, died 17 October 1907 in Dresden, was a German physicist, engineer and epistemologist, considered the founder of technical thermodynamics and of the Dresden School of thermodynamics. ... Gottfried Semper Gottfried Semper (1803-1879) was a German architect, art critic, and professor of architecture, who designed and built the Semper Oper in Dresden between 1838 and 1841. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome In architecture, a cupola consists of a dome-shaped ornamental structure located on top of a larger roof or dome, often used as a lookout or to admit light and provide ventilation. ...


In 1909, the course program of the ETH was restructured to that of a real university, from its early, very schoolish agenda, and the ETH was granted the right to award doctorates. In 1911, it was given its current name, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule. In 1924, another reorganization structured the university in 12 departments. 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Interior skylights in the main building
Interior skylights in the main building

With a new law in 1991, which became effective in 1993, the ETH Zürich, the EPFL, and four associated research institutes were joined and administered together as the "ETH Bereich". Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1215x1800, 1257 KB) Interior of the main ETH building, it is my own work. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1215x1800, 1257 KB) Interior of the main ETH building, it is my own work. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Monster Clothespin from Outer Space, and entrance of the EPFL The École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) is the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne in Switzerland. ...


An official decision states that the name of the institution is "ETH Zurich" in English and "ETH Zürich" in German, without expanding the acronym.


Reputation

In national comparisons of the swissUP Ranking, the ETH traditionally achieves best marks in natural sciences, computer science and engineering sciences. However, it scores low in categories involving student opinions.


A ranking published by CHE in May 2006 compares the ETH with other universities in the German-speaking countries. The ETH ranked first by peer review and reputation in all natural sciences, computer science and engineering sciences. It also scores high in categories like number of publications and citations.


The ETH is regularly ranked among the top universities in the world. It is placed between 3rd and 6th in Europe and between 10th and 27th in the world in international rankings by the Academic Ranking of World Universities and the Times Higher Education Supplement World University Rankings. It was also ranked 12th by the latter in both sciences and technology in 2005. The Academic Ranking of World Universities is compiled by researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and includes major institutes of higher education in all countries of North America, Europe, Asia, Pacific, and Latin America, compared and ranked by multiple numerical criteria, including publications in peer-reviewed journals and Nobel prizes... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ...


Historically, the ETH achieved its reputation particularly in the fields of chemistry, mathematics and physics. There are 21 Nobel Laureates who are associated with the ETH, counting only graduates of the ETH and Professors who have been honored for their work at ETH. The most recent Nobel Laureate is Kurt Wüthrich who has won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2002. Chemistry (from Greek χημεία khemeia[1] meaning alchemy) is the science of matter at the atomic to molecular scale, dealing primarily with collections of atoms, such as molecules, crystals, and metals. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, known today as the father of geometry; shown here in a detail of The School of Athens by Raphael. ... Physics (from the Greek, (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the discovery and understanding of the fundamental laws which govern matter, energy, space and time. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Kurt Wüthrich (born October 4, 1938) is a Swiss chemist and Nobel laureate. ...


Admission and education

Students and locals in the ETH front courtyard
Students and locals in the ETH front courtyard

The ETH is not selective in its undergraduate admission procedures. Like every public university in Switzerland, the ETH is obliged to grant admission to every Swiss citizen who sat through Matura. However, most applicants from foreign countries are required to take either the reduced entrance exam or the comprehensive entrance exam; an applicant can be admitted to the ETH even without any verifiable educational records by passing the comprehensive entrance exam. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x1624, 886 KB) This is a picture of the ETH Main Building from the street-side entrance, it is my own work. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1200x1624, 886 KB) This is a picture of the ETH Main Building from the street-side entrance, it is my own work. ... Matura (Matur, Maturita) is the word commonly used in Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Italy, Liechtenstein, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia and Switzerland for the final exams young adults (aged 18 or 19) take at the end of their secondary education. ...


