FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Dune (film)
Dune

Promotional film poster for Dune
Directed by David Lynch
Produced by Dino De Laurentiis
Written by Frank Herbert (novel)
David Lynch
Starring Kyle MacLachlan
Francesca Annis
Music by Toto
Cinematography Freddie Francis
Editing by Antony Gibbs
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date(s) December 14, 1984 (premiere)
Running time 137 min. (180 min. extended version)
Country United States
Language English
Budget $45,000,000 (estimated)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile
This article is about the 1984 film. See Frank Herbert's Dune for the 2000 adaptation.

Dune is a 1984 science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. The film stars Kyle MacLachlan as Paul Atreides, and includes an ensemble of well-known American and European actors in supporting roles, including Sting, Jose Ferrer, Virginia Madsen, Linda Hunt, Patrick Stewart, Max von Sydow, and Jürgen Prochnow, among others. It was filmed at the Churubusco Studios in Mexico City and included a soundtrack by the band Toto. As in the novel, the central plot concerns a young man foretold in prophecy as the "Kwisatz Haderach" who will protect the titular desert planet from the malevolent House Harkonnen and save the universe from evil. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (490x755, 44 KB) This image is of a film poster, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the film or the studio which produced the film in question. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... Francesca Annis as Lady Macbeth in Roman Polanskis Macbeth (1971). ... Toto was a Grammy Award winning American rock band founded in 1976[1] by some of the most popular and experienced session musicians of the era. ... Freddie Francis (born December 22, 1917) is an English cinematographer and film director. ... This article is about the American media conglomerate. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... This article is about the TV miniseries. ... // Events The Walt Disney Company founds Touchstone Pictures to release movies with subject matter deemed inappropriate for the Disney name. ... Science fiction film is a film genre that uses speculative, science-based depictions of imaginary phenomena such as extra-terrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, and time travel, often along with technological elements such as futuristic spacecraft, robots, or other technologies. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1985), wielding the infamous Weirding Module. Paul Orestes Atreides is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner, CBE (born October 2, 1951), universally known by his stage name Sting, is an Academy Award-nominated sixteen time Grammy-winning English musician from Wallsend in North Tyneside. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintron, known as José Ferrer (January 8, 1912-January 26, 1992), was an actor and director, born in Santurce, Puerto Rico. ... Virginia Madsen (born September 11, 1961) is an American actress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the actor. ...  , (born April 10, 1929) is an Academy-Award nominated Swedish actor, known in particular for his collaboration with filmmaker Ingmar Bergman. ... Jürgen Prochnow ([IPA: jʏɐgÉ™n pʀɔxnoː]; born June 10, 1941) is a German actor. ... Estudios Churubusco is one of the oldest and largest movie studios in Latin America located in the Churubusco neighborhood of Mexico City. ... Nickname: Location of Mexico City Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Dune is an original soundtrack by Toto for the film Dune, released in December 1984 (see music in 1984). ... Toto was a Grammy Award winning American rock band founded in 1976[1] by some of the most popular and experienced session musicians of the era. ... Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1984) For the related Hebrew expression, see Kefitzat Haderech. ... Emblem of House Harkonnen from Emperor: Battle for Dune For the novel of the same name, see Dune: House Harkonnen. ...


After the success of the novel, attempts to adapt Dune for a film began as early as 1971. A lengthy process of what is known in the film industry as development hell followed throughout the 1970s, during which directors such as David Lean, Alejandro Jodorowsky, and Ridley Scott were considered. In 1981, David Lynch was hired as director by executive producer Dino De Laurentiis. Development hell is media-industry jargon for a film, television screenplay, or computer program[1] (or sometimes just a concept or idea) getting stuck in development and never going into production. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... Alejandro Jodorowsky (IPA: ) (born February 17, 1929, in Tocopilla, Chile) is an amateur scholar in comparative religion, playwright, director, producer, composer, actor, mime, comic book writer, tarot card reader and historian, and psychotherapist. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... The primary definition of Executive Producer is the person who brings the money together for a motion picture or television production. ... Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ...


The film was not well received by critics and performed poorly at the American box office at the time. Upon its release, director David Lynch distanced himself from the project, stating that pressure from both producers and financiers restrained his artistic control and denied him final cut. Artistic control is a term commonly used in media production, such as movies, television, and music production. ... Final cut privilege is a film industry term usually used when a director has contractual authority over how a film is ultimately released for public viewing. ...


Fans of the Dune series are polarized by the movie, although in the years since its release, the film has become a cult favorite, and at least three different versions have been released worldwide. In some cuts of the film Lynch's name is replaced in the credits with the name of a fictional director Alan Smithee, a pseudonym used by directors who wish not to be associated with a film for which they would normally be credited. A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... Alan Smithee, Allen Smithee, Alan Smythee, and Adam Smithee are pseudonyms used between 1968 and 1999 by Hollywood film directors who wanted to be dissociated from a film for which they no longer wanted credit. ...

Contents

Plot

Note: The following synopsis refers to the "Theatrical cut" version of the film, which features departures from the original novel.
The Planets of Dune: Arrakis, Caladan, Giedi Prime and Kaitain.
The Planets of Dune: Arrakis, Caladan, Giedi Prime and Kaitain.

In the year 10,191 A.G. (After Guild) (23,190 AD), the known universe, a sprawling feudal galactic empire, is ruled by the Padishah Emperor Shaddam Corrino IV. In this time the most precious substance in the universe is the spice melange, which extends life, expands consciousness and is vital to space travel. The powerful Spacing Guild and its Navigators use the orange spice gas to achieve a sense called prescience by which they safely guide the interstellar ships to any part of the universe using the quantum mechanics of Holtzman generators, an extremely complicated machine which "folds space" (in effect, the ship is moved instantaneously across vast distances). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1422x610, 579 KB) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and possibly also by any actors appearing in the screenshot. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1422x610, 579 KB) This image is a screenshot from a copyrighted film, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by the studio which produced the film, and possibly also by any actors appearing in the screenshot. ... Arrakis, (الراقص ar-rāqiṣ, the dancer) later Rakis (informally known as Dune) is a fictional desert planet featured in the Dune series of novels by Frank Herbert; it is the home of the Fremen (Zensunni wanderers) and later, the Imperial Capital under the Atreides Empire. ... Caladan is a fictional planet in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Giedi Prime is the name of a fictional planet set in Frank Herberts Dune universe described in the Dune science fiction novels. ... Kaitain is a fictional planet appearing in Frank Herberts Dune universe. ... The Spacing Guild is a fictional organization in Frank Herberts Dune universe created in a series of science fiction novels starting in Dune and ending with Chapterhouse Dune. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... Padishah Emperor Shaddam Corrino IV, portrayed by Giancarlo Giannini in the Dune miniseries The Padishah Emperor was the title of the hereditary rulers of the Padishah Empire in Frank Herberts fictional Dune universe. ... Emperor Shaddam Corrino IV, portrayed by José Ferrer in Dune (1984) Shaddam Corrino IV is a character in the fictional Dune universe of Frank Herbert. ... Look up Melange in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Spacing Guild is a fictional organization in Frank Herberts Dune universe created in a series of science fiction novels starting in Dune and ending with Chapterhouse Dune. ... In the Dune universe, Guild Navigators are humans, mutated through high consumption of the spice melange, who are safely able to navigate interstellar space in a Heighliner. ...


