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Encyclopedia > Dunfermline
Dunfermline
Dùn Phàrlain (Gaelic)
Dunfermline (Scots)
OS grid reference: NT105875
Population: 39,229
Council area: Fife
Constituent country: Scotland
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Police force: Fife Constabulary
Lieutenancy area: Fife
Former county: Fife
Post town: DUNFERMLINE
Postal: KY11, KY12
Telephone: 01383
Scottish Parliament: Dunfermline East
Dunfermline West
Mid Scotland and Fife
UK Parliament: Dunfermline and West Fife
European Parliament: Scotland
Scotland
City Chambers, Dunfermline Town Centre
City Chambers, Dunfermline Town Centre

The Royal Burgh of Dunfermline (in Gaelic, Dùn Phàrlain) is a town in Fife, Scotland. It sits on high ground 3 miles from the shore of the Firth of Forth, northwest of Edinburgh. The town is the historic capital of Scotland and Robert the Bruce is buried within Dunfermline Abbey. The town is intersected from north to south by Pittencrieff Glen, a deep, picturesque and tortuous ravine, from which the town derives its name and at the bottom of which flows Lyne Burn. Dunfermline has a population of 39,229 [1]. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Scots refers to the Anglic varieties spoken in parts of Scotland. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (553x933, 177 KB) Summary Source file can be found at Category:Scottish Location Maps Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dunfermline ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997(as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... Constituent countries is a phrase sometimes used, usually by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia (example here) and European institutions such as the Council of Europe... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Fife Police bike photographed at Kirkcaldy police station. ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... This is a list of post towns in the United Kingdom, sorted by the postal area (the first part of the outward code of a postcode). ... This is a list of the post towns of the United Kingdom sorted in postcode sequence. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) has 73 constituencies, each electing one Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) by the first past the post system of election, and eight additional member regions, each electing seven additional member MSPs. ... Dunfermline East is a plurality voting system constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999 and is part of the Mid Scotland and Fife electoral region for the additional member system (AMS). ... Dunfermline West is a plurality voting system constituency represented in the Scottish Parliament since 1999 and is part of the Mid Scotland and Fife electoral region for the additional member system (AMS). ... Mid Scotland and Fife is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... Scotland is divided into 59 constituencies of the United Kingdom Parliament - 19 Burgh constituencies and 40 County constituencies. ... Dunfermline and West Fife is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Scotland. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (497x694, 60 KB) Source- Dave Dunn I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (497x694, 60 KB) Source- Dave Dunn I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... The Firth of Forth from Calton Hill The Forth Bridges cross the Firth Satellite photo of the Firth and the surrounding area Map of the Firth The Firth of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary or firth of Scotlands River Forth, where it flows into the North... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland (1306 – 1329). ... Dunfermline Abbey and Church - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Dunfermline Abbey is the remains of a great Benedictine abbey founded in 1070 by Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore and granddaughter of Edmund Ironside, King of England. ...


Dunfermline is in close proximity to the site of the former naval base and dockyard of Rosyth. Major industries in the Dunfermline area include engineering, electronics, defence and textiles. These have more recently gone into a steady decline. Employment in the town has in recent years begun to diversify to service sector employment and major employers in Dunfermline now include HBOS (Halifax Bank of Scotland) and BSkyB [2]. Rosyth (pronounced Ross-sythe) (Scottish Gaelic: Ros Saoithe) is located on the Firth of Forth on Scotlands east coast, a mile (1. ... Group headquarters on The Mound, Edinburgh HBOS Office at Trinity Road, Halifax HBOS plc (LSE: HBOS) is the holding company of the HBOS Group, formed on the 10 September 2001 by, and named after, the principals involved in the merger of Halifax plc, the former Halifax Building Society, with Bank... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

History

Image:Dunfermline is voted the qworse place to live . Abbey - entrance.jpg
Dunfermline Abbey, main entrance.

The history of Dunfermline goes back to a remote period, for the Culdees had an establishment here. The name comes from the Gaelic "Dùn Fearam Linn" which translates as "the fort in the bend of the stream". There is no documentary evidence for the name being derived from 'Parlan' or anything of the sort, other than the modern form of the name in Scottish Gaelic. The monks of the abbey called the Tower Burn, 'Aqua de Ferme' and the 'Ferm' element in the name dates back to documents of the eleventh century. The Culdees formed an ancient monastic order with settlements in Ireland and Scotland. ...


