FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > E. H. Crump

Edward Hull Crump (October 2, 1874October 16, 1954) was a Memphis, Tennessee insurance broker, businessman, and political figure in the early 20th century. October 2nd is the 275th day (276th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 90 days remaining. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... October 16 is the 289th day of the year (290th in Leap years). ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... City nickname: The River City or The Bluff City Location in the state of Tennessee County Shelby County, Tennessee Area  - Total  - Water 763. ... Insurance is a system to alleviate financial losses by transferring risk of loss from one entity to another. ... Politics is the process and method of making decisions for groups. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


A native of Holly Springs, Mississippi, Crump moved to Memphis in 1892 and became a successful businessman, and began to make the political connections that would serve him for the rest of his life. He was a delegate to the Tennessee Democratic State Convention in 1902 and 1904. In 1905 he was named to the municipal Board of Public Works, and Commissioner of Fire and Police in 1907. Holly Springs is a city located in Marshall County, Mississippi. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... 1902 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Starting in the 1910s Crump began to build a political machine which came to have statewide influence. He was particularly adept in his use of what were at the time essentially two political minority groups in Tennessee, blacks and Republicans. Unlike most Southern Democrats of his era, Crump was not opposed to blacks voting – as long as they always voted his way. Blacks were reliable Crump machine voters for the most part, serving roughly the same role for him that recent immigrants did in most Northern political machines. Crump also skillfully manipulated Republicans, who were numerically very weak in the western two-thirds of the state but dominated politics in East Tennessee. Often they found it necessary to ally themselves with Crump in order to accomplish any of their goals, and they often did. Events and trends Science Einsteins theory of general relativity Max von Laue discovers the diffraction of x-rays by crystals Alfred Wegener puts forward his theory of continental drift War, peace and politics Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary leads to World War I October Revolution in... A political machine is an unofficial system of political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, and behind-the-scenes control within the structure of a representative democracy. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Southern United States or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ...


Crump was very influential for nearly half a century. He preferred to work for the most part behind the scenes, serving only three terms of two years each as mayor of Memphis (19101916) at the beginning of his career, but essentially naming the next several mayors. His rise to prominence disturbed many of the state political leaders in Nashville; the "Ouster Law", designed to remove officials who refused to enforce state laws, was passed primarily with Crump and his lax enforcement of state Prohibition in mind. He was county treasurer of Shelby County from 1917 to 1923. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention a total of seven times. A mayor (from the Latin maīor, meaning larger,greater) is the politician who serves as chief executive official of some types of municipalities. ... 1910 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1916 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ... Downtown Nashville at dusk, viewed from the Gateway Bridge Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... Shelby County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... 1917 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1923 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ...


After several years of working behind the scenes, Crump decided to run for Congress in 1930. He was easily elected to the former Tenth District, which was co-extensive with Shelby County. He served two terms, March 4, 1931January 3, 1935. (During his service the Twentieth Amendment was ratified, redefining the starting dates of Congressional and Presidential terms.) During this time he was also a regent of the Smithsonian Institution. He remained hugely influential in Memphis as well, staying in constant communication with his operatives there and visiting during all Congressional recesses. The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1931 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1935 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Amendment XX (the Twentieth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, also called The Lame Duck Amendment, establishes some details of presidential succession and of the beginning and ending of the terms of elected federal officials. ... President of the United States - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The Smithsonian castle, as seen through the garden gate. ...


In 1936 he was named to the Democratic National Committee, serving on that body until 1945. In 1939 he was elected to a final term as mayor. 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Democratic National Committee is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


His statewide influence began to wane in the late 1940s, when two of his opponents were elected to office in 1948, Gordon Browning, a onetime protege who had broken with him returning to become governor again, and Estes Kefauver being elected to the United States Senate. For the remainder of his life, the bulk of his influence was limited to Memphis. The defeat of his longtime associate Kenneth McKellar by Albert Gore, Sr. for United States Senate in 1952 marked another turning point, and the days of his massive influence over Tennessee politics were over, his death coming less than two years later. He was interred at Memphis' Elmwood Cemetery. Centuries: 19th century - 20th century - 21st century Decades: 1890s 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s - 1940s - 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s Years: 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 Events and trends Technology First nuclear bomb First cruise missile, the V1 flying bomb and the first ballistic missile, the... 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Gordon Weaver Browning (November 22, 1895–May 23, 1976) was an American politician who represented Tennessee in the United States Congress and was later Governor of Tennessee from 1937 to 1939 and again from 1949 to 1953. ... A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... Estes Kefauver Carey Estes Kefauver (July 26, 1903 - August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Another Kenneth McKellar was a famous Scottish singer. ... Albert Gore Sr. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 1952 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Historic Elmwood Cemetery, founded in 1852 is the oldest active cemetery in Memphis, Tennessee. ...


However, Crump's marks on Memphis can be seen even today. Crump was a strong supporter of fire service and for many years the Memphis Fire Department was considered one of the very best in a medium-sized city and is still quite well-regarded. He felt separate operations for each municipal utility were inherently inefficient; today the Memphis Division of Light, Gas, & Water is one of the largest combined municipal utilites in the United States. He believed that cities should not be unnecessarily noisy; Memphis has strong noise ordinances that are more aggressively enforced than those of many other jurisidictions. He was one of the early supporters of automobile safety inspections in the Deep South; all Mempis-registered vehicles are inspected annually (twice a year until the 1990s). Although many of these innovations are said to have benefited Crump personally in one way or another, it is inarguable that they have benefited the city of Memphis greatly as well. This article is about utility in economics and in game theory. ... A small variety of cars, the most popular kind of automobile. ... Events and trends Technology Explosive growth of the Internet; decrease in the cost of computers and other technology Reduction in size and cost of mobile phones leads to a massive surge in their popularity Year 2000 problem (commonly known as Y2K) Microsoft Windows operating system becomes virtually ubiquitous on IBM...


  Results from FactBites:
 
E. H. Crump - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (796 words)
Edward Hull Crump (October 2, 1874 – October 16, 1954) was a Memphis, Tennessee insurance broker, businessman, and political figure in the early 20th century.
Crump also skillfully manipulated Republicans, who were numerically very weak in the western two-thirds of the state but dominated politics in East Tennessee.
Crump was a strong supporter of fire service and for many years the Memphis Fire Department was considered one of the very best in a medium-sized city and is still quite well-regarded.
TN Encyclopedia: HISTORIC STADIUMS (1086 words)
Two stadiums constructed by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) during the New Deal, Crump Stadium in Memphis and the Stone Castle in Bristol, are currently still in use.
In 1944 Memphis businessman and politician E. Crump began a tradition that lasted more than twenty-five years.
The E. Crump Blind Benefit Game, played annually on the first weekend of December, featured two area high school football teams.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m