Four planets draw the attention of the Spacing Guild: Arrakis, a desert planet and only source of spice in the universe; Caladan, home of House Atreides; Giedi Prime, home of House Harkonnen; and Kaitain, Home of the Emperor Shaddam IV. The Guild, fearing a plot that might jeopardize Spice production, sends a third stage Navigator to Kaitain demanding explanations from the Emperor, who confidentially lets the Guild know of his plans to destroy House Atreides. The popularity of Duke Leto Atreides has grown within the Landsraad, and as Leto is suspected to be creating a secret army with a technique involving sound, he is now a threat to the Emperor. Shaddam's plan is to give the Atreides control of Arrakis, replacing the Harkonnens, who at an appointed time would launch a sneak attack on the Atreides. Upon being informed of the plot, the Navigator commands the Emperor to kill the Duke's son, Paul Atreides, a young man who dreams prophetic visions of his purpose. The cryptic assassination order draws the attention of the Bene Gesserit sisterhood, as Paul Atreides is tied to their centuries long breeding program in search of the Kwisatz Haderach. Arrakis, (الراقص ar-rāqiṣ, the dancer) later Rakis (informally known as Dune) is a fictional desert planet featured in the Dune series of novels by Frank Herbert; it is the home of the Fremen (Zensunni wanderers) and later, the Imperial Capital under the Atreides Empire. ... Caladan is a fictional planet in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... The coat of arms of House Atreides, based on the description in the books For the novel of the same name, see Dune: House Atreides. ... Giedi Prime is the name of a fictional planet set in Frank Herberts Dune universe described in the Dune science fiction novels. ... Emblem of House Harkonnen from Emperor: Battle for Dune For the novel of the same name, see Dune: House Harkonnen. ... Kaitain is a fictional planet appearing in Frank Herberts Dune universe. ... Duke Leto Atreides, portrayed by William Hurt in the Dune miniseries Leto Atreides I is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... The Landsraad was a fictional organisation in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1985), wielding the infamous Weirding Module The Weirding Module was a device introduced into the Dune movie to replace the Bene Gesserit martial art referred to by the Fremen as the Weirding Way. ... Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1985), wielding the infamous Weirding Module. Paul Orestes Atreides is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... The Bene Gesserit (as seen in the prologue of an alternate version of the David Lynch Dune film. ... Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1984) For the related Hebrew expression, see Kefitzat Haderech. ...


Before departure, Paul is tested by Reverend Mother Gaius Helen Mohiam with a deadly gom jabbar at his throat. Paul is forced to place his hand in a box, which subjects him to excruciating and increasing pain; he passes to Mohiam's satisfaction, withstanding more pain than anyone has before him. Meanwhile, in the industrial world of Giedi Prime, the sadistic Baron Vladimir Harkonnen tells his nephews Glossu Rabban and Feyd-Rautha about his plan to eliminate their centuries long enemies, House Atreides, by manipulating someone very close to the Duke into betraying him. Gaius Helen Mohiam is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... The Gom Jabbar is a fictional device appearing in Frank Herberts Dune universe. ... Baron Vladimir Harkonnen, portrayed by Ian McNeice in the Sci-Fi Channels Dune miniseries The Baron Vladimir Harkonnen is a fictional character from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Glossu Rabban, portrayed by Laslo Imre Kisch in the Dune miniseries Glossu Rabban (nickname The Beast) was a minor character in the science fiction novel Dune by Frank Herbert. ... Feyd-Rautha portrayed by Matt Keeslar in the Dune miniseries Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen is a key character in the science fiction novel Dune by Frank Herbert. ...


The Atreides leave Caladan for Arrakis, a mysterious world of vast deserts, filled with gigantic sandworms and populated by the Fremen, mysterious people who have long held a prophecy that a messiah would come to lead them to true freedom. Upon arrival to Arrakis, Duke Leto is informed by one of his right-hand men, Duncan Idaho, that the Fremen have been largely underestimated, as they exist in vast numbers in Arrakis and could prove to be powerful allies. Duke Leto gains the trust of the people of Arrakis, proving to be a charismatic and just leader. But before the Duke can establish an alliance with the Fremen, the Harkonnen launch their attack more quickly than the Atreides expect. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Spoiler warning: The Fremen are a group of people in the Dune series of science fiction novels by Frank Herbert. ... Messiah (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; Aramaic: , Aramaic/Syriac: , ; Arabic: ‎, ) Literally, Messiah means The Anointed (One), typically someone anointed with holy anointing oil. ... Duncan Idaho is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ...


While the Atreides anticipated a trap, they are unable to withstand a devastating Harkonnen sneak attack, supported by the Emperor's elite troops, the Sardaukar, and aided by a traitor within House Atreides itself, Doctor Wellington Yueh. Captured, Duke Leto dies in a failed attempt to assassinate the Baron Vladimir Harkonnen using a poison gas capsule planted in his tooth by Dr. Yueh, but his concubine Jessica and his son Paul escape into the deep desert. With Jessica's Bene Gesserit abilities and Paul's developing skills, they manage to join a band of native Fremen. Paul emerges as Muad'Dib, the religious and political leader the Fremen have been waiting for. Paul teaches the Fremen to use the weirding modules and begins targeting mining production of spice. In the span of two years, spice production is effectively halted. The Emperor is warned by the Spacing Guild of the situation on Arrakis, as the Guild fears that Paul would eventually take the Water of Life. The fears of the Spacing Guild are revealed to Paul in a prophetic dream. Paul drinks the Water of Life and enters a coma that disturbs all Bene Gesserits in the universe. The water of life prompts several visions to Paul, and upon awaking Paul is transformed and gains control of the sandworms of Arrakis. He has also discovered the secret to controlling spice production; water kept in huge caches by the Fremen can be used to destroy the spice. Paul tells his army of Fremen "he who can destroy a thing controls it." Paul has also seen into space and the future; the Emperor is amassing a huge invasionary fleet above Arrakis to regain control of the planet and the spice. Emblem of the Imperial Sardaukar from Emperor: Battle for Dune The Sardaukar were a fictional army from Frank Herberts Dune universe, primarily featured in the science fiction novel Dune. ... Dr. Wellington Yueh, portrayed by Robert Russell in the Dune miniseries - Baron Vladimir Harkonnen Dr. Wellington Yueh is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Lady Jessica Atreides, portrayed by Saskia Reeves in the Dune miniseries Jessica Atreides is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... The Water of Life is a fictional drug from Frank Herberts science fiction novel Dune. ...


