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Encyclopedia > Dundas Square
Dundas Square.
Dundas Square.
Dundas Square L.E.D. pixelboard showing "The Heart of the City" on Dundas Square logo.
Dundas Square L.E.D. pixelboard showing "The Heart of the City" on Dundas Square logo.
Close-up view of the L.E.D. pixelboard.
Close-up view of the L.E.D. pixelboard.
The square's main part consists of a large open space made of 35 by 35 inch (889 by 889 mm) square granite slabs, specially textured for the safety of persons playing in, or running through the fountains. Each of the 20 fountains includes a grille equal in size to one of the slabs. (Fountains were off at the time this image was captured.)
The square's main part consists of a large open space made of 35 by 35 inch (889 by 889 mm) square granite slabs, specially textured for the safety of persons playing in, or running through the fountains. Each of the 20 fountains includes a grille equal in size to one of the slabs. (Fountains were off at the time this image was captured.)
Grilles removed for service, showing internal structure and space underneath the grilles and granite slabs.
Grilles removed for service, showing internal structure and space underneath the grilles and granite slabs.

Yonge Dundas Square[1] is a public square in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on the southeast corner of Yonge Street and Dundas Street. It was opened to the public in November of 2002, and a "grand opening" concert was held on May 30, 2003. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 684 KB) Photographer/Author: Me, Leslie Mateus, a user of the Portuguese Wikipedia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 684 KB) Photographer/Author: Me, Leslie Mateus, a user of the Portuguese Wikipedia. ... Download high resolution version (1200x795, 97 KB)Dundas Square urbeach pixelboard I captured this picture of the Dundas Square pixelboard, that displays The Heart of the City, etc. ... Download high resolution version (1200x795, 97 KB)Dundas Square urbeach pixelboard I captured this picture of the Dundas Square pixelboard, that displays The Heart of the City, etc. ... Closeup of pixelboard showing Dundas Square logo, etc. ... Closeup of pixelboard showing Dundas Square logo, etc. ... Download high resolution version (1024x678, 94 KB)Urban beach wave-fountain grilles This is a multiple exposure picture I took at the Dundas Square waterplay area when the water was turned off for a concert. ... Download high resolution version (1024x678, 94 KB)Urban beach wave-fountain grilles This is a multiple exposure picture I took at the Dundas Square waterplay area when the water was turned off for a concert. ... Download high resolution version (1200x795, 97 KB)Grille open for shutting down the fountains for the season (shoes raised granite tiles) I captured this newsworthy memory of one of the Dundas Square fountain grilles being opened up for being shut down for the season. ... Download high resolution version (1200x795, 97 KB)Grille open for shutting down the fountains for the season (shoes raised granite tiles) I captured this newsworthy memory of one of the Dundas Square fountain grilles being opened up for being shut down for the season. ... Template:Hide = Motto: Template:Unhide = Diversity Our Strength Image:Toronto, Ontario Location. ... A sign for Yonge Street at the intersection with Maitland Street. ... Dundas Street showing the 506 Carlton Streetcar (the 505 Dundas Street streetcar also runs along Dundas), with Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in background. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Because Dundas Street bends at the square, a triangular portion is chopped off one side, so the shape of the square is actually like a square with a triangle taken out of one side. This northern side of the square that runs at an angle is known as the hypotenuse, which features a structure supported by 11 cement pillars of the type used to make overpasses on highways. This creates an industrial urban aesthetic, which, being to the north, casts no shadows on the rest of the space. The other three sides are square (i.e. at right angles to one another and to Yonge Street and Dundas Street West).


Designed by Brown + Storey Architects, the square was intended as a new public space in Toronto, somewhat akin to Nathan Phillips Square, designed by Viljo Revell for New City Hall. Unlike Nathan Phillips Square, however, Dundas Square is operated as a commercial venture, with a separate Board of Management. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gathering place. ... Nathan Phillips Square, 2005 Nathan Phillips Square is a city square that forms the front (south) entrance to Toronto City Hall or New City Hall at Queen Street West and Bay Street (its address is 100 Queen West). ... Viljo Revell (January 25, 1910– November 8, 1964) was a Finnish architect of the functionalist school. ... Toronto City Hall The City Hall of Toronto, Ontario, Canada is one of the most distinctive landmarks of the city. ...


