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Encyclopedia > Dvoryanstvo
It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Russian nobility. (Discuss)

Dvoryanstvo (Russian: дворянство) refers to a category of Russian nobility. A person of this category was called dvoryanin (it was a status, a social category, but not a title). Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Categories of Russian nobility and royalty Kniaz (as ancient ruler) Velikiy Kniaz Boyar Tsar (Emperor), Tsarina (Empress, Empress consort) Tsar family Tsarevich, Tsarevna Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Duke) (as title), Velikaya Knyaginya (Grand Duchess), Velikaya Knyazhna (Grand Duchess) Dvoryanstvo Titled Dvoryanstvo Earl Baron Kniaz (as title) Related article Table of Ranks... Categories of Russian nobility and royalty Kniaz (as ancient ruler) Velikiy Kniaz Boyar Tsar (Emperor), Tsarina (Empress, Empress consort) Tsar family Tsarevich, Tsarevna Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Duke) (as title), Velikaya Knyaginya (Grand Duchess), Velikaya Knyazhna (Grand Duchess) Dvoryanstvo Titled Dvoryanstvo Earl Baron Kniaz (as title) Related article Table of Ranks... A title is a prefix or suffix added to a persons name to signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. ...


The word is commonly translated as "nobility" or "gentry", but in this and related articles the term "dvoryanstvo" will be used, for a clear distinction from other types of nobility known in Russian history. The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ... Before the Industrial Revolution, the gentry was located between the yeomanry and the nobility. ...


Dvoryanstvo didn't have specific prefixes to their names, such as don, von or de. But dvoryans had right to the official appellation that depended on the rank: your nobility (ваше благородие), your high nobility (ваше высокоблагородие), your high ancestry (ваше высокородие), etc. The term Don may refer to; Don, Donald Ducks nickname. ... Von (generally in small case only as von) is a German preposition which approximately means of or from. ... DE or de may refer to: // Language De is a preposition meaning of or from in a number of Romance Languages such as French and Spanish, and is often evident in the names of people, places, and things. ...


The term derives from the Russian word dvor (двор) in the meaning of Court (of kniaz and later, of tsar). Kniaz’ or knyaz (князь in Russian and Ukrainian; cneaz in Romanian fem. ... Look up Tsar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For the US community of Czar, see Czar, West Virginia. ...


Unlike boyar title of nobility, which was exclusively hereditary, dvoryanstvo could be acquired. A newly designated dvoryanin was usually entitled to landownership. A loss of land did not automatically mean loss of dvoryanstvo. In later Imperial Russia, higher ranks of state service (see Table of Ranks) were automatically granted dvoryanstvo, not necessarily associated with landownership. A boyar (also spelled bojar; Romanian: boier) was a member of the highest rank of the feudal Russian and Romanian aristocracy, second only to the ruling princes, from the 10th through the 17th century. ... A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, or land which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called the tenant. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic Sea to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start... Table of Ranks (Табель о рангах; Tabel o rangakh) was a formal list of positions and ranks in military, government, and court of the Imperial Russia. ...


The class originated in 12th-13th centuries basing on military servitude. Land entitlement originates in 14th century, and by 17th century this class constituted the majority of landowners. Peter the Great finalized the status of dvoryanstvo, while abolishing the boyar title. The privileges of dvoryanstvo were legalized in 1785 in Zhalovahaya Gramota (Жалованная Грамота), (Bestowed Charter). Peter I Emperor and Autocrat of All Russia Peter I (Pyotr Alekseyvich) (9 June 1672–8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death. ... A boyar (also spelled bojar; Romanian: boier) was a member of the highest rank of the feudal Russian and Romanian aristocracy, second only to the ruling princes, from the 10th through the 17th century. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


The Bestowed Charter introduced an organization of the nobility: every guberniya and district (уезд, uyezd) had the Dvoryan Assembly (дворянское собрание). The chair of a dvoryan assembly was called Gubernia (District) Marshal of Dvoryanstvo, or Marshal of Nobility (губернский (уездный) предводитель дворянства). Estateless dvoryanstvo (беспоместное дворянство, bespomestnoye dvoryanstvo) was dvoryanstvo gained by state service, but which was not entitled to land ownership. Guberniya (Russian: ) (also gubernia, guberniia, gubernya) was a major administrative subdivision of the Imperial Russia, usually translated as governorate or province. ... Assembly of Nobility or Dvoryan Assembly (Дворянское Собрание) was the self-government body of the social class (сословие) of dvoryanstvo in Imperial Russia during 1785-1917. ...


Hereditary dvoryanstvo (потомственное дворянство) was transferred to wife, children and further direct legal descendants along the male line. In exceptional cases, the emperor could transfer dvoryanstvo along indirect or female lines, e.g., to preserve a notable family name.


Personal dvoryanstvo (личное дворянство) was transferable only to the wife and was of much lower prestige.


Titled dvoryanstvo (титулованное дворянство) was of highest category: those who had titles of kniaz, baron and earl. The latter two titles were introduced by Peter the Great. A baron or earl could be either propriatory (actual) ( владетельный (действительный)), i.e., who owned land in the Russian Empire or titular (титулярный), i.e., only endowed with the title. Kniaz’ or knyaz (князь in Russian and Ukrainian; cneaz in Romanian fem. ... Spaytans brader Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... An Earl or Jarl was an Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian title, meaning chieftain and it referred especially to chieftains set to rule a territory in a kings stead. ... Peter I Emperor and Autocrat of All Russia Peter I (Pyotr Alekseyvich) (9 June 1672–8 February 1725 [30 May 1672–28 January 1725 O.S.1]) ruled Russia from 7 May (27 April O.S.) 1682 until his death. ... Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start...


Among privileges of dvoryanstvo was the right to have a family coat of arms, introduced by the end of the 17th century. A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


Since 1782, a kind of uniform was introduced for civilian dvoryanstvo called uniform of civilian service (мундир статской службы) or simply civilian uniform (статский (штатский) мундир). The uniform prescribed colors that depended on the territory. The uniform was required at the places of service, at the Court and other important public places.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dvoryanstvo at AllExperts (554 words)
Dvoryanstvo didn't have specific prefixes to their names, such as don, von or de.
Titled dvoryanstvo (титулованное дворянство) was of highest category: those who had titles of kniaz, baron and earl.
Among privileges of dvoryanstvo was the right to have a family coat of arms, introduced by the end of the 17th century.
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Dvoryanstvo (495 words)
Dvoryanstvo didn't have specific prefixes to their names, such as don, von or de.
Estateless dvoryanstvo (беспоместное дворянство, bespomestnoye dvoryanstvo) was dvoryanstvo gained by state service, but which was not entitled to land ownership.
Among privileges of dvoryanstvo was the right to have a family coat of arms, introduced by the end of the 17th century.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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