Upon the Emperor's arrival at Arrakis, Paul launches a final attack against both the Harkonnen and the Emperor at the capital city of Arakeen. His Fremen warriors, armed with weirding modules and riding sandworms, defeat the Emperor's legions of Sardaukar while Paul's sister Alia kills the Baron Harkonnen, who floats through a wall breach to be eaten by a sandworm. Paul faces the defeated Emperor, and avenges his family in a duel to the death with Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen. After making Feyd's organs burst by screaming at his corpse without a weirding module, Paul commands rain to fall on Arrakis. Alia reveals to everyone that Paul is the Kwisatz Haderach. Alia Atreides, portrayed by Daniela Amavia in the Children of Dune miniseries. ...


Cast

Kyle MacLachlan as Paul Atreides
Kyle MacLachlan as Paul Atreides

In credited order: Image File history File links Publicity still of Kyle MacLachlan in Dune This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organisation to promote their works in the media. ... Image File history File links Publicity still of Kyle MacLachlan in Dune This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organisation to promote their works in the media. ...

Sting as Feyd-Rautha.
Sting as Feyd-Rautha.

Francesca Annis as Lady Macbeth in Roman Polanskis Macbeth (1971). ... Lady Jessica Atreides, portrayed by Saskia Reeves in the Dune miniseries Jessica Atreides is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Leonardo Cimino is an Italian film and television actor. ... Bradford Claude Dourif (March 18, 1950, Huntington, West Virginia) is an American Academy Award nominated actor. ... Piter De Vries is a fictional character from Frank Herberts Dune science fiction series. ... José Vicente Ferrer de Otero y Cintrón (January 8, 1909 – January 26, 1992), was an Academy Award-winning Puerto Rican actor and film director, born in the Santurce district of San Juan, Puerto Rico. ... Padishah Emperor Shaddam Corrino IV, portrayed by Giancarlo Giannini in the Dune miniseries The Padishah Emperor was the title of the hereditary rulers of the Padishah Empire in Frank Herberts fictional Dune universe. ... Emperor Shaddam Corrino IV, portrayed by José Ferrer in Dune (1984) Shaddam Corrino IV is a character in the fictional Dune universe of Frank Herbert. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The following is a comprehensive list of Fremen from the fictional Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Freddie Jones (born September 12, 1927) is a British character actor. ... Thufir Hawat, portrayed by Freddie Jones in the 1984 movie Thufir Hawat, portrayed by Jan Vlasák in the Dune miniseries Thufir Hawat is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Richard Anson Jordan (July 19, 1938 – August 30, 1993) was an American stage, screen and film actor. ... Duncan Idaho is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1985), wielding the infamous Weirding Module. Paul Orestes Atreides is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Virginia Madsen (born September 11, 1961) is an American actress. ... Julie Cox as Princess Irulan in the miniseries Frank Herberts Dune. ... Silvana Mangano (April 21,[1] 1930 – December 16, 1989) was an Italian actress. ... Sayyadina Ramallo, or Reverend Mother Ramallo, is a fictional character from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Everett McGill (born October 21, 1945) is an American actor. ... Stilgar is a fictional character featured in Frank Herberts Dune universe. ... Kenneth McMillan (July 2, 1932 - January 8, 1989) was an American character actor. ... Baron Vladimir Harkonnen, portrayed by Ian McNeice in the Sci-Fi Channels Dune miniseries The Baron Vladimir Harkonnen is a fictional character from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Marvin John Nance (December 21, 1943 – December 30, 1996), known professionally as Jack Nance and occasionally credited as John Nance, was an American stage and screen actor in offbeat or avant-garde film and theatre. ... Siân Phillips (pronounced IPA: ), CBE is a Welsh actress who was born Jane Elizabeth Ailwên Phillips in Betws, Carmarthenshire, Wales, on May 14, 1933. ... Gaius Helen Mohiam is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Angélica Aragón (born as Angélica Espinoza Stransky July 11, 1953 in Mexico City) is a Mexican actress of telenovelas and such films as Dune, A Walk in the Clouds, Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights and the blockbuster film Sexo, Pudor y Lágrimas. ... Jürgen Prochnow ([IPA: jʏɐgÉ™n pʀɔxnoː]; born June 10, 1941) is a German actor. ... Duke Leto Atreides, portrayed by William Hurt in the Dune miniseries Leto Atreides I is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Paul L. Smith (born February 5, 1939 in Everett, Massachusetts) is a Hollywood character actor. ... Glossu Rabban, portrayed by Laslo Imre Kisch in the Dune miniseries Glossu Rabban (nickname The Beast) was a minor character in the science fiction novel Dune by Frank Herbert. ... This article is about the actor. ... Gurney Halleck is a fictional soldier in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner, CBE (born October 2, 1951), universally known by his stage name Sting, is an Academy Award-nominated sixteen time Grammy-winning English musician from Wallsend in North Tyneside. ... Feyd-Rautha portrayed by Matt Keeslar in the Dune miniseries Feyd-Rautha Harkonnen is a key character in the science fiction novel Dune by Frank Herbert. ... Dean Stockwell (born March 5, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning American film and television actor, active for over 60 years. ... Dr. Wellington Yueh, portrayed by Robert Russell in the Dune miniseries - Baron Vladimir Harkonnen Dr. Wellington Yueh is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ...  , (born April 10, 1929) is an Academy-Award nominated Swedish actor, known in particular for his collaboration with filmmaker Ingmar Bergman. ... Liet-Kynes is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Alicia Roanne Witt (born August 21, 1975) is an American film, stage and television actress. ... Alia Atreides, portrayed by Daniela Amavia in the Children of Dune miniseries. ... Mary Sean Young (born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 20, 1959) is an American actress. ... Chani (short for Chanisihayah) is a fictional character featured in Frank Herberts science fiction Dune universe. ... The following is a comprehensive list of Fremen from the fictional Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... The following is a comprehensive list of Fremen from the fictional Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... The following is a comprehensive list of Fremen from the fictional Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ...

Production

Pre-release flyer for Jodorowsky's Dune
Pre-release flyer for Jodorowsky's Dune

Shot almost entirely in Mexico, the movie is an adaptation of the first part of a series of novels (see Dune, by Frank Herbert) and containing elements from the later parts. Image File history File linksMetadata Jodorowskys_Dune. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Jodorowskys_Dune. ... Alejandro Jodorowsky (IPA: ) (born February 17, 1929, in Tocopilla, Chile) is an amateur scholar in comparative religion, playwright, director, producer, composer, actor, mime, comic book writer, tarot card reader and historian, and psychotherapist. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ...


