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Encyclopedia > Dutch roll

Dutch roll is one of an aircraft's flight dynamic modes (others include phugoid, short period, and spiral divergence). It involves a coupling of roll and yaw which is normally well damped in most light aircraft. Some aircraft with well-damped dutch roll modes can experience a degradation in damping as airspeed and altitude increase. Dutch roll stability can be artificially increased by the installation of a yaw-damper (commonly referred to incorrectly as a yaw-dampener). Flight dynamics is the study of orientation of air and space vehicles and how to control the critical flight parameters, typically named pitch, roll and yaw. ... A phugoid is one of the flight dynamics modes of an aircraft (others include Short Period, Dutch Roll, and Spiral Divergence). ... Flight dynamics is the study of orientation of air and space vehicles and how to control the critical flight parameters, typically named pitch, roll and yaw. ... Flight dynamics is the study of orientation of air and space vehicles and how to control the critical flight parameters, typically named pitch, roll and yaw. ... Damping is any effect, either deliberately engendered or inherent to a system, that tends to reduce the amplitude of oscillations. ... Airspeed refers to the speed of an aircraft in relation to the air which may be different from groundspeed which is the speed of the aircraft in relation to the ground. ... Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum, called zero level. ...


The Dutch Roll mode can be excited by any use of aileron or rudder, but for flight test purposes it is usually excited with a rudder doublet or singlet. Some larger aircraft are better excited with aileron inputs. Periods can range from a few seconds for light aircraft to a minute or more for airliners. Aileron location on a Piper PA-28. ... A rudder is a device used to steer a ship or other watercraft. ... Light-sport aircraft is a definition by the FAA in the USA for aircraft with a Maximum Gross Takeoff Weight < 1320 lb (exceptions for seaplanes), a Maximum airspeed in level flight of 120 knots, one or two seats, and a fixed pitch propellor piston engine. ... An airliner is a large fixed-wing aircraft (an aeroplane/airplane) initially designed for the transport of paying passengers, and usually operated by an airline company (which owns or leases the aircraft). ...


The name comes from the movement that (Dutch) skaters make when skating on ice. Outdoor ice skating in Austria Ice skating is travelling on ice with skates, narrow (and sometimes parabolic) blade-like devices moulded into special boots (or, more primitively, without boots, tied to regular footwear). ...


Dutch roll is also the name (considered by professionals to be a misnomer) given to a coordination maneuver generally taught to student pilots to help them improve their crosswind-landing technique. The airplane is alternately rolled as much as 60-degrees left and right while opposite rudder is applied to keep the nose of the airplane pointed at a fixed point. (This technique is more commonly referred to as a slip. If the airspeed is allowed to decay the aircraft can stall, and the crossed controls can cause it to spin.) Aerobatic maneuvres are maneuvers involving aircraft in unusual attitudes, in air shows, dog fights or competition aerobatics. ... Aviators are people who fly aircraft either for pleasure or for a job. ... A crosswind is any wind that is blowing perpendicular to a line of travel, or perpendicular to a direction. ... A rudder is a device used to steer a ship or other watercraft. ... In aeronautics, a slip or forward slip is manoevre where an airplane pilot rolls the aircraft in one direction with the ailerons and yaws it in the opposite direction with the rudder. ... Simple Definition: An aircraft in flight is usually not pointed directly into the oncoming airflow. ... In flying, a spin is a special case of a stall. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dutch roll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (621 words)
Dutch roll is a type of aircraft motion, consisting of an out-of-phase combination of "tail-wagging" and rocking from side to side.
The Dutch roll mode can be excited by any use of aileron or rudder, but for flight test purposes it is usually excited with a rudder singlet (short, sharp motions of the rudder to a specified angle, and then back to the centered position) or doublet (a pair of such motions in opposite directions).
Dutch roll is also the name (considered by professionals to be a misnomer) given to a coordination maneuver generally taught to student pilots to help them improve their "stick-and-rudder" technique.
Equilibrium, Stability, and Damping [Ch. 10 of See How It Flies] (3591 words)
Dutch roll is a messy combination of rolling, slipping, and yawing.
The rolling and yawing motions associated with Dutch roll are shown in figure 10.6; we will discuss the slipping component in a moment.
First, bit of simple advice: in an airplane that is susceptible to Dutch roll, be extra careful to avoid uncoordinated usage of ailerons and rudder since that would unnecessarily put energy into the Dutch roll mode.
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