Until the late 1990s, the Dundas Square site was occupied by a block of retail stores, and considered by many to be a "seedy" or dangerous corner. In 1998, as part of its Yonge Street Regeneration Project, Toronto City Council approved the expropriation and demolition of the buildings on the site, and the construction of Dundas Square. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... Expropriation is the act of removing from control the owner of an item of property. ...


The square is opposite the Toronto Eaton Centre and just south of the Ryerson University campus, and is part of an historic revitalization effort by the city, residents and the Downtown Yonge Business Improvement Area[2], an association of local businesses. This effort was spearheaded by Councillor Kyle Rae, Mr. Robert Sniderman of the Senator Restaurant and Mr. Arron Barberian of Barberian's Steak House. The Toronto Eaton Centre is a large shopping mall and office complex in downtown Toronto, Ontario Canada, named after the now-defunct Eatons department store chain. ... Ryerson University is a publicly funded post-secondary education institution located in the heart of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Kyle Rae is a city councillor in Toronto, Canada. ...

Contents

Design Features

The square is actually on a slight incline, which architects Brown and Storey have said was intended to evoke a theatrical stage. It is made with modular raised square textured 35.125 by 35.125 inch (892 by 892 mm) granite slabs (each slab costing approx. $1500: $1,000 materials plus $500 labour), features a diagonally running zinc canopy along the northern hypotenuse of the "square", a movable plinth which serves as a stage for concerts and other performances, a row of lighted fountains set directly into the pavement, a row of small trees along the southern edge, a transparent canopy over the plinth, and a new entrance to Dundas subway station below. A series of low, circular stone planters was added to the western side of the square in summer 2005. Quarrying granite for the Mormon Temple, Utah Territory. ... General Name, Symbol, Number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Atomic mass 65. ... Plinth of the Sign of the Kiwi, Dyers Pass, Port Hills, Christchurch (NZ) c 1917 - Collection: [Christchurch City Libraries] Look up Plinth in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dundas is a station on the Yonge-University Spadina line of the Toronto subway. ...


The granite slabs, made of two kinds of granite, modularize the space, with a period of 7 slabs (every 7th slab has a slightly different texture and darkness). This period intertwines with the 5-slab periodicity of the splash fountains, with a spatial period of 177 inches (4.5 m) (one splash fountain every 5 slabs), making a mathematically intricate space.


The centerpiece of the square is the array of fountains designed by Dan Euser of Waterarchitecture. Two rows of ten fountains are spread out across the main walkway of the square, so that visitors have the opportunity to walk through or around the fountains. Unlike many other city fountains, the Dundas Square fountains were meant for waterplay, and include a sophisticated filtration system that, according to both of the architects, keeps the water at or above "pool quality" water. According to Euser, the water is treated to maintain health standards for waterplay. According to facility administrator Christine MacLean, the slate that was chosen for the entire space has nonslip properties for the safety of persons running through or playing in the fountains. Each of the ten water fountains consists of a stainless steel grille with 30 ground nozzles (arranged in three rows of ten) under it. Dan Euser is a world-class artist, sculptor, designer, and landscape architect specializing in water sculptures. ... A ground nozzle is a spray nozzle made for being installed at grade level (i. ...


Surrounding buildings

This view shows the largest media tower in Canada, located at the NW corner of the intersection.
This view shows the largest media tower in Canada, located at the NW corner of the intersection.