The pre-production process was slow and problematic, and the project was handed from director to director.[1] In 1971 the production company Apjac International (APJ) (headed by Arthur P. Jacobs) optioned the rights to film Dune. As Jacobs was busy with other projects (such as the sequel of Planet of the Apes) the project was delayed for another year. Originally, it was to be directed by David Lean (with Robert Bolt writing the screenplay) and scheduled to begin shooting in 1974. In 1973, Arthur P. Jacobs died. Development hell is media-industry jargon for a film, television screenplay, or computer program[1] (or sometimes just a concept or idea) getting stuck in development and never going into production. ... Arthur Jacobs was a twentieth century film producer responsible for numerous classic films of the 1960s and 1970s, including the Planet of the Apes series, Dr. Doolittle, Goodbye, Mr. ... This article is about the 1968 film. ... Sir David Lean KBE (March 25, 1908 – April 16, 1991) was an Academy Award-winning English film director and producer, best remembered for big-screen epics such as Lawrence of Arabia, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Doctor Zhivago and A Passage to India. ... Robert Oxton Bolt (August 15, 1924 – February 12, 1995) was an English playwright and a two-time Oscar winning screenwriter. ...


In December 1974, a French consortium led by Jean-Paul Gibon purchased the rights to the movie from APJ. The director this time would be Alejandro Jodorowsky. Alejandro Jodorowsky (IPA: ) (born February 17, 1929, in Tocopilla, Chile) is an amateur scholar in comparative religion, playwright, director, producer, composer, actor, mime, comic book writer, tarot card reader and historian, and psychotherapist. ...


In 1975, Jodorowsky tried to film the story as a ten hour feature, in collaboration with Orson Welles, Dan O'Bannon, Salvador Dalí, Gloria Swanson, Hervé Villechaize and others (nicknamed by him as "his seven samurais"). The music would have been done by Pink Floyd. Jodorowsky set up a pre-production unit in Paris that consisted of Chris Foss, a British artist who designed covers for science fiction periodicals, Jean Giraud (Moebius), a French illustrator who created and also wrote and drew for Metal Hurlant magazine, and H. R. Giger. Moebius began designing creatures and characters for the film, while Foss was brought in to design the film's space ships and hardware. Giger started designing the Harkonnen Castle based on Moebius' storyboards and Dali was to play the role of the Emperor for a reported $100,000 an hour. Jodorowsky also hired Dan O'Bannon to head the special effects department. Dali and Jodorowsky began quarreling over money and just as the storyboards, designs, and the script were finished, the financial backing dried up. Frank Herbert travelled to Europe in 1976 to find that two million dollars of the 9.5 million budget were already spent in pre-production and that the Jodorowsky's script would result in a 14-hour movie ("It was the size of a phonebook" Herbert recalled). Although Jodorowsky took several creative liberties with his novel, Herbert stated that he and Jodorowsky had an amicable relationship. George Orson Welles (May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, actor and producer for film, stage, radio and television. ... Dan OBannon (born Daniel Thomas OBannon on September 30, 1946 in St. ... Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marquis of Púbol (May 11, 1904 – January 23, 1989), was a Spanish surrealist painter of Catalan descent born in Figueres, Catalonia (Spain). ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ... Hervé Jean-Pierre Villechaize (April 23, 1943 – September 4, 1993) was a French actor who achieved worldwide recognition for his role as Mr. ... Pink Floyd are an English rock band that initially earned recognition for their psychedelic or space rock music, and, as they evolved, for their progressive rock music. ... Christopher Foss (born 1946) is a British illustrator and science fiction artist, best known for his science fiction book covers and the illustrations for the original editions of The Joy of Sex. ... Jean Henri Gaston Giraud (born May 8, 1938) is a French comics artist. ... Métal Hurlant is the name of a French magazine of science fiction comics, created in December 1974 by Jean Giraud (aka Moebius), Jean-Pierre Dionnet and Philippe Druillet. ... Birth machine Hans Ruedi Giger (IPA: ) (born at Chur, Grisons canton, February 5, 1940) is an Academy Award-winning Swiss painter, sculptor, and set designer best known for his design work on the film Alien. ... Dan OBannon (born Daniel Thomas OBannon on September 30, 1946 in St. ...


The rights for filming were yet again sold, this time to Dino de Laurentiis. Although embittered, Jodorowsky states that the Dune project changed his life. Dan O'Bannon entered a psychiatric hospital after the failure of the production and worked on 13 scripts afterwards; his 13th script was Alien.[2] This article is about the first film in a series. ...


De Laurentiis commissioned Herbert to write the screenplay in 1978. However, considering that an average script is 110 pages long, Herbert's 175-page script was rejected.


With De Laurentiis holding the rights for filming, he hired director Ridley Scott in 1979 (with Rudolph Wurlitzer writing the screenplay and H.R. Giger back from the Jodorowsky production). Scott worked on three scripts using The Battle of Algiers as a point of reference and intended to split the book into two movies before moving on to direct another science fiction film, 1982's Blade Runner. As he recalls, the pre-production process was slow and to get the project done would have taken more time: Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... The Battle of Algiers (in Italian, La Battaglia di Algeri) is a 1965 black-and-white film directed by Gilles Pontecorvo. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about the 1982 film. ...

But after seven months I dropped out of Dune, by then Rudy Wurlitzer had come up with a first-draft script which I felt was a decent distillation of Frank Herbert's. But I also realised Dune was going to take a lot more work — at least two and a half years' worth. And I didn't have the heart to attack that because my older brother Frank unexpectedly died of cancer while I was prepping the De Laurentiis picture. Frankly, that freaked me out. So I went to Dino and told him the Dune script was his. — From Ridley Scott: The Making of his Movies by Paul M. Sammon

By 1981, the nine-year deal was expiring. De Laurentiis re-negotiated the rights again and settled the rights for Dune sequels (written and unwritten). Raffaella De Laurentiis, after seeing The Elephant Man, decided that David Lynch should direct the movie. Around that time Lynch was receiving several other offers, including Return of the Jedi, and agreed to direct and write Dune. The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Movie poster Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi, is a science fiction film that debuted in 1983, and re-released with changes in 1997 and 2004. ...


David Lynch worked on the script for six months with Eric Bergen and Christopher De Vore, eventually adapting the movie into two scripts. The team split up after this first attempt because of creative differences. Lynch would continue to work on five more different scripts. Shooting of Dune finally started with the 135-page 6th draft of the script on March 30, 1983. With a budget of over 40 million dollars, Dune required 80 sets built upon 16 sound stages and a total crew of 1700, with many of the exterior shots filmed in the Samalayuca Dunes in Chihuahua. The rough cut of Dune under completion was over four hours in duration without post production effects, but Lynch's intended cut of the movie as reflected in the seventh and last draft of the script was three hours long. is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... THEY SUC |native_name = |nickname = Lady of the Desert |settlement_type = |motto = |image_skyline = |imagesize = |image_caption = |image_flag = Mexico stateflags Chihuahua. ...


However, Universal Pictures and the film financiers expected a standard two-hour cut of the film. To shorten the film, producers Dino De Laurentiis, Raffaella De Laurentiis and director David Lynch removed numerous scenes, filmed new scenes that comprised simplified or concentrated elements of the plot, and added voice over narrations, including a new introduction by Virginia Madsen, into the final cut. Contrary to popular rumors, Lynch made no other version of the movie outside the Theatrical Cut; no longer, three to six hour version ever existed in its complete form.[3] Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ...


In the Introduction for his 1985 short story collection Eye, Frank Herbert discussed the film's reception and his participation in the production, and listed scenes that were shot but cut from the released version.[4] Herbert stated he was satisfied with the end result of the movie, but expressed disappointment that some of the scenes he saw on the rough cuts of Dune were not included in the Theatrical Cut.[5] This article is in need of attention. ... Eye is a collection of short stories written by Frank Herbert and published in 1985. ...


Release

Dune's premiere was on December 3, 1984 at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. and was released worldwide on December 14. Publicity for Dune was extensive before its release, not only because it was based on a best-selling novel but because it was directed by David Lynch, who had success with Eraserhead and The Elephant Man. Several magazines followed the production, and published articles praising the film before its release,[6] all part of the advertising and merchandising of Dune, which also included a documentary for television as well as items placed in toy stores.[7] is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Reception

In his review, critic Roger Ebert gave Dune one star out of four and wrote "This movie is a real mess, an incomprehensible, ugly, unstructured, pointless excursion into the murkier realms of one of the most confusing screenplays of all time." [8] Ebert added that "The movie's plot will no doubt mean more to people who've read Herbert than to those who are walking in cold," and later named it "the worst movie of the year."[9] On At The Movies with Gene Siskel and Ebert, Siskel began his review by saying "it's physically ugly, it contains at least a dozen gory gross-out scenes, some of its special effects are cheap — surprisingly cheap because this film cost a reported 40 to 45 million dollars — and its story is confusing beyond belief. In case I haven't made myself clear, I hated watching this film."[10] The film was later listed as the worst film of 1984 in their "Stinkers of 1984" episode.[11] Other negative reviews focused on the same issues as well as on the length of the film.[12] Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... At the Movies with Ebert & Roeper is a movie review television program featuring film critic Roger Ebert and columnist Richard Roeper, both of the Chicago Sun-Times. ... Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ...


Janet Maslin of The New York Times also gave Dune a negative review of one star out of five. She said that, "Several of the characters in Dune are psychic, which puts them in the unique position of being able to understand what goes on in the movie" and explained that the plot was "perilously overloaded, as is virtually everything else about it." Janet Maslin (b. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


The staff of Variety gave Dune a more favorable, but still negative review stating "Dune is a huge, hollow, imaginative and cold sci-fi epic. Visually unique and teeming with incident, David Lynch's film holds the interest due to its abundant surface attractions but won't, of its own accord, create the sort of fanaticism which has made Frank Herbert's 1965 novel one of the all-time favorites in its genre." They also commented on how "Lynch's adaptation covers the entire span of the novel, but simply setting up the various worlds, characters, intrigues and forces at work requires more than a half-hour of expository screen time." They did enjoy the cast and said that "Francesca Annis and Jurgen Prochnow make an outstandingly attractive royal couple, Siân Phillips has some mesmerizing moments as a powerful witch, Brad Dourif is effectively loony, and best of all is Kenneth McMillan, whose face is covered with grotesque growths and who floats around like the Blue Meanie come to life." Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Blue Meanie can refer to: Blue Meanies, fictional music-hating creatures who invade Pepperland in the movie Yellow Submarine Blue Meanies, fictional cat-like creatures in Katherine Applegates book series, Remnants. ...


Richard Corliss of Time magazine gave Dune a negative review, stating that "Most sci-fi movies offer escape, a holiday from homework, but Dune is as difficult as a final exam. You have to cram for it." He noted that "MacLachlan, 25, grows impressively in the role; his features, soft and spoiled at the beginning, take on a he-manly glamour once he assumes his mission." He ended by saying "The actors seem hypnotized by the spell Lynch has woven around them — especially the lustrous Francesca Annis, as Paul's mother, who whispers her lines with the urgency of erotic revelation. In those moments when Annis is onscreen, Dune finds the emotional center that has eluded it in its parade of rococo decor and austere special effects. She reminds us of what movies can achieve when they have a heart as well as a mind." Richard Corliss is a writer for Time magazine who focuses on movies, with the occasional article on music or sports, and has distinguished himself for his clever way with words. ... TIME redirects here. ...


While most critics were negative towards Dune, critic and science fiction writer Harlan Ellison was of a different opinion at the time. In his 1989 book of film criticism Harlan Ellison's Watching, he says that the $42 million production failed because critics were denied screenings at the last minute after several re-schedules, a decision by Universal that, according to Ellison, made the film community feel nervous and negative towards Dune before its release.[13] Ellison eventually became one of the film's few positive reviewers. Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. ... Harlan Ellisons Watching Harlan Ellisons Watching (ISBN 0887330673) is a 1989 compilation of 25 years worth of essays and film reviews written by Harlan Ellison for Cinema magazine, the Los Angeles Free Press, Starlog magazine, and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction among others. ...


More even-handed criticism praised Lynch's noir-baroque approach to the film. Others compare it to other Lynch films that are equally hard to access, such as Eraserhead, and assert that in order to watch it, the viewer must first be aware of the Dune universe. In the years since its initial release Dune has become a cult favorite, and has gained more positive reviews from online critics[14] and viewers.[15] Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. ...


As a result of its poor commercial and critical reception, all initial plans of Dune's sequels were cancelled. It was reported that David Lynch was working on the screenplay for Dune Messiah [16] and was hired to direct a second and a third Dune film. Dune Messiah is a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert, the second in a series of six novels. ...


In retrospect, "Lynch admitted he should never have directed Dune," [17] and prefers not to discuss it in interviews. Universal has approached him for a possible Director's Cut of the film, but Lynch has rejected every offer. A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ...