The town's increased fame and prosperity date from the marriage of Malcolm Canmore and his queen Margaret, which took place in the town in 1070. The king then lived in a tower on a mound surrounded on three sides by the glen. A fragment of this castle still exists in Pittencrieff Park, a little west of the later palace. Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (anglicised Malcolm III) (1030x1038–13 November 1093) was King of Scots. ... Stained glass window image of Saint Margaret of Scotland in the small chapel at Edinburgh Castle Saint Margaret of Scotland, also known by her Anglo-Saxon name Margaret Ætheling (c. ... Events Hereward the Wake begins a Saxon revolt in the Fens of eastern England. ...


Under the influence of Queen Margaret in 1075 the foundations were laid of the Benedictine priory, which was raised to the rank of an abbey by David I (see Dunfermline Abbey). Robert the Bruce gave the town its charter in 1322, though in his Fife: Pictorial and Historical (ii. 223), A. H. Millar contends that till the confirming charter of James VI (1588) all burghal privileges were granted by the abbots. A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... King David I (or Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim; also known as Saint David I or David I the Saint) (1084 – May 24, 1153), was King of Scotland from 1124 until his death, and the youngest son of Malcolm Canmore and of Saint Margaret (sister of Edgar Ætheling). ... Dunfermline Abbey and Church - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Dunfermline Abbey is the remains of a great Benedictine abbey founded in 1070 by Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore and granddaughter of Edmund Ironside, King of England. ... Robert I, King of Scots (Mediaeval Gaelic:Roibert a Briuis; modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Bruis; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; 11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), usually known in modern English as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland (1306 – 1329). ... Events September 27/September 28 - Battle of Ampfing, often called the last battle of knights, in which Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor defeats Frederick I of Austria Births January 11 - Emperor Komyo of Japan (died 1380) Deaths January 3 - King Philip V of France (born 1293) March 16 - Humphrey de... James VI and I (James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland. ... 1588 was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ...


In the 18th century Dunfermline impressed Daniel Defoe as showing the "full perfection of decay", but it regained prosperity. A staple industry was the manufacture of table linen. The weaving of damask was introduced in 1718 by James Blake, who had learned the secret of the process in the workshops at Drumsheugh near Edinburgh, to which he gained admittance by feigning idiocy; and after that date the linen trade advanced by leaps and bounds, much of the success being due to the beautiful designs produced by the manufacturers. Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Italian silk damask, 1300s. ... // The Funj warrior aristocracy deposes the reigning mek and places one of their own ranks on the throne of Sennar. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ...


Among other industries that have largely contributed to the welfare of the town are dyeing and bleaching, brass and iron founding, tanning, machine-making, brewing and distilling, milling, rope-making and the making of soap and candles.

Pittencrieff Park, known locally as The Glen.
Pittencrieff Park, known locally as The Glen.

The town is well supplied with public buildings. Besides the New Abbey church, the United Free church in Queen Anne Street founded by Ralph Erskine, and the Gillespie church, named after Thomas Gillespie (17081774), another leader of the Secession movement, possess some historical importance. Erskine is commemorated by a statue in front of his church and a sarcophagus over his grave in the abbey churchyard; Gillespie by a marble tablet on the wall above his resting-place within the abbey. Image File history File links Pittencrieff_Park. ... Image File history File links Pittencrieff_Park. ... The United Free Church of Scotland (or ‘U.F. Church’) is a Scottish Presbyterian denomination formed in 1900 by the union of the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland (or U.P.) and the Free Church of Scotland, which in turn united with the Church of Scotland in 1929. ... Ralph Erskine (March 18, 1685 - November 6, 1752), was a Scottish churchman. ... Thomas Gillespie (1708 - January 19, 1774), was a Scottish church leader. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ...


The Corporation buildings, a blend of the Scots Baronial and French Gothic styles, contain busts of several Scottish sovereigns a statue of Robert Burns, and Sir Noel Paton’s painting of the "Spirit of Religion." Other structures are the County buildings, the Public, St Margaret’s, Music and Carnegie halls, the last in the Tudor style, Carnegie public baths, high school (founded in 1560), school of science and art, and two hospitals . bovvered ??? Robert Burns, foremost Scottish poet Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) was a poet and a lyricist. ...


