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Encyclopedia > Dwight L. Moody
Dwight Lyman Moody
Preacher , evangelist and publisher
Born February 5, 1837
Northfield, Massachusetts
Died December 22, 1899

Dwight Lyman Moody (February 5, 1837 - December 22, 1899), also known as D.L. Moody, was an American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School and Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts (now the Northfield Mount Hermon School), the Moody Bible Institute and Moody Publishers. Image File history File links Dwight_Lyman_Moody_c. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Northfield is a town located in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... The Moody Church (sometime also referred to as Moody Memorial Church) is a historic non-denominational protestant brick-façade church on the near-north side of Chicago. ... Northfield Mount Hermon School Northfield Mount Hermon School (NMH) is a ninth-twelfth grade private college preparatory school (secondary school) located in Northfield, Massachusetts, United States. ... Moody Bible Institute (MBI) was founded by evangelist and businessman Dwight Lyman Moody in 1886. ... Moody Publishers was founded in 1894 by D.L. Moody, under the name Bible Institute Colportage Association (BICA). ...

Contents

Early life

Dwight Moody was born in Northfield, Massachusetts to a large family. His father, a small farmer and stone mason, was an alcoholic and died at the age of 41 when Dwight was only four years old. He had five older brothers and a younger sister, with an additional twin brother and sister born one month after his father's death. His mother struggled to support the family, but even with her best effort, some of her children had to be sent off to work for their room and board. Dwight too was sent off, where he went he received cornmeal porridge and milk, three times a day.[citation needed] He complained to his mother, but when she found out that he had all that he wanted to eat, she sent him back. Even during this time, she continued to send them to church. Together with his eight siblings he was raised in the Unitarian church. His oldest brother ran away and was not heard from by the family until many years later. Northfield is a town located in Franklin County, Massachusetts. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Unitarianism is the belief...


When Moody turned 17, he moved to Boston to work in his uncle's shoe store. One of his uncle's requirements was that Moody attend the Congregational Church of Mount Vernon where Dr. Edward Norris Kirk was pastor. In April 1855 Moody was then converted to evangelical Christianity when his teacher, Edward Kimball talked to him about how much God loved him. His conversion sparked the start of his career as an evangelist. However his first application for church membership, in May 1855, was rejected. He was not received as a church member until May 4, 1856. As his teacher, Mr. Edward Kimball, stated, Boston redirects here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an...

I can truly say, and in saying it I magnify the infinite grace of God as bestowed upon him, that I have seen few persons whose minds were spiritually darker than was his when he came into my Sunday School class; and I think that the committee of the Mount Vernon Church seldom met an applicant for membership more unlikely ever to become a Christian of clear and decided views of Gospel truth, still less to fill any extended sphere of public usefulness. Mr. Moody remained in my class for two years, until he bade me good-bye on leaving Boston for Chicago.

[citation needed] Sunday school, Indians and whites. ...

Chicago and the Civil War

Moody moved to Chicago, Illinois in September, 1856, where he joined the Plymouth Congregational Church, and began to take an active part in the prayer meetings. In the spring of 1857, he began to minister to the welfare of the sailors in Chicago's port, then gamblers and thieves in the saloons. A contemporary witness recalls these days: For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...

The first meeting I ever saw him at was in a little old shanty that had been abandoned by a saloon-keeper. Mr. Moody had got the place to hold the meetings in at night. I went there a little late; and the first thing I saw was a man standing up with a few tallow candles around him, holding a negro boy, and trying to read to him the story of the Prodigal Son and a great many words he could not read out, and had to skip. I thought, 'If the Lord can ever use such an instrument as that for His honor and glory, it will astonish me.'

[citation needed]


His work led to the largest Sunday School of his time.[citation needed] As a result of his tireless labor, within a year the average attendance at his school was 650, while 60 volunteers from various churches served as teachers. It became so well known that the just-elected President Lincoln visited and spoke at a Sunday School meeting on November 25, 1860. For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


After the Civil War started, he was involved with the U.S. Christian Commission of the YMCA, and paid nine visits to the battle-front, being present among the Union soldiers after the conflicts of Shiloh, Pittsburgh Landing, and Murfreesboro, and ultimately entered Richmond with the army of General Grant. He married Miss Emma C. Revell, on August 28, 1862, with whom he had a daughter, Emma Reynolds Moody, and two sons, William Revell And Paul Dwight Moody. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Not to be confused with YWCA. This article is about the association. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant, Don Carlos Buell Albert Sidney Johnston â€ , P.G.T. Beauregard Strength Army of West Tennessee (48,894), Army of the Ohio (17,918)[1] Army of Mississippi (44,699)[1] Casualties 13,047: 1,754 killed, 8... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders William S. Rosecrans Braxton Bragg Strength 43,400 37,712 Casualties 13,249 (1,730 killed, 7,802 wounded, 3,717 captured/missing) 10,266 (1,294 killed, 7,945 wounded, 1,027 captured/missing) The Battle of Stones River... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ...