There are no obligatory examinations during the first academic year which is divided into two semesters. However, the actual selection process takes place in the summer shortly after the second semester. Students have to pass the block examinations of courses of the first year, called the Basisprüfung. If the weighted average score is not sufficient, you are required to retake the entire Basisprüfung which usually means that you have to resit through the first year. More than 50% of the students fail Basisprüfung on first try and many of them choose to drop out after the failure. The structure of examinations in higher academic years is similar to the Basisprüfung, but with a higher success rate. The regular time to reach graduation is six semesters for the Bachelor of Science degree and three further semesters for the Master of Science degree. The last semester is dedicated to writing a thesis. A Bachelor of Science (B.S., B.Sc. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ...


Education at the ETH tends to be theoretically oriented with a high amount of mathematics involved throughout the courses. The main language of teaching in undergraduate studies is German while English is lingua franca in Master's studies and graduate studies. Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, known today as the father of geometry; shown here in a detail of The School of Athens by Raphael. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Campus

The ETH Zürich has no single campus. The main building was constructed in the 1860s in the heart of the city, and when the university grew, it spread out into the surrounding quarters. Its Zentrum location consists thus of various buildings and institutions throughout Zurich, firmly integrating the ETH in the city. The main building is literally across the street from the University of Zurich. // Events and trends Technology The First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States is built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... The University of Zurich (in German: Universität Zürich) is the largest university of Switzerland, in the city of Zurich. ...


Because this geographic situation substantially hindered the expansion of the ETH, a new campus was built from 1964 to 1976 on the Hönggerberg in the outskirts of the city. The last major expansion project of this new campus was completed in 2003; since then, the Hönggerberg location houses the departments of materials science, architecture, civil engineering, physics, biology, and chemistry. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... The Materials Science Tetrahedron, which often also includes Characterization at the center Materials science is an interdisciplinary field involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering. ... The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Physics (from the Greek, (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the discovery and understanding of the fundamental laws which govern matter, energy, space and time. ... Biology (from Greek βίος λόγος, see below) is the branch of science dealing with the study of living organisms. ... Chemistry (from Greek χημεία khemeia[1] meaning alchemy) is the science of matter at the atomic to molecular scale, dealing primarily with collections of atoms, such as molecules, crystals, and metals. ...


Student life

ETH students were found to be the busiest students of all institutions of higher education in Switzerland [2]. Undergraduates have a tight curriculum with twice as many lectures as comparable courses in other universities of Switzerland.


The ETH has well over 100 student associations. Most notably the VSETH (Verband der Studierenden an der ETH) which comprises all department associations. The associations regularly organize events with varying size and popularity. Events of the neighboring University of Zurich are well-attended by ETH students and vice versa. The VSETH organizes events of greater public attention, such as the Polyball, the Polyparty and the Erstsemestrigenfest, the first two housed in the main building of the ETH. The University of Zurich (in German: Universität Zürich) is the largest university of Switzerland, in the city of Zurich. ...


Traditions

The annual Polyball is the most prestigious public event at the ETH, with a long tradition since the 1880s. The end of November, the Polyball welcomes around 10'000 dancers, music-lovers and partygoers in the extensively decorated main building of the ETH. The Polyball is the biggest decorated ball in Europe.


The amicable rivalry between the ETH and the neighbouring University of Zurich is cultivated since 1951. There has been an annual rowing match between teams from the two institutions on the river Limmat. The Limmat is a river in Switzerland which rises in the city of Zürich at the north end of Lake Zürich and flows in northwestern direction until it flows after 35 km into the river Aare north of the small town of Brugg and shortly after the mouth...


There are many regular symposia and conferences at the ETH, most notably the annual Wolfgang Pauli Lectures, in honor of former ETH Professor Wolfgang Pauli. Distinct lecturers, among them 24 Nobel Laureates, have held lectures of the various fields of natural sciences at this conference since 1962. This article is about Austrian-Swiss physicist Wolfgang Pauli. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ...