Other projects in the immediate area include the redevelopment of the Eaton Centre, the long-delayed construction of a new cinema complex to the north, known as the Metropolis development, and the 'Olympic Spirit Toronto' building to the south east(now closed). A so-called "Media Tower" - essentially a scaffold for billboards, operated by Clear Channel Communications - has been constructed on the northwest corner. It is considered to be the tallest media tower in the world. The Olympic Spirit Toronto building also sports a large media tower complete with video screen on top of it. Dundas Square is located within the Downtown Yonge Business Improvement Area (BIA), which city councillor Kyle Rae has pointed to Times Square in New York City as a model to emulate, with its canyon of billboards and animated advertising screens. To the west of the square is the Hard Rock Cafe building, which also features a series of billboards and a large video screen. This, however, is controversial due to the loss of identity many feel a city sacrifices when these media towers are built (see 'Controversy' below). Image File history File links Billboards_at_dundas_square. ... Image File history File links Billboards_at_dundas_square. ... Metropolis is a notoriously delayed retail and entertainment complex on the north-east corner of Yonge and Dundas streets in Toronto. ... This article is about the company. ... Kyle Rae is a city councillor in Toronto, Canada. ... Times Square For other uses, see Times Square (disambiguation) Times Square is the name given to a principal intersection, at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue, and stretching from West 42nd to West 47th Streets in the New York City borough of Manhattan. ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ...


The Eaton Centre redevelopment was completed in 2004. The Metropolis development, run by PenEquity corporation, was begun in January 1999 after expropriation had taken place and continues; the expected completion date has been revised to 2007. Construction restarted in the fall of 2005, and is ongoing. The Olympic Spirit Toronto building was officially opened in late summer 2004 and closed in early summer 2006.


Under Yonge Dundas Square

Architectural glass brick is used to obscure clear visual line of sight into women's washroom/changeroom on the left, and men's on the right. The glass brick, however, admits light, and the labyrinth design allows for unobstructed passage of air, as well as barrier-free accessibility. Additionally, inside the washrooms, glass brick windows run around the entire perimeter, near the top of the wall, to create "natural artificial light" by way of light bulbs shining in, but located in the service/utilities area that runs all the way around outside the washrooms. The result is an underground space that is transformed into a space that appears to be naturally illuminated.
Architectural glass brick is used to obscure clear visual line of sight into women's washroom/changeroom on the left, and men's on the right. The glass brick, however, admits light, and the labyrinth design allows for unobstructed passage of air, as well as barrier-free accessibility. Additionally, inside the washrooms, glass brick windows run around the entire perimeter, near the top of the wall, to create "natural artificial light" by way of light bulbs shining in, but located in the service/utilities area that runs all the way around outside the washrooms. The result is an underground space that is transformed into a space that appears to be naturally illuminated.

The surface of Dundas Square is not level, because it is sloped upward as the surface goes away from Yonge Street. This is to allow sufficient height to provide clearance for the Toronto Parking Authority garage entrance. The architects planned the surface's slope to make it interesting and to accommodate the necessary clearances for what lies under the Square. Additionally, level P1 houses the washrooms/changerooms, green room (for stage performers), and various utilities rooms, custodial and supply closets, as well as the water treatment plant and pump rooms for the fountains. Download high resolution version (1200x823, 93 KB)Urbeach washroom/changeroom architecture: glass-brick labyrinth I took this picture of the Dundas Square washroom/changeroom facility to show the modern architectural use of glass brick, in the design of the labyrinth, to allow an open concept design (light passage, and open... Download high resolution version (1200x823, 93 KB)Urbeach washroom/changeroom architecture: glass-brick labyrinth I took this picture of the Dundas Square washroom/changeroom facility to show the modern architectural use of glass brick, in the design of the labyrinth, to allow an open concept design (light passage, and open... Architectural glass brick provides an ideal combination of passage of light, and visual obscuration (visual distortion) to provide privacy. ... The Toronto Parking Authority is a public corporation owned by the City of Toronto. ... An ultramodern mens washroom, showing a row of sinks embedded into a large marble slab on the right. ... A changeroom (in Australia, Canada, and other areas, including some parts of the USA, and also known as a changing room, change room, lockerroom, or locker room in the United Kingdom or USA) is a place where people go to change their clothes. ... For the music studio, film or online magazine named The Green Room, see The Green Room A green room is a room in a theater, studio, or other public venues for the accommodation of performers or speakers when not required on the stage. ...