I started selling out on Dune. Looking back, it's no one's fault but my own. I probably shouldn't have done that picture, but I saw tons and tons of possibilities for things I loved, and this was the structure to do them in. There was so much room to create a world. But I got strong indications from Raffaella and Dino De Laurentiis of what kind of film they expected, and I knew I didn't have final cut. — David Lynch, on Dune[18]

Departures from the novel

The film makes numerous departures from the novel, most notably in the case of the Weirding Way, which in the novel is a super-martial art form that allows Paul Atreides to move with lightning speed. In the film it is replaced with "Weirding Modules," sonic weapons that resemble small video cameras and amplify the user's voice into a destructive force. Since the time of release, this has been controversial among Dune fans.[19][20] Reportedly, the original technique was left out because it was thought that a pitched combat of Fremen fighting Sardaukar while using the book's Weirding Way would resemble an unsophisticated kung-fu film; additionally, the Weirding Modules provided an opportunity for the use of special effects. This change literalized a moment in the novel in which Paul says his name had become a death-prayer, as the Fremen shout "Muad'dib!" before killing an opponent. In the film, a Fremen training with the weirding module says "Muad'dib" and accidentally destroys a ceiling, leading Paul to make the remark "my name is a killing word." The Bene Gesserit (as seen in the prologue of an alternate version of the David Lynch Dune film. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1985), wielding the infamous Weirding Module The Weirding Module was a device introduced into the Dune movie to replace the Bene Gesserit martial art referred to by the Fremen as the Weirding Way. ... Spoiler warning: The Fremen are a group of people in the Dune series of science fiction novels by Frank Herbert. ... Emblem of the Imperial Sardaukar from Emperor: Battle for Dune The Sardaukar were a fictional army from Frank Herberts Dune universe, primarily featured in the science fiction novel Dune. ... Martial arts film is a film genre that originated in the Pacific Rim. ...


The film grants the Bene Gesserit telepathy, while the novel notes their keen, nearly superhuman awareness. In a scene in which Spacing Guild members are responsible for covering up the Guild Navigator's activities, they cannot speak normally, but instead use a translating device, which has the appearance of a vintage radio microphone. Hawat is forced to milk a gruesome captive cat daily for the antidote to the residual poison in his body. The Harkonnens drink the juices of crushed insects; they also have heart-plugs, sadistic devices that terminate slaves by "unplugging" their hearts. Telepathy, from the Greek τῆλε, tele, remote; and πάθεια, patheia, to be effected by, describes the hypothetical transfer of information on thoughts or feelings between individuals by means other than the five classical senses. ... Sandworm from the cover of Heretics of Dune. ...


There are several distinctive visual and aesthetic choices made in the film that do not seem directly inspired by Herbert's novel. In the film, the Bene Gesserit women adopt shaven heads when they become Reverend Mothers and the Mentats have enormous eyebrows. The 'thopters (ornithopters) are depicted as wingless, jet- or rocket-propelled aircraft, while the color of the Arrakeen sky is changed from silver to orange. Aesthetics is commonly known as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values, sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste. ... An ornithopter (from Greek ornithos bird and pteron wing) is an aircraft that flies by flapping its wings. ...


Perhaps most conspicuously, both Paul and Feyd-Rautha are older in the film than in the novel. There is no mention in the film of the reasons for their mutual hatred, which are explained in detail in the novel. Furthermore, their climactic duel is reduced in both significance and length in the film.


Several characters are entirely excluded from the film adaptation, presumably as a result of time limitations, such as Count Fenring, his Bene Gesserit wife Margot, and several other minor characters. The deaths of characters such as Thufir Hawat, Baron Harkonnen, and Rabban were altered or omitted altogether. Hasimir Fenring is a fictional character in the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ... Lady Margot Fenring is a fictional character from the Dune universe created by Frank Herbert. ...


The final line in the novel, spoken by Jessica to Chani, is "We who carry the name of concubine - history will call us wives" (in reference to Paul's marriage to and refusal of Irulan). In the film, the final lines (spoken by Alia) are "And how can this be? For he is the Kwisatz Haderach!", and are delivered after rain falls on Arrakis. Paul Atreides, as portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynchs Dune (1984) For the related Hebrew expression, see Kefitzat Haderech. ...


Some of the novel's central themes were minimized for the adaptation; political topics such as the "unstable tripod of power" in the novel's universe (Emperor, Landsraad, and Guild) were not depicted faithfully.[21] The Guild treat the Emperor like a lackey rather than an equal power, while the Landsraad is almost non-existent. The book has the Guild operating behind the scenes, and their dependence on spice is only revealed at the end. It is not said that they were involved in the original plot against Duke Leto Atreides.


The Emperor's main concern in the book is that the Fremen are potentially as dangerous as his Sardaukar, the toughness of each group being reckoned to come from the harshness of their environment. He is less concerned with spice, reckoning he will get his share whoever controls it.


The ecological themes were not addressed as they were through the series: the film ends with rain falling on Arrakis, apparently at Paul's command. In the novel, this was accomplished decades later, through great efforts by the Fremen and years of terraforming. Additionally, a plot complication is created because rain falling on Arrakis would effectively stop spice production, as in the novel, water is the only thing that poisons worms.[22] Artists conception of a terraformed Mars in four stages of development. ...


Versions

DVD cover for Dune
2006 Extended Edition DVD cover

Despite a scathing overall reception, the movie has achieved a respectable cult status of which at least three other versions outside the original theatrical cut have been released. In grand total, five versions of Dune are known. Download high resolution version (694x873, 144 KB)Dune front cover. ... Download high resolution version (694x873, 144 KB)Dune front cover. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Theatrical cut

Released worldwide in 1984, it was edited by 37 seconds in the UK to pass PG rating, at a total running time of 137 minutes. Though this 137-minute version was not David Lynch's intended cut, it is the only director-approved version and the only official version he ever made of the film for release. It is widely available on both VHS and DVD. In 2006 it was remastered for a special DVD release, and as of late 2006 has been released on HD-DVD with many of the special features seen on other disks. DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Alan Smithee version

The less-seen 189-minute "Alan Smithee" version is a favorite on its own, released in 1989. Prepared originally for syndicated television (and later seen on basic cable television networks) for a two-night broadcast, it was prepared without either participation or authorization by David Lynch. The missing footage includes a painted montage at the prologue, and several scenes reinserted, including the "little-maker" essence-of-spice scene. The television version was edited in a seemingly haphazard way (for example, certain shots were repeated throughout the film to create the impression that new footage had been added). Lynch objected to these edits and had his name removed from the credits of this print (which were replaced by Alan Smithee and Judas Booth). This version was initially only released on laserdisc in Japan, but has also been found as a poorly recorded VHS on the bootleg market.[23] It is now available worldwide on DVD. Alan Smithee, Allen Smithee, Alan Smythee, and Adam Smithee are pseudonyms used between 1968 and 1999 by Hollywood film directors who wanted to be dissociated from a film for which they no longer wanted credit. ...


