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Encyclopedia > Dundee
Dundee
Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Dèagh
Scots: Dundee
City of Discovery

Dundee shown within Scotland
Area[1]  26 sq mi (67.3 km²)
Population 143,090
OS grid reference NO365325
Council area Dundee City
Lieutenancy area Dundee
Constituent country Scotland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town DUNDEE
Postcode district DD1-DD6
Dialling code 01382
Police Tayside
Fire Tayside
Ambulance Scottish
European Parliament Scotland
UK Parliament Dundee East
Dundee West
Scottish Parliament Dundee East
Dundee West
Angus
North East Scotland
List of places: UKScotland

Coordinates: 56°27′51″N 2°58′13″W / 56.464167, -2.970278 Dundee is the name for a number of places Dundee, Scotland is the original one Dundee, Florida (town) East Dundee, Illinois (village) Dundee, Illinois West Dundee, Illinois (village) Dundee Township, Illinois (county subdivision) Dundee, Iowa (city) Dundee, Michigan (village) Dundee Township, Michigan (county subdivision). ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... This article is about the Anglic language of Scotland. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 451 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1154 × 1535 pixel, file size: 661 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... This article is about the country. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... For local government purposes, Scotland is divided into 32 areas designated as Council Areas of Scotland which are all governed by unitary authorities designated as Councils which have the option under the Local Government (Gaelic Names) (Scotland) Act 1997 (as chosen by Na h-Eileanan an Iar) of being known... Politics in Dundee, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Dundee (Dùn Dèagh in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for the ceremonial lords-lieutenant, the monarchs representatives, in Scotland. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... This article is about the country. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The DD postcode area, also known as the Dundee postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Arbroath, Brechin, Carnoustie, Dundee, Forfar, Kirriemuir, Montrose, Newport-on-Tay and Tayport in Scotland. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Map showing the council areas of Scotland with the ones in the police area highlighted. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Tayside Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the area of Tayside and covering a geographical area of 7,500 square kilometres. ... Two Mercedes-Benz Sprinter-based ambulances of the Scottish Ambulance Service The Scottish Ambulance Service serves all of Scotland and is a special health board funded directly by the health department of the Scottish Executive. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Dundee East is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Dundee West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Dundee East is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Dundee West is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Angus is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... North East Scotland is one of the eight electoral regions of the Scottish Parliament which were created in 1999. ... List of burghs in Scotland List of cities in the United Kingdom Lists of places within Scottish regions List of places in Orkney List of places in Shetland List of places in the Borders region of Scotland List of places in the Central region of Scotland List of places in... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Dundee (Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Dèagh) is the fourth-largest city in Scotland and, fully named as Dundee City, one of Scotland's 32 local government council areas. It is on the north bank of the River Tay's estuary which feeds into the North Sea. // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... This article is about the country. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... The River Tay looking eastwards from Perth The River Tay, in terms of flow (193 kilometres or 120 miles), is the longest river in Scotland. ... For other meanings, see Estuary (disambiguation) Río de la Plata estuary An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ...


Dundee's history begins with the Picts in the Iron Age. During the Medieval Era, it was the site of many battles. Throughout the Industrial Revolution, the local jute industry caused the city to grow rapidly. In this period, Dundee also gained a reputation for its marmalade industry and its journalism, giving Dundee its epithet as the city of "jute, jam and journalism". A replica of the Hilton of Cadboll Stone. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... The word Jute is also used in reference to the Germanic people, the Jutes. ...


Presently, Dundee's population is 143,090. However, if contiguous settlements—such as Monifieth, Birkhill, and Invergowrie—are counted, the number is around 170,000. Dundee's population reached a peak of nearly 200,000 at the start of the 1970s, but has since declined, due to outward migration and the change of council boundaries in the 1970s and 1980s, which saw Dundee lose suburbs to the surrounding counties. This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ... Monifieth is a small town and burgh on the East Coast of Scotland, which ajoins the City of Dundee. ... Birkhill and neighbouring Muirhead are two small villages in Angus, just to the west of Dundee, Scotland. ... Invergowrie is a village on the north bank of the River Tay to the west of Dundee. ...


Today, Dundee is known as the City of Discovery, in honour of Dundee's history of scientific activities and of the RRS Discovery, Robert Falcon Scott's Antarctic exploration vessel, which was built in Dundee and is now berthed in the city harbour. Biomedical and technological industries have arrived since the 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10% of the United Kingdom's digital-entertainment industry. Dundee has two universities—the University of Dundee and the University of Abertay Dundee. The city is home to the Scottish Dance Theatre, which is based in the city's renowned Dundee Repertory Theatre. The Royal Scottish National Orchestra regularly plays in the city's Caird Hall. On 5 March 2004 Dundee was granted Fairtrade City status.[2] The RRS Discovery was the last wooden three-masted ship to be built in the British Isles, and was launched on 21 March 1901, designed for Antarctic research. ... Scott of the Antarctic redirects here. ... For other uses, see Antarctica (disambiguation). ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... The University of Abertay Dundee, usually known simply as Abertay University, is a university in Dundee, Scotland. ... Scottish Dance Theatre is a contemporary dance company based at Dundee Rep. ... Dundee Repertory Theatre has Scotland’s only full-time repertory company. ... The Royal Scottish National Orchestra is Scotlands national symphony orchestra. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fairtrade Town is a status awarded by the Fairtrade Foundation in the United Kingdom and Channel Islands, describing an area which is committed to the promotion of Fairtrade-labelled goods. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Dundee

The date of the earliest settlement on the present site of Dundee is unknown, but certainly long before its first mention in historical records in the 12th century. The name "Dundee", Gaelic Dùn Dèagh, incorporates the place-name element dùn, fort, possibly referring to the hill-fort, traces of which survive on Dundee Law. The meaning of Dundee is unknown, though it has been suggested it could mean 'Fort of Fire', perhaps referring to beacons lit on the Law, 'Fort of the God', or 'Fort on the Tay'. In 1191, the town was awarded a charter making it a royal burgh, which would indicate that it was already a town of some size and importance.[3] This charter was later revoked by Edward I, though it was replaced by a new charter from Robert the Bruce in 1327. Dundee became a walled city in 1545, owing to a period of hostilities known as the rough wooing. In July 1547, much of the city was destroyed by an English naval bombardment. In 1645, during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, Dundee was again besieged, this time by the Royalist Marquess of Montrose.[3] In 1651 during the Third English Civil War, it was invaded by General Monck, who was the commander of Oliver Cromwell's forces in Scotland. These English Parliamentarians destroyed much of the city and killed many of its inhabitants. Dundee was later the site of an early Jacobite uprising when John Graham, 1st Viscount Dundee raised the Stuart standard on Dundee Law in support of James VII (James II of Great Britain) following his overthrow, earning him the nickname Bonnie Dundee.[4] // History Origin and name Archaeological evidence of burials suggest that the Dundee Law may have been used by human settlers 3500 years ago. ... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Robert I, King of Scots, usually known as Robert the Bruce (July 11, 1274 – June 7, 1329, reigned 1306 – 1329), was, according to a modern biographer (Geoffrey Barrow), a great hero who lived in a minor country. ... The Anglo-Scottish Wars were a series of wars fought between England and Scotland during the sixteenth century. ... Combatants Scottish Royalists and Irish Catholic Confederate troops Scottish Covenanters Commanders James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose Archibald Campbell, 1st Marquess of Argyll and David Leslie Strength Fluctuating, 2000-4000 troops at any one time over 30,000 troops, but many based in England and Ireland Casualties Total of 28... James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose (1612 - 21 May 1650), was a Scottish nobleman and soldier, who initially joined the Covenanters in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, but subsequently supported King Charles I as the English Civil War developed. ... The Third English Civil War (1649–1651) was the third of three wars known as the English Civil War (or Wars) which refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1652 and include the First English Civil War... George Monck, 1st Duke of Albemarle by Sir Peter Lely, painted 1665–1666. ... Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... The English parliament in front of the King, c. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... The Viscount of Dundee John Graham, 1st Viscount of Dundee (c. ... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... Dundee Law seen from afar Law, Dundee is an area located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland. ... James VII and II King of England, Scotland and Ireland James II of England and VII of Scotland (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 6 February 1685. ... James II can refer to: James II of Scotland James II of England James II of Aragon James II of Cyprus This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Bonnie Dundee, better known as John Graham, Viscount Dundee, who died fighting for the Jacobite cause at the Battle of Killiecrankie is immortalised in this song by Sir Walter Scott. ...

The Wishart Arch is the only surviving part of the city walls
The Wishart Arch is the only surviving part of the city walls

Dundee greatly expanded in size during the Industrial Revolution mainly because of the flax and then latterly the jute industry.[5] By the end of the 19th century, a majority of the city's workers were employed in its many jute mills and in related industries. Dundee's location on a major estuary allowed for the easy importation of jute from the Indian subcontinent as well as whale oil—needed for the processing of the jute—from the city's large whaling industry. The industry began to decline in the 20th century as it became cheaper to process the cloth on the Indian subcontinent. The city's last jute mill closed in the 1970s. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 723 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee Wikipedia:Scottish Wikipedians notice board/New images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 723 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee Wikipedia:Scottish Wikipedians notice board/New images Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... The word Jute is also used in reference to the Germanic people, the Jutes. ... Map of South Asia (see note) This article deals with the geophysical region in Asia. ... Whale oil is the oil obtained from the blubber of various species of whales of the genus Balaena, as , Greenland or right whale (northern whale-oil), (southern whale-oil), Balaenoptera longimana, Balaenoptera borealis (Finback oil, Finner whale-oil, Humpback oil). ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ...