Controversy

Yonge Dundas Square is controversial in some circles. Criticism ranges from suggestions that the city has missed an opportunity for sorely needed green space within the downtown area (or at least more interesting architectural elements) to questions of what the true intent behind the ostensibly public square is. Numerous groups, from the Toronto Public Space Committee, to organizers of Toronto iterations of the Reclaim The Streets phenomenon, often point to the Square as exemplifying a negative trend in urban planning. The Toronto Public Space Committee (TPSC) is a local, volunteer-run, non-profit organization located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada that prides itself in defending the city’s public space from corporate and private forces, including automobiles and outdoor advertising. ... Reclaim the Streets (RTS) is a group of people with a collective ideal of community ownership of public spaces. ...


The square is surrounded on all sides by gigantic commercial billboards; with city funds going towards what appears to be a large re-development experiment, many have pointed to the square as a prime example of the creeping privatization of public space. Those making this point have been bolstered by the fact that the square's board is populated by both local businesses and residents. The Board of Management for the Square is an ABC organization of the City of Toronto. While there are permit fees for commercial events, community groups can use the Square for free under the Square's Community Use Policy. All events are charged back for staffing and equipment use. Privatization (alternately denationalization or disinvestment) is the transfer of property or responsibility from the public sector (government) to the private sector (business). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gathering place. ...


On an aesthetic note, some detractors have said that when the fountains are not running (e.g. to mask out the sounds of traffic), the square feels like a GO transit commuter bus station or an abandoned parking lot. Some suggest it should have monuments or other items (such as greenery) to break up the open space. However, the main problem is often said to be the simple lack of people. This has been improving with the addition of regular special events including lunchtime jazz concerts and outdoor film screenings. When events are not taking place, the Square is set with cafe tables, chairs and umbrellas.


Incidents

On March 15th 2006 sections of the signage on the Eaton Centre side of the square came loose falling onto pedestrians. High winds reaching speeds of 120 km/h (75 mph) caused sections of the billboard to fall more than fifteen stories to the ground. Police closed Yonge Street until the signage could be secured. One man in his 20s suffered severe head injuries from the falling debris. A sign for Yonge Street at the intersection with Maitland Street. ...


Fountains

One of the splash fountains in operation, running at full height.
One of the splash fountains in operation, running at full height.
One of the three rows of ten nozzles that are present in each of the 20 fountains. A fisheye lens was used so that we can see at least some of the nozzles in close detail, yet still be able to see and count all 10 of them. The nozzles are spaced 2 inches (approx. 50 mm) apart within each row, and the rows are spaced 3 inches (approx. 75 mm) apart.
One of the three rows of ten nozzles that are present in each of the 20 fountains. A fisheye lens was used so that we can see at least some of the nozzles in close detail, yet still be able to see and count all 10 of them. The nozzles are spaced 2 inches (approx. 50 mm) apart within each row, and the rows are spaced 3 inches (approx. 75 mm) apart.
Dundas Square showing the 600 ground nozzles arranged in 20 groups, right in the middle of the main walkway.
Dundas Square showing the 600 ground nozzles arranged in 20 groups, right in the middle of the main walkway.
A jogger cools off in the "urban beach" that forms the main central part of Dundas Square (multiple exposure picture).
A jogger cools off in the "urban beach" that forms the main central part of Dundas Square (multiple exposure picture).

