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Encyclopedia > Dwarf planet
Artist's impression of Pluto (background) and Charon (foreground). Pluto, considered a planet for 76 years, was reclassified as a dwarf planet in 2006.

A dwarf planet is a celestial body within the Solar System that satisfies the following four conditions:[1] Image File history File links Pluto_artistimpression. ... Image File history File links Pluto_artistimpression. ... For other uses, see Pluto (disambiguation). ... Charon (shair-ən or kair-ən (key), IPA , Greek Χάρων), discovered in 1978, is, depending on the definition employed, either the largest moon of Pluto or one member of a double dwarf planet with Pluto being the other member. ... This article is about the astronomical term. ... See lists of astronomical objects for a list of the various lists of astronomical objects in Wikipedia. ... This article is about the Solar System. ...

The term dwarf planet was adopted in 2006 as part of a three-way classification of bodies orbiting the Sun. Objects that are large enough to have cleared the neighbourhood of their orbit are defined as planets, while those which are too small to be in hydrostatic equilibrium are defined as small solar system bodies. The category dwarf planet is not a subset of the category planet, but a separate category altogether; that is to say, a dwarf planet is not a planet. As defined, the term dwarf planet does not apply to other planetary systems.[2] Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... Sol redirects here. ... For other uses, see Mass (disambiguation). ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... In physics, a rigid body is an idealization of a solid body of finite size in which deformation is neglected. ... Hydrostatic equilibrium occurs when compression due to gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient which creates a pressure gradient force in the opposite direction. ... For other uses, see Sphere (disambiguation). ... In the end stages of planet formation, a planet will have cleared the neighbourhood of its own orbital zone, meaning it has become gravitationally dominant, and there are no other bodies of comparable size other than its own satellites or those otherwise under its gravitational influence. ... A natural satellite is an object that orbits a planet or other body larger than itself and which is not man-made. ... The final definition left the solar system with eight planets. ... This article is about the astronomical term. ... A Small Solar System Body (SSSB) is a term defined in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union to describe objects in the Solar System that are neither planets nor dwarf planets: [1] This encompasses: all minor planets apart from the dwarf planets, : the classical asteroids, (except for 1 Ceres, the... A planetary system consists of at least one star and various orbiting objects (such as asteroids, comets, moons, and planets). ...


Three dwarf planets are currently recognized: Ceres, Pluto and Eris, though about seventy objects are suspected to be dwarf planets, and there are estimated to be some 200 out to the distance of the Kuiper Belt.[3] Spectral type: G[8] Absolute magnitude: 3. ... For other uses, see Pluto (disambiguation). ... Absolute magnitude: −1. ... The Kuiper belt, derived from data from the Minor Planet Center. ...

Contents

List of dwarf planets

The IAU has officially identified three celestial bodies that have immediately received dwarf planet classification:[4]

Dwarf planets
Name Ceres Pluto Eris
MPC number 1 134340 136199
Region of Solar System Asteroid belt Kuiper belt Scattered disc
Diameter 941±32 km 2306±30 km 2400±100 km
Mass in kg
compared to Earth
9.5×1020 kg
0.00016
1.305×1022 kg
0.0022
~1.67×1022 kg[5]
0.0028
Mean equatorial radius*
in km
0.0738
471
0.180
1,148.07
0.19
~1,200
Volume*
0.00042
0.005
0.007
Density (in Mg/m³) 2.08 2.0 2.1
Equatorial gravity (in m/s2) 0.27 0.60 ~0.68
Escape velocity (in km/s) 0.51 1.2 ~1.3
Rotation period (d)
(in sidereal days)
0.3781 -6.38718
(retrograde)
Orbital radius* (AU)
semi-major axis
in km
2.5-2.9
2.766
413,715,000
29.66-49.30
39.48168677
5,906,376,200
37.77-97.56
67.6681
10,210,000,000
Orbital period*(a)
(in sidereal years)
4.599 248.09 557
Mean orbital speed
(in km/s)
17.882 4.666 3.437
Orbital eccentricity 0.080 0.24880766 0.44177
Orbital inclination 10.587° 17.14175° 44.187°
Inclination of the equator from the orbit
(see Axial tilt)
119.61°
Mean surface temperature (in K) 167 40 30
Number of natural satellites 0 3 1
Date of discovery January 1, 1801 February 18, 1930 October 21, 2003