Departments

As of 2006, the ETH Zurich comprises the following departments:


Architecture and Civil Engineering

Engineering Sciences The Parthenon on top of the Acropolis, Athens, Greece Architecture (from Latin, architectura and ultimately from Greek, αρχιτεκτων, a master builder, from αρχι- chief, leader and τεκτων, builder, carpenter) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Environmental engineering is the application of science and engineering principles to improving the environment (air, water, and/or land resources), to provide healthful water, air and land for human habitation and for other organisms, and to investigate the possibilities for remediation of polluted sites. ... Geomatics is the discipline of gathering, storing, processing, and delivering of geographic information. ...

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Information Technology (IT)[1] is a broad subject concerned with the use of technology in managing and processing information, especially in large organizations. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... The term management characterizes the process of and/or the personnel leading and directing all or part of an organization (often a business) through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible). ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a level of technological mastery sufficient to leave the surface of the planet for the first time and explore space. ... Face-to-face trading interactions among on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor Economics, as a social science, studies the production, distribution, and consumption of resources. ... Mechanical engineers design and build engines and power plants. ... “Process engineering is about applying engineering approaches, techniques, and tools to the construction of Process Models. ... The Materials Science Tetrahedron, which often also includes Characterization at the center Materials science is an interdisciplinary field involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering. ...

System-oriented Natural Sciences Biology (from Greek βίος λόγος, see below) is the branch of science dealing with the study of living organisms. ... Chemistry (from Greek χημεία khemeia[1] meaning alchemy) is the science of matter at the atomic to molecular scale, dealing primarily with collections of atoms, such as molecules, crystals, and metals. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, known today as the father of geometry; shown here in a detail of The School of Athens by Raphael. ... Physics (from the Greek, (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the science concerned with the discovery and understanding of the fundamental laws which govern matter, energy, space and time. ...

Other Sciences Food science is a discipline concerned with all technical aspects of food, beginning with harvesting or slaughtering, and ending with its cooking and consumption. ... Earth science (also known as geoscience or the geosciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... jecca is very beautiful!! Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related due to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ...

The examples and perspective in this article may not represent a worldwide view. ... The social sciences are groups of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of the world. ... Niccolò Machiavelli, ca 1500, became the key figure in realistic political theory, crucial to political science Political Science is the systematic study of the allocation and transfer of power in decision making. ...

Affiliates

Nobel Prize winners

The people listed below were graduates of the ETH or they were awarded the Nobel Prize for their work at ETH as professors. Nobel Prize medal. ...

1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (in English: William Conrad Roentgen) (March 27, 1845 – February 10, 1923) was a German physicist, of the University of Würzburg, who, on November 8, 1895, produced and detected electromagnetic radiation in a wavelength range today known as x-rays or Röntgen Rays, an achievement... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Alfred Werner (December 12, 1866 - November 15, 1919) was a German Nobel prize-winning chemist. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Willstätter Richard Martin Willstätter (August 13, 1872 – August 3, 1942) was a German chemist whose study of the structure of chlorophyll and other plant pigments won him the 1915 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Fritz Haber in 1918. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 3 - Babe Ruth is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees for $125,000, the largest sum ever paid for a player at that time. ... Charles Edouard Guillaume (February 15, 1861 – May 13, 1938) received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1920 in recognition of the service he had rendered to precision measurements in Physics by his discovery of anomalies in nickel steel alloys. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Einstein redirects here. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Petrus Josephus Wilhelmus Debije (March 24, 1884 – November 2, 1966) was a Dutch physical chemist. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Richard Kuhn (December 3, 1900 – August 1, 1967) was a German biochemist, born in Vienna, Austria. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Lavoslav (Leopold) Ružička (September 13, 1887 - September 26, 1976) was a Nobel Prize winner in chemistry, the first one from Croatia. ... 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Otto Stern Otto Stern (February 17, 1888 – August 17, 1969) was an German physicist and Nobel laureate. ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... This article is about Austrian-Swiss physicist Wolfgang Pauli. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Tadeus Reichstein (July 20, 1897 - August 1, 1996) was a Polish Nobel Prize-winning chemist. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Felix Bloch. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Hermann Staudinger (March 23, 1881 in Worms- Sept. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Vladimir Prelog (July 23, 1906 – January 7, 1998) was a renowned Bosnian - Croatian chemist who worked in Prague, Zagreb and Zurich and who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1975. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Werner Arber (born June 3, 1929) is a Swiss microbiologist. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Heinrich Rohrer (born June 6, 1933) is a Swiss physicist who, with Gerd Binnig, received half of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Physics for their joint invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). ... Gerd Binnig (born July 20, 1947) is a German-born physicist who shared with Heinrich Rohrer half of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Physics for their invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Johannes Georg Bednorz (born May 16, 1950) is a German physicist who, along with Karl Alex Muller, was awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize for Physics for their joint discovery of superconductivity in certain substances at temperatures higher than had previously been thought attainable. ... Karl Alexander Müller (born April 20, 1927) is a Swiss physicist who, along with J. Georg Bednorz, was awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize for Physics for their joint discovery of superconductivity in certain substances at higher temperatures than had previously been thought attainable. ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Robert Ernst (born August 14, 1933) is a Swiss chemist and Nobel Laureate. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... Kurt Wüthrich (born October 4, 1938) is a Swiss chemist and Nobel laureate. ...

Other Affiliates

for a more comprehensive list, see the German version of this article [3]. Hendrik Petrus Berlage Hendrik Petrus Berlage, Amsterdam, February 12, 1856 — The Hague August 12, 1934, was a prominent Dutch architect. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Womens Bridge, in Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Max Frisch (May 15, 1911 – April 4, 1991), was a Swiss architect, playwright and novelist, one of the most representative writers of the German literature after World War II. In his creative works Frisch paid particular attention to issues relating to problems of personal identity, morality and political commitment. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Herzog & de Meuron is a Swiss architect firm with an international reputation, founded in 1978 by Jacques Herzog (born 19 April 1950 in Basel) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950 in Basel), its two main partners. ... Herzog & de Meuron is a Swiss architect firm with an international reputation, founded in 1978 by Jacques Herzog (born 19 April 1950 in Basel) and Pierre de Meuron (born 8 May 1950 in Basel), its two main partners. ... Allianz Arena in Munich. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... The Pritzker Architecture Prize is awarded annually by the Hyatt Foundation to honor a living architect. ... Gottfried Semper Gottfried Semper (1803-1879) was a German architect, art critic, and professor of architecture, who designed and built the Semper Oper in Dresden between 1838 and 1841. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Bernard Tschumi (born January 25, 1944 Lausanne, Switzerland) is a contemporary French/Swiss architect, writer, and academic. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An Ciara Danille Bowers is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Othmar Ammann (March 26, 1879 - September 22, 1965) was a renowned civil engineer whose designs include: George Washington Bridge (opened October 24, 1931) Bayonne Bridge (opened November 15, 1931) Bronx-Whitestone Bridge (opened April 29, 1939) Throgs Neck Bridge (opened January 11, 1961) Verrazano Narrows Bridge (opened November 21... The term civil engineer refers to an individual who practices civil engineering. ... Hans Albert Einstein (May 14, 1904 – July 26, 1973) was a Professor of Hydraulic Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and the first son of renowned physicist Albert Einstein (1879-1955) and his first wife Mileva Marić (1875-1948). ... The term civil engineer refers to an individual who practices civil engineering. ... Niklaus Wirth giving a lecture Niklaus E. Wirth (born February 15, 1934) is a Swiss computer scientist. ... Computer science (informally: CS or compsci) is, in its most general sense, the study of computation and information processing, both in hardware and in software. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... Georg Cantor Georg Ferdinand Ludwig Philipp Cantor (March 3, 1845, St. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Richard Dedekind Julius Wilhelm Richard Dedekind (October 6, 1831 – February 12, 1916) was a German mathematician who did important work in abstract algebra and the foundations of the real numbers. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... François Diederich // Prof. ... A chemist pours from a Florence flask. ... Heinz Hopf (November 19, 1894 – June 3, 1971) was a mathematician born in Gräbschen, Germany. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Adolf Hurwitz Adolf Hurwitz (26 March 1859- 18 November 1919) was a German mathematician, and one of the most important figures in mathematics in the second half of the nineteenth century (according to Jean-Pierre Serre, always something good in Hurwitz). He was born in a Jewish family in Hildesheim... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Marcel Grossmann (born in Budapest on April 9th, 1878 - died in Zurich on September 7th, 1936) was a mathematician and a friend and classmate of Albert Einstein. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Philippe Kahn Philippe Kahn Working on the first camera-phones Philippe Kahn (born March 16, 1952)[1] is a French-born mathematician, technology innovator and entrepreneur known as the inventor of the camera phone, a pioneer in the wireless industry, and the founder of Starfish Software, LightSurf Technologies and Borland. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An entrepreneur (a loanword from French) is a person who undertakes and operates a new enterprise or venture and assumes some accountability for the inherent risks. ... An inventor is a person who creates new inventions, typically technical devices such as mechanical, electrical or software devices or methods. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Hermann Minkowski. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jürgen Moser (1928 – 1999) was a German mathematician who specialized in dynamical systems. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... John von Neumann in the 1940s. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Computer science (informally: CS or compsci) is, in its most general sense, the study of computation and information processing, both in hardware and in software. ... Hermann Amandus Schwarz, born 25 January 1843 in Hermsdorf, Germany, died 30 November 1921 in Berlin, was a mathematician. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... George Pólya (December 13, 1887 – September 7, 1985, in Hungarian Pólya György) was a Hungarian mathematician. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Hermann Weyl Hermann Weyl (November 9, 1885 – December 8, 1955) was a German mathematician. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Carl Gustav Jung Carl Gustav Jung (July 26, 1875 – June 6, 1961) was a Swiss psychiatrist and founder of the neopsychoanalytic school of psychology. ... A psychologist is a scientist and/or clinician who studies psychology, the systematic investigation of the human mind, including behavior and cognition. ... Demetrios Christodoulou (born October 19, 1951) is a mathematical physicist, well known in the field of general relativity for his proof, together with Sergiu Klainerman, of the nonlinear stability of the Minkowski vacuum. ... ... Rudolf Clausius - physicist and mathematician Rudolf Julius Emanuel Clausius (January 2, 1822 – August 24, 1888), was a German physicist and mathematician. ... ... Carl Culmann (July 10, 1821 - December 9, 1881) was a German structural engineer. ... Structural engineer is an individual who practices structural engineering. ... History Christian Menn is a well known and respected Civil Engineer from Bern, Switzerland who designs his bridges to be aesthetically pleasing. ... Structural engineer is an individual who practices structural engineering. ... Armand Borel (21 May 1923 - 11 August 2003) was a Swiss mathematician, born in La Chaux-de-Fonds, and was a permanent professor at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton from 1957 to 1993. ... 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See also

The Monster Clothespin from Outer Space, and entrance of the EPFL The École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) is the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne in Switzerland. ... The University of Zurich (in German: Universität Zürich) is the largest university of Switzerland, in the city of Zurich. ... The following is a list of universities in Switzerland: University of Basel (Basel) University of Berne (Bern) University of Fribourg (Fribourg) University of Geneva (Geneva) University of Neuchâtel (Neuchâtel) University of Lausanne (Lausanne) University of Lucerne (Lucerne) University of Lugano (Lugano) University of St. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
News (217 words)
ETH Zurich researchers have developed a new method that allows even the surfaces of living organisms to be examined quickly and simply.
ETH Zurich researchers can manufacture devices such as field-effect transistors simply and thus economically by using a novel process.
ETH Zurich researchers discover a new infection mechanism: Salmonellae exploit their host’s immune response to embed themselves into the intestine.
ETH Zurich - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1512 words)
The ETH Zurich, often called Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, is a science and technology university in the city of Zürich, Switzerland.
Education at ETH tends to be theoretically oriented with a high amount of mathematics involved throughout the courses.
Because this geographic situation substantially hindered the expansion of the ETH, a new campus was built from 1964 to 1976 on the Hönggerberg in the outskirts of the city.
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