The growing Sunday School congregation needed a permanent home, so Moody started a church in Chicago, the Illinois Street Church.


In June 1871, Moody met Ira D. Sankey, the Gospel singer, with whom he soon partnered. In October the Great Chicago Fire destroyed his church, his home, and the dwellings of most of his members. His family had to flee for their lives, and, as Mr. Moody said, he saved nothing but his reputation and his Bible. His church was rebuilt within three months at a near-by location as the Chicago Avenue Church. His lay follower William Eugene Blackstone was a prominent American Zionist. Ira D. Sankey (1840-1908) was an American Gospel singer and composer associated with evangelist Dwight L. Moody. ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... William Eugene Blackstone (October 6, 1841-November 7, 1935) was an American evangelist and Christian Zionist influenced by Dwight Lyman Moody, and author of the Zionist Blackstone Memorial of 1891. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ...


In the years after the fire, Moody's wealthy Chicago supporter J.A. Farwell attempted to persuade him to make his permanent home in Chicago, offering to build Moody and his family a new house. But the now-famous Moody, also sought by supporters in New York, Philadelphia and elsewhere, chose the tranquil farm he had purchased next door to his birthplace in Northfield, MA. He felt he could better recover from his lengthy and exhausting preaching trips in a rural setting.[citation needed] Northfield became an important location in evangelical Christian history in the late 19th century as Moody organized summer conferences which were led and attended by prominent Christian preachers and evangelists from around the world. It was also in Northfield where Moody founded three schools which later merged into today's Northfield Mount Hermon School.


England

It was while on a trip to England in Spring of 1872 that he became well known as an evangelist. Some have claimed he was the greatest evangelist of the 19th century.[citation needed] He preached almost a hundred times and came into communion with the Plymouth Brethren. His preaching had an impact as great as that of George Whitefield and John Wesley within Britain, Scotland and Ireland. On several occasions he filled stadiums of 2,000 to 4,000 capacity. In the Botanic Gardens Palace, a meeting had between 15,000 to 30,000 people. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Brethren are a Christian Evangelical movement that began in Dublin, London, Plymouth, and the continent of Europe in the late 1820s. ... George Whitefield (December 16, 1714 - September 30, 1770), was a minister in the Church of England and one of the leaders of the Methodist movement. ... For other persons named John Wesley, see John Wesley (disambiguation). ...


This turnout continued throughout 1874 and 1875, with crowds of thousands at all of his meetings. During his visit to Scotland he was helped and encouraged by Andrew A. Bonar. The famous London Baptist preacher, Charles Spurgeon invited him to speak and promoted him as well. When he returned to the United States, crowds of 12,000 to 20,000 were just as common as in England.[citation needed] President Grant and some of his cabinet attended a meeting on January 19, 1876. His evangelistic meetings were held from Boston to New York, throughout New England and as far as San Francisco, and other West coast towns from Vancouver to San Diego. Andrew Alexander Bonar, a minister of the Free Church of Scotland; born Edinburgh May 29, 1810, youngest brother of Horatius Bonar; died Glasgow December 30, 1892. ... Spurgeon in his late twenties. ... Ulysses S. Grant,[2] born Hiram Ulysses Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885), was an American general and the eighteenth President of the United States (1869–1877). ...


Moody aided in the work of cross-cultural evangelism by promoting "The Wordless Book", a teaching tool that had been invented by Charles Spurgeon in 1866. In 1875 he added a fourth color to the design of the three-color evangelistic device: gold - to "represent heaven". This "book" has been and is still used to teach uncounted thousands of illiterate people - young and old - around the globe about the Gospel message.[1] Open air preaching in China using the Wordless Book[1] The Wordless Book is a Christian evangelistic device. ... Spurgeon in his late twenties. ...

