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Encyclopedia > Dutch clipper

While the majority of the clipper ships sailed under British and American flags, more then a hundred clippers were built in the Netherlands.They were rather medium-clippers than the larger extreme-clipper. For other uses, see Clipper (disambiguation). ...


At an exhibition in Amsterdam in 1852 the Dutch lieutenant-commander M.H. Jansen showed a model of a medium-clipper which he became of the shipbuilders Perrine, Patterson & Stack (New York). The shipping company of Gebr. Blussé (Dordrecht) were very impressed by this model. This resulted in 1854 in the launching of the clipper Kosmopoliet (800 tons) for this company. She is said to be the first Dutch clipper.
But in 1850 the barque Magdalena (377 ton) was built in Amsterdam and in 1853 four more ships with clipper lines were launched, of which the iron ship California (663 ton) is the most famous. Built by Fop Smit, mastered by F.C. Jaski for the company L. Bienfait & sn. On the maiden trip Jaski sailed her in 86 days from Duins to Port Adelaide, delivering a hundred satisfied English immigrants. This is about the Dutch city of Dordrecht. ...


The Kosmopoliet also carried cargo and passengers. She was full rigged and carried royals and skysails on all three masts. Though a voyage from Holland to Java (port to port) normally took a 100 days or more, the Kosmopoliet completed her maiden voyage in 89 days. Later she did the passage in 76, 74 and 77 days. In 1862 the Kosmopoliet II (1200 tons) was launched, followed by number III which measured 1385 tons. The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... View of the Puncak area in West Java Java (Indonesian: Jawa) is the most populous of Indonesias islands, and the site of its capital city, Jakarta. ...


Other companies soon followed Gebr. Blussé. Some clipper ships were purchased from abroad, like the Electra (ex-Witch of the Wave), but most were built in Dutch shipyards.
Other famous series were built, like the Noach I to VI (950 to 1350 tons), several Thorbecke's, the Lichtstraal (1260 tons), Voorlichter (1660 tons), Nestor, Utrecht, etc.


In 1874 a Dutch government investigation into the condition of the shipping industrie, called the Enquête of 1874, stated that in 1868 sixteen clipper ships with a total tonnage of 6000 tons, were registered. In 1873 there were eighteen ships (totalling 7878 tons). Although other sources mention a greater number of ships that can be called medium-clipper.


Probably there was a difference of opinion in the definition of the clipper. Maybe the ships in the Enquête were only called clipper when they were full rigged, but there were other rigs too. In 1854 for example, the Argo was launced as a 4-masted Jackass-barque. Others were rigged as barque and the Reinhart was a brigantine. BARK (Bin r Automatisk Rel Kalkylator) was completed in February 1950 at a cost of 400. ... In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ...


Some figures

The book De clippers of Anno Teenstra (1946) contains a list of all ships under Dutch flag which were classified as clipper over the period 1850-1890. The total list counts 140 ships. Eighteen of those were built on foreign shipyards.


Of the 122 Dutch ships:

61 were built as a full-rigged ship
44 were built as a barque
15 were built as a brig
2 were built as a schooner
1 was built as a brigantine

In later years some of the full-rigged ships were re-rigged as other types. 21 were re-rigged as barques, and 1 barque was even re-rigged into a ship. One re-rigged barque was further reduced into a schooner. A barque, sometimes spelled bark, originally referred to a particular type of ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows. ... In sailing, a brig is a vessel with two masts at least one of which is square rigged. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner is a type of sailing ship characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ...


Ten ships were built in iron, 6 were composite ships and 3 were built in steel. Three ships were built with auxiliary steam engines, and at all three ships the engines were taken out after a few years. Composite materials (or composites for short) are engineering materials made from two or more components. ... A steam engine is a heat engine that makes use of the thermal energy that exists in steam, converting it to mechanical work. ...


Even today the Dutch have a clipper sailing - the fullrigged ship Stad Amsterdam (http://www.stadamsterdam.nl). Built in 2000 by Damen Shipyards, owned by Randstad Holding and the city of Amsterdam. Municipality of Amsterdam Alternate meanings: See Amsterdam Amsterdam is the capital of the Netherlands. ...


