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Encyclopedia > E. Nesbit
Edith Nesbit

Born: August 15, 1858
Kennington, Surrey
Died: May 4, 1924
New Romney, Kent
Occupation(s): Writer, poet

Edith Nesbit (married name Edith Bland; August 15, 1858 - May 4, 1924) was an English author and poet whose children's works were published under the androgynous name of E. Nesbit. She wrote or collaborated on over 60 books of fiction for children, several of which have been adapted for film and television. She started a new genre, of magical adventures arising from everyday settings, and has been much imitated. She was also a political activist and co-founded the Fabian Society, a precursor to the modern Labour Party. Image File history File links Nesbit. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Kennington is an area of south London, situated within the London Borough of Lambeth. ... Not to be confused with Surry. ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Map sources for New Romney at grid reference TR0624 New Romney is a small seaside town in Kent, England. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (125th in leap years). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ... The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

Biography

She was born in 1858 at 38 Lower Kennington Lane in Kennington, she was born a gemini Surrey (now part of Greater London), the daughter of a schoolteacher, John Collis Nesbit, who died in March 1862, before her fourth birthday. Her sister Mary's ill health meant that the family moved around constantly for some years, living variously in Brighton, Buckinghamshire, France (Dieppe, Rouen, Paris, Tours, Poitiers, Angouleme, Bordeaux, Arcachon, Pau, Bagneres de Bigorre, and Dinan in Brittany), Spain and Germany, before settling for three years at Halstead Hall in Halstead in north-west Kent, a location which later inspired The Railway Children. 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Kennington is an area of south London, situated within the London Borough of Lambeth. ... Not to be confused with Surry. ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ... Dieppe is a town and commune in the Seine-Maritime département of Haute-Normandie (eastern Normandy), France. ... Rouen Cathedral The entrance to Rouen Cathedral Abbey church of Saint-Ouen, (chevet) in Rouen Rouen, medieval house Rouen (pronounced in French, sometimes also ) is the historical capital city of Normandy, in northwestern France on the River Seine, and presently the capital of the Haute-Normandie (Upper Normandy) région. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Tours is a city in France, the préfecture (capital city) of the Indre-et-Loire département, on the lower reaches of the river Loire, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast. ... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a small city located in west central France. ... Angoulême is a town in southwestern France, préfecture ( capital city) of the Charente département. ... New city flag (traditional tri-crescent) City coat of arms Motto: The fleur-de-lis alone rules over the moon, the waves, the castle, and the lion Location Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Aquitaine Département Gironde (33) Intercommunality Urban Community of Bordeaux Mayor... Arcachon is a resort town on the Atlantic coast of southwest France. ... Pau is a town of southwestern France, préfecture (capital) of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département. ... Bagnères-de-Bigorre is a commune of southwestern France, in the Hautes-Pyrénées département, of which it is a sous_préfecture. ... Steep street from Dinan to the river Dinan is a walled Breton town and a commune in the Côtes-dArmor département, France. ... Brittany has an expansive coastline Flag of Brittany (Gwenn-ha-du) Historical province of Brittany région of Bretagne, see Bretagne. ... Halstead is a village in Kent, England located approximately 3 miles south of Orpington and 4 miles north of Sevenoaks. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... The Railway Children is a childrens book by Edith Nesbit. ...


When Nesbit was 17, the family moved again, this time back to London, living variously in South East London at Eltham, Lewisham, Grove Park and Lee. Eltham, London, England Eltham, New Zealand, Taranaki, New Zealand Eltham, Victoria, Australia This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Lewisham is an area within the London Borough of Lewisham in south-east London. ... Grove Park is an area in the south-eastern corner of the London Borough of Lewisham. ... Lee is a place in the London Borough of Lewisham in south-east London. ...


