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Encyclopedia > EDSA III
Series of attempts
at regime change
in the Philippines
(1970–2006)

Civil unrest (1970)
People Power (1986)
Claim of Tolentino (1986)
Honasan's First (1987)
Honasan's Second (1989)
Fall of Estrada (2001)
May 1 riots (2001)
July 27 mutiny (2003)
February 24 coup (2006)
The First Quarter Storm was a period of unrest in the Philippines, composed of a series of heavy demonstrations, protests, and marches against the government from January to March 1970, two years before the Philippines were placed under martial law. ... The EDSA Revolution, also referred to as the People Power Revolution and the Philippine Revolution of 1986, was a mostly nonviolent mass demonstration in the Philippines. ... Arturo M. Tolentino Arturo M. Tolentino (September 19, 1910 – August 2, 2004) was a prominent political figure in the Philippines. ... Gregorio Ballesteros Gringo Honasan (born Baguio City, 14 March 1948) was a senator of the Philippines, elected in 1995 and reelected in 2001, until his term ended in 2004. ... Gregorio Ballesteros Gringo Honasan (born Baguio City, 14 March 1948) was a senator of the Philippines, elected in 1995 and reelected in 2001, until his term ended in 2004. ... EDSA II (pronounced as Edsa dos), also called by the local media as the Second People Power Revolution, is the common name of the four-day popular revolution that peacefully overthrew Philippine president Joseph Estrada in January 2001. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... The Oakwood Mutiny was a mutiny that occurred in the Philippines on July 27, 2003. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Philippines is currently under a state of emergency, announced by presidential spokeperson Ignacio Bunye on the morning of February 24, 2006. ...

EDSA III (pronounced EDSA Tres), as was touted by some members of the Philippine media, was a very large protest rally that was sparked by the arrest in April 2001 of newly deposed President Joseph Estrada of the Philippines. The rally was held for several days in a major highway in Metro Manila, the Epifanio de los Santos Avenue or EDSA, which eventually turned into a march to Mendiola Street in Manila, which is near the Malacanang presidential palace. Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... A man carries a sign at the September 24, 2005 anti-war protest, a demonstration in Washington, D.C. American Civil Rights March on Washington, leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial, August 28, 1963. ... The Chicago Police Department arrests a man A protester is arrested during a demonstration. ... The President of the Philippines is the head of state and government of the Republic of the Philippines. ... José Marcelo Ejército a. ... Epifanio de los Santos Avenue (EDSA) Epifanio de los Santos Avenue (also known as EDSA) is the main road in Metro Manila, Philippines. ... Mendiola Street is a short thoroughfare in the district of San Miguel in Manila, the capital of the Philippines. ... Another View of Malacañan Palace, with the renovation to the facade during the Macapagal administration; this photo is of the palace before 1978 reconstruction. ...

Contents


Events

April 30

See also 2001 EDSA Revolution EDSA II (pronounced as Edsa dos), also called by the local media as the Second People Power Revolution, is the common name of the four-day popular revolution that peacefully overthrew Philippine president Joseph Estrada in January 2001. ...


The crowd of an alleged several hundred thousand people (although according to Iglesia ni Cristo-owned broadcast network Net 25 and to Senator Sotto, a high of over 3 million in the evening of April 30th), most of whom were members of the masses and large members of the Iglesia ni Cristo who supported Estrada, gathered at the EDSA Shrine, the site of the January EDSA II revolt which had toppled Estrada from the presidency. Iglesia ni Cristos first chapel The Iglesia ni Cristo (IPA: ) (also known as INC, Iglesia ni Manalo, or Iglesya ni Kristo ; Filipino for Church of Christ) is a nontrinitarian independent religious organization which originated in the Philippines. ... New Era Television (commonly known as Net 25) is the UHF Television network of Eagle Broadcasting Corporation (EBC), the broadcast division of the Philippine religious group, Iglesia ni Cristo. ... The EDSA Shrine (official name: Our Lady of Peace Quasi-Parish) is a small church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Manila located at the intersection of Ortigas Avenue and Epifanio de los Santos Avenue (EDSA) in Quezon City. ... The EDSA II revolution is depicted on the 200-peso bill. ...


The protest was led by members of the political opposition of the time, most notably Senators Juan Ponce Enrile, Miriam Defensor Santiago and Vicente Sotto III. Juan Ponce Enrile (born February 14, 1924) is a political figure in the Philippines. ... Miriam Defensor-Santiago Dr. Miriam Defensor Santiago (born June 15, 1945) is a politician and senator of the Philippines. ... Vicente C. Tito Sotto III (born August 24, 1948) is a former senator in the Philippines Congress. ...


May 1

The rally aimed to remove Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from the presidency and to reinstate Estrada. The rally came to a head on the morning of May 1st, 2001 when thousands of protesters stormed towards Malacanang Palace, the presidential residence; government soldiers and the policemen dispersed the marchers, causing violence. Several broadcast vans of ABS-CBN were torched by members of the crowd, while others attacked the police and soldiers with rocks, sticks, and pipes. The police and military responded with force after implementing a "maximum tolerance" policy, which led to the injury of many of the protesters. Among those arrested in the riot, 2/3 were devotees of Iglesia ni Cristo, to the surprise of the government, since there have been negotiations prior that INC will pull out its members from the rally.[1] Gloria Macaraeg Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947) is the 14th and current president of the Philippines. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Depiction of the Malacañang Palace at the back of the 20-peso bill. ... Seal of the Armed Forces of the Philippines The Armed Forces of the Philippines or AFP (Sandatahan Lakas ng Pilipinas in Filipino) originated in the revolutionary battles during Philippine War of Independence against Spain. ... The Philippine National Police is the National police force of the Republic of the Philippines. ... Categories: Corporation stubs | Philippines | Television networks ...


Aftermath

The neutrality of this section is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.

Hours after the crowds of EDSA III were dispersed, civic-minded citizens trooped to EDSA, only to be greeted by such grave acts of vandalism. There were garbage everywhere and the vicinity stank of human waste. Even the reliefs on the EDSA Shrine, which was created in commemoration of the 1986 Revolution, were not spared, some of them missing parts. Volunteers from all over Metro Manila spent the next twenty four hours or so cleaning up the entire place. Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ...


That the event was called "EDSA III," styled after the 1986 EDSA Revolution and the 2001 EDSA Revolution is not consistent among observers. Some argue that while this was a major protest, the spirit of it was unlike the first and second protests. Yellow journalism alleges that EDSA's I and II's participants were made up of more well-to-do civilians as compared to those who participated in EDSA III. Other arguments also point to the success of the first two to remove the presidents targeted, versus this event's failure to do so. The EDSA Revolution, also referred to as the People Power Revolution and the Philippine Revolution of 1986, was a mostly nonviolent mass demonstration in the Philippines. ... EDSA II (pronounced as Edsa dos), also called by the local media as the Second People Power Revolution, is the common name of the four-day popular revolution that peacefully overthrew Philippine president Joseph Estrada in January 2001. ...


External link

  • Ralliers tell their stories

  Results from FactBites:
 
1986 EDSA Revolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3088 words)
Enrile crossed EDSA from Camp Aguinaldo to Camp Crame amidst cheers from the crowd.
While the EDSA Revolution is almost universally acknowledged as a great example of democracy at work, many political scientists and sociologists have commented that the Philippines has largely failed to actualize the possible gains from a fresh change in government, including the new constitution.
EDSA II resulted in the downfall of Estrada's administration, the extreme polarization of Philippine society, and the dilution of the concept of "People Power".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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