Channel 2 version

In 1992, KTVU, a San Francisco, CA Fox affiliate, pieced together a hybrid edit of the two previous versions for broadcast in the San Francisco Bay Area. It is essentially the television version with all the violence of the theatrical version reincorporated into the film, along with many of the "fabricated" shots objected to by Lynch removed. {{Infobox_Broadcast | call_letters = KTVU| city = | station_logo = | station_slogan = Complete Bay Area News Coverage| station_branding = KTVU Fox 2 (general)KTVU Channel 2 News HD (news)| analog = 2 (VHF)| digital = 56 (UHF)| other_chs = | affiliations = Fox| network = | founded = March 3, 1958| location = [[Oakland, California]| callsign_meaning = K TeleVision for YoU(though original owner claimed calls were... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ...


An Extended Edition DVD version was released in Europe in November 2005. It includes, among its many extra features, an extended version of the film, credited to Alan Smithee, which is 177 minutes long. The booklet explains that this version was created for an American television channel, and is most likely the aforementioned Channel 2 Version. Neither the video nor the audio was remastered, exhibiting a poor television-like quality. Although the cover states that the soundtrack is in mono sound, it is, in fact, in stereo.[citation needed]


Extended Edition

An Extended Edition was released by Universal Home Entertainment in the US on DVD on January 31, 2006. The DVD contains both Lynch's 137-minute theatrical cut and a 177-minute edit of the Alan Smithee television version (the latter being presented for the first time in its original anamorphic aspect ratio). It also features a documentary on the production design and special effects, as well as a supplementary section of outtakes and scenes not included in any previous version of the film, including an alternate ending. is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anamorphic widescreen is a cinematography and photography technique for capturing a widescreen picture on standard 35mm film. ...


Workprint version

An assembly of all footage after the completion of principal photography was shown to the crew in Mexico, as well as to Frank Herbert. Contrary to popular fan rumors, it was by no means the Director's Cut of the film. This workprint version is the basis of such rumors, but there was never a four-hour cut of the movie in its complete form. In the fan edit online communities, attempts have been made to re-assemble a "Workprint" of the film closer to David Lynch's intent and the original novel by using the deleted scenes and fixing any technical errors from the Smithee version.[24] A workprint is a rough version of a motion picture, used by the film editor(s) during the editing process. ... A fan edit is a version of a film modified by a viewer, that removes, reorders, or adds material in order to create a new interpretation of the film. ...


Influence on popular culture

The Reverend Mother and the Lady Elara from Emperor: Battle for Dune
The Reverend Mother and the Lady Elara from Emperor: Battle for Dune
Emperor Frederick Corrino IV from Dune 2000
Emperor Frederick Corrino IV from Dune 2000

The film inspired the Cryo Interactive video game Dune, which used elements (such as the Weirding Modules) unique to the film. The character of Paul Atreides was designed to look like Kyle MacLachlan, and the CD version of the game included footage of the film. The Westwood Studios Dune games (Dune II, Dune 2000 and Emperor: Battle for Dune) were also visually influenced by the film. For example, the Emperor in Dune 2000 and the Reverend Mother in Emperor: Battle for Dune resemble the equivalent characters in Lynch's film. Image File history File links Reverend_Mother_Holding_Lady_Elara_Captive. ... Image File history File links Reverend_Mother_Holding_Lady_Elara_Captive. ... A Reverend Mother is a fictional character appearing in the novel Dune, being a Bene Gesserit woman who has finished her training. ... Image File history File links Shaddam_IV_The_Bastard. ... Image File history File links Shaddam_IV_The_Bastard. ... Dune 2000 is a Dune computer game, released by Westwood Studios in 1998. ... Cryo Interactive Entertainment was a French video game development and publishing company founded in 1992, but existing unofficially since 1989 as a developer group under the name Cryo. ... Dune, by Cryo Interactive, is one of the Dune computer games. ... Westwood Studios (1985-2003) was a computer and video game developer, founded in 1985 as Westwood Associates by Brett Sperry and Louis Castle and based in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... A number of computer games based on Frank Herberts science fiction novel Dune and its two adaptations for film and television were created: // Main article: Dune (video game) Dune blended adventure with economics and military strategy, and is considered by many the most immersive Dune computer game. ... Dune II: The Building of a Dynasty (retitled Dune II: Battle for Arrakis in Europe and for the Mega Drive/Genesis port) is a Dune computer game, released in 1992 by Westwood Studios. ... Dune 2000 is a Dune computer game, released by Westwood Studios in 1998. ... A Reverend Mother is a fictional character appearing in the novel Dune, being a Bene Gesserit woman who has finished her training. ...


Dialogue and music from the film have been sampled in various songs. On their album Machine Language, the techno-music DJ group Dynamix II's song "Get Out of My Mind" samples the Mohiam/Alia scene which features the titular line. Virginia Madsen's opening monologue is also featured in several songs by artists including Aphrodite, Astral Projection, and MFG. The Christian industrial/dance band Mortal samples from the film in their 1993 album Fathom, including featuring Baron Harkonnen's line "I'm alive!" in the song "Alive and Awake." The 1990 production of "Spice" by Eon (musician) also contains dialogue from the Baron and Guild Navigators. Category: ... Aphrodite (born Gavin King) less commonly known as A Zone or DJ Aphro, is a UK jungle and drumnbass DJ/producer commonly referred to as the Godfather of Jungle, who works along with Micky Finn on their joint Urban Takeover label. ... Astral Projection are an electronic musical group producing Goa Trance music. ... MFG (also known as Message From God) are Aharon Segal and Guy Zurkel, a psychedelic trance project from Israel. ... Dance music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. ... // Also known as Ian Loveday this house and techno pioneer released a seminal cd Void Dweller (Sept 1992) with dark and hard driving beats, with samples of Dune and themes from the classic horror movie Basket Case (film). ...


Dune is the likely inspiration for the lyrics "Walk without rhythm, it won't attract the worm" in the song "Star 69 / Weapon of Choice" by Fatboy Slim. In the novel, Paul notes "We must walk without rhythm" to avoid notice by a sandworm as he and Jessica cross the desert; Lynch's Dune (1984) features Paul's line "If we walk without rhythm, we won't attract the worm" 82 minutes into the film.[25] Weapon of Choice is a song by Fatboy Slim, aka Norman Cook, released in 2000. ... FatBoy Slim (born Quentin Leo Cook on July 31, 1963,[1] also known as Norman Cook) is a British big beat musician. ...


See also

Dune is an original soundtrack by Toto for the film Dune, released in December 1984 (see music in 1984). ... Toto was a Grammy Award winning American rock band founded in 1976[1] by some of the most popular and experienced session musicians of the era. ... This is an incomplete list, which may never be able to satisfy certain standards for completeness. ... This article is about the TV miniseries. ...