Eastern Expansion

Dunfermline has seen substantial growth, which has partially resulted from the rising house prices in Edinburgh. A large town expansion (known as Duloch Park) is taking place at the east of Dunfermline. It includes substantial provisions for housing and employment as well as a supermarket, a commercial leisure park and a district park with community woodland and open space. Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ...


The commercial leisure park has been called the Fife Leisure Park. It forms the most northern part of the eastern expansion and sits adjacent to junction 3 of the M90. It contains a number of commercial leisure facilities including an Odeon multiplex cinema, a bingo hall, a bowling alley and a gym. There are also a number of fast-food restaurants and a hotel associated with the leisure park. The Odeon was a building used for musical performance in Athens built in the 5th century BC. Hence, any building in ancient Greece or the ancient Roman Empire was called an odeon. ...


Town Centre & Shopping

 Dunfermline High Street looking west
Dunfermline High Street looking west

Dunfermline is a sub-regional shopping centre serving west Fife [3][4]. The centre is popular and has some of the highest levels of footfall in Fife [5]. The main shopping thoroughfare is located along a traditional, pedestrianised High Street. At one end of the High Street is a modern shopping mall, the Kingsgate Centre. A major expansion of the mall is currently underway. This is being built on the site of the former bus station and a multi-storey carpark. The extension will contain two levels of shops and will be anchored by a new Debenhams store, which is due for completion by the end of 2008. Fife Council are preparing plans to provide a new bus station at the west end of the High Street on the former Co-op site on Queen Ann Street.[6] Image File history File links Dunfermline_High_Street. ... Image File history File links Dunfermline_High_Street. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Main Street. ... Debenhams plc (LSE: DEB) is a retailer with a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom. ...


As a former capital of Scotland Dunfermline has an abbey and palace ruins which are located on the south-west edge of the town centre.


Facilities in and around the centre include the Carnegie Theatre, the Carnegie Library, the Carnegie Sports Centre, the Andrew Carnegie Birthplace Museum and the Abbots House Museum. A Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style Carnegie libraries for both public use and academic institutions were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie, earning him the nickname, the Patron Saint of Libraries. ...


Queen Margaret Hospital

Queen Margaret was built in two phases; phase 1 completed in 1983 and phase 2 in 1993. After only 8 years there were plans to downgrade the Hospital, and remove the A&E.


There were plans for Queen Margaret to receive services from a potential downgrading of Victoria Hospital in Kirkcaldy, which never occurred.


Queen Margaret has a dedicated railway station, built in 2000.


Education

Primary Schools

Dunfermline has 14 primary schools:

  • Bellyeoman Primary School
  • Canmore Primary School
  • Commercial Primary School
  • Lynburn Primary School
  • Masterton Primary School
  • McLean Primary School
  • Milesmark Primary School
  • Pitcorthie Primary School
  • Pitreavie Primary School
  • Pittencrieff Primary School
  • St.Leonard's Primary School
  • St.Margaret's RC Primary School
  • Touch Primary School
  • Wellwood Primary School

Secondary Schools

There are four high schools in the Dunfermline area. It should be noted that Dunfermline does have some of the largest high schools in Scotland.

Dunfermline High School is a school located near the centre of Dunfermline, the ancient capital of Scotland. ... Rector of Queen Anne, Mr James Bellshaw Queen Anne High School is a large non-denominational secondary school of around 1,800 pupils. ... Woodmill High School is a local authority run High School in Dunfermline, Scotland. ...

Dunfermline High School

Thought to be one of the oldest schools in Scotland, with evidence for its founding in the early 1120s, Dunfermline High School and its alumni have played an important part in the town's history throughout the ages. It was King David I, the son of Malcolm Canmore and Queen Margaret, who originally put up the money for the school.


It was taken out of the Abbey under which it was born and founded properly in the town in 1468 by Abbott Richard De Bothwell.


Later the school was burned down during the reformation and rebuilt by Queen Anne of Denmark in 1560 who was gifted the school as a present by the King.