The width of the water spray is always 6 inches (152 mm) wide, the three rows of ten are each 3 inches (76 mm) apart, and 18 inches (457 mm) broadside, because the nozzles in each row are spaced 2 inches (51 mm) apart. This 18 inch (457 mm) width was selected to match the width of the widest of adult human users. The height of the spray is time-varying, and under program control. There are various programs for the fountains, the two most common being sinusoidal unison, and westward wave packets. During most of the summer and fall of 2004, all 600 nozzles rose and fell in unison, in a sinusoidally time-varying fashion, with a period of approximately 10 seconds, to create an urban beach effect, as the "waves" or "surf" pounds against the hard rock surface. The water goes from approximately 1 foot (300 mm) high, to 8 feet (2.4 m) high, giving rise to a peak-to-peak sinusoidal amplitude of 7 feet (2.1 m). Starting on Thursday, 27 October 2004, the program was changed to one that sends wave packets westward, with a period of approximately 8 seconds across all 10 fountains (but only the middle channel of each one, with the westward channels forming a background pedestal). This period gives rise to a phase velocity of approximately 5.6 meters per second. Running westward at a moderate speed (i.e. approximately 20 km/h), one can stay inside the peak of the wave packet, to get a very enjoyable waterplay experience, when the wave packet program is running in the fountains. Download high resolution version (816x1232, 96 KB)One of the fountains on the urbeach I took this picture of one of the urban beach fountains, when it was at full spray, backlit by natural sunlight. ... Download high resolution version (816x1232, 96 KB)One of the fountains on the urbeach I took this picture of one of the urban beach fountains, when it was at full spray, backlit by natural sunlight. ... Download high resolution version (1200x288, 79 KB)Closeup showing one of the three rows of nozzles in each funtain I captured this picture of one of the three rows of 10 nozzles that are in each of the Dundas Square fountains. ... Download high resolution version (1200x288, 79 KB)Closeup showing one of the three rows of nozzles in each funtain I captured this picture of one of the three rows of 10 nozzles that are in each of the Dundas Square fountains. ... Download high resolution version (1200x795, 95 KB)Urbeach on a warm day I took this picture at the urban beach today, since it was nice and warm (25 deg. ... Download high resolution version (1200x795, 95 KB)Urbeach on a warm day I took this picture at the urban beach today, since it was nice and warm (25 deg. ... Download high resolution version (1024x678, 96 KB)A jogger cools off in the Dundas Square splash fountains. ... Download high resolution version (1024x678, 96 KB)A jogger cools off in the Dundas Square splash fountains. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The fountains are intended to appeal to children and adults alike, and there is evidence that this intention has been realized:

Meanwhile, nearer Yonge street, by the splash pad (a series of fountains designed to allow people to cool off in their spray), a group of men in their early 20's laughing and speaking Portuguese tried to wrestle each other into the spray. [3]

Some locals have raised concerns about overzealous security guards chasing people out of the fountains or telling them not to "loiter", when in fact, architects Brown and Storey, the creator of the fountains (Dan Euser), the firm that initiated the bidding, as well as Councillor Kyle Rae, and the management of Dundas Square have all confirmed that waterplay was one of the intended uses of the space.


The entire rock surface is of a very dark (almost black) color, and effectively absorbs sunlight, thus creating a warm surface to rest on. The water runs under the dark rock slabs, and is thus heated by them, so that the fountain water is solar heated.


Three curved lighting masts along the south edge of the urbeach, made of hollow structural steel have a high gloss white finish that contrasts with the rough nonslip texture of the black granite, and each support six mercury vapour arc lamps that create evening light that comes from approximately the same directions as natural sunlight does during the day (i.e. from various southerly directions). Hollow structural steel (HSS) is rapidly becoming a popular building material, because of its combination of strength, ease of construction, and architectural beauty. ...


At the Southeast and Southwest corners of Yonge Dundas Square there are drinking water fountains. The water fountain on the Southwest corner (nearest to Yonge Street) is known for its large, cool stream of water that flows down the fountain to drains in the ground. The stream produced by the other fountain is warmer and flows less copiously. On the other hand, the fountain nearest Yonge street is also near a protrusion in the ground that people like to sit on. This makes it very awkward to get a drink out of this fountain since often a person is sitting right in front of where one would get a drink. This is especially awkward since the stream produced by this fountain is big, making getting a drink a cool, refreshing experience, but also resulting in somewhat of a messy experience that one would not want a stranger to view.

Looking down into the 46 slots in one of the 20 fountain grilles, we can see the inner workings of the waterplay space. Much of the inner workings are underneath the rock tiles. The tiles are much like the tiles of the raised floor in a computer room, so that one or more can be removed to service the waterplay equipment.
Looking down into the 46 slots in one of the 20 fountain grilles, we can see the inner workings of the waterplay space. Much of the inner workings are underneath the rock tiles. The tiles are much like the tiles of the raised floor in a computer room, so that one or more can be removed to service the waterplay equipment.