*Measured relative to the Earth. Spectral type: G[8] Absolute magnitude: 3. ... For other uses, see Pluto (disambiguation). ... Absolute magnitude: −1. ... The Minor Planet Center operates at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), which is part of the Center for Astrophysics (CfA) along with the Harvard College Observatory (HCO). ... This article is about the Solar System. ... For other uses, see Asteroid (disambiguation). ... The Kuiper belt, derived from data from the Minor Planet Center. ... Eris, the largest known scattered disc object (center), and its moon Dysnomia (left of center). ... “Kg” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... A tonne (also called metric ton) is a non-SI unit of mass, accepted for use with SI, defined as: 1 tonne = 103 kg (= 106 g). ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Gravity is a force of attraction that acts between bodies that have mass. ... Acceleration is the time rate of change of velocity and/or direction, and at any point on a velocity-time graph, it is given by the slope of the tangent to the curve at that point. ... Space Shuttle Atlantis launches on mission STS-71. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Look up day in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... On a prograde planet like the Earth, the sidereal day is shorter than the solar day. ... The astronomical unit (AU or au or a. ... “km” redirects here. ... The orbital period is the time it takes a planet (or another object) to make one full orbit. ... A year (from Old English gēr) is the time between two recurrences of an event related to the orbit of the Earth around the Sun. ... The sidereal year is the time for the Sun to return to the same position in respect to the stars of the celestial sphere. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In astrodynamics, under standard assumptions any orbit must be of conic section shape. ... For the science fiction novella by William Shunn, see Inclination (novella). ... World map showing the equator in red In tourist areas, the equator is often marked on the sides of roads The equator marked as it crosses Ilhéu das Rolas, in São Tomé and Príncipe. ... Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... In astronomy, axial tilt is the inclination angle of a planets rotational axis in relation to a perpendicular to its orbital plane. ... For other uses, see Kelvin (disambiguation). ... A natural satellite is an object that orbits a planet or other body larger than itself and which is not man-made. ... The planet Pluto has three known moons. ... Dysnomia (officially designated (136199) Eris I Dysnomia) is a moon of the dwarf planet Eris. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Other candidates

The smallest icy body known to have achieved hydrostatic equilibrium is Mimas, which is 400km in diameter. Mike Brown suggests that the lower limit for an icy dwarf planet is therefore likely to be somewhere under 400km. Although it is difficult to measure the diameters of TNOs, Brown believes that, as of August 2006, Sedna and 42 bodies in the Kuiper Belt and Scattered Disc, in addition to Pluto and Eris, met this requirement and qualified as dwarf planets. His team is observing another 30 such objects that they have yet to announce, and believe that the total number will eventually prove to be about 200, with many more such as Sedna beyond that.[1] Mimas (mee-məs or mye-məs, IPA: , Greek Μίμᾱς, rarely Μίμανς) is a moon of Saturn that was discovered in 1789 by William Herschel. ... Look up Sedna in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Sedna may refer to: Sedna, the Inuit goddess of the sea 90377 Sedna, a planetoid Sedna Planitia, a landform on the planet Venus Sedna, an Irish king This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might otherwise share...


Among these, the following may be greater than 700 km in diameter: “km” redirects here. ...

