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Encyclopedia > EMusic
eMusic
Image:eMusic logo.png
Opened: January, 1998
Pricing: Flag of the United States: Subscriptions starting at $9.99/month
Flag of the United Kingdom: Subscriptions starting at £8.99/month
Flag of Europe: Subscriptions starting at 12.99/month
Platforms: MP3s downloadable in any platform; open-source clients available for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux
Format: MP3 (.mp3)
Restrictions: None
Catalogue: 2,500,000+
Preview: 30 seconds
Streaming: m3u
Trial: 14 days, 25 tracks or 50 tracks or 100 tracks
Protocol: Hypertext Transfer Protocol (http://)
Availability: United States, Canada, Europe
Features: Booster packs
Website: www.emusic.com

EMusic is an online music store that operates by subscription. It is headquartered in New York, New York, and owned by Dimensional Associates, LLC. As of March 2007, eMusic is the second largest online music store and has over 250,000 subscribers.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... USD redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... An operating system (OS) is the software that manages the sharing of the resources of a computer and provides programmers with an interface used to access those resources. ... “Windows” redirects here. ... Mac OS X (IPA: ) is a line of graphical operating systems developed, marketed, and sold by Apple Inc. ... This article is about operating systems that use the Linux kernel. ... An audio file format is a container format for storing audio data on a computer system. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and other copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... Streaming media is multimedia that is continuously received by, and normally displayed to, the end-user while it is being delivered by the provider. ... This article is about characterizing and appraising something of interest. ... For other senses of this word, see protocol. ... HTTP (for HyperText Transfer Protocol) is the primary method used to convey information on the World Wide Web. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... The subscription business model is a business model that has long been used by magazines and record clubs, but the application of this model is spreading. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...


EMusic differs from other well-known subscription music services (such as Napster and Rhapsody) in that the files available for download are in the MP3 format, making them fully compatible with all digital music players, and free from digital rights management software restrictions such as expiration dates, or copying or CD burning limitations. Napster, LLC (NASDAQ: NAPS, formerly Roxio, Inc. ... Rhapsody is an online music service run by RealNetworks. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and other copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... A CD burner, CD recorder or CD writer is an internal or external writable Compact Disc drive that can be attached to a computer. ...


While lauded by many, the lack of digital rights management (DRM) encoding and low price model have made the service unappealing to the Big Four record labels, leading it to specialize in underground artists and non-mainstream music genres, including indie rock, pop, jazz, electronica, new age, underground rap, traditional music, classical music, and experimental music. Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and other copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... The world music market, or global music market consists of record companies, labels and publishers that distribute recorded music products internationally and that often control the rights to those products. ... Underground music is music which has developed a cult following, independent of commercial success. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Electronica refers to a wide range of contemporary electronic music designed for a wide range of uses, including foreground listening, some forms of dancing, and background music for other activities; but unlike electronic dance music, is not specifically focused on the dance floor. ... New Age music is a style of music originally associated with some New Age beliefs. ... Underground rap is a term sometimes used to describe forms of rap music which have little or no mainstream appeal, visibility or commercial presence. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... For experimental rock music, see experimental rock. ...

Contents

Files

Due to the contentious nature of DRM encoding utilized by competing download services, eMusic has won praise for not including any in their own files, despite the fact that it has cost them contracts with the major record labels. They have openly stated that this is a business move that has greatly aided the site's popularity.[2] As Apple does not currently license FairPlay--the DRM format compatible with their popular iPod player, used in files downloaded from their iTunes Music Store--doing away with such protections is the only means for a competing company to offer iPod-compatible downloads.[3] EMusic stores a record of user purchases on its internal servers, but does not place any purchaser information inside the tracks that are sold.[1] Digital rights management (DRM) is an umbrella term that refers to access control technologies used by publishers and other copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. ... A record label is a brand created by companies that specialize in manufacturing, distributing and promoting audio and video recordings, on various formats including compact discs, LPs, DVD-Audio, SACDs, and cassettes. ... Apple Inc. ... FairPlay is a digital rights management (DRM) technology created by Apple Inc. ... iPod is a brand of portable media player designed and marketed by Apple and launched in October 2001. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ITunes. ...