Download high resolution version (1024x622, 88 KB)Urban beach waterplay nozzles After a security guard told me and my 2 year old daughter not to play in the water, I contacted the architects, the designers, the city councillor, and the facility administrators to confirm that the fountains were actually designed... Download high resolution version (1024x622, 88 KB)Urban beach waterplay nozzles After a security guard told me and my 2 year old daughter not to play in the water, I contacted the architects, the designers, the city councillor, and the facility administrators to confirm that the fountains were actually designed...

Water quality

Children often play in, and drink from, the splash fountains. Joggers often drink to their heart's content, while splashing into the water to cool off. Some people fill up their drinking bottles from this water. Whenever there is open water like this, water quality standards must be maintained.
Children often play in, and drink from, the splash fountains. Joggers often drink to their heart's content, while splashing into the water to cool off. Some people fill up their drinking bottles from this water. Whenever there is open water like this, water quality standards must be maintained.

Because many people drink from the ground spray nozzles (some people even fill up water bottles from the ground sprays), and since of course waterplay is one of the intended uses, the water is tested every morning, between 9 am and 10 am, by the health department. The water is treated with bromine, which many bathers prefer to chlorine. There are three separate water treatment facilities, one for each group of ten westmost nozzles in each grille (200 nozzles total), another for the middle row of ten in each grille, and a third for all of the eastmost nozzles. There are three switches, one for each of the three channels (east, center, and west). Each channel is fitted with a pipe that has an inside diameter of exactly 8 inches (approx. 203 mm) inches in diameter (according to BOMBEN Plumbing and Heating which holds the contract for system repairs). Each set of ten nozzles is supplied with a 2 inch (approx. 51 mm) I.D. pipe, i.e. each fountain has three 2 inch (51 mm) pipes supplying it. Thus each fountain provides the approximate equivalent of three large firehoses. The water that runs into the grilles travels west, under the raised floor of the Dundas Square slabs, to the treatment facility under the west end of the waterplay area. Sometimes the water runs only partially, e.g. from 2004 24 September, through 2004 27 September, the middle channel was down, so only 400 of the 600 nozzles were operational. In this case, the waterplay experience feels a little "thin" (notably less splash factor when running through broadside). If one of the three channels goes down over the weekend, it usually won't be repaired until the next weekday. When all 600 nozzles are running, crashing through the wall of water feels about equivalent to entry off a 3 metre springboard into a pool (in terms of approximate equivalent splash factor). The wall of water in each fountain is spaced so as not to be so dense as to cause bruising when crashing through it, but dense enough to create a high thrill factor. Download high resolution version (1024x782, 94 KB)Urban beach, evening waterplay I took this picture when I was playing with my daughter at the Dundas Square waterplay area. ... Download high resolution version (1024x782, 94 KB)Urban beach, evening waterplay I took this picture when I was playing with my daughter at the Dundas Square waterplay area. ... General Name, Symbol, Number bromine, Br, 35 Chemical series halogens Group, Period, Block 17, 4, p Appearance gas/liquid: red-brown solid: metallic luster Atomic mass 79. ... General Name, Symbol, Number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, Period, Block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Atomic mass 35. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Diving off a springboard A springboard or diving board is used for diving and is a board that is itself a spring, i. ...


Programming (animation and sequencing) of Dan Euser's water sculpture fountains

The fountains comprise a dynamic art installation and water sculpture in which the 600 water jets are programmed to vary, dynamically, over time.


Due to cost limitations, only the middle channel (i.e. middle ten nozzles of each fountain) can be animated, but the outside two channels can still be globally controlled. The outside two channels are often used to set a background (pedestal) level, while the middle channel animates, typically with a period of 8 seconds.


Each fountain shoots water straight up out of the ground, to a height, h(t) that varies as a periodic function of time, t. Therefore, there are ten time-varying waveforms, h0, h1, h2, ... h9, one waveform from each of the ten fountains.