A follower of William Morris, 19-year-old Nesbit met bank clerk Hubert Bland in 1877. Seven months pregnant, she married Bland on 22 April 1880, though she did not immediately live with him, as Bland initially continued to live with his mother. Their marriage was an open one. Bland also continued an affair with Alice Hoatson which produced two children (Rosamund in 1886 and John in 1899), both of whom Nesbit raised as her own. Her own children were Paul Bland (1880-1940), to whom The Railway Children was dedicated; Iris Bland (1881-19??); and Fabian Bland (1885-1900), who died aged 15 after a tonsil operation, and to whom she dedicated Five Children And It and its sequels, as well as The Story of the Treasure Seekers and its sequels. William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris, publisher Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ... Hubert Bland Hubert Bland (3 January 1855-14 April 1914) was an early English socialist and one of the founders of the Fabian Society. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... April 22 is the 112th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (113th in leap years). ... 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Open marriage typically refers to a marriage in which the partners agree that each is free to engage in extramarital sexual relationships, without regarding this as sexual infidelity. ... The Railway Children is a childrens book by Edith Nesbit. ... The Palatine tonsils with the soft palate, uvula, and tongue visible. ... Five Children and It is a childrens book by Edith Nesbit, first published in 1902. ...


Nesbit and Bland were among the founders of the Fabian Society (a precursor to the Labour Party) in 1884. Their son Fabian was named after the society. They also jointly edited the Society's journal Today; Hoatson was the Society's assistant secretary. Nesbit and Bland also dallied briefly with the Social Democratic Federation, but rejected it as too radical. Nesbit was an active lecturer and prolific writer on socialism during the 1880s. Nesbit also wrote with her husband under the name "Fabian Bland"[1], though this activity dwindled as her success as a children's author grew. The Fabian Society is a British socialist intellectual movement, whose purpose is to advance the socialist cause by reformist, rather than revolutionary, means. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British political party. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ...


Nesbit lived from 1899 to 1920 in Well Hall House, Eltham, Kent (now in south-east Greater London). On 20 February 1917, some three years after Bland died, Nesbit married Thomas "the Skipper" Tucker, a ship's engineer. 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Eltham is a place in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... February 20 is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


Towards the end of her life she moved to a house called "Crowlink" in Friston, East Sussex, and later to St Mary's Bay in Romney Marsh, East Kent. Suffering from lung cancer, probably a result of her heavy smoking, she died in 1924 at New Romney, Kent, and was buried in the churchyard of St Mary in the Marsh. Friston is a village in Suffolk, England. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... The Romney Marsh is a sparsely-populated wetland area in the counties of Kent and East Sussex in the south-east of England. ... Lung cancer is a cancer of the lungs characterized by the presence of malignant tumours. ... Map sources for New Romney at grid reference TR0624 New Romney is a small seaside town in Kent, England. ...

E. Nesbit's grave in St Mary in the Marsh's churchyard bears a grave marker shaped like goal posts, giving both her pseudonym "E. Nesbit" and her name "Edith Bland". (There is also a memorial plaque to her inside the church.) Fantasy fiction author F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre is seen here visiting E. Nesbit's grave. MacIntyre credits E. Nesbit as an influence on his own fiction.
E. Nesbit's grave in St Mary in the Marsh's churchyard bears a grave marker shaped like goal posts, giving both her pseudonym "E. Nesbit" and her name "Edith Bland". (There is also a memorial plaque to her inside the church.) Fantasy fiction author F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre is seen here visiting E. Nesbit's grave. MacIntyre credits E. Nesbit as an influence on his own fiction.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1560, 325 KB)http://en. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1560, 325 KB)http://en. ... F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre (center) is seen here at the London offices of The Spectator with (left) Boris Johnson, Member of Parliament for Henley-on-Thames, and (right) Arthur Wellesley, Marquess of Douro OBE, chairman of Richemont Holdings UK. Fergus (also Feargus) Gwynplaine MacIntyre. ...

Literature

Nesbit's literary output was tremendous. Writing by herself, she published about 40 books for children: either novels or collections of stories. Collaborating with others, she published almost as many more, as well as a great deal of hack journalism that remains largely uncollected. A hack writer is a writer for hire, paid to express others thoughts or opinions in felicitous verbiage, often in the form of political pamphlets. ...


Nesbit's books for children are known for being entertaining without turning didactic, although some of her earlier works, notably Five Children and It and even more so The Story of the Amulet, veer in that direction. Some of them clearly display her socialist politics, notably "Harding's Luck" and "The House of Arden", which use time travel to make points about historical progress or (in her view) the lack of it. Five Children and It is a childrens book by Edith Nesbit, first published in 1902. ... The Story of the Amulet is a novel for children, written in 1906 by E. Nesbit. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ...


According to her biographer Julia Briggs, Nesbit was "the first modern writer for children": "(Nesbit) helped to reverse the great tradition of children's literature inaugurated by [Lewis] Carroll, [George] MacDonald and Kenneth Grahame, in turning away from their secondary worlds to the tough truths to be won from encounters with things-as-they-are, previously the province of adult novels." Briggs also credits Nesbit with having invented the children's adventure story. Lewis Carroll. ... George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ... Kenneth Grahame Kenneth Grahame (March 8, 1859 – July 6, 1932) was a Scottish novelist. ... A fictional universe is a cohesive imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ...


Among Nesbit's best-known books are The Story of the Treasure Seekers (1898) and The Wouldbegoods (1899), which both recount stories about the Bastables, a fictional middle class family that has fallen on relatively hard times; Nesbit likely styled them upon her own childhood family. Nesbit's children's writing also included numerous plays and collections of verse. The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ... Verse is a writing that uses meter as its primary organisational mode, as opposed to prose, which uses grammatical and discoursal units like sentences and paragraphs. ...


She also popularized an innovative style of children's fantasy that combined realistic, contemporary children in real-world settings with magical objects and adventures. In doing so, she was a direct or indirect influence on many subsequent writers, including P.L. Travers (author of Mary Poppins), Edward Eager, Diana Wynne Jones and J.K. Rowling. C.S. Lewis wrote of her influence on his Narnia series and mentions the Bastable children in The Magician's Nephew. Michael Moorcock would go to write a series of steampunk novels with an adult Oswald Bastable (of The Treasure Seekers) as the lead character. ... This article is about the Mary Poppins series of childrens books. ... Edward McMaken Eager (1911 – October 23, 1964) was an American author who made a distinct contribution to childrens literature by introducing a theme of magic into the lives of ordinary children. ... Diana Wynne Jones (born London August 16, 1934) is a British writer, principally of fantasy novels for children and adults, as well as a small amount of non-fiction. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born July 31, 1965 in Chipping Sodbury, South Gloucestershire), commonly known as J.K. Rowling (pronunciation: roll-ing; her former students used to joke with her name calling her the Rolling Stone), is a British fiction writer. ... Clive Staples Lewis (November 29, 1898 – November 22, 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an author and scholar. ... The cover to an audio book edition of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis, with artwork by Leo and Diane Dillon The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... Michael John Moorcock (born December 18, 1939) is a prolific English writer primarily of science fiction and science fantasy who has also published a number of literary novels. ... A rocket lands on the moon in Le Voyage dans la Lune, the film adaptation of Jules Vernes From the Earth to the Moon. ...


Selected works

The Pilot (aka The One where Monica Gets a Roommate, The One where it all Began, The First One) is the very first episode of the television situation comedy Friends. ... Five Children and It is a childrens book by Edith Nesbit, first published in 1902. ... The Phoenix and the Carpet is a novel for children, written in 1904 by E. Nesbit. ... The Story of the Amulet is a novel for children, written in 1906 by E. Nesbit. ... The Railway Children is a childrens book by Edith Nesbit. ... The Enchanted Castle is a book was published in 1907 by Edith Nesbit. ... The Magic City is a childrens book by Edith Nesbit, first published in 1910. ... Towering over the city of Naples, Vesuvius is dormant but certainly not extinct .A dormant volcano is one which is not currently erupting, but is believed to still be capable of erupting. ...

References

  1. ^ The Prophet's Mantle (1885), a fictional story inspired by the life of Peter Kropotkin in London.

Peter Kropotkin Prince Peter Alexeevich Kropotkin (In Russian Пётр Алексе́евич Кропо́ткин) (December 9, 1842 - February 8, 1921) was one of Russias foremost anarchists and one of the first advocates of what he called anarchist communism: the model of society he advocated for most of his life was that of a communalist society...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
The New York Review of Books: The Writing of E. Nesbit (1912 words)
Born in 1858, Edith Nesbit was the daughter of the head of a British agricultural college.
Nesbit's usual device is to take a family of children ranging in age from a baby to a child of ten or eleven and then involve them in adventures, either magical or realistic (never both at the same time).
Nesbit's vow to survive somehow in the enemy's consciousness became, finally, her art—when this you see remember me—and the child within continued to the end of the adult's life.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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