Missionary preaching in China using Moody's version of The Wordless Book

Dwight L. Moody visited Britain with Ira D. Sankey, with Moody acting as preacher and Sankey singing. Together they published books of Christian hymns. In 1883 they visited Edinburgh and raised £10,000 for the building of a new home for the Carrubbers Close Mission. Moody later preached at the laying of the foundation stone for what is one of the few buildings on the Royal Mile which continues to be used for its original purpose and is now called the Carrubbers Christian Centre. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 460 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1668 × 2172 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From Chinas Millions; China Inland Mission; London; January 1892 (colors added by Brian York in photoshop for emphasis) This image is in the public domain... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 460 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1668 × 2172 pixel, file size: 414 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) From Chinas Millions; China Inland Mission; London; January 1892 (colors added by Brian York in photoshop for emphasis) This image is in the public domain... Open air preaching in China using the Wordless Book[1] The Wordless Book is a Christian evangelistic device. ... Ira D. Sankey (1840-1908) was an American Gospel singer and composer associated with evangelist Dwight L. Moody. ... See also hymn - a program to decrypt iTunes music files. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... Carrubbers Christian Centre Carrubbers Christian Centre is a church on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. Carrubbers Close Mission was founded in 1858 and its members originally met in a former Atheist Meeting House in Carrubbers Close. ... Much of the Royal Mile is cobbled, as seen in this view looking east down the High Street past the old Tron Kirk. ... Carrubbers Christian Centre Carrubbers Christian Centre is a church on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. Carrubbers Close Mission was founded in 1858 and its members originally met in a former Atheist Meeting House in Carrubbers Close. ...


Moody greatly influenced the cause of cross-cultural Christian missions after he met the pioneer missionary to China, Hudson Taylor. He actively supported the China Inland Mission and encouraged many of his congregation to volunteer for service overseas. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hudson & Maria Taylor in 1865 James Hudson Taylor 戴德生 (May 21, 1832 – June 3, 1905), was a British Protestant Christian missionary to China, and founder of the China Inland Mission (CIM) (now OMF International) who served there for 51 years, bringing over 800 missionaries to the country and directly resulting in... The China Inland Mission was a missionary society, set up by English missionary Hudson Taylor on 25 June 1865 in Brighton during a home leave. ...


He preached his last sermon on November 16, 1899 in Kansas City, KS. Becoming ill, he returned home by train to Northfield. During the preceding several months, friends had observed he had added some 30 pounds to his already ample frame. Although his illness was never diagnosed, it has been speculated that he suffered congestive heart failure. He died on December 22, surrounded by family. Already installed by Moody as leader of his Chicago Bible Institute, R. A. Torrey succeeded Moody as its president. Ten years after Moody's death, the Chicago Avenue Church was renamed The Moody Church in his honor, and the Chicago Bible Institute was likewise renamed Moody Bible Institute. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Reuben Archer Torrey(1856-1928), American evangelist, was born in Hoboken, New Jersey, on 28 January 1856. ... The Moody Church (sometime also referred to as Moody Memorial Church) is a historic non-denominational protestant brick-façade church on the near-north side of Chicago. ...


Works

  • Heaven Diggory Press ISBN 978-1846858123
  • Prevailing Prayer - What Hinders it? Diggory Press ISBN 978-1846858031
  • Secret Power Diggory Press ISBN 978-1846858024
  • The Ten Commandments

References

  • M. Laird Simons, Holding the Fort: comprising sermons and addresses at the Great Revival meetings conducted by Moody and Sankey, with the lives and labors of Dwight L. Moody, Ira D. Sankey, and P.P. Bliss, Norwich, Connecticut: Henry Bill Publishing Co., 1877.
  • Christian Biography Resources
  • Austin, Alvyn. China’s Millions: The China Inland Mission and Late Qing Society. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company (March 5, 2007) ISBN 978-0802829757
  • J.F Finlay jr, Dwight L Moody: American Evangelist 1837-1899. 1969
  • S. N. Gundry, Love them in. The Proclamation Theology of D L Moody. 1976
  • L W Dorsett, A Passion for Souls. The Life of D L Moody. 1997
  • B J Evensen, Gods's Man for Gilded Age. D L Moody and the Rise of Mass Evangelism. 2003
  • D.M. Gustafson, D.L. Moody and Swedes: Shaping Evangelical Identity among Swedish Missions Friends 1867-1899. (Linköping Studies in Arts and Sciences 419. / Linköping Studies in Identity and Pluralism 7.) 2008.

Notes

  1. ^ Austin (2007), 1-10

External links

  • Moody Bible Institute
  • Moody Church
  • Sample sermons by D. L. Moody
  • "Shall I enter the Army?" Moody said, "No."
  • Sermons by D. L. Moody
  • Dwight L. Moody at Find A Grave
  • [1] Several books by Moody

Find A Grave is an online database of seventeen million cemeteries and burial records. ...

See also

Horatio Spafford - Spafford, a friend of Moody, wrote the words to the hymn "It Is Well With My Soul" Horatio Gates Spafford (1828-1888) was the author of the hymn It Is Well With My Soul. There are many authors of many hymns, but it is perhaps the story surrounding Horatio Spaffords life when he wrote the hymn which makes the authors story so exceptional and enduring...


 
 

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