The first fountain, (numbered 0) squirts, then the second one (numbered 1), and so on, up to the last one (9), and then the sequence repeats, continuously. This program sends wave packets (spatially sampled, i.e. hx(t) is discrete in x) westward at a speed of approximately 20 km/h, so that a jogger can run west, through the fountains at this phase velocity of the wave packet, as shown below:

The sequenced phase velocity of 20 km/h is ideal for joggers cooling off in the fountains.
The sequenced phase velocity of 20 km/h is ideal for joggers cooling off in the fountains.

Fountain x produces a periodic signal, hx(t) with a period of eight seconds. However, each fountain's height is 36 degrees out of phase with an ajacent fountain, as shown in the figure below: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1653x695, 12 KB)Funtains sequencing illustration. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1653x695, 12 KB)Funtains sequencing illustration. ...

Timing diagram made from measurements made on Thursday, 27 October 2004. The sequence is periodic in both space and time. In time it is periodic with a period of 8 seconds. In space, it may be modeled as periodic, and infinite in extent, with a period of 10 fountains, because the transition from 9th to 0th is the same as the in-between transitions.
Timing diagram made from measurements made on Thursday, 27 October 2004. The sequence is periodic in both space and time. In time it is periodic with a period of 8 seconds. In space, it may be modeled as periodic, and infinite in extent, with a period of 10 fountains, because the transition from 9th to 0th is the same as the in-between transitions.

The directionality imposed by the sequencer encourages bathers to run west rather than east. It therefore reduces the probability that joggers will bump into each other, since they most likely run through the fountains in the same direction. Moreover, the sequencer makes the bathing experience optimal for joggers who run west at exactly 20 km/h. Thus the tendency toward the same speed AND direction sets forth a recipe for minimizing contact or obstruction, in much the same way as synchronized stoplights make traffic move at a constant speed. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1667x1703, 23 KB)Spatiotemporal analysis of Dundas Square funtains. I drew this figure, using idraw, based on measurements I made of the Dundas Square fountains. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1667x1703, 23 KB)Spatiotemporal analysis of Dundas Square funtains. I drew this figure, using idraw, based on measurements I made of the Dundas Square fountains. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the above figure h1(t) = h0(t − 0.8s), h2(t) = h1(t − 0.8s), ... h9(t) = h8(t − 0.8s), and finally, h9(t) = h8(t − 0.8s), so that h9(t) = h0(t − 7.2s), and so on.


Since the sequence exists on a half-open interval, it may be modeled as if it were periodic (replicated) in space, x, along a row of infinitely many fountains. Thus the DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform) may be properly applied to an analysis of the spatial wave characteristics. Temporally, a Fourier series is more appropriate since the waveform is periodic and continuous in time. In mathematics, the Fourier transform is a certain linear operator that maps functions to other functions. ...


Fountain Schedule

The fountains generally run 24 hours a day. Other than the aquatic play area out in front of the Ontario Science Centre (the centerpiece of Teluscape), Dundas Square is Toronto's only other 24-hour waterplay area, open at all times of the day or night except during special events, maintenance, or other exceptions. The fountains usually run from around mid April to the end of October, making this also one of the two aquatic play areas in Toronto that opens very early in the season and closes very late in the season. In 2004, the fountains were shut down and winterized on the morning of October 28th. In 2005 the fountains were scheduled to be winterized (shut down, water blown out with compressed air, and protective metal strips placed over each row of 10 jets) November 4 or 5th, as they were needed for a movie shoot. There was a film crew using the space as a set to represent Berlin, so the fountains remained on into the first week of November. Completed Teluscape. ... It has been suggested that Winterizing a vacant home be merged into this article or section. ...


Awards

1999 - Canadian Architect magazine, Award of Excellence for significant building in the design stage. ...recognized as an outstanding example of contemporary architecture.


2000 Architecture magazine, Progressive Architecture citation. ...commended as a new form of urban space with great presence... pushes the limits of invention and originality.