References

Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Eye is a collection of short stories written by Frank Herbert and published in 1985. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... The fictional Dune universe, or Duniverse, is the political, scientific, and social setting of author Frank Herberts six-book Dune series of science fantasy novels. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... Dune Messiah is a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert, the second in a series of six novels. ... Children of Dune Children of Dune is a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert, third in a series of six novels set in the Dune universe. ... God Emperor of Dune is a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert published in 1981 — the fourth novel in the Dune series. ... Heretics of Dune is a 1984 science fiction novel by Frank Herbert, fifth in a series of six novels. ... Chapterhouse Dune is a science fiction novel by Frank Herbert, last in his series of six Dune novels. ... Brian Patrick Herbert (born 1947) is a best selling American author who lives in Washington state. ... |200px| ]] Pseudonym: Gabriel Mesta Born: March 27, 1962 ) Oregon, Wisconsin, U.S. Occupation: Author Genres: Science fiction Debut works: Resurrection, Inc Influences: The War of the Worlds Kevin J. Anderson (born March 27, 1962) is a prolific American science fiction author. ... Dune: House Atreides Dune: House Harkonnen Dune: House Corrino Prelude to Dune is a prequel trilogy of novels written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, set in Frank Herberts Dune universe. ... House Atreides is the first book in a prequel trilogy to the Dune series, set before the events of Frank Herberts original works. ... House Harkonnen is the second book in a prequel trilogy to the Dune series, set before the events of Frank Herberts original works. ... House Corrino is the third book in a prequel trilogy to the Dune series, set before the events of Frank Herberts original works. ... Dune: The Butlerian Jihad Dune: The Machine Crusade Dune: The Battle of Corrin Legends Of Dune is a prequel trilogy of novels written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson, set in Frank Herberts Dune universe. ... This page is about the novel Dune: The Butlerian Jihad. ... Dune: The Machine Crusade is a book in the Dune series. ... Dune: The Battle of Corrin is the third book in the Legends of Dune series. ... Hunters of Dune is the first part of the seventh book (until recently, called Dune 7) of the original Dune series, along with Sandworms of Dune. ... Sandworms of Dune is the second part of the seventh book (until recently, called Dune 7) of the classic Dune series, along with Hunters of Dune. ... Heroes of Dune is the tentative title[1] of a planned prequel trilogy that will take place in Frank Herberts Dune universe, to be written by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. ... Dune is an original soundtrack by Toto for the film of the same name, released in December 1984 (see 1984 in music). ... This article is about the TV miniseries. ... Dune is a strategy board game set in Frank Herberts Dune universe, published by Avalon Hill in 1979. ... Dune was a collectible card game produced by Last Unicorn Games and Five Rings Publishing Group, and later Wizards of the Coast. ... A number of computer games based on Frank Herberts science fiction novel Dune and its two adaptations for film and television were created: // Main article: Dune (video game) Dune blended adventure with economics and military strategy, and is considered by many the most immersive Dune computer game. ... Dune: Spice Opera is the very rare CD with some music from the computer game Dune and some unreleased, published by Virgin Records in 1992. ... A number of games have been based on Frank Herberts Dune universe: Card games 1997 Dune, Wizards of the Coast/Five Rings Publishing Group/Last Unicorn Games Board games 1979 Avalon Hills Dune, Avalon Hill 1984 Parker Brothers Dune, Parker Brothers - fanpage Role-playing games 2000 Dune: Chronicles... The Dune Encyclopedia was published in 1984 - its only edition. ... The Road to Dune is a science fiction companion book to the Dune chronicles by Frank Herbert, Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. ... The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... This article is about the David Lynch film. ... Wild at Heart is a 1990 American film written for the screen and directed by David Lynch, based on Barry Giffords novel Wild at Heart: The Story of Sailor and Lula about a young couple from South Carolina who, after Sailors return from prison, decide to go on... Fire Walk With Me is a 1992 movie directed by David Lynch and starring Sheryl Lee, Ray Wise, Chris Isaak, Kiefer Sutherland, Mädchen Amick, Phoebe Augustine and Dana Ashbrook. ... For the Bon Jovi album, see Lost Highway (album). ... The Straight Story is a motion picture, released in 1999 and directed by David Lynch. ... For the street in Los Angeles, see Mulholland Drive. ... This article is about the film. ... The Short Films of David Lynch (2002) is a DVD collection of the early student and commissioned film work of American filmmaker David Lynch. ... Lumière and Company (1996) was a collaboration between several film directors in which each made a short film using the original Lumière brothers camera. ... Darkened Room is a short film that appeared on www. ... Boat is a short film directed by David Lynch, released in 2007 on the DVD anthology Dynamic:01. ... This article is about the television show. ... American Chronicles was a documentary television program which was run by Fox Broadcasting Company as part of its 1990 fall lineup. ... This article is about the TV series, for the Billy Preston album, see On the Air (album) On the Air (1992) was an ABC sitcom created by David Lynch and Mark Frost. ... Hotel Room was a three episode 1993 HBO TV-Series produced by David Lynch (who directed two of them). ... Industrial Symphony No. ... Rabbits redirects here, for the animal, see Rabbit Rabbits is a 2002 film written and directed by David Lynch. ... Images, first published in 1994 (now out of print), is a book by David Lynch. ... Dumbland is a series of eight crudely animated shorts written, directed, and voiced by director David Lynch in 2002. ... The Angriest Dog in the World is a comic strip created by film director David Lynch. ... David Lynch is known for his constant collaboratios with various of the same actors and crew in his productions. ... BlueBob is an album of music cowritten and performed by David Lynch and John Neff. ... Lynch on Lynch is a book of interviews with David Lynch, conducted, edited, and introduced by Chris Rodley, himself a filmmaker. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dune (novel) - Dune (5346 words)
Dune spawned five sequels written by Herbert, and inspired a film adaptation by David Lynch, two mini-series made by the United States-based Sci-Fi Channel, computer games, and a series of prequels co-written by Brian Herbert, the author's son, and Kevin J. Anderson.
Dune is set far in the future amidst a sprawling feudal intergalactic empire where planetary fiefdoms are controlled by noble Houses that owe allegiance to the Imperial House Corrino.
The historical basis of this film lies in the story of the Sudanese supposed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad, an Islamic messianic figure that rose to power in the late 19th century.
Dune (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4384 words)
Dune is a 1984 science fiction film directed by David Lynch and based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name and containing elements from the later parts.
Dune's premiere was on December 3, 1984 at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. and was released worldwide on December 14.
In the film, the 'thopters (ornithopters) are depicted as wingless, jet or rocket-propelled aircraft.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m