The original Tay Bridge (from the south) the day after the disaster. The collapsed section can be seen near the northern end
The original Tay Bridge (from the south) the day after the disaster. The collapsed section can be seen near the northern end

In addition to jute the city is also known for jam and journalism. The "jam" association refers to marmalade, which was purportedly invented in the city by Janet Keiller in 1797 (although in reality, recipes for marmalade have been found dating back to the 1500s). Keiller's marmalade became a famous brand because of its mass production and its worldwide export. Local firm Mackays still makes marmalade in Dundee.[6] However, the industry was never a major employer compared with the jute trade.[7] Marmalade has since become the preserve of larger businesses, but jars of Keiller's marmalade are still widely available. "Journalism" refers to the publishing firm DC Thomson & Co., which was founded in the city in 1905 and remains the largest employer after the health and leisure industries.[8][9] The firm publishes a variety of newspapers, children's comics and magazines, including The Sunday Post, The Courier, Shout and children's publications, The Beano and The Dandy. Tay Rail Bridge This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Tay Rail Bridge This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Jam from berries Jam (also known as jelly or preserves) is a type of sweet spread or condiment made with fruits or sometimes vegetables, sugar, and sometimes pectin if the fruits natural pectin content is insufficient to produce a thick product. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... For other uses, see Marmalade (disambiguation). ... Keillers marmalade, named after its creator Janet Keiller is believed to have been the first commercial brand of marmalade, produced in Dundee, Scotland. ... Keillers marmalade, named after its creator Janet Keiller is believed to have been the first commercial brand of marmalade, produced in Dundee, Scotland. ... D. C. Thomson & Co. ... These comics and magazines are or were published by D. C. Thomson & Co. ... The Sunday Post is a Scottish newspaper, (with a wide circulation in the North of England also ) published in Dundee by DC Thomson, and characterised by a folksy mix of news, sentimental stories and short features. ... The Courier & Advertiser is a broadsheet newspaper published by DC Thomson in Dundee in six daily editions: the Early edition, and regional editions for Fife, NE Fife, Perth, Angus and Dundee. ... Shout is a UK magazine for teenage girls, published by DC Thomson since 1993. ... This March 2007 does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... // The Dandy is a British childrens comic published by D. C. Thomson & Co. ...


Dundee also developed a major maritime and shipbuilding industry in the 19th century. 2,000 ships were built in Dundee between 1871 and 1881, including the Antarctic research ship used by Robert Falcon Scott, the RRS Discovery. This ship is now on display at Discovery Point in the city, and the Victorian steel-framed works in which Discovery's engine was built is now home to the city's largest bookstore.[10] The need of the local jute industry for whale oil also supported a large whaling industry. Dundee Island in the Antarctic takes its name from the Dundee whaling expedition, which discovered it in 1892. Whaling ceased in 1912 and shipbuilding ceased in 1981.[11] The estuary was the location of the first Tay rail bridge, built by Thomas Bouch and opened in 1879. At the time it was the longest railway bridge in the world. The bridge fell down in a storm less than a year later under the weight of a train full of passengers in what is known as The Tay Bridge Disaster. None of the passengers survived.[12] Scott of the Antarctic redirects here. ... The RRS Discovery was the last wooden three-masted ship to be built in the British Isles, and was launched on 21 March 1901, designed for Antarctic research. ... Whale oil is the oil obtained from the blubber of various species of whales of the genus Balaena, as , Greenland or right whale (northern whale-oil), (southern whale-oil), Balaenoptera longimana, Balaenoptera borealis (Finback oil, Finner whale-oil, Humpback oil). ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ... Dundee Island (63°30′ S 055°55′ W) is an ice-covered island lying east of the northeastern tip of Antarctic Peninsula and south of Joinville Island. ... Dundee Whaling Expedition (1892 - 1893) On September 6, 1892 a Dundee, Scotland whaling company decided to gamble and sent four steam-powered whaling ships the Balaena, Active, Diana and Polar Star to Weddell Sea in search of Right Whales. ... A view of the Tay Bridge from Dundee Tay Bridge, central section The Tay Bridge (sometimes unofficially the Tay Rail Bridge) is a railway bridge approximately two and a quarter miles (three and a half kilometres) long[1] that spans the Firth of Tay in Scotland, between the city of... Sir Thomas Bouch (25 February 1822 - 30 October 1880) was a railway engineer in Victorian Britain. ... A view of the Tay Bridge from Dundee Tay Bridge, central section The Tay Bridge (sometimes unofficially the Tay Rail Bridge) is a railway bridge approximately two and a quarter miles (three and a half kilometres) long[1] that spans the Firth of Tay in Scotland, between the city of...


Governance

Main article: Politics of Dundee
City of Dundee Arms since 1996
City of Dundee Arms since 1996

Dundee was first made a royal burgh in 1191 and became a unitary council area in 1996 under the Local Government etc. (Scotland) Act 1994,[13] which gave it a single tier of local government control under the Dundee City Council. The city has two mottos—Dei Donum (Latin: Gift of God) and Prudentia et Candore (With Thought And Purity),[14] although usually only the latter is used for civic purposes. Dundee is represented in both the British House of Commons and in the Scottish Parliament. For elections to the European Parliament, Dundee is within the Scotland constituency. Politics in Dundee, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Dundee (Dùn Dèagh in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A Royal Burgh is a type of Scottish burgh (town or city), used today for ceremonial purposes only. ... A unitary authority is a type of local authority that has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area. ... The Local Government Act etc. ... The local government of Scotland is organised into 32 unitary authorities covering the mainland and islands of Scotland. ... Politics in Dundee, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Dundee (Dùn Dèagh in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... Scotland constitutes a single constituency of the European Parliament. ...


Local government

Dundee City Square. The building at the back of the square is Caird Hall. The building on the right is Dundee City Chambers, where the city council meets
Dundee City Square. The building at the back of the square is Caird Hall. The building on the right is Dundee City Chambers, where the city council meets

Dundee is one of 32 council areas of Scotland,[13] represented by the Dundee City Council, a local authority composed of 29 elected councillors. Previously the city was a county of a city and later a district of the Tayside region. Council meetings take place in the City Chambers, which opened in 1933 and are located in City Square. The civic head and chair of the council is known as the Lord Provost, a position similar to that of mayor in other cities. The council executive is based in Tayside House on the banks of the River Tay, but the council recently announced plans to demolish it in favour of new premises (Dundee House) on North Lindsay Street.[15] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 475 KB)This photo shows the pedestrianised Square in Dundee city centre. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 475 KB)This photo shows the pedestrianised Square in Dundee city centre. ... The council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The local government regions and districts of Scotland were established under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 as a two-tier system of local government in Scotland. ... Tayside (Taobh Tatha in Gaelic) was a local government region of Scotland from 1974 to 1995. ... The local government regions and districts of Scotland were established under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 as a two-tier system of local government in Scotland. ... A Lord Provost is the Scottish equivalent of a Lord Mayor. ... The River Tay looking eastwards from Perth The River Tay, in terms of flow (193 kilometres or 120 miles), is the longest river in Scotland. ...


The council was controlled by a minority coalition of Labour and Liberal Democrats of 12 councillors, with the support of the Conservatives who had five. Although the Scottish National Party (SNP) was the largest party on the council, with 11 councillors.[16][17] Elections to the council are on a four year cycle, the most recent as of 2007 being on 3 May 2007. Previously, Councillors were elected from single-member wards by the first past the post system of election, although this changed in the 2007 election, due to the Local Governance (Scotland) Act 2004.[18] Eight new multi-member wards were introduced, each electing three or four councillors by single transferable vote, to produce a form of proportional representation. The 2007 election resulting in no single party having overall control, with 13 Scottish National Party, 10 Labour, 3 Conservatives, 2 Liberal Democrats, and 1 Independent Councillors. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A ward in the United Kingdom is an electoral district represented by one or more councillors. ... The plurality voting system, also known as first past the post, is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election. ... This is an Act of the Scottish Parliament which provided, inter alia, for the election of local Councillors by the Single Transferable Vote system. ... This STV ballot for the Australian Senate illustrates group voting tickets. ... Proportional representation (sometimes referred to as full representation, or PR), is a category of electoral formula aiming at a close match between the percentage of votes that groups of candidates (grouped by a certain measure) obtain in elections and the percentage of seats they receive (usually in legislative assemblies). ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... This article is about the Scottish Labour Party founded in 1976. ... The Conservative and Unionist Party, more commonly known as the Conservative Party, is currently the largest majortiy opposition party in the United Knigdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, is a liberal political party in the United Kingdom formed in 1988 by the merger of the Liberal Party and the Social Democratic Party; the two parties had already been in an alliance for seven years prior to this, since not long...


Westminster and Holyrood

For elections to the British House of Commons at Westminster, the city area and portions of the Angus council area are divided in two constituencies.[19] The constituencies of Dundee East and Dundee West are as of 2007 represented by Stewart Hosie (Scottish National Party (SNP)) and James McGovern (Labour), respectively. For elections to the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, the city area is divided between three constituencies. The Dundee East (Holyrood) constituency and the Dundee West (Holyrood) constituency are entirely within the city area. The Angus (Holyrood) constituency includes north-eastern and north-western portions of the city area.[19] All three constituencies are within the North East Scotland electoral region. as of 2007 Shona Robison (SNP) is the Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) for the Dundee East constituency; Joe Fitzpatrick (SNP) is the current MSP for the Dundee West constituency and Andrew Welsh (SNP) is the current MSP for the Angus constituency. Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Clock Tower and New Palace Yard from the west The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the council area in Scotland. ... In the United Kingdom each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elects one or more members to a parliament or assembly. ... Dundee East is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Dundee West is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stewart Hosie MP Stewart Hosie is the Scottish National Party Member of Parliament for the Dundee East constituency in the 2005 UK General Election. ... The Scottish National Party (SNP) (Scottish Gaelic: is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... James McGovern (born 17 November 1956) is a Scottish politician, and is the Labour Member of Parliament for the Dundee West UK parliamentary constituency in Dundee, Scotland. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The new Scottish Parliament Building at Holyrood designed by the Catalan architect Enric Miralles and opened in October 2004. ... Dundee East is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Dundee West is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... Angus is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). ... North East Scotland is one of the eight electoral areas for the Scottish Parliament through which 7 of the 56 Additional Members System MSPs are elected. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shona Robison MSP Shona Robison is a Member of the Scottish Parliament for Dundee East, being elected as a Scottish National Party (SNP) candidate at the 2003 election. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) (Ball Pàrlamaid na h-Alba (BPA) in Gaelic) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... Joe FitzPatrick (born April 1, 1967 in Dundee) is a Scottish Nationalist politician. ... Andrew Welsh (born 1944) was a Scottish National Party member of parliament for South Angus from 1974 to 1979, Angus East from 1987 to 1997 and Angus from 1997 to 2001. ...


International links

The arms of the twinned cities and their national flags alongside those of Dundee in the City Chambers.

Dundee maintains cultural, economic and educational ties with six twin cities:[20] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 188 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The arms/logos of the twin cities of Dundee, and their national flags, in the City Chambers. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 188 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The arms/logos of the twin cities of Dundee, and their national flags, in the City Chambers. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

In addition, the Scottish Episcopalian Diocese of Brechin (centred on St Paul’s Cathedral in Dundee) is twinned with the diocese of Iowa, USA and the diocese of Swaziland.[21] Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about Orléans, France; for other meanings see Orleans (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... For the German World War II radar system of the same name, see Würzburg radar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Location in Virginia Coordinates: , Country State Founded 1749 Government  - Mayor William D. Euille Area  - Total 15. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... Map of the West Bank, with Nablus in the center north. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Arab_Emirates. ... Location of Dubai in the UAE Coordinates: , Country Emirate Dubai Incorporated (town) June 9, 1833 Incorporated (emirate) December 2, 1971 Founder Maktoum bin Bati bin Suhail (1833) Seat Dubai Subdivisions Towns and villages Jebel Ali Hatta Al Hunaiwah Al Aweer Al Hajarain Al Lusayli Al Marqab Al Shindagha Al Faq... Logo of the Scottish Episcopal Church with the motto: Evangelical truth and Apostolic order. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... The Diocese of Brechin The Diocese of Brechin is in the North East of Scotland, and part of the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... St Pauls Cathedral is an Episcopal Cathedral in the city of Dundee, Scotland. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Geography

Dundee is located on the north bank of the Firth of Tay and near the North Sea. The city surrounds the basalt plug of an extinct volcano, called Dundee Law or simply The Law (174 metres (571 ft)).[22] Dundee is Scotland's only south-facing city, giving it a claim to being Scotland's sunniest and warmest city.[23] Temperatures tend to be a couple of degrees higher than Aberdeen to the north or the coastal areas of Angus. Dundee suffers less severe winters than other parts of Scotland due to the close proximity to the North sea and the salt air and a range of protective hills at the back of the city, which are often snow covered while the city itself remains clear. The Firth of Tay is a firth in Scotland between the regions of Fife and City of Dundee into to which Scotlands largest river in terms of flow, the River Tay empties. ... The North Sea is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, located between the coasts of Norway and Denmark in the east, the coast of the British Isles in the west, and the German, Dutch, Belgian and French coasts in the south. ... For the cities, see Basalt, Colorado and Basalt, Idaho. ... Volcanic plug near Rhumsiki, Far North Province, Cameroon A volcanic plug, also called a volcanic neck or lava neck, is a volcanic landform created when lava hardens within a vent on an active volcano. ... Cleveland Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska photographed from the International Space Station For other uses, see Volcano (disambiguation). ... Dundee Law seen from afar Law, Dundee is an area located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland. ...


The city, being on a relatively small landspace, is the most densely populated area in Scotland after Glasgow and around fifth in the U.K. overall. It is characterised by tall tenements, mainly four storeys high, Victorian, and built from a honey or brown sandstone. The inner districts of the city, as well as some of the outer estates, are home to a large number of multi storey tower blocks from the 1960s. The outer estates are among some of the poorest urban districts in the United Kingdom. To the east of the city area is the distinct but incorporated suburb of Broughty Ferry with its yacht club, wide ranging and upmarket services and expensive houses—many of architectural note, developed during the Industrial Revolution, housing professionals, footballers, and the GMTV presenter Lorraine Kelly. A recent apartment in Broughty Ferry entered the market with an asking price of £750,000, far higher than the Scottish average. This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Broughty Ferry (Brochtie in Scots) is a suburb on the eastern edge of the City of Dundee, situated on the shore of the Firth of Tay in eastern Scotland. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... GMTV (Good Morning Television) is a national British breakfast television station owned by ITV plc (75%) and The Walt Disney Company (25%). It has held the license for the breakfast Channel 3 franchise since 1993, when it outbid the previous 6am-9. ... Lorraine Kelly is a Scottish television presenter and journalist best known as a presenter for GMTV, the ITV morning television station. ... GBP redirects here. ...


Dundee lies close to Perth (20 miles) and the southern Highlands to the west. St Andrews (14 miles) and north-east Fife are situated to the south, while the Sidlaw Hills, Angus Glens and the Glamis Castle are located to the north. Two of Scotland's most prestigious links golf courses, St Andrews and Carnoustie are located nearby. The towns of Invergowrie in Perthshire, Newport on Tay in Fife and Monifieth and Birkhill in Angus are outside of local government control of Dundee but are de facto suburbs of the city. Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... Lowland-Highland divide Highland Sign with welcome in English and Gaelic The Scottish Highlands (A Ghàidhealtachd in Gaelic) include the rugged and mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... For other uses, see St Andrews (disambiguation). ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... Sidlaw Hills are a range of hills correctly known as The Sidlaws due to Law being a Scots word meaning hill. ... The Five Glens of Angus are the five Highland glens located in the western portion of the Angus region of Scotland. ... Glamis Castle Glamis Castle is situated beside the village of Glamis — pronounced Glahmz (in IPA: ) — in Angus, Scotland. ... A links golf course, sometimes referred to as a seaside links is the oldest style of golf course, first developed in Scotland. ... This article is about the sport. ... St Andrews Links in the city of St Andrews, Scotland, is regarded as the home of golf.It is the oldest course in the world. ... The Championship course. ... Invergowrie is a village on the north bank of the River Tay to the west of Dundee. ... Perthshire (Siorrachd Pheairt in Gaelic) was a county in central Scotland, which extended from Strathmore in the east, to the Pass of Drumochter in the north, Rannoch Moor and Ben Lui in the west, and Aberfoyle in the south. ... , Newport-on-Tay is a small town in the north east of Fife in Scotland. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... Monifieth is a small town and burgh on the East Coast of Scotland, which ajoins the City of Dundee. ... Birkhill and neighbouring Muirhead are two small villages in Angus, just to the west of Dundee, Scotland. ... This article is about the council area in Scotland. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


Demography

Natives of Dundee are called Dundonians and are recognisable by their distinct accent,[24] which most noticeably substitutes the monophthong /e/ in place of the diphthong /ai/. A significant proportion of the population are on a lower than average income or receive social security benefits. More than half of the city's council wards are among Scotland's most deprived[25] and fewer than half of the homes in Dundee are owner-occupied,[26] a slight majority being owned by housing associations and the council, although it does rank higher than Glasgow. For all its social problems, neither do Dundonians die as early as Glaswegians. The Whitfield area in particular has the highest rate of child poverty in the UK at 96%.[27] Dundee had the highest rate of abortions in Scotland in 2004 (24.2 per 1000)[28] and the highest rate of teenage pregnancy in Western Europe.[29] (1 in 16; the national average is 1 in 23).[30] This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... A monophthong (in Greek μονόφθογγος = single note) is a pure vowel sound, one whose articulation at both beginning and end is relatively fixed, and which does not glide up or down towards a new position of articulation; compare diphthong. ... In phonetics, a diphthong (also gliding vowel) (Greek δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally with two sounds, or with two tones) is a monosyllabic vowel combination involving a quick but smooth movement from one vowel to another, often interpreted by listeners as a single vowel sound or phoneme. ... Social security primarily refers to social welfare service concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized conditions, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment and others. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Whitfield is a residential area in the North of Dundee, United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... A current understanding of Western Europe. ...


Dundee's population increased substantially with the urbanisation of the Industrial Revolution as did other British cities. The most significant influx occurred in the mid-1800s with the arrival of Irish workers fleeing from the Potato Famine and attracted by industrialisation.[31] The city also attracted immigrants from Italy, fleeing poverty and famine, and Poland, seeking refuge from the anti-Jewish pogroms in the 19th century, and later, World War II in the 20th. Today, Dundee has a sizeable ethnic minority population, and has the third highest Asian population (~3,500) in Scotland after Glasgow and Edinburgh.[32] Dundee has attracted large numbers of Eastern Europeans and is predicted to expand further due to Bulgarian immigrants.[1] Abertay University and Dundee University draw a large number of students from abroad (mostly Irish and EU but with an increasing number from countries in the Far East), and students account for 14.2% of the population, the highest proportion of the four largest Scottish cities.[1] Dundee is also one of only four local authorities in Scotland to recycle more than 20% of its waste.[33] An 1849 depiction of Bridget ODonnell and her two children during the famine. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... This article is about the concept of a minority. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ... This article is about the Asian regions. ...


Economy

Cox's Stack, A chimney from the former Camperdown works jute mill. The chimney takes its name from jute baron James Cox who later became Lord Provost of the city
Cox's Stack, A chimney from the former Camperdown works jute mill. The chimney takes its name from jute baron James Cox who later became Lord Provost of the city

Dundee is a regional employment and education centre, with over 300,000 persons within 30 minutes drive of the city centre and 700,000 people within one hour. Many people from North East Fife, Angus and Perth and Kinross commute to the city.[34] In 2006 the city itself had an economically active population of 76.7% of the working age population, about 20% of the working age population are full time students. The city sustains just under 95,000 jobs in around 4,000 companies. The number of jobs in the city has grown by around 10% since 1996. Recent and current investment levels in the city are at a record level. Since 1997 Dundee has been the focus of investment approaching an estimated £1 billion.[35] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 253 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 1421 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 253 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 1421 pixel, file size: 193 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Please see the file description page for further information. ... A Lord Provost is the Scottish equivalent of a Lord Mayor. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... This article is about the council area in Scotland. ... Perth and Kinross (Peairt agus Ceann Rois in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area. ...


Despite this economic growth the proportion of Dundee’s population whose lives are affected by poverty and who are classed as socially excluded is second only to Glasgow. Median weekly earnings were £409 in February 2006, an increase of 33% since 1998, on a par with the Scottish median.[34] Unemployment in 2006 was around 3.8%, higher than the Scottish average of 2.6%, although the city has “closed the gap” since 1996 when unemployment was 8.6% with the Scottish average at 6.1%. In 2000 the number of unemployed in the city had fallen to below 5,000 for the first time in over 25 years. Average house prices in Dundee have more than doubled since 1990 from an average of £42,475, to £102,025 in 2006.[36] Total house sales in the city have more than trebled since 1990 from £115,915,391 to £376,999,716 in 2004. House prices rose by over 15% between 2001–2002 and 2002–2003 and between 2005 and 2006 by 16.6%.[36]


Modern Economic History

The period following World War II was notable for the transformation of the city's economy. While jute still employed one-fifth of the working population, new industries were attracted and encouraged. NCR Corporation selected Dundee as the base of operations for the UK in late 1945,[37] primarily because of the lack of damage the city had sustained in the war, good transport links and high productivity from long hours of sunshine. Production started in the year before the official opening of the plant on June 11, 1947. A fortnight after the 10th anniversary of the plant, the 250,000th cash machine was produced. By the 1960s, NCR had become the principal employer of the city and produced ATMs at several of its Dundee plants. The firm, developed magnetic-strip readers for cash registers and produced early computers.[38] Astral, a Dundee-based firm that manufactured and sold refrigerators and spin dryers was merged into Morphy Richards and rapidly expanded to employ over 1,000 people.[39] The development in Dundee of a Michelin tyre-production facility helped to absorb the unemployment caused by the decline of the jute industry, particularly with the abolition of the jute control by the Board of Trade on April 30, 1969.[40] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... NCR Corporation (NYSE: NCR) is a technology company specializing in solutions for the retail and financial industries. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Outdoor ATMs may be free-standing, like this kiosk, or built into the side of banks or other buildings An automatic teller machine, automated teller machine (ATM) or cash machine is an electronic device that allows a banks customers to make cash withdrawals and check their account balances without... Antique crank-operated cash register This article is about the cash register. ... Refrigeration (from the Latin frigus, frost) is generally the cooling of a body by the transfer of a portion of its heat away from it. ... An electric clothes dryer A clothes dryer or tumble dryer is a household appliance that is used to remove the residual moisture from a load of clothing and other textiles, generally shortly after they are cleaned in a washing machine. ... Morphy Richards is a leading business firm located in Dundee, Scotland. ... Michelin (full name: Compagnie Générale des Établissements Michelin) (Euronext: ML) based in Clermont-Ferrand in the Auvergne région of France, is primarily a tyre manufacturer. ... Firestone tire This article is about pneumatic tires. ... The Board of Trade circa 1808. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ...


Employment in Dundee changed dramatically during the 1980s with the loss of nearly 10,000 manufacturing jobs due to closure of the shipyards, cessation of carpet manufacturing and the disappearance of the jute trade. To combat growing unemployment and declining economic conditions, Dundee was declared an Enterprise Zone in January 1984. In 1983, the first Sinclair ZX Spectrum home computers were produced in Dundee by Timex. In the same year the company broke production records, despite a sit-in by workers protesting job cuts and plans to demolish one of the factory buildings to make way for a supermarket. Timex closed its Dundee plant in 1993 following an acrimonious six month industrial dispute.[41] In January 2007, NCR announced its intention to cut 650 jobs at its Gourdie facility, and to turn the facility over for low volume production. The company has pledged to retain R&D, software, sales and support functions in Dundee. Urban Enterprise Zones (UEZs) also known as Enterprise Zones encourage development in blighted neighborhoods by offering entrepreneurs and investors tax and regulatory relief if they start businesses in the area. ... Sinclair Research Ltd was a home computer company founded by Sir Clive Sinclair in Cambridge, England. ... The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... The home computer is a consumer-friendly word for the second generation of microcomputers (the technical term that was previously used), entering the market in 1977 and becoming common during the 1980s. ... Timex Group B.V. is an American watch company. ... A sit-in or sit-down is a form of direct action that involves one or more persons nonviolently occupying an area for protest, often to promote political, social, or economic change. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ...


Modern day

As in the rest of Scotland manufacturing industries are being gradually replaced by a mixed economy, although 13.5% of the workforce still work in the manufacturing sector, higher than the Scottish and UK average, and more than double that of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen. The main new growth sectors have been software development and biotechnology along with retail. The city has a small financial, banking and insurance sector, employing 11% of the workforce. A mixed economy is an economic system that incorporates aspects of more than one economic system. ... “Software development” redirects here. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ...

Magdalen Green and Bandstand, Located in the West End
Magdalen Green and Bandstand, Located in the West End

In 2006, 29 companies employed 300 or more staff these include limited and private companies NCR Corporation, Michelin, Tesco, D. C. Thomson & Co, BT, SiTEL, Norwich Union, Royal Bank of Scotland, ASDA, Strathtay Scottish, Tayside Contracts, Tokheim, Scottish Citylink, W H Brown Construction, C J Lang & Son, Joinery and Timber Creations, HBOS, Debenhams, Travel Dundee, WL Gore and Associates, In Practice Systems, The Wood Group, Simclar, Millipore Life Sciences, Alchemy (antibody technology), Cypex(manufacturers of recombinant drug metabolising enzymes, including cytochrome P450s, and in vitro drug metabolism specialists). Major employers in the public sector and non profit sector are NHS Tayside, the University of Dundee, Tayside Police, Dundee College, Tayside Fire Brigade, HM Revenue and Customs, University of Abertay Dundee and Wellcome Trust. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1152 pixel, file size: 441 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1152 pixel, file size: 441 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... NCR Corporation (NYSE: NCR) is a technology company specializing in solutions for the retail and financial industries. ... Michelin (full name: Compagnie Générale des Établissements Michelin) (Euronext: ML) based in Clermont-Ferrand in the Auvergne région of France, is primarily a tyre manufacturer. ... , For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... D. C. Thomson & Co. ... BT Group plc (also known as British Telecommunications plc) which trades as BT (and previously as British Telecom) is the privatised UK state telecommunications operator. ... Norwich Union is an insurance company in the UK. It is the biggest life-insurer in the UK, and has a strong position in motor insurance. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland Plc (Scottish Gaelic: [1]) is one of the retail banking subsidiaries of Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc, which together with NatWest, provides branch banking facilities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the supermarket chain. ... Strathtay Scottish Omnibuses Ltd was formed a bus operating subsidiary of the Scottish Transport Group in June 1985 from Walter Alexander & Sons (Midland) Ltd and Walter Alexander & Sons (Northern) Ltd. ... Scottish Citylink Coaches Ltd is a long distance express coach operator in Scotland and the Republic of Ireland (where it operates simply as Citylink.). The company was formed as a subsidiary of Scottish Transport Group in June 1985. ... Group headquarters on The Mound, Edinburgh HBOS Office at Trinity Road, Halifax HBOS plc (LSE: HBOS) is a banking and insurance group in the United Kingdom, the holding company for Bank of Scotland plc, which operates the Bank of Scotland and Halifax brands; HBOS Australia, owner of BankWest; and HBOS... Debenhams plc (LSE: DEB) is a retailer with a chain of department stores based in the United Kingdom, and franchised stores in a number of other countries. ... Travel Dundee is a bus operator based in Dundee and operates services mainly within Dundee City. ... WL Gore and Associates is a company most commonly known for its Gore-Tex® fabrics. ... NHS Tayside is one of the fourteen Scottish regions of the National Health Service. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... Map showing the council areas of Scotland with the ones in the police area highlighted. ... Dundee College is a further education and higher education college in the city of Dundee, Scotland. ... Tayside (Taobh Tatha in Gaelic) was a local government region of Scotland from 1974 to 1995. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP        Her Majestys Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is a non-ministerial department of the British Government primarily responsible for the collection of taxes, some forms of state support, some aspects of UK frontier protection and import controls. ... The University of Abertay Dundee, usually known simply as Abertay University, is a university in Dundee, Scotland. ... The Wellcome Trusts Gibbs Building on Euston Road The Wellcome Trust is a United Kingdom-based charity established in 1936 to administer the fortune of the American-born pharmaceutical magnate Sir Henry Wellcome. ...


The largest employers in Dundee are the city council and the National Health Service, which make up over 10% of the city's workforce. The biomedical and biotechnology sectors, including start-up biomedical companies arising from university research, employ just under 1,000 people directly and nearly 2,000 indirectly.[42] Information technology and software for computer games have been important industries in the city for more than twenty years. Rockstar North, developer of Lemmings and the Grand Theft Auto series was founded in Dundee as DMA Design by David Jones; an undergraduate of the University of Abertay Dundee.[43] David Jones is now the CEO of Realtime Worlds, which has recently (2007) released Crackdown for the Xbox 360, and is responsible for employing over 140 people of multi national origin, primarily in Dundee. Politics in Dundee, Scotland, are evident in the deliberations and decisions of the city council of Dundee (Dùn Dèagh in Gaelic), in elections to the council, and in elections to the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood) and the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (Westminster). ... NHS redirects here. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ... The structure of insulin Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ... Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... Rockstar North Limited (formerly DMA Design Limited) is a Scottish developer of computer and video games founded by David Jones in Dundee and presently located in Leith Street, Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Lemming or Lemmings can refer to: A small rodent — see Lemming A computer game — see Lemmings (video game) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Grand Theft Auto redirects here. ... David Jones is a common name, particularly in Wales, and there have been several well-known individuals with this name. ... The University of Abertay Dundee, usually known simply as Abertay University, is a university in Dundee, Scotland. ... David Jones is a common name, particularly in Wales, and there have been several well-known individuals with this name. ... Realtime Worlds Ltd is a computer game developer based in Dundee, Scotland. ...


Dundee is responsible for 10% of Britain’s digital entertainment industry, with an annual turnover of £100 million.[44] Outside of specialised fields of medicine, science and technology, the proportion of Dundonians employed in the manufacturing sector is higher than that found in the larger Scottish cities; nearly 12% of workers. Manufacturing income per head in Dundee was £19,700 in 1999, compared to £16,700 in Glasgow.[45] The insolvency rate for businesses in Dundee is lower than other Scottish cities, accounting for only 2.3% of all liquidations in Scotland, compared to 22% and 61.4% for Edinburgh and Glasgow respectively.[45] The secondary sector of industry is the manufacturing sector of industry. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ...


The surrounding area is home to three major UK military bases, Condor (Royal Marines), Leuchars (RAF) which can cause sudden noise from aircraft exercises, and Barry (army and training). Genera Vultur Gymnogyps For other uses, see Condor (disambiguation). ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... St Athernase Church in Leuchars, Fife, Scotland Leuchars is a small town near the north east coast of Fife in Scotland, sited nearly 2 miles (3 km) to the north of the village of Guardbridge which lies on the north bank of the River Eden where it widens to the... RAF is an three letter acronym for: Royal Air Force -- the Air Force of the United Kingdom (see also Air Ministry) Red Army Faction (Rote Armee Fraktion) -- a German terror organisation Rigas Autobusu Fabrika -- a factory making buses in Riga, Latvia Rapid Action Force in India Računarski Fakultet RAF... Barry, Angus is a small village in Angus, Scotland at the mouth of the River Tay. ...


The city is served by Ninewells Hospital—one of the largest and most up to date in Europe, as well as three other public hospitals: Kings Cross, Victoria, and Ashludie, and one private: Fernbrae. Ninewells Hospital The Ninewells Hospital is a hospital situated on the western edge of Dundee, Scotland at . The proposal for the hospital was put forward in May 1960 and final permission was accepted by Parliament in February 1962. ...

Sensation Science Centre attraction

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 1. ...

Transport

Dundee is served by the A90 road which connects the city to the M90 and Perth in the west, and Forfar and Aberdeen in the north. The part of the road that is in the city is a dual carriageway and forms the city's main bypass on its north side, known as the Kingsway, which can become very busy at rush hour. To the east, the A92 connects the city to Monifieth and Arbroath. The A92 also connects the city to the county of Fife on the south side of the Tay estuary via the Tay Road Bridge. The main southern route around the city is Riverside Drive and Riverside Avenue (the A991), that runs alongside the Tay from a junction with the A90 in the west, to the city centre where it joins the A92 at the bridge. The A90 is a major road in Scotland. ... The M90 motorway is a major road in Scotland. ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... Forfar is a town and former royal burgh of approximately 13,500 people, located in the unitary authority of Angus in Scotland. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... This early German Autobahn uses a dual carriageway design. ... The A92 is a major road in Scotland. ... Monifieth is a small town and burgh on the East Coast of Scotland, which ajoins the City of Dundee. ... , Arbroath or Aberbrothock (Scottish Gaelic: Obair Bhrothaig which translates literally as at the mouth of the Brothock[1]) is a former royal burgh and the largest town in the council area of Angus in Scotland, and has a population of 22,785. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ... The Tay Road Bridge is a road bridge in Scotland over the River Tay from Newport-on-Tay in the north east of Fife, to the City of Dundee. ...

Dundee viewed across the Tay estuary from the southern side. The hill in the background is Dundee law which is situated approximately in the centre of the city. To the left is the Tay Road Bridge
Dundee viewed across the Tay estuary from the southern side. The hill in the background is Dundee law which is situated approximately in the centre of the city. To the left is the Tay Road Bridge

Dundee has an extensive public bus transport system, with the Seagate Bus Station serving as the city's main terminus for journeys out of town. Travel Dundee operates most of the intra-city services, with other more rural services operated by Stagecoach Strathtay. The city's two railway stations are the main Dundee (Tay Bridge) Station, which is situated near the waterfront and the much smaller Broughty Ferry Station, which is located to the eastern end of the city. These are complemented by the stations at Invergowrie railway station, Balmossie and Monifieth railway station. Passenger services at Dundee are provided by First ScotRail, CrossCountry and NXEC. There are no freight services that serve the city since the Freightliner terminal in Dundee was closed in the 1980s. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 169 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 169 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The River Tay looking eastwards from Perth The River Tay, in terms of flow (193 kilometres or 120 miles), is the longest river in Scotland. ... Dundee Law seen from afar Law, Dundee is an area located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland. ... The Tay Road Bridge is a road bridge in Scotland over the River Tay from Newport-on-Tay in the north east of Fife, to the City of Dundee. ... Seagate Bus Station serves the city of Dundee, Scotland. ... Travel Dundee is a bus operator based in Dundee and operates services mainly within Dundee City. ... Strathtay Scottish Omnibuses Ltd, in Scotland, was formed as a bus operating subsidiary of the Scottish Transport Group in June 1985 from Walter Alexander & Sons (Midland) Ltd and Walter Alexander & Sons (Northern) Ltd. ... Dundee Railway Station serves the city of Dundee on the east coast of Scotland. ... Broughty Ferry railway Station Broughty Ferry railway station Serves the suburban town of Broughty Ferry in Dundee. ... Invergowrie is a village on the north bank of the River Tay to the west of Dundee. ... Balmossie railway station is a railway station in Dundee, Scotland which serves the east of Broughty Ferry. ... Monifieth is a small town and burgh on the East Coast of Scotland, which ajoins the City of Dundee. ... First ScotRail is the brand under which FirstGroup PLC runs its railway franchise to operate all domestic passenger services within Scotland, as well as the cross-border Caledonian Sleeper service to London. ... This article is about CrossCountry trains. ... National Express East Coast is the name under which the new train operating company NXEC Trains Ltd has stated it will operate the InterCity East Coast rail franchise, which includes services in England and Scotland. ... Class 47, no. ...


Dundee Airport offers commercial flights to London City Airport, Birmingham International Airport and Belfast City.[46] The airport is capable of serving small aircraft and is located 3 kilometres west of the city centre, adjacent to the Tay river. The nearest major international airport is Edinburgh Airport, 59.2 miles (95.3 km) to the south. Gate 4 of the Airport Dundee Airport (IATA: DND, ICAO: EGPN) is located 3 km from the centre of Dundee, Scotland or, for navigation purposes, 0. ... London City Airport (IATA: LCY, ICAO: EGLC) is a single-runway airport, intended for use by STOL (Short Take Off and Landing) airliners, and principally serving the financial districts of London. ... Birmingham International Airport (IATA: BHX, ICAO: EGBB) is a major airport located 5. ... Belfast City Tower George Best Belfast City Airport (IATA: BHD, ICAO: EGAC) is an airport in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Edinburgh Airport (IATA: EDI, ICAO: EGPH) is located in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was the busiest airport in Scotland in 2007, handling 9,037,200 passengers. ...


The nearest passenger seaport is Rosyth, about 35 miles (56 km) to the south on the Firth of Forth. Rosyth (pronounced Ross-sythe) (Scottish Gaelic: Ros Saoithe) is located on the Firth of Forth on Scotlands east coast, a mile (1. ... The Firth of Forth from Calton Hill The Forth Bridges cross the Firth Satellite photo of the Firth and the surrounding area Map of the Firth Firth of Forth (Scottish Gaelic: Linne Foirthe) is the estuary or firth of Scotlands River Forth, where it flows into the North Sea...


Education

Schools

Schools in Dundee have a pupil enrollment of over 20,300.[26] There are forty-one primary schools and ten secondary schools in the city. Of these, twelve primary and three secondary schools serve the city's Roman Catholic population; the remainder are non-denominational. Dundee is also home to a school for girls of Muslim parents—the only one of its kind in Scotland.[47] Standards in Dundee's primary schools have shown continuous improvement since 2001, with most meeting or exceeding the national average for rates of improvement.[48] Educational performance at standard and higher grade in secondary schools had been well below the national average in 1997 to 1999,[26] although subsequent figures have shown a significant improvement. Between 2003 to 2005, 85% of pupils achieved access 3 or standard grade, 5–6 in English or Maths and 12% achieving at least 5 higher awards at A–C grades.[49] The average number of graduates who continued on to further or higher education was 56% in the school year 2004/5, 4% higher than the national average of 52%.[49] This was an increase from the period of 1997 to 1999 when the rate had been well below the national average.[49] The rate of truancy in Dundee schools has improved to 0.2% from previous rates, which had exceeded the national average of 0.8%.[26] There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In Scotland the Higher is one of the national school-leaving certificate exams and university entrance qualifications of the Scottish Qualifications Certificate (SQC) offered by the Scottish Qualifications Authority which superseded the old Higher Grade on the Scottish Certificate of Education (SCE). ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...


Dundee is home to one independent school, the High School of Dundee, which was founded in the 13th century by the Abbot and monks of Lindores. Early students included William Wallace (allegedly), Hector Boece and the brothers James, John and Robert Wedderburn who were the authors of The Gude and Godlie Ballatis, one of the most important literary works of the Scottish Reformation. It was the earliest reformed school in Scotland, having adopted the new religion in 1554. Students in Rome, Italy. ... The High School of Dundee, informally Dundee High School (HSD or DHS), is one of Scotlands leading public, or independent schools, and the only public school in Dundee. ... For other uses, see Abbot (disambiguation). ... A Roman Catholic monk A monk is a person who practices monasticism, adopting a strict religious and ascetic lifestyle, usually in community with others following the same path. ... Lindores is a small village in Fife, Scotland, about 2 miles south-east of Newburgh. ... For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... Hector Boece (or Hector Boyce) (1465-1536) was a Scottish philosopher. ... James ( 1495–1533), John ( 1505–1556) and Robert Wedderburn ( 1510– 1555) were Scottish religious reformers and poets. ... James ( 1495–1533), John ( 1505–1556) and Robert Wedderburn ( 1510– 1555) were Scottish religious reformers and poets. ... John Knox regarded as the leader of the Scottish Reformation The Scottish Reformation was Scotlands formal break with the papacy in 1560, and the events surrounding this. ... The Reformed churches are a group of Protestant denominations historically related by a similar Zwinglian or Calvinist system of doctrine but organizationally independent. ...


The most prominent of Dundee's state secondary schools are the 4 former academies (all of which still bear the title: Harris Academy, Morgan Academy, Grove Academy and Lawside Academy. Harris Academy was founded in 1885 and is the largest state school in the city. Former pupils include MP George Galloway, professional footballer Christian Dailly and the former vice-chairman of Rangers Football Club, Donald Findlay. Morgan Academy dates back to 1888 when the Dundee Burgh School Board bought Morgan hospital and reopened it as a school. The school and the prior hospital take their names from John Morgan, who bequeathed much of his fortune to establish a residential institution. The building was gutted by fire in 2001 but has since been restored and updated. Grove Academy traditionally educated the children from the Broughty Ferry area of Dundee, where wealthy 19th century merchants built their villas. It was named as one of the top 50 Scottish schools in the 2004-2005 academic year. Lawside Academy was established by the Sisters of Mercy in 1907 and, before the introduction of comprehensive schooling in the 1970s, served as the only Catholic academy for many miles, with students travelling from Perth, Arbroath, Forfar and Cupar. Although Catholic, the school welcomes people from all faiths, and at any one time some 20% of the student body is non-Catholic. In 2003, Dundee City Council decided to merge Lawside with St. Saviour's RC High; this will take effect with the 2008-2009 academic year, one year after Lawside celebrates its centenary. The name of the new school will be St.Paul's Academy. State school is an expression used in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to distinguish schools provided by the government from privately run schools. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... Harris Academy Shield/Badge Harris Academy is a secondary school located in the West End of Dundee, Scotland. ... Morgan Academy Morgan Academy is a secondary school in Dundee, Scotland. ... // About Grove Academy Grove Academy is a high school, situated in the Broughty Ferry area of Dundee, Scotland. ... Lawside Academy is a state secondary school in Dundee, Scotland. ... George Galloway (born 16 August 1954 in Dundee) is a Scottish politician and author noted for his left-wing views, confrontational style, and rhetorical skill. ... Christian Edward Dailly (born October 23, 1973 in Dundee, Scotland), is a Scottish professional football player. ... For other uses, see Rangers F.C. (disambiguation). ... Donald Findlay QC, (born March 17, 1951 in Cowdenbeath, Fife) is a leading Scottish advocate and a former vice-chairman of Rangers Football Club. ... John Morgan is a common name, especially in Wales, UK. Well-known people with this name include: John Morgan (bishop): Archbishop of Wales, from 1949 to 1957 John Morgan (comedian) John Morgan (etiquette expert) John Morgan (golfer) John Morgan (journalist) John Morgan (mathematician), a mathematician at Columbia University John Morgan... The Religious Order of the Sisters of Mercy (RSM) is an order of Catholic women founded by Catherine McAuley in Dublin, Ireland in 1831. ... Perth (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a royal burgh in central Scotland. ... , Arbroath or Aberbrothock (Scottish Gaelic: Obair Bhrothaig which translates literally as at the mouth of the Brothock[1]) is a former royal burgh and the largest town in the council area of Angus in Scotland, and has a population of 22,785. ... Forfar is a town and former royal burgh of approximately 13,500 people, located in the unitary authority of Angus in Scotland. ... Location within the British Isles The Royal Burgh of Cupar is a burgh in Fife, Scotland, and is Fifes former county town, although in 1975 the administration of the newly-created Fife Regional Council was moved to Glenrothes. ...


Colleges and universities

The University of Dundee
The University of Dundee

Dundee is home to two universities and a student population of approximately 17,000.[1] The University of Dundee became an independent entity in 1967, after 70 years of being incorporated into the University of St Andrews during which time it was known as Queen's College. Significant research in biomedical fields and oncology is carried out in the "College of Life Sciences".[50] The university also incorporates the Duncan of Jordanstone School of Art and Design. In October 2005, the university became the first UNESCO centre in the UK; the centre will be involved in research regarding the management of the world's water resources on behalf of the United Nations.[51] The University of Dundee was ranked third for social work, seventh for architecture and eighth for biological sciences.[52] It was voted Scottish University of the Year by the Sunday Times 2006 Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x1152, 333 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee University of Dundee Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x1152, 333 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee University of Dundee Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ... See cancer for the biology of the disease, as well as a list of malignant diseases. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Social Workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ...


The University of Abertay Dundee is a new university; created in 1994 under legislation granting the status of university to the Dundee Institute of Technology, which had been founded in 1888. The university has a computer games technology and design department that holds an annual computer game production competition called Dare to Be Digital.[53] The university is also home to the Dundee Business School. In May 2002, University of Abertay Dundee was ranked number one in the United Kingdom for its investment in IT facilities by the Financial Times.[54][52] The University of Abertay Dundee, usually known simply as Abertay University, is a university in Dundee, Scotland. ... In the United Kingdom, the term New University has two meanings regarding British universities. ... The Further and Higher Education Acts 1992 made changes in the funding and administration of further education and higher education within the United Kingdom. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ...


Dundee College is the city's umbrella further education college, which was established in 1985 as an institution of higher education and vocational training. The college is noted for its New Media centre and incorporates the Scottish School of Contemporary Dance. In a 2005 HMIE inspection, the college's teaching and learning process were rated "very good" in six of the seven subject areas and overall evaluations.[55] Dundee College is a further education and higher education college in the city of Dundee, Scotland. ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... New Media is the marriage of mediated communications technologies with digital computers. ... The Scottish School of Contemporary Dance is a noted dance and performing arts school affiliated with the Dundee College. ... Her Majestys Inspectorate of Education is a body with responsibility for overseeing standards in education in Scotland. ...


Religious sites

Dundee Parish Church, St Mary's is one of three of the Dundee's City Churches which are joined together; only two function as places of worship: St. Mary's and St. Clement's (the Old Steeple) which can be seen in the background.
Dundee Parish Church, St Mary's is one of three of the Dundee's City Churches which are joined together; only two function as places of worship: St. Mary's and St. Clement's (the Old Steeple) which can be seen in the background.

The City Churches, Dundee Parish Church (St Mary's) and the Steeple Church, are the most prominent Church of Scotland buildings in Dundee. They are on the site of the medieval parish kirk of St Mary, of which only the 15th century west tower survives. The attached church was once the largest parish church in medieval Scotland. Dundee was unusual among Scottish medieval burghs in having two parish kirks; the second, dedicated to St Clement, has disappeared, but its site was approximately that of the present City Square. In the Middle Ages Dundee was also the site of houses of the Dominicans (Blackfriars), and Franciscans (Greyfriars), and had a number of hospitals and chapels. These establishments were sacked during the Reformation in the 16th century and have been reduced to sites. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x1152, 410 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee Dundee Parish Church (St Marys) User:Ydam/Created Articles Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x1152, 410 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee Dundee Parish Church (St Marys) User:Ydam/Created Articles Metadata This file contains additional... Dundee Parish Church (St Mary’s) is located in the east section of Dundees City Churches, the other being occupied by the Steeple Church. ... The Steeple Church is one of the most prominent of the City Churches in Dundee, Scotland. ... The Church of Scotland (CofS; Scottish Gaelic: ), known informally by its pre-Union Scots name, The Kirk, is the national church of Scotland. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation to Mary. ... Clement of Alexandria (Titus Flavius Clemens), was the first member of the Church of Alexandria to be more than a name, and one of its most distinguished teachers. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...


The Church of Scotland Presbytery of Dundee currently consists of 45 congregations although, due to dwindling numbers, many now share a minister. Robert Murray McCheyne, who was the minister of St Peter's (now Free Church of Scotland) from 1838 until his death in 1843, led a significant religious revival in Dundee.[56] There are two cathedrals in the city: St. Paul's (Scottish Episcopal) and St. Andrew's (Roman Catholic). Presbyterian governance of a church is typified by the rule of assemblies of presbyters, or elders. ... In most Protestant churches, a minister is a member of the ordained clergy who leads a congregation; such a person may also be called a Pastor, Preacher, or Elder. ... Robert Murray MCheyne, in an illustration from his biography Robert Murray MCheyne (21 May 1813 – 25 March 1843) was a minister in the Church of Scotland from 1835 to 1843. ... The contemporary Free Church of Scotland is that part of the original Free Church of Scotland that remained outside of the union with the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland in 1900. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Logo of the Scottish Episcopal Church with the motto: Evangelical truth and Apostolic order. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...


The Catholic community is part of the Diocese of Dunkeld which is led by Bishop Vincent Paul Logan. The fact that 3 of the city's 10 secondary schools are Roman Catholic attests to a sizable Catholic community, an unusual occurrence in the East of Scotland. By way of comparison, Edinburgh (almost 3 times the size of Dundee) also has 3 Catholic secondary schools and Aberdeen only 1. There are 19 Catholic parishes (including two university chaplaincies) within the boundaries of Dundee City. A recent influx of people from Poland has led to the Pallotines establishing a presence in the community, and they have taken up residence in the parish dedicated to Saint Francis of Assisi. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Dunkeld is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Scotland. ... The Right Reverend Vincent Paul Logan DD, is the 9th bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Dunkeld, which was restored by Pope Leo XIII on 4th of March 1878. ... Pallottine fathers The Pallottines are a religious congregation within the Roman Catholic Church, founded in 1835 as SAC, societas apostolatus catholici, by the Roman priest Vincent Pallotti. ... Saints redirects here. ... Saint Francis of Assisi, St. ...


Muslims are served by a large mosque, several secondary mosques and the Al Maktoum Institute of Islamic and Arabic Studies which opened in 2000. Scotland's only private Islamic school for girls, the 'Imam Muhammed Zakariya School for Islamic Studies' is located in Broughty Ferry. Halal stores and restaurants, along with specialist shops selling Asian clothes and accessories can be found in and around the Hilltown area. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Islam (Arabic: ; ( ▶ (help· info)), the submission to God) is a monotheistic faith, one of the Abrahamic religions and the worlds second-largest religion. ... Halal (حلال, alāl, halaal) is an Arabic term meaning permissible. In the English language it most frequently refers to food that is permissible according to Islamic law. ... Hilltown, Dundee (commonly known as The Hilltown) is a mainly resendential area of Dundee. ...


A recorded Jewish community has existed in the city since the 19th century. The present orthodox synagogue at Dudhope Park was built in the 1970s, with the Hebrew Burial Grounds located around three miles (5 km) to the east. There is also a Hindu mandir and Sikh gurdwara located in the city. The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... The synagogue Scolanova Trani in Italy. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... The Gopuram of temples, in south India, are adorned with colourful icons depicting a particular story surrounding the temples deity. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ... The Harimandir Sahib. ...


Culture

McManus Galleries and Victoria & Albert Museum.
McManus Galleries and Victoria & Albert Museum.

Dundee is home to Scotland's only full-time repertory ensemble, established in the 1930s. One of its alumni, Hollywood actor Brian Cox is a native of the city.[57] The Dundee Repertory Theatre, built in 1982 is the base for Scottish Dance Theatre. Dundee's principal concert auditorium, the Caird Hall (named after its benefactor, the jute baron James Key Caird) regularly hosts the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Various smaller venues host local and international musicians during Dundee's annual Jazz, Guitar and Blues Festivals. An art gallery and an art house cinema are located in Dundee Contemporary Arts, which opened in 1999 in the city's cultural quarter. McManus Galleries is a Gothic Revival-style building, located in Albert Square. It houses a museum and art gallery; exhibits include a collection of fine and decorative art, items from Dundee's history and natural history artefacts. Britain’s only full-time public observatory, Mills Observatory is located at the summit of the city's Balgay Hill. Sensation Dundee, [1], is a science center with over 80 exhibits based on the five senses. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1928x1441, 491 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee Wikipedia:Scottish Wikipedians notice board/New images User:Ydam/Created Articles Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1928x1441, 491 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dundee Wikipedia:Scottish Wikipedians notice board/New images User:Ydam/Created Articles Metadata This file contains... McManus Galleries houses a museum and art gallery with a collection of fine and decorative art as well as a natural history collection McManus Galleries is a Gothic Revival-style building, located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland. ... Repertory or rep, called stock in the U.S., is a term from Western theatre. ... ... This article is about the actor. ... Dundee Repertory Theatre has Scotland’s only full-time repertory company. ... Scottish Dance Theatre is a contemporary dance company based at Dundee Rep. ... For the album by The Cure, see Concert (album). ... An auditorium is the area within a theatre, concert hall or other performance space where the audience is located in order to hear and watch the performance. ... The Caird Hall is the principal concert auditorium in Dundee, Scotland. ... Sir James Key Caird (1837 - 1916) was a jute baron and philanthropist. ... The Royal Scottish National Orchestra is Scotlands national symphony orchestra. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Blues music redirects here. ... Dundee Contemporary Arts Dundee Contemporary Arts (or DCA as it is often called for short) is an arts complex in the city of Dundee, Scotland which houses a contemporary art gallery, a two-screen cinema, a print studio, a visual arts research facility and a café bar. ... McManus Galleries houses a museum and art gallery with a collection of fine and decorative art as well as a natural history collection McManus Galleries is a Gothic Revival-style building, located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... This article is about scientific observatories. ... Balgay is a leafy suburb/area in the west end of Dundee, Scotland. ...

Dundee Headquarters of DC Thomson & Co.
Dundee Headquarters of DC Thomson & Co.

Dundee has a strong literary heritage, with several authors having been born, lived or studied in the city. These include A. L. Kennedy, Rosamunde Pilcher, Kate Atkinson, Thomas Dick, Mary Shelley and John Burnside. The Dundee International Book Prize is a biennial competition open to new authors, offering a prize of £10,000 and publication by Polygon Books. Past winners have included Andrew Murray Scott, Claire-Marie Watson and Malcolm Archibald. William McGonagall, regularly cited as the "worlds worst poet",[58] worked and wrote in the city, often giving performances of his work in pubs and bars. Many of his poems are about the city and events therein, such as his work The Tay Bridge Disaster. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 1071 pixel, file size: 505 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1425 × 1071 pixel, file size: 505 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... D. C. Thomson & Co. ... Alison Louise Kennedy (born October 22, 1965 in Dundee) is a Scottish writer of novels, short stories and non-fiction. ... Rosamunde Pilcher OBE (maiden name Scott, born 22 September 1924 in Lelant, Cornwall, United Kingdom) is a British novelist. ... Kate Atkinson (b. ... Thomas Dick (1774 - 1857), a popular Scottish scientific teacher and writer known for his works on astronomy. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... John Burnside (19 March 1955 -) is a Scottish writer, born in Dunfermline. ... The Dundee International Book Prize is a biennial competition open to new authors, offering a prize of £10,000 and publication by Polygon Books. ... William Topaz McGonagall (1825–September 29, 1902) was a weaver, actor, and poet. ...


Music

Popular music groups such as the 1970s soul-funk outfit Average White Band, the Associates,[59] the band Spare Snare,[60] Danny Wilson and the Indie rock band The View hail from Dundee. The View's debut album went to number one in the UK charts in January 2007.[60] Ricky Ross of Deacon Blue and singer-songwriter KT Tunstall are former pupils of the High School of Dundee, although Tunstall is not a native of the city.[61] The Northern Irish indie rock band Snow Patrol was formed by students at the University of Dundee,[62] Brian Molko; lead singer of Placebo, grew up in the city.[63] At the end of June, Dundee hosts an annual blues festival known as the Dundee Blues Bonanza.[64] In May 2006, BBC Radio 1's Big Weekend music festival was held in the city's Camperdown park.[60] Funk is a distinct style of music originated by African-Americans, e. ... The Average White Band (also AWB) is a Scottish funk and R&B band. ... The Associates were a Scottish new wave band of the early 1980s. ... Voted as the 46th best Scottish band of all time[1], Spare Snare is a lo-fi band from Dundee, Scotland. ... Danny Wilson were a pop group formed in Dundee, Scotland. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... The View are a four piece indie rock band from Dryburgh, a district in Dundee, Scotland. ... The View are a four piece indie rock band from Dryburgh, a district in Dundee, Scotland. ... Ricky Ross (born 22 December 1957 in Dundee, Scotland) is a male singer, most famously with the Scottish rock band, Deacon Blue. ... Deacon Blue are a Scottish pop band. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... Kate KT Tunstall (born 23 June 1975) is a Scottish singer and songwriter. ... The High School of Dundee, informally Dundee High School (HSD or DHS), is one of Scotlands leading public, or independent schools, and the only public school in Dundee. ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... Snow Patrol are a Grammy Award-nominated alternative rock band which formed in Scotland, with the majority of their members being from Bangor and Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... Brian Molko (born December 10, 1972, in Belgium) is a songwriter, lead vocalist and guitarist of the band Placebo. ... Placebo are an alternative rock band currently consisting of Brian Molko and Stefan Olsdal. ... Blues music redirects here. ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... Radio 1s Big Weekend (sometimes referred to as One Big Weekend) is a music festival run by BBC Radio 1. ... Camperdown Park, the largest of Dundees parks, is the location for Camperdown House, built in 1828 for Robert Duncan, Earl of Camperdown and son of Admiral Duncan, who defeated the Dutch at the Battle of Camperdown in 1797. ...


Television and Radio

Dundee is home to 1 of 11 BBC Scotland centres. BBC Scotland Dundee is located within the Nethergate centre. The regional studios of STV are also located in Dundee and this is where the local news opt-out is broadcast from, within the North Tonight news bulletins shown on STV. BBC Scotland (BBC Alba in Gaelic) is a constituent part of the British Broadcasting Corporation, the publicly-funded broadcaster of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the Scottish television network. ... North Tonight is stvs nightly news programme covering the North of Scotland. ... This article is about the Scottish television network. ...


Between 2001 and 2002, the city had its own RSL television channel, the Channel Six Dundee, which played music videos and cult children's cartoons. The city has three radio stations— Tay FM, Tay AM and Wave 102. A UK Restricted Service Licence (often called an RSL), is typically granted to radio stations and television stations broadcasting within the UK to serve a local community or a special event. ... Channel Six Dundee operated between 2001 and 2002, was the city of Dundees own RSL television channel. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tay AM. (Discuss) Tay FM is a Scottish radio station based in Dundee, and serving large parts of Fife and the former Tayside region. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Tay FM. (Discuss) Tay AM is a Scottish radio station based in Dundee, and serving large parts of Fife and the former Tayside region. ... Wave 102 FM Categories: Station stubs | UK Radio Stations ...


Sports

Dens Park (foreground) and Tannadice Park, the two closest senior football grounds in the British Isles