See also

The following is a partial list of prominent city squares: // Statue Square, Edinburgh Square, Connaught Place - Hong Kong Tiananmen Square - Beijing Azadi Square - Tehran Naghsh-i Jahan Square - Isfahan Siam Square - Bangkok Kim Il Sung Square - Pyongyang Republic Square - Yerevan Freedom Square - Baku Azneft Square - Baku Heldenplatz - Vienna Old...

External links

Toronto Path website [4] According to Guinness World Records, PATH is the largest underground shopping complex with 27 km (16 miles) of shopping arcades. It has 371,600 sq. metres (4 million sq. ft) of retail space. In fact, the retail space connected to PATH rivals the West Edmonton Mall in size.

  • Official site with event listings
  • Architect's Site
  • Public must push limits, make Dundas Square theirs
  • ... WHO WINS THE HEART OF THE CITY
  • By permit only
  • "Dundas Squared" on the hypotenuse, etc.
  • Dundas Square Fountains in a Storyboard
Toronto landmarks MTR Logo
Art Gallery of Ontario | Canada's Walk of Fame | Canadian Broadcasting Centre | Casa Loma | CHUM-City Building | CN Tower | Dundas Square | Exhibition Place | Fairmont Royal York | Fort York | Harbourfront Centre | Hockey Hall of Fame | Kensington Market | Nathan Phillips Square | Old City Hall | Ontario Place | Ontario Science Centre | Osgoode Hall | PATH Underground | Queen's Park | R.C. Harris Filtration Plant | Robarts Library | Royal Ontario Museum | St. James' Cathedral | St. Lawrence Hall | St. Lawrence Market | St. Michael's Cathedral | Todmorden Mills | Toronto City Hall | Toronto Eaton Centre | Toronto Islands | Toronto Pearson International Airport | Toronto Zoo | Union Station | Waterfront Trail | WindShare Wind Turbine

Sports: Air Canada Centre | BMO Field | Maple Leaf Gardens | Ricoh Coliseum | Rogers Centre | Varsity Arena Originally, a landmark literally meant a geographic feature used by explorers and others to find their way back or through an area. ... Image File history File links Toronto_Flag. ... The main entrance to the AGO The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) is an art museum on the eastern edge of Torontos downtown Chinatown district, on Dundas Street West between McCaul Street and Beverley Street. ... Canadas Walk of Fame acknowledges the achievements and accomplishments of successful Canadians. ... The Canadian Broadcasting Centre View up to the skylight inside the Barbara Frum atrium. ... Casa Loma Casa Loma (literally House on the Hill) is a Toronto, Ontario, Canada tourist attraction and the former home of financier Sir Henry Mill Pellatt. ... The CHUM-City Building The CHUM-City Building is the headquarters of CHUM Limited, a Canadian media corporation. ... The CN Tower, at 553. ... Looking East from the CNE Ferris Wheel (National Trade Centre at left, Automotive Building at right). ... The Royal York Hotel opened in 1929 as the tallest building in the British Commonwealth. ... A blockhouse at Fort York in 2004 Fort York is an historic site of military fortifications and related buildings on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Harbourfront Centre The Harbourfront Centre is a key cultural facility on Toronto, Ontarios waterfront, situated at 235 Queens Quay West. ... The Hockey Hall of Fame is located at the corner of Front & Yonge in downtown Toronto The Stanley Cup on display at the Hockey Hall of Fame The Hockey Hall of Fame which is located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, celebrates the history of hockey with exhibits featuring memorabilia and NHL... Kensington market in downtown Toronto Kensington Market is one of the most famous neighbourhoods in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Nathan Phillips Square, 2005 Nathan Phillips Square is a city square that forms the front (south) entrance to Toronto City Hall or New City Hall at Queen Street West and Bay Street (its address is 100 Queen West). ... Ontario Place is an agency of the Government of Ontario, an entertainment attraction, located approximately 4 km west of downtown Toronto on the shore of Lake Ontario, just south of Exhibition Place. ... Completed Teluscape. ... PATH is a 27-kilometre network of pedestrian tunