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Encyclopedia > Dunmanway

Coordinates: 51°43′N, 09°07′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Dunmanway
Dúnmaonmhuí
Coat of arms of Dunmanway
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
51°43′15″N 9°06′46″W / 51.720955, -9.112716
Irish Grid Reference
W228530
Statistics
Province: Munster
County: County Cork
Population (2006) 2,328
Website: www.dunmanway.net

Dunmanway (Irish: Dúnmaonmhuí) is a small town in County Cork, in the southwest of Ireland. It is the geographical centre of the region known as West Cork. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... Demonstration map of County map with location on island of Ireland. ... The Global Positioning System (GPS) is the only fully functional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the túatha. ... Statistics Area: 24,607. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Cork Code: C (CK proposed) Area: 7,457 km² Population (2006) 480,909 (including City of Cork); 361,766 (without Cork City) Website: www. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Cork Code: C (CK proposed) Area: 7,457 km² Population (2006) 480,909 (including City of Cork); 361,766 (without Cork City) Website: www. ... West Cork (Irish: Iarthar Chorcaí) in south-west Ireland, lies in Irelands largest county, County Cork. ...


It is probably best known as the birthplace of Sam Maguire, an Irish Protestant republican, for whom the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship Trophy is named. Samuel (Sam) Maguire (1879 - February 6, 1927), an Irish Republican and Gaelic footballer, is chiefly remembered as the eponym of the Sam Maguire Cup, given to the All-Ireland Senior Champions of Gaelic football. ... The Gaelic Athletic Association The All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (known for sponsorship reasons as the Bank of Ireland Football Championship) is the premier knockout competition in the game of Gaelic football played in Ireland. ...


There is disagreement over the meaning and origin of the town's name. Various sources list its meaning when translated from Irish as "the castle of the yellow river," "the castle on the little plain," "the fort of the gables (or pinnacles)," and "the fort of the yellow women."

Contents

History

19th century references date the founding of Dunmanway to the late 17th century, when the English crown settled a colony there to provide a resting place for troops marching between Bandon and Bantry. By 1700, about thirty families lived in the town. WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference W488551 Statistics Province: Munster County: Elevation: 70 m (229 ft) Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   1,578  3,583 Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 51. ...


Sir Richard Cox, Lord Chancellor of Ireland in 1703–1707, was the town's most important early patron. Cox obtained a grant from King William III to hold market days and fairs in the town and strongly encouraged the development of the local flax industry. To that end, Cox imported artisans from Ulster to teach the required skills. He sponsored numerous incentives for local residents involved in making linen, including rent-free housing for top producers, bonuses for efficient laborers, rewards for schoolgirls who showed strong loom skills, and production contests with generous prizes. In 1735, the town consisted of forty houses and two to three hundred people. By 1747, the linen industry was well-established and Cox's personal census recorded 557 people. Two years later, it rose to 807.[1] The office of Lord Chancellor of Ireland was the highest judicial office in Ireland from earliest times until the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922. ... William III of England (The Hague, 14 November 1650 – Kensington Palace, 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, Stadtholder of the main provinces of the Dutch Republic from 28... Binomial name Linum usitatissimum Linnaeus. ... Statistics Area: 24,481 km² Population (2006 estimate) 1,993,918 Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) forms one of the four traditional provinces of Ireland. ...


Free-market economic policies in England led to the removal of protective duties on linen in 1827.[2] In 1837, Samuel Lewis's Topographical Dictionary of Ireland recorded a population of 2,738. It also recorded the town's changing economic fortunes: Samuel Lewis was the editor and publisher of topographical dictionaries and maps of the United Kingdom and Ireland. ...

The manufacture of linen continued to flourish for some years, but at present there are very few looms at work. A porter and ale brewery, established in 1831, produces 2,600 barrels annually; there are also two tanyards and two boulting-mills, the latter capable of grinding annually 15,000 bags of flour, and there are two or three smaller mills in the vicinity. Since 1810 a considerable trade in corn has been carried on.

West Cork was hit hard by the Great Famine. In the early 1850s, following the migrations and evictions which characterized the famine's upheavals, more than seventy percent of Dunmanway residents did not own any land.[3] An 1849 depiction of Bridget ODonnell and her two children during the famine. ...


On November 28, 1921, during the Anglo-Irish War (1919–1921), seventeen British Auxiliary Division troops were killed by the Irish Republican Army at the Kilmichael Ambush (near Dunmanway). The subsequent sacking and burning of the city of Cork by the occuping British forces is thought to be linked to the Kilmichael Ambush. On December 15, 1920, an Auxiliary shot dead the local priest, Canon Magner, for refusing to toll his church's bells on Armistice Day; a local boy, Tadhg Crowley, was also killed in an apparently random incident. There were numerous other actions in and around Dunmanway during the war (see Chronology of the Irish War of Independence). In addition, after a truce was declared in July 1921, the local IRA killed a number of alleged informers. Controversy continues in particular over the killing of ten men (including three residents of Dunmanway) in the spring of 1922, all of whom were Protestants (see Dunmanway Massacre). is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerrilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament... The Auxiliary Division of the Royal Irish Constabulary, generally known as the Auxiliaries or Auxies, was a paramilitary organization within the RIC during the Anglo-Irish War. ... This article is about the historical army of the Irish Republic (1919–1922) which fought in the Irish War of Independence 1919–21, and the Irish Civil War 1922–23. ... Combatants Irish Republican Army Royal Irish Constabulary Commanders Tom Barry Francis Crake† Strength 36 IRA volunteers of the West Cork Flying column 18 officers of the RIC Auxiliary Division Casualties 3 dead 17 dead 1 wounded The Kilmichael Ambush on November 28, 1920 was a turning point in the Irish... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 37. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Armistice Day Celebrations in Toronto, Canada - 1918 Armistice Day is the anniversary of the official end of World War I, November 11, 1918. ... This page aims to give a chronology of actions in the Irish War of Independence 1919-1921. ... The Protestant Massacre refers to the killings of thirteen Protestant civilians, allegedly by maverick elements of the Irish Republican Army, in West Cork] between 26 April/28 April 1922, apparently triggered by the killing of a member/volunteer of the IRA, Michael ONeill, Acting Officer Commanding of the Bandon...