In the Old Statistical Account of Scotland of 1790 reference is made to a school kept by Mr Robert Paterson over Queen Anne of Denmark's house in Dunfermline. Under the patronage of Queen Anne, wife of James VI of Scotland, a school was founded which was open to both boys and girls. Statistical Accounts of Scotland are indispensable documents for the study of Scotland in the 18th and 19th Centuries. ... Anna of Denmark (October 14, 1574 – March 4, 1619) was queen consort of King James I of England and VI of Scotland. ... James VI and I King of England, Scotland and Ireland James VI of Scotland and I of England (Charles James) (19 June 1566–27 March 1625) was a King who ruled over England, Scotland and Ireland, and was the first Sovereign to reign in the three realms simultaneously. ...


The poet Robert Henryson was one of the first "Masters" of the school. (Later the title master was changed to Rector)


It is from these great people that shaped the school in the first 800 years of its life that the house names come from - Canmore, Queen Margaret, Bothwell, Henryson; Denmark house was lost as recent school restructuring work as preparation for downsizing in 2008 when the school will be rebuilt. The school is the fourth largest in Scotland [7].


The school badge is made up from the crest of Malcolm Canmore, the Queen Margaret Cross and the symbol of Abbot Bothwell.


The school has two latin mottos: 1. "Quid Quid agis age pro viribus" meaning "Everything you do do it with vigour". 2. "Labor Omnia Vincit" meaning "Work conquers everything".


There are plans to rebuild the high school but they are still in the early planning stages.


Queen Anne High School

Queen Anne High School is a large non-denominational secondary school of around 1,800 pupils. It is the fifth largest in Scotland [8]. It is located on the northern outskirts of Dunfermline on Pilmuir Street (the A823). Rector of Queen Anne, Mr James Bellshaw Queen Anne High School is a large non-denominational secondary school of around 1,800 pupils. ...


Between the latter part of the nineteenth century and the 1930s, the school was located on a site between what is now bounded by the Kingsgate Shopping Centre, Pilmuir Street and Carnegie Drive. In the 1930s it moved to the former Dunfermline High School building that lay to the north of Priory Lane. In the 1950s it moved again to a new campus at Broomhead, just to the south of its current location. In August 2003 it moved again, but this time only 200 yards to the north.


Further Education

Dunfermline is home to Lauder College. It is located in the Halbeath area on the east of the town. Lauder College is a further education college based in Halbeath, Dunfermline, Scotland. ...


Dunfermline is within commuting distance for universities in Edinburgh, Stirling, Dundee and Glasgow. Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... For other uses, see Dundee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ...


Transport

Dunfermline is served by two rail stations on the Fife Circle line. These are Dunfermline Town on St Leonards Street and Dunfermline Queen Margaret. Stations located at Rosyth and Inverkeithing also serve a number of housing estates to the south of the town. Railway tracks running through a railway station in North East England A railway yard in Portland, Oregon. ...


Originally, there were two stations in the town, Dunfermline Upper and Dunfermline Lower. Dunfermline Upper on Carnegie Drive, closed in 1967, due to the Beeching downgrading of railway branch lines and stations. The site was empty land, until a retail park was built on the site, New Carnegie Drive around 1991. Many railway lines were closed as a result of the Beeching Axe The Beeching Axe is an informal name for the British Governments attempt in the 1960s to control the spiralling cost of running the British railway system. ...


Dunfermline Lower became simply Dunfermline, which operated on St Leonards Street and was the only station in the town. Dunfermline has changed its name slightly to became Dunfermline Town in 2000.


The main bus provider in Dunfermline is Stagecoach Fife, which operates services to surrounding towns and cities.


There is a 20mins service to Edinburgh, with all journeys operating via Ferrytoll park and ride facility which has been built to the south of Inverkeithing. Buses from here also link with Heriot-Watt University, Gyle, Leith and Edinburgh Airport. Ferrytoll is park and ride, located near Dunfermline at north side of the forth road bridge in 2004 it was expansioned to hold over 1000 cars buses operate every 10min off peak, ever 5mins at peak from Edinburgh - ferrytoll buses also operate to Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy, St Andrews List of buses...


Political subdivisions

Just before the 1975 reforms of the local government, there were plans to cut Fife in two with the southern half going to Edinburgh hands, but after public protest the plans were dropped.


From 1975 Dunfermline gave its name to a local government district in the Fife region of Scotland. Since 1996 it has been included in the Fife unitary area. (See: Subdivisions of Scotland) 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997(as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known...


See A. H. Millar’s Fife: Pictorial and Historical (2 vols,, 5895); and Sheriff Alneas Mackay’s History of Fife and Kinross (189?).


Town twinning

Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location within Rioja Media (La Rioja). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States. ... Cà dZan - a 1925 Sarasota residence that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places Sarasota is a city in the central west coast of Florida, USA. Sarasota Bay and several barrier islands facing the Gulf of Mexico are within its city limits. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Norway. ... County Sør-Trøndelag District Municipality NO-1601 Administrative centre Trondheim Mayor (2005) Rita Ottervik (AP) Official language form Neutral Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 258 342 km² 322 km² 0. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Wilhelmshaven is a town in Lower Saxony, Germany. ...

Notable people

Several distinguished names have connections with Dunfermline.


Robert Henryson (1430 - 1506), the poet, was long one of its schoolmasters. John Row (1568 - 1646), the Church historian, held the living of Carnock, 5 km (3 miles) to the west., and David Ferguson (d. 1598) who made the first collection of Scottish proverbs (not published till 1641), was parish minister; Robert Gilfillan (17981850), the poet, and Sir Joseph Noel Paton (1821-1901), painter and poet—whose father was a designer of patterns for the damask trade - were all born here. Robert Henryson (c. ... // Events May 23 - Joan of Arc is captured by the Burgundians while leading an army to relieve Compiègne The Ottoman Empire captures Thessalonica from the Venetians First use of optical methods in the creation of Art A map of Europe in 1430. ... 1506 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 23 - Peace of Longjumeau ends the Second War of Religion in France. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events January 7 - Boris Godunov seizes the throne of Russia following the death of his brother-in-law, Tsar Feodor I. April 13 - Edict of Nantes - Henry IV of France grants French Huguenots equal rights with Catholics. ... Events The Long Parliament passes a series of legislation designed to contain Charles Is absolutist tendencies. ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Study for The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania Joseph Noel Paton (13 December 1821 – 26 December 1901) is a Scottish artist, born in Woolers Alley, Dunfermline, Fife. ... The coronation banquet for George IV 1821 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Andrew Carnegie, however, is in a sense the most celebrated of all her sons, as he is certainly her greatest benefactor. He gave to his birthplace the free library and public baths, and, in 1903, the estate of Pittencrieff Park and Glen, rich in historical associations as well as natural charm, together with bonds yielding £25,000 a year, in trust for the maintenance of the park, the support of a theatre for the production of plays of the highest merit, the periodical exhibitions of works of art and science, the promotion of horticulture among the working classes and the encouragement of technical education in the district. So while New York's Carnegie Hall is much better known, Dunfermline has its own. Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American businessman, a major and widely respected philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham, NYC, City That Never Sleeps, The Concrete Jungle, The City So Nice They Named It Twice Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1676 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ...


Dunfermline is the hometown of the still-running 1970s rock band, Nazareth. `70's punk band The Skids and `80's pop-rock band Big Country were both founded here by singer/songwriter/guitarist Stuart Adamson, who grew up here. Dunfermline is also known as the birthplace of musician Ian Anderson, the frontman of the long-running British group Jethro Tull. Singer Barbara Dickson is also from the town. Nazareth is an earthy and versatile Scottish rock band that had several hard rock hits, as well as scoring with the Felice and Boudleaux Bryant penned ballad, Love Hurts, in the middle of the 1970s. ... The Skids The Skids were a punk rock and new wave band from Dunfermline in Scotland, founded in 1977 by Stuart Adamson (1958-2001, on guitar, vocals), Richard Jobson (vocals), Tom Kellichan (drums) and Willie Simpson (bass). ... For other uses, see Big Country (disambiguation). ... Stuart Adamson (April 11, 1958 - December 16, 2001), was a Scottish rock musician, who founded The Skids and later Big Country, as well as the 90s alternative country rock act, the Raphaels. ... Anderson (far right) with Jethro Tull in a recent promotional photo. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Barbara Dickson is a Scottish actress and singer, known for her work on stage (Blood Brothers) and television (Band of Gold). ...