Other Types


Types of sailing vessels and rigs

Bark | Barque | Barquentine | Bilander | Brig | Brig (Hermaphrodite) | Brigantine | Caravel | Carrack | Catamaran | Catboat | Clipper | Clipper (Dutch Clipper) | Cog | Cutter | Dhow | Fluyt | Fore & Aft Rig | Full Rigged Ship | Gaff Rig | Galleon | Gunter Rig | Hermaphrodite Brig | Junk | Ketch | Mersey Flat | Multihull | Nao | Norfolk Wherry | Pocket Cruiser | Proa | Schooner | Sloop | Smack | Snow | Square Rig | Tall ship | Thames Sailing Barge | Trimaran | Wherry | Wherry (Norfolk) | Windjammer | Xebec | Yacht | Yawl Wooden sailing boat Sailing is motion across a body of water in a sailing ship, or smaller boat, powered by wind. ... In Norse mythology, see Ríg. ... A barque, sometimes spelled bark, originally referred to a particular type of ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows. ... A barque, sometimes spelled bark, originally referred to a particular type of ship-rigged sailing vessel with a plain bluff bow and a full stern with windows. ... This article is about the ship. ... A bilander, also spelled billander or belandre, was a small European merchant ship with two masts, used in the Netherlands for coast and canal traffic and occasionally seen in the North Sea but more frequently to be seen in the Mediterranean Sea. ... In sailing, a brig is a vessel with two masts at least one of which is square rigged. ... A hermaphrodite brig, or brig-schooner, is a type of two-masted sailing ship which has square sails on the foremast combined with a schooner rig on the mainmast (triangular topsail over a gaff mainsail). ... In sailing, a brigantine is a vessel with two masts, at least one of which is square rigged. ... A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, three-masted ship used by the Spanish for long voyages of exploration beginning in the 15th century. ... Categories: Stub | Ship types ... Two Hobie catamarans, showing the typical Hobie raised platform joining the two hulls, and tall mast. ... The occupied boats are catboats, but with a mast and boom rig A catboat (alternate spelling: cat boat), or a cat_rigged sailboat, is a sailing vessel characterized by a single mast carried well forward (, near the front of the boat). ... For other uses, see Clipper (disambiguation). ... The earliest development seems to have been Celtic, though the cog was first noted in the Dutch city of Muiden in the 10th century. ... For other meanings, see cutter (baseball), cutter (tool) and self-harm. ... A dhow is a traditional boat design with one or more triangular sails, called lateens. ... A fluyt or a flute (pronounced as flight) is a type of sailing ship originally designed as a dedicated cargo vessel. ... A fore-and-aft rig is a sailing rig consisting mainly of sails that are set along the line of the keel rather than perpendicular to it. ... A full rigged ship or fully rigged ship is a square rigged sailing vessel with three or more masts, all of them square rigged. ... Gaff rig is a sailing rig in which the mainsail is a four-cornered fore-and-aft rigged sail controlled at its head by a spar called the gaff. ... For the fictional unit of money called a galleon, see Money in Harry Potter. ... In sailing, a gunter is a wire that leads from one end of a gaff to the other. ... A hermaphrodite brig, or brig-schooner, is a type of two-masted sailing ship which has square sails on the foremast combined with a schooner rig on the mainmast (triangular topsail over a gaff mainsail). ... The Junk is a Chinese sailing vessel. ... Ketch on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast aft of the main mast. ... A Mersey flat is a two masted, doubled-ended barge with rounded bilges, carvel build and fully decked. ... A multihull is a sailing ship with more than one hull. ... Categories: Stub | Ship types ... The Norfolk wherry is a black-sailed trader, type of boat on the Norfolk Broads and Suffolk Broads, now part of The Broads National Park, in Norfolk, England. ... A twin hulled vessel with unequal parallel hulls, superficially similar to an outrigger canoe. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner is a type of sailing ship characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... Important notice: This article is about the modern civilian boat type. ... See: To strike with an open palm, such as to smack a child. ... This article is about snow, the merchant vessel. ... Square rig is a generic type of sailing vessel in which the main horizontal spars are perpendicular to the keel of the ship. ... Tall ship is a somewhat informal collective term for some kinds of sailing ships. ... A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... A wherry (meaning boat) is a boat used for carrying cargo on rivers and canals in England. ... The Norfolk wherry is a black-sailed trader, type of boat on the Norfolk Broads and Suffolk Broads, now part of The Broads National Park, in Norfolk, England. ... A xebec, also spelled xebeque, jabeque, sciabecco, zebec, chebec and chebeck, was a small, fast, three-masted (but originally two-masted) vessel of the 16th to 19th centuries used almost exclusively in the Mediterranean Sea, with a distinctive hull, which added a pronounced overhanging bow and stern, and rarely displacing... A yacht was originally defined as a light, fast sailing vessel used to convey important persons. ... A yawl is a two-masted sailing craft similar to a sloop or cutter but with an additional mizzen mast well aft of the main mast, often right on the transom. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Clipper at AllExperts (1219 words)
Clippers sailed all over the world, primarily on the trade routes between Britain and its colonies in the east, in the trans-Atlantic trade, and in the New York-to-San Francisco route round The Horn during the Gold Rush.
Clippers, outrunning the British blockade of Baltimore, came to be recognized as ships built for speed rather than cargo space; while traditional merchant ships were accustomed to average speeds of under 5 knots (9 km/h), clippers aimed at 9 knots (17 km/h) or better.
Given their speed and maneuverability, clippers frequently mounted cannon or carronade and were often employed as pirate vessels, privateers, smuggling vessels, and in interdiction service.
clipper: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (1685 words)
Long and narrow, the clipper had the greatest beam aft of the center; the bow cleaved the waves; and the ship carried, besides topgallant and royal sails, skysails and moonrakers—a veritable cloud of sails.
One of these clippers, when fully rigged and riding before a tradewind were acknowledged to be the fastest of all sail vessels, with peak average velocities even exeeding 20 knots for endurances over 12 hours.
When the last China Clippers were retired, they ended the age of the fastest commercial sailing vessels made by man. Their velocities have been improved upon many times by modern ocean yachts, but never by any commercial sail vessel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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