Possible dwarf planets
Name Category Diameter Mass
2005 FY9 ("Easterbunny") Cubewano ~1300-1900 km ~4.0 × 1021 kg
Sedna Scattered-Extended object 1180–1800 km 1.7-6.1 × 1021 kg
2003 EL61 ("Santa") Cubewano ~1960×1518×996 km ~4.2 × 1021 kg
Quaoar Cubewano 755-1050 km[6]; 1070-1450 km 1.0-2.6 × 1021 kg
2002 TC302 Scattered disc object 920-1480[6] ~7.8 × 1019 kg
Orcus Plutino 875-1020 km[6] 6.2 - 7.0 × 1020 kg
Varuna Cubewano ~874 km (755-1025 km[7]; >480-800 km[6] ~5.9 × 1020 kg
2002 AW197 Cubewano 625-850[6]; 700-800 km (770-1010 km[8]) ~5.2 × 1020 kg
Ixion Plutino 430-710 km[6]; <822 km (900-1230 km[8]) ~5.8 × 1020 kg
2002 UX25 Cubewano 570-795 km[6] ~7.9 × 1020 kg
2002 TX300 Cubewano 530 km ? (<709 km) 1.6 - 3.7 × 1020 kg
1996 TL66 460-690 km
2003 VS2 540-925 km[6]
2004 GV9 610-750 km[6]
2002 KX14 380-780 km[6]
2002 MS4 600-850 km[6]
2003 AZ84 590-785 km[6]

The status of Charon, currently regarded as a satellite of Pluto, remains uncertain, as there is presently no clear definition of what distinguishes a satellite system from a binary (double planet) system. The original draft resolution (5)[2] presented to the IAU stated that Charon could be considered a planet because: Image File history File links Gnome_globe_current_event. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... (also written (136472) 2005 FY9) is a very large Kuiper belt object, and one of the two largest among the population in the classical KBO orbits. ... you are abunch of bull | bgcolour=#FFFFC0 | name=90377 Sedna | image= | caption= Sedna is located in the center of the green circle | discovery=yes | discoverer=M. Brown, C. Trujillo, D. Rabinowitz | discovered=November 14, 2003 | mp_name=90377 Sedna | alt_names= | mp_category=Trans-Neptunian object | epoch=September 26, 1990 (JD 2448160. ... (also written (136108) 2003 EL61), nicknamed Easter Bunny, is a large Kuiper belt object, roughly one-third the mass of Pluto, discovered by J. L. Ortiz et al. ... 50000 Quaoar (pronounced kwaa·waar or kwow·ər, English IPA: , Tongva ) [2] is a Trans-Neptunian object orbiting the Sun in the Kuiper belt. ... (84522) 2002 TC302 is a large Scattered Disk Object (SDO), orbiting the sun at a distance of 39. ... 90482 Orcus (originally known by the provisional designation 2004 DW) is a Kuiper Belt object (KBO) that was discovered by Michael Brown of Caltech, Chad Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory, and David Rabinowitz of Yale University. ... 20000 Varuna (VAR oo na) is a large classical Kuiper Belt object (KBO). ... (55565) 2002 AW197 (also written: (55565) 2002 AW197) is a trans-Neptunian object. ... 28978 Ixion (IPA pronunciation: , Wiktionary:Ixion) is a Kuiper belt object discovered on May 22, 2001. ... (55637) 2002 UX25 (also written as (55637) 2002 UX25) is a large Trans-Neptunian object discovered on October 30, 2002 by the Spacewatch program. ... (55636) 2002 TX300 (Also written as (55636) 2002 TX300) is a large Trans-Neptunian object discovered in October 15, 2002 by the NEAT program. ... (also written (15874) 1996 TL66) is a trans-Neptunian object that resides in the scattered disc. ... is a Trans-Neptunian object (TNO). ... , also written as 2003 AZ84, is a Trans-Neptunian object. ... Charon (shair-ən or kair-ən (key), IPA , Greek Χάρων), discovered in 1978, is, depending on the definition employed, either the largest moon of Pluto or one member of a double dwarf planet with Pluto being the other member. ... Pluto and Charon are sometimes informally considered to be a double (dwarf) planet. ...

  1. Charon independently would satisfy the size and shape criteria for planetary status (and in the terms of the final resolution, for the status of dwarf planet)
  2. Charon, on account of its large mass relative to Pluto, revolves with Pluto around a common barycentre located in space between Pluto and Charon rather than around a point located within Pluto.

This definition, however, was not preserved in the IAU's final resolution. It is unknown if it will be taken up at a future date. If a similar definition were to be adopted, Charon would be added to the list of dwarf planets. The barycenter (from the Greek &#946;&#945;&#961;&#973;&#954;&#949;&#957;&#964;&#961;&#959;&#957;) is the center of mass of two or more bodies which are orbiting each other, and is the point around which both of them orbit. ...


The second, third, and fourth largest objects in the main asteroid belt (Vesta, Pallas and Hygiea) could be classified as dwarf planets if it is shown that their shape is determined by hydrostatic equilibrium. At present this has not been demonstrated conclusively.[9] The Dawn probe, expected to enter orbit around Vesta in 2011, may provide evidence for or against dwarf planet in that case. 4 Vesta (ves-ta) is the second most massive asteroid in the asteroid belt, with a mean diameter of about 530 km and an estimated mass 12% the mass of the entire asteroid belt. ... 2 Pallas (pal-us, Greek Παλλάς) was the first asteroid discovered after 1 Ceres. ... 10 Hygiea (hye-jee-a or hi-jee-a) is the fourth largest Main belt asteroid with a diameter of 407 km. ... Hydrostatic equilibrium occurs when compression due to gravity is balanced by a pressure gradient which creates a pressure gradient force in the opposite direction. ... The Dawn Mission, launched on September 27, 2007, is NASAs mission to send a robotic space probe to the two most massive members of the asteroid belt: the asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. ... 2011 (MMXI) will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Size and mass of dwarf planets

The upper and lower limits to the size and mass of dwarf planets are not specified in the IAU resolution. There is strictly no upper limit, and an object larger or more massive than Mercury that is considered not to have cleared the neighborhood around its orbit may still be classified as a dwarf planet. [[Link titleBold text // ]] This article is about the planet. ...


The lower limit is determined by the concept of hydrostatic equilibrium shape, but the size or mass at which an object attains this shape is undefined, and empirical observations suggest that it may vary according to the composition and history of the object. The original draft of IAU resolution 5 defined hydrostatic equilibrium shape as applying "to objects with mass above 5×1020 kg and diameter greater than 800 km",[2] but this language was not retained in the final resolution 5A that was passed.


According to some astronomers, the new definition could mean the addition of up to 45 new dwarf planets.[10][11]


Orbital dominance

Using a parameter developed by S. Alan Stern and Harold F. Levison, Steven Soter and other astronomers have argued for a distinction between dwarf planets and the other eight planets based on their inability to "clear the neighborhood around their orbits", that is, to remove smaller bodies whose orbits bring them nearby by collision, capture, or gravitational disturbance. This concept is combined with a concept of orbital dominance measured in terms of the ratio of the mass of a planetary candidate to the combined mass of all other objects in its vicinity. Dwarf planets are too small in mass to significantly alter their environment in the manner of a planet. This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... S. Alan Stern is a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute. ... Harold F. Hal Levison is a planetary scientist specializing in planetary dynamics. ... Steven Soter is an astronomer who argued for a distinction between dwarf planets and the other eight planets based on their inability to clear the neighborhood around their orbits. This article belongs in one or more categories. ... A planet (from the Greek &#960;&#955;&#945;&#957;&#942;&#964;&#951;&#962;, planetes or wanderers) is a body of considerable mass that orbits a star and that produces very little or no energy through nuclear fusion. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ...


There are several other theories that try to differentiate between planets and dwarf planets, but the current definition of what constitutes a planet uses this concept.


Stern et al. introduce a parameter Λ, expressing the probability of an encounter resulting in a given deflection of orbit. The value of this parameter in Stern’s model is proportional to the square of the mass and inversely proportional to the period. Following the authors, this value can be used to estimate the capacity of a body to clear the neighbourhood of its orbit. Stern and Levison found a gap of five orders of magnitude in Λ between the smallest terrestrial planets and the largest asteroids and KBOs:

Planetary discriminants
Body Mass (ME*)
Λ/ΛE**
µ***
Mercury 0.055 0.0126 9.1×104
Venus 0.815 1.08 1.35×106
Earth 1.00 1.00 1.7×106
Mars 0.107 0.0061 1.8×105
Ceres 0.00015 8.7×10−9 0.33
Jupiter 317.7 8510 6.25×105
Saturn 95.2 308 1.9×105
Uranus 14.5 2.51 2.9×104
Neptune 17.1 1.79 2.4×104
Pluto 0.0022 1.95×10−8 0.077
Eris 0.0028 3.5×10−8 0.10

*ME in Earth masses.
**Λ/ΛE = M²/P, in Earth masses squared per year.
***µ = M/m, where M is the mass of the body, and m is the aggregate mass of all the other bodies that share its orbital zone.
[[Link titleBold text // ]] This article is about the planet. ... For other uses, see Venus (disambiguation). ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... 1 Ceres (IPA , Latin: ) is a dwarf planet in the asteroid belt. ... For other uses, see Jupiter (disambiguation). ... This article is about the planet. ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Neptune (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pluto (disambiguation). ... Absolute magnitude: −1. ...


Contention

A number of scientists expressed their disagreement[12] with the currently adopted IAU definition of dwarf planet by means of car bumper stickers.


While accepting the characterisation of dwarf planet for Ceres and Eris (dwarf planet in this case meaning just a small planet), Stern rejects the current IAU definition of planet, both in terms of defining dwarf planets as something other than a type of planet, and in using orbital characteristics (rather than intrinsic characteristics) of objects to define them as dwarf planets.[13] Thus, he and his team will still refer to Pluto as the ninth planet. One should also note, that it will be in pages hosted by NASA and controlled by Stern's team, that the upcoming information and the first photographs of Pluto will be unveiled to the world. However, NASA has announced that it will use the new guidelines established by the IAU.[14] Spectral type: G[8] Absolute magnitude: 3. ... Absolute magnitude: −1. ...


Prior to the 2006 IAU reclassification, several terms were suggested for bodies which are now formally cited as a dwarf planet, including minor planet, subplanet and planetoid.


Types of dwarf planets

The IAU's Resolution 6a[4] recognizes Pluto as "the prototype of a new category of trans-Neptunian objects". The name and precise nature of this category are not specified, but in the debate leading up to the resolution, the members of the category were variously referred to as Plutons and Plutonian objects. The former name was generally deprecated[15] and was abandoned in the final draft resolution (6b)[16]; the latter name failed to win majority approval on a 180–186 vote in the IAU General Assembly on August 24, 2006. The category, while established, remains nameless. IAU redirects here. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... On August 24, 2006, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) decided to reclassify Pluto as a dwarf planet, requiring that a planet must clear the neighbourhood around its orbit. ...


At an earlier stage in the definition process, the category (then described as "pluton") was defined to be a planet whose orbit took more than 200 Julian years to complete and whose orbit was more highly inclined and elliptical than a traditional planetary orbit.[17] This article is about the astronomical term. ... In astronomy, a Julian year is a unit of time defined as exactly 365. ... Inclination is one of the six orbital parameters describing the shape and orientation of a celestial orbit and is the angular distance of the orbital plane from the plane of the reference (usually planets equator or the ecliptic), stated in degrees. ...


This category of Pluto-like objects only applies to dwarf planets which meet the conditions of being trans-Neptunian and "like Pluto" in terms of period, inclination and eccentricity. A dwarf planet may or may not be a member of this category, but all members of the category must be dwarf planets.


The membership of this class, other than Pluto itself, remains obscure. Eris and the objects listed in the table "Possible dwarf planets" (above) also qualify in terms of the minimum period, and most exhibit orbital eccentricity and inclination that are significant, though not always equal to or greater than Pluto's. Quaoar, however, has a much smaller eccentricity and inclination, and so possibly does not qualify as a Pluto-like object. Absolute magnitude: −1. ... 50000 Quaoar (pronounced kwaa·waar or kwow·ər, English IPA: , Tongva ) [2] is a Trans-Neptunian object orbiting the Sun in the Kuiper belt. ...


See also

The final definition left the solar system with eight planets, pictured above (not to scale) Displays the remaining eight planets with the celestial bodies that have now been designated as dwarf planets. ... For other uses, see Asteroid (disambiguation). ... The centaurs are a class of icy planetoids that orbit the Sun between Jupiter and Neptune, named after the mythical race of centaurs. ... The final definition left the solar system with eight planets, pictured above (not to scale). ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Mesoplanet is a term coined by Isaac Asimov to refer to planetary bodies with sizes smaller than Mercury but larger than 1 Ceres. ... Minor planets, or asteroids or planetoids, are minor celestial bodies of the Solar system orbiting the Sun (mostly Small solar system bodies) that are smaller than major planets, but larger than meteoroids (commonly defined as being 10 meters across or less[1]), and that are not comets. ... A Small Solar System Body (SSSB) is a term defined in 2006 by the International Astronomical Union to describe objects in the Solar System that are neither planets nor dwarf planets: [1] This encompasses: all minor planets apart from the dwarf planets, : the classical asteroids, (except for 1 Ceres, the... A trans-Neptunian object (TNO) is any object in the solar system that orbits the sun at a greater distance on average than Neptune. ...

References

  1. ^ IAU 2006 General Assembly: Result of the IAU Resolution votes
  2. ^ a b c Draft Resolution 5 for GA-XXVI: Definition of a Planet.
  3. ^ Mike Brown page on dwarf planets.
  4. ^ a b IAU 2006 General Assembly: Result of the IAU Resolution votes.
  5. ^ Brown, M.E. et al. 2006. Satellites of the Largest Kuiper Belt Objects. Astrophysical Journal, 639:L43-L46 More accurate work based on Dysnomia's orbit in preparation.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/astro-ph/pdf/0702/0702538v1.pdf
  7. ^ http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/faculty/jewitt/varuna.html
  8. ^ a b http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/faculty/jewitt/kb.html
  9. ^ Three new planets may join solar system. New Scientist. Retrieved on 2006-08-16.
  10. ^ Nine Planets Become 12 with Controversial New Definition. Space.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-16.
  11. ^ What makes a planet?. Michael E. Brown. Retrieved on 2006-08-16.
  12. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/5283956.stm
  13. ^ Unabashedly Onward to the Ninth Planet.
  14. ^ Hotly-Debated Solar System Object Gets a Name, NASA press release.
  15. ^ Astronomers divided over "planet" definition.
  16. ^ The Final IAU Resolution on the definition of "planet" ready for voting.
  17. ^ Draft definition, IAU press release.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Space. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Michael (Mike) E. Brown (born c. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

 v  d  e The Solar System
The Sun Mercury Venus The Moon Earth Phobos and Deimos Mars Ceres The asteroid belt Jupiter Moons of Jupiter Saturn Moons of Saturn Uranus Moons of Uranus Moons of Neptune Neptune Moons of Pluto Pluto The Kuiper Belt Dysnomia Eris The Scattered Disc The Oort Cloud
The Sun · Mercury · Venus · Earth · Mars · Ceres · Jupiter · Saturn · Uranus · Neptune · Pluto · Eris
Planets · Dwarf planets · Moons: Terrestrial · Martian · Jovian · Saturnian · Uranian · Neptunian · Plutonian · Eridian
Small bodies:   Meteoroids · Asteroids/Asteroid moons (Asteroid belt) · Centaurs · TNOs (Kuiper belt/Scattered disc) · Comets (Oort cloud)
See also astronomical objects, the solar system's list of objects, sorted by radius or mass, and the Solar System Portal

 
 

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