Demographics

A statue of Sam Maguire in the town square.
A statue of Sam Maguire in the town square.

Just as a person living in Ireland is called Irish, or a person from County Cork is Corkonian, a person living in Dunmanway is known as a Doheny as the local Gaelic Athletic Association club is known as "The Dohenys". Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (960 × 1280 pixel, file size: 1. ... Samuel (Sam) Maguire (1879 - February 6, 1927), an Irish Republican and Gaelic footballer, is chiefly remembered as the eponym of the Sam Maguire Cup, given to the All-Ireland Senior Champions of Gaelic football. ... Statistics Province: Munster County Town: Cork Code: C (CK proposed) Area: 7,457 km² Population (2006) 480,909 (including City of Cork); 361,766 (without Cork City) Website: www. ... A stylised Celtic cross serves as the traditional logo of the GAA. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael) is an organisation which is mostly focussed on promoting Gaelic Games - traditional Irish sports, such as hurling, camogie, Gaelic football, handball, and rounders. ...


Immigration to the town in recent years has caused a massive growth in population. The population grew 52% in the period from 2002 to 2006. The 2002 census reported that there were 1,532 people living in Dunmanway and the 2006 census reported that the town has a population of 2,328.


Nationalities

By small town standards Dunmanway has a very cosmopolitan population. Immigration to the town and surrounding areas began in the 1970s in particular from the United Kingdom, Germany, and the Netherlands. Immigration from these countries is still going on, mainly in the form of people who are attracted to the relaxed pace of life which is the norm in West Cork. Into the 2000s, immigration to Dunmanway took on a greater pace as the Celtic Tiger economy began to take hold. Today in Dunmanway there are very considerable percentages of Polish, Latvians, and British. In addition to these there are small groups of Hungarians, Estonians, Germans, Dutch, and Chinese, along with individuals from many other countries. West Cork (Irish: Iarthar Chorcaí) in south-west Ireland, lies in Irelands largest county, County Cork. ... Cartoon of the Celtic Tiger. ...


Religion

Dunmanway is predominantly Roman Catholic with a large Protestant minority and a small Neopagan minority. There are two different Protestant denominations in the town, namely the Church of Ireland and Methodism, the former being by far the larger. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ... The Church of Ireland (Irish: ) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For school of ancient Greek medicine...


As Christianity is the religion of the vast majority of the town, Christmas and Easter are very important times of year in Dunmanway. Many businesses remain closed from Christmas Day for four or five days and then close again for a day or two for New Year's Day. At Easter the case is similar with many businesses closing from Good Friday to Easter Monday. The Corpus Christi procession in June is also a major event for the Catholic faithful. Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Easter, the Sunday of... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... This article is about January 1 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Good Friday is the Friday before Easter (Easter always falls on a Sunday). ... Easter Wednesday is the day after Easter Tuesday and is celebrated as a holiday in some largely Christian cultures. ... Corpus Christi Procession in Germany This article is about the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. ...


Many of the British immigrants to the town lead a New Age lifestyle and adhere to various forms of Neopaganism[citation needed]. New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... Neopaganism or Neo-Paganism is any of a heterogeneous group of new religious movements, particularly those influenced by ancient, primarily pre-Christian and sometimes pre-Judaic religions. ...


Local lore

A later scion of the Cox family, Richard, heard that a preacher allied to John Wesley was due to visit the town and decided to give him a ducking in the local lake. To practice he went out in a boat but fell into the water and was drowned. The event was commemorated by the following verse: John Wesley (June 28 [O.S. June 17] 1703 – March 2, 1791) was an eighteenth-century Anglican minister and Christian theologian who was an early leader in the Methodist movement. ...

"'Tis there the lake is,
Where the duck and the drake is,
And 'tis there the crane can have his fine feed of frogs.
When night come's round it,
The spirits surround it,
For in it was drownded Sir Richard Cox."
Chapel Lake.
Chapel Lake.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Burke, Terence (1974). "County Cork in the Eighteenth Century". Geographical Review 64 (1): pp. 61-81. 
  2. ^ Cousens, S.H. (1960). "The Regional Pattern of Emigration during the Great Irish Famine, 1846-51". Transactions and Papers (Institute of British Geographers) 28: pp. 119-134. 
  3. ^ Cousens, S.H. (1961). "Emigration and Demographic Change in Ireland, 1851-1861". The Economic History Review 14 (2): pp. 275-288. 

References

External links

  • Unofficial town site
  • Dunmanway
  • Doheny GAA Club

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dunmanway (190 words)
Dunmanway can be described as the geographic center of West Cork.
The fairs and the weekly market are no longer a feature of the town, which is the commercial and business centre for a wide area.
The various roads radiating westwards and northwards from Dunmanway lead to the scenic rugged heartland of West Cork which is in marked contrast to the coves and inlets of the coastal area.
Map of Dunmanway, County Cork IE by MapQuest (113 words)
Map of Dunmanway, County Cork IE by MapQuest
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