The record labels working with eMusic don't worry about file sharing of their music because eMusic users tend to be older, and less likely to engage in file sharing.[4][5] College students either couldn't or wouldn't pay for music online, so eMusic is more targeted at avid music fans.[5] Gene Rumsey, general manager of Concord Music Group, says eMusic fans are not the typical college-age file sharers. They are more rabid fans whom he believes are less likely to engage in online song swapping.[4] Serious music fans would also appreciate that musicians are actually paid for every download.[5] File sharing is the activity of making files available to other users for download over the Internet, but also over smaller networks. ...


The eMusic service uses LAME compression to produce variable bit rate MP3 files with an average bitrate of 192 kbit/s. [6] Look up lame in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Variable bit rate (VBR) is a term used in telecommunications and computing that relates to sound or video quality. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ...


Status

EMusic had 2,000,000 tracks available for download and sold over 100,000,000 tracks as of December 2006.[7] New subscribers receive 25 free downloads over a period of 14 days.[4] After the trial period, unless the user cancels, the trial account turns into a subscription account. Subscriptions allow users to download a number of tracks per month. As of March 2007 a basic package is US$ 9.99 per month (or 12.99 for eMusic Europe) for 30 downloads, with Plus and Premium subscriptions offering more downloads per month at higher prices. Every month the download limit is reset (regardless of how many songs were downloaded). EMusic also offers "booster packs" to subscribers, which expire after a year rather than after a month, and are consumed when subscribers download tracks beyond their monthly allotments. Earlier business models supported an "all-you-can-eat" downloading pattern. For a monthly fee, customers were able to download as many tracks as they wished from the service. As the since-deleted customer fora documented, eMusic regularly disciplined customers--including canceling their contracts--who downloaded more tracks than eMusic thought reasonable within the "all-you-can-eat" framework. USD redirects here. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ...


EMusic caters to an older audience with the average subscriber being 39 who subscribes for at least a year.[2] Older listeners may also be drawn because arguably "adult" genres of music--classical, jazz--are typically represented by longer tracks than such "younger" genres as punk and hence reward cost-conscious consumer seeking out bargains for their alloted 30 downloads per month.


Selection

Most of eMusic's contracts are with independent labels, giving the service a reputation for primarily offering indie rock, indie pop, punk rock, jazz and classical music. EMusic highlights its offerings through a host of exclusive editorial content, along the lines of monthly "editor's picks", columns and guides. The company also cites statistics from the American Association of Independent Music that independents' market share of CD sales is 28%.[4] Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other meanings of the term, see column (disambiguation). ... For the concept of a guide, see guide. ...


With the "big four" record labels--Sony BMG, Universal Music Group, EMI and Warner Music Group--unwilling to do business with the site[4], many popular artists are either unrepresented or have very few releases available. This is more of a problem in the genres of Top 40 rock and rap music, and less so in genres such as jazz, where major artists spread their output across multiple, smaller labels. This allows the site to feature some acclaimed recordings by artists such as Thelonious Monk, Sonny Rollins, Miles Davis, and John Coltrane. Bertelsmann is a transnational media corporation founded in 1835, based in G tersloh, Germany. ... Universal Music Group (UMG) is the largest business group and family of record labels in the recording industry. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Top 40 is a radio format based on frequent repetition of songs from a constantly-updated list of the forty best-selling singles. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... Theodore Walter Sonny Rollins (born September 7, 1930 in New York City) is an American jazz tenor saxophonist. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... “Coltrane” redirects here. ...


The site's alternative (or "indie") rock selection has also been aided by the rise in widely-distributed but privately owned "minor" labels, such as Kill Rock Stars and Matador Records, who have a fair amount of big-name talent on their rolls (i.e. Cat Power, The Decemberists, Interpol and Sleater-Kinney, who have been among eMusic's top-sellers). Music from other popular indie labels includes Merge Records (Spoon, Arcade Fire, Lambchop), Epitaph Records (Bad Religion, NOFX), K Records (Modest Mouse, Built To Spill), Touch and Go Records (Mekons, Girls Against Boys), and TVT Records (Lil Jon, Ying Yang Twins, Guided By Voices). Alternative music redirects here. ... Kill Rock Stars is an independent record label founded in 1991 by Slim Moon and based in Olympia, Washington, United States, though it will be moving some of its operations to New York City and Portland, Oregon in 2007. ... Matador Records is a record label, famous for a roster of highly-respected indie rock artists and bands. ... Cat Power is the stage name of American singer/songwriter Charlyn Chan Marshall (born Charlyn Marie Marshall on 21 January 1972). ... The Decemberists are a five-piece indie pop band from Portland, Oregon, fronted by singer/songwriter Colin Meloy . ... For the international organisation, see Interpol. ... Sleater-Kinney are an indie rock trio from Olympia, Washington influenced by the riot grrrl movement of the 1990s. ... Merge Records is an independent record label based in Durham, North Carolina. ... Lead singer Britt Daniel Spoon is an American indie rock band from Austin, Texas. ... Arcade Fire (often known as The Arcade Fire) is an indie rock band from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Lamb chop has several meanings: For the television sock-puppet character, see Lamb Chop. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... K Records is an independent record label in Olympia, Washington, co-founded, owned, and operated by Calvin Johnson, formerly of the bands Cool Rays, Beat Happening, The Go Team, The Halo Benders and, at present, in the band Dub Narcotic Sound System. ... Template:Lyricwiki Modest Mouse is an American indie rock band. ... Built to Spill is an American indie rock band based in Boise, Idaho. ... Touch and Go Records is an independent record label based in Chicago, Illinois, USA, which began life in 1979 in East Lansing, Michigan as a magazine put out by Tesco Vee. ... TVT Records is an independent record label founded in 1985 by Steve Gottlieb. ...


In 1999, eMusic made headlines by releasing one of the first internet-only albums by a major artist: Long Tall Weekend by They Might Be Giants.[8] The band would also go on to release a series of monthly, exclusive rarities collections (known as "TMBG Unlimited") through the service in 2001 and 2002.[5] John Flansburgh said that "Getting a half dozen or dozen unreleased songs out each month provides an ‘ultimate fan club’ experience."[5] Long Tall Weekend was an Internet-only album by They Might Be Giants and was released in 1999 (see 1999 in music). ... This article is about the musical group. ... Rarities may refer to the following musical albums: Rarities (1978), by the Beatles Rarities (1980), by the Beatles Rarities (1995), by Roxette Rarities (1997), by The Presidents of the United States of America Rarities (2005), by the Indigo Girls Rarities (2006), by Kinky B-Sides and Rarities, the name of... John Conant Flansburgh (born May 6, 1960) is an actor and musician from Brooklyn, New York (though born and raised in Lincoln, Massachusetts). ...


In June 2006, eMusic added new music from V2 Records in the U.S. The label is one of eMusic's highest-profile additions thus far, with multiplatinum acts Moby and The White Stripes, along with critical favorites such as Grandaddy.[9] However, this music is not available to eMusic users in many other countries. V2 Records (or V2 Music) is a record label that was started in 1996 by Richard Branson, five years after he sold Virgin Records to EMI. Over the years V2 acquired Junior Boys Own, Gee Street Records, Blue Dog Records, and Big Cat Records. ... Not to be confused with Mooby. ... This article is about the American duo. ... Grandaddy was an indie rock group from Modesto, California, United States. ...


On August 10, 2006, eMusic added two European versions of its online store: 'eMusic UK' and 'eMusic Europe'. Current subscribers to the global site that were within the European Union had their membership transferred to the appropriate European store. EMusic UK and eMusic Europe have markedly inflated prices compared to their North American counterpart, partially due to the extra sales taxes which these stores are now subject to, which was particularly noted by customers forced to transfer. However, the changeover also included access to labels not available to non-European customers, notably London-based Domino Records. The changeover also includes many works previously unavailable to European customers, such as music from The White Stripes and Mogwai. However, some artists previously available, such as Vienna Teng, became unavailable to UK subscribers, even if they had purchased them previously. It is also notable that the European version of the store is for customers within the European Union, not customers within Europe. is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Domino Records is an independent record label based in London. ... This article is about the American duo. ... For the Swiss progressive house producer who releases under the name Moogwai, see Chab. ... Album cover for Waking Hour Vienna Teng (born on October 3, 1978) is an Taiwanese-American pianist and singer-songwriter based in San Francisco. ...


In June 2007, eMusic added perhaps its biggest star yet to its lineup: Paul McCartney of The Beatles. The album in question, Memory Almost Full, is also the first release on Starbucks' Hear Music label. Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Memory Almost Full is a studio album by Paul McCartney released in the United Kingdom on June 4, 2007 and in the United States a day later. ... For other meanings of the name Starbuck, see Starbuck. ... Hear Music is the brand name of Starbucks retail music concept. ...