Dundee has two professional football teams; Dundee and Dundee United who play at Dens Park and Tannadice Park, respectively. Their stadia are closer together than any senior football club pair in the world. Dundee is one of only three British cities to have produced two European Cup semi-finalists (the others being Glasgow and London). Dundee lost to A.C. Milan in 1963 and Dundee United lost to A.S. Roma in 1984. In addition, Dundee reached the semi-finals of the forerunner to the UEFA Cup in 1968 and Dundee United were runners-up in UEFA Cup in 1987. Since 2004–05 season, Dundee United is the city's only Scottish Premier League (SPL) team.[65] There are also six junior football teams in the area: Dundee North End, East Craigie, Lochee Harp, Lochee United, Dundee Violet and Downfield. In May 2005, two local teams—Tayport and Lochee United—qualified for the final of the Scottish Junior Cup at Tannadice Park, which was won by Tayport.[66] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dens Park is a football stadium located on Dens Road in the Scottish city of Dundee. ... Tannadice Park, usually referred to as Tannadice, is a football stadium located on Tannadice Street in the Scottish city of Dundee. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Dundee Football Club, founded in 1893, are a football team based in the city of Dundee, Scotland. ... Dundee United Football Club is a Scottish professional football club located in the city of Dundee. ... Dens Park is a football stadium located on Dens Road in the Scottish city of Dundee. ... Tannadice Park, usually referred to as Tannadice, is a football stadium located on Tannadice Street in the Scottish city of Dundee. ... Champions League Logo The UEFA Champions League is an annual international inter-club football competition between Europes most successful clubs, regarded as the most prestigious club trophy in the sport. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Associazione Calcio Milan, commonly referred to by the abbreviation AC Milan or simply Milan, is an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy. ... The season 1962-63 of the European Cup football club tournament was won by A.C. Milan for the first time, in a final match against SL Benfica, who were appearing in a third consecutive final. ... Associazione Sportiva Roma (ISE: IT0001008876) is a major professional football club both in Italy’s Serie A and in European football. ... The season 1983-84 of the European Cup football club tournament was won by for a fourth time by Liverpool FC in a penalty shootout in the final against AS Roma. ... The tenth Inter-Cities Fairs Cup was played over the 1967-68 season. ... The UEFA Cup 1986-87 was won by IFK Goteborg of Sweden on aggregate over Dundee United of Scotland. ... The 2004-05 season was the 108th season of competitive football in Scotland. ... The Clydesdale Bank Scottish Premier League commonly known as the Scottish Premier League, Premier League or SPL is a professional league competition for football clubs located at the top level of the Scottish football league system - above the Scottish Football League. ... A Scottish association football competition that, through various incarnations, existed from the 1892 to 1947. ... Dundee North End Football Club are a football (soccer) club based in the city of Dundee in Scotland. ... East Craigie F.C. is a Scottish junior football club based in Dundee. ... Lochee Harp Football Club are a junior football club based in the Lochee area of the city of Dundee in Scotland. ... Lochee United F.C. are a Scottish junior football club from the Lochee area of Dundee. ... Dundee Violet F.C. is a Scottish junior football club based in Dundee. ... Downfield F.C. is a Scottish junior football club based in the Downfield area of Dundee. ... , Tayport is located in Fife, Scotland. ... Lochee is an area of Dundee, Scotland. ... The Scottish Junior Cup, also known as the OVD Cup, is a competition organised by the Scottish Junior Football Association. ... Tannadice Park, usually referred to as Tannadice, is a football stadium located on Tannadice Street in the Scottish city of Dundee. ...


Dundee is home to the Dundee Texol Stars ice hockey team which plays at Dundee Ice Arena. The team participates in the Scottish National League (SNL) with the Dundee Tigers and the Northern League (NL) and in cup competitions. Dundee is home to Dundee High School Former Pupils rugby club which plays in the First Division of the BT Premier League rugby club. Menzieshill Hockey Club are one of Scotland's premier field hockey teams and regularly represent Scotland in European competitions. The team plays in the European Indoor Cup A Division and has won the Scottish Indoor National League seven times in the last decade. An outdoor concrete skate park was constructed in Dudhope Park with money from the Scottish Executive’s Quality of Life Fund.[67] Opened in 2006, the park was nominated for the Nancy Ovens Award.[68] The Dundee Texol Stars are an ice hockey sports team based in the Scottish city of Dundee. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Scottish National League is the ice hockey league in Scotland. ... Dundee Tigers, Tayside, Scotland. ... The Northern League is an ice hockey league in the United Kingdom, contested by teams from both England and Scotland. ... Dundee High School Former Pupils Rugby Football Club are a rugby union team that play their home games at the Mayfield Playing Fields, Dundee, Scotland The team was founded in 1880 and currently play in the BT Scotland Premiership Division Two. ... The BT League Championship is the national Rugby Union league for Scotland. ... The Executives logo, shown with English and Scottish Gaelic caption The term Scottish Executive is used in two different, but closely-related senses: to denote the executive arm of Scotlands national legislature (i. ...


See also

This article explains the meaning of area as a Physical quantity. ... Ardler is an area in the north west of Dundee, Scotland. ... Balgay is a leafy suburb/area in the west end of Dundee, Scotland. ... Balgillo is a housing development in the Dundee suburb of Broughty Ferry. ... Balgowan is an area of Dundee, Scotland. ... Barnhill is an area of Broughty Ferry, which is a suburb of the city of Dundee, Scotland. ... Blackness is an area of the city of Dundee. ... Broughty Ferry (Brochtie in Scots) is a suburb on the eastern edge of the City of Dundee, situated on the shore of the Firth of Tay in eastern Scotland. ... Camperdown is an area of Dundee, Scotland, best known for Camperdown Park, which is the largest in the city. ... Charleston is an area located on the North-West edge of Dundee, United Kingdom. ... Until the industrial revolution the City Centre represented the full extent of the City of Dundee. ... Claverhouse is an area of Dundee, Scotland. ... Craigiebank is an area of Eastern Dundee, Scotland. ... Douglas and Angus (commonly referred to as Douglas) is an area of Eastern Dundee, Scotland. ... Fairmuir is an area of Dundee, Scotland. ... Fintry is a housing scheme in Dundee, United Kingdom. ... Gowrie Park is a residential area of Dundee, Scotland, United Kingdom. ... Hilltown, Dundee (commonly known as The Hilltown) is a mainly resendential area of Dundee. ... Kirkton is located North of Dundee City Centre it is know for its High Rised residential area which can be seen for 1 Mile outside the City and Fife Kirkton is in the North Terminus for 18 and 19 Bus Service Kirkton Asda to City Centre. ... Dundee Law seen from afar Law, Dundee is an area located in the centre of Dundee, Scotland. ... Lochee is an area of Dundee, Scotland. ... This article or section needs to be wikified. ... Menzieshill water tower Menzieshill is an area of the city of Dundee, United Kingdom. ... Ninewells is an area of Dundee, Scotland, best known for its hospital. ... Pitkerro is an area of Dundee, Scotland located in the eastern part of the city. ... St Marys is a resendential area od the Dundee located in the extreme northwest of the city. ... Baxter park pavillion in the areas Baxter park Stobswell is an area of Dundee, Scotland. ... Strathmartine is an area of Dundee in east central Scotland. ... Magdalen Green and Bandstand, Located in the West End The West End Is a residential section of the city of Dundee, Scotland located to the west of the city centre around the areas main throughfair Perth Road and along the banks of the river Tay. ... Woodside is a small housing area in the north of Dundee. ... Whitfield is a residential area in the North of Dundee, United Kingdom. ...

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  68. ^ Leisure and arts services committee - Agenda (PDF). Dundee city council (14 August 2006). Retrieved on 2006-09-06.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fairtrade Foundation is a charity which promotes the sale of Fairtrade-labelled products in the United Kingdom. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Bartholomew (December 25, 1831 - March 29, 1893) was a Scottish cartographer, born in Edinburgh. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Evening Telegraph, known locally as the Tele (usually pronounced Tully) is the sister paper of The Courier and Advertiser, published by Dundee firm D.C. Thomson. ... D. C. Thomson & Co. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Evening Telegraph, known locally as the Tele (usually pronounced Tully) is the sister paper of The Courier and Advertiser, published by Dundee firm D.C. Thomson. ... D. C. Thomson & Co. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United Kingdom, the four Boundary Commissions are responsible for determining the boundaries of House of Commons constituencies. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Commission for Racial Equality is a non-governmental organisation in the United Kingdom which tackles racial discrimination and promotes racial equality. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Friends of the Earth is an international network of environmental organizations in 70 countries. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 92 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Was the first employee of DMA Design. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 92 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 92 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scotsmans offices in Edinburgh The Scotsman is a Scottish national newspaper, published in Edinburgh. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Her Majestys Inspectorate of Education is a body with responsibility for overseeing standards in education in Scotland. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... D. C. Thomson & Co. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Herald is a common name for newspapers throughout the English-speaking world, and the Sunday editions are often called Sunday Herald. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Yahoo! Music, provided by the Yahoo! network, is a provider of a variety of music services, including Internet radio, music videos, news, artist information, and original programming. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC Sport is the sports division of the BBC. It became a fully dedicated division of the BBC in 2000. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... D. C. Thomson & Co. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Smith, W. J. (1973). A history of Dundee. David Winter & Son. OCLC 62092907. 
  • Scott, Andrew Murray [1989] (1999). Discovering Dundee: The Story of a City. Mercat Press. ISBN 1873644884. 
  • Scott, Andrew Murray [2000] (2006). Modern Dundee: Life In the City Since World War Two. Breedon Books. ISBN 0859765326. 
  • Scott, Andrew Murray (2004). Dundee's Literary Lives, Vol 1. Abertay Historical Society. ISBN 0900019387. 
  • Scott, Andrew Murray (2005). Dundee's Literary Lives, Vol 2. Abertay Historical Society. ISBN 0900019395. 
  • Scott, Andrew Murray (2004). The Wee Book of Dundee. B&W. ISBN 1902927990. 

The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ...

External links

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  • Dundee City Council
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  • Dundonian for beginners
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  • Dundee's most comprehensive listings site
  • Memorial inscriptions from the cities oldest cemetery
This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Scotland. ... Broad Street at the heart of Stirlings Old Town area (called Top of the Town by locals) Stirling Castle (Southwest aspect) The main courtyard inside Stirling Castle. ... This article is about the country. ... , Bangor, in north Wales, is one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... This article is about the city of Newport in Wales. ... St Davids (Welsh: Tyddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ... For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... Northern Ireland (Irish: , Ulster Scots: Norlin Airlann) is a constituent country of the United Kingdom lying in the northeast of the island of Ireland, covering 5,459 square miles (14,139 km², about a sixth of the islands total area). ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other places with similar names, see Derry (disambiguation) and Londonderry (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... , Newry (from the Irish: Iúr Cinn Trá meaning The Yew Tree at the Head of the Strand, short form An tIúr, The Yew) is the fourth largest city in Northern Ireland and eighth on the island of Ireland. ... For the council, see Lisburn City Council. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dundee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4453 words)
Dundee is in close proximity to some of Scotland's notable scenery including Perth (20 miles) and the southern Highlands to the west, St Andrews (14 miles) and north-east Fife heading south and Angus lying north and east of the city, including the Angus Glens.
Dundee's location on a major estuary allowed for the easy importation of jute from the Indian subcontinent and an ample supply of whale oil from the city's large whaling industry, needed for processing of the cloth.
Dundee was the first city in the world to have electric street lights, employing bulbs designed by James Bowman Lindsay who demonstrated his invention at a public meeting in 1835.
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