Nutritionist and television presenter Gillian McKeith also grew up in the town. Gillian McKeith Gillian McKeith (born 1959) is a Scottish nutritionist, television presenter, and author. ...


Sport

Football

Dunfermline has one professional football team, Dunfermline Athletic (DAFC), which plays in the Scottish Premier League (SPL), the top division in Scottish football. The club is based at East End Park on Halbeath Road and has the nickname 'The Pars'. Dunfermline Athletic won the Scottish Cup in 1961 and 1968, and played regular European football in the UEFA and European Cup-Winners Cups throughout the 60s and early 70s. They reached the Semi Final of the European Cup Winners Cup in season 68-69, losing 1-2 on aggregate to eventual winners Slovan Bratislava. On the way to the semi-final they beat Apoel FC Olympiakos and West Bromwich Albion. The club are currently managed by former Derry City manager Stephen Kenny, after Jim Leishman moved upstairs to a "Director of Football" role in November 2006. Dunfermline Athletic F.C. is a Scottish football team currently playing in the Scottish Premier League. ... The Scottish Premier League (SPL) is the top division within the current structure of football in Scotland. ... The Cup Winners Cup was a football club competition between the winners of the European domestic league cups. ... Club Crest SK Slovan Bratislava is a Slovak football team, based in Bratislava. ... APOEL FC (Greek: ΑΠΟΕΛ; Aθλητικός Ποδοσφαιρικός Όμιλος Eλλήνων Λευκωσίας, Athlitikos Podosfairikos Omilos Ellinon Lefkosias, Hellenic Athletic Football (Soccer) Team of Nicosia) is a Cypriot football club, playing in Nicosia. ... Olympiacos CFP is a Greek football club, part of the Olympiacos sports club founded in 1925, which plays in the port city of Piraeus. ... West Bromwich Albion Football Club is an English football club formed by workers from Salters Spring Works in West Bromwich, West Midlands in 1878. ... Derry City can refer to: the Northern Ireland city of Derry/Londonderry and its local authority Derry City Council Derry City FC, an association football club playing in Northern Ireland. ... There are multiple individuals name Stephen Kenny, including: Stephen Kenny (Australian lawyer), Guantanamo detainee David Hicks original lawyer. ... Jim Leishman is a former professional footballer and is currently Manager of Scottish Premier League team Dunfermline Athletic. ...


Rugby Union

Dunfermline Rugby Football Club are based at McKane Park. The club has various teams, from the First XV which plays in Scotland's Premier 3 League, through to a Mini Section for primary school children.


Athletics

Linsey Macdonald was a member of the bronze medal winning women's 400m relay team at the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow. She was also a finalist in the individual 400m. Her old club Pitreavie AAC is still an active club with international competitors in track and field, cross country and road running. Badge, released in the USSR The 1980 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXII Olympiad, were held in Moscow in the Soviet Union. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The Dunfermline City Half Marathon is one of several summer long distance races which attracts an international field.


External links

References

Coordinates: 56.07192° N 3.43930° W For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Home | Dunfermline (300 words)
Dunfermline Athletic are delighted to announce CCW's sponsorship of their East Stand.
Start your day at East End Park on Sunday 25th November and enjoy our matchday hospitality before being taken to Dens Park, Dundee for the game.
We're sure that despite all of the difficulties of recent weeks, all fans of Dunfermline Athletic will want to congratulate Jim Leishman now that he has officially received his honour from Her Majesty the Queen.
Robert Burns Country: The Burns Encyclopedia: Dunfermline (426 words)
In its Abbey, founded in 1072 by Queen Margaret, wife of King Malcolm Ceannmor, Robert the Bruce lies buried.
It was at Dunfermline in 1581 that James VI signed the first National Convenant, and where, in 1650, Charles II signed the Dunfermline Declaration, reaffirming his oath to adhere to the Covenant.
Burns visited Dunfermline with Dr Adair during his tour of Clackmannanshire in October 1787, adair recorded: 'At Dunfermline we visited the Abbey Church now consecrated to Presbyterian Worship.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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