The eMusicLive Venue Network is 22 independent clubs in the US where live shows are recorded and offered to eMusic subscribers. Numerous shows are recorded every week. In addition to subscription sales, recorded CDs are offered for sale at the venue immediately after the event. EMusic plans to establish kiosks where the music can be delivered directly to MP3 players or flash drives. [10]


Beginning September 18, 2007, eMusic began offering audiobooks in MP3 format. [11]


Incarnations and ownership

The original eMusic was started in March 1995 by Mark Chasan[12] as the fourth online CD retailer. EMusic and Nordic Music (owned by Kent Kiefer) formed a joint venture in February 1998 to become the first digital media retailer and sold the first MP3 players on the internet. EMusic, then headed by Chasan and Kiefer, purchased Guy Giuliano's internet radio service GBS Radio Networks. The new consortium launched the first online radio network LoudRadio, to broadcast over a terrestrial radio station via KLOD-FM in Flagstaff, Arizona. Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Nickname: Location in Coconino County the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State County Coconino County Government  - Mayor Joseph C. Donaldson Area  - City  98. ...


The company now known as eMusic was founded by Gene Hoffman and Bob Kohn on January 8, 1998 and originally named GoodNoise Corporation. In October 1998, GoodNoise acquired eMusic.com along with on-line music pioneer Internet Underground Music Archive (IUMA). In November 1999, eMusic acquired main rival Cductive[13] and in December 1999 acquired Tunes.com, which operated Rollingstone.com and DownBeatJazz.com. Then in 2001, the major label Universal Music (then a division of Vivendi Universal) bought eMusic.com for USD 24.6 million.[14] Bob Kohn currently serves as founder, Chairman & CEO of RoyaltyShare, Inc. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Cductive was a pioneering online music store that was founded in 1996 by Thomas V. Ryan, John Rigos, and Alan Manuel. ... The following is a partial list of record labels, both past and present. ... Universal Music Group (UMG) is the largest major label in the record industry, with a 23% market share. ... Vivendi Universal (VU) is a French conglomerate active in media and communications with activities in music, television and film, publishing, telecommunications and the Internet. ...


In November 2003 the service was purchased from VU Net USA by a New York-based private equity arm of JDS Capital Management, Inc.[15] Following a contentious period during which customer fora were frozen and information disseminated by the company limited, it was relaunched in 2004.


References

  1. ^ NEW BARENAKED LADIES SONG IS ABOUT EMUSIC'S 100 MILLIONTH DOWNLOADER. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  2. ^ a b Anderson, Nate. "Making money selling music without DRM: the rise of eMusic", Ars Technica, 2006-05-22. Retrieved on 2006-09-04. 
  3. ^ About Us. eMusic. Retrieved on 2006-09-04.
  4. ^ a b c d e Graham, Jefferson. "EMusic's pitch: Download song — and own it", USA Today, 2006-07-30. Retrieved on 2006-09-04. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Viveiros, Beth Negus. "Finely TUNED", DIRECT magazine, 2001-09-01. 
  6. ^ Emusic Technical Help. Retrieved on 2007-03-13.
  7. ^ eMusic sells 100 Million downloads; Catalogue surpasses 2 Million tracks (2006-12-13). Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  8. ^ "EMUSIC.COM & YAHOO! TO HOST EXCLUSIVE WEB-LAUNCH OF 'THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS' NEW MP3-ONLY ALBUM JULY 19", 1999-07-19. Retrieved on 2006-09-04. 
  9. ^ eMUSIC ADDS V2 MUSIC, PALM PICTURES AND VELOUR MUSIC. eMusic (2006-06-15). Retrieved on 2006-09-04.
  10. ^ "eMusic venues". Retrieved on 2007-03-24. 
  11. ^ "eMUSIC INTRODUCES WORLD'S FIRST AUDIOBOOKS CATALOGUE IN MP3". Retrieved on 2007-10-01. 
  12. ^ "Music to their Ears: Virtual CD Stores", BusinessTown.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-04. 
  13. ^ eMusic.com to Acquire Cductive.com. eMusic (1999-11-22). Retrieved on 2006-09-04.
  14. ^ Evans, James. "eMusic Bought by Universal for $24.6 Million", PC World, 2001-04-09. Retrieved on 2006-09-04. 
  15. ^ "New York-Based Private Equity Firm Finalizes Purchase of eMusic", eMusic, 2003-11-04. Retrieved on 2006-09-04. 
  • eMusic February 6, 2006 press release, "eMusic—World's Largest Digital Retailer of Independent Music—Begins Reporting Download Sales to Soundscan", February 6, 2006

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See also

  • Category:Online music stores - A list of eMusic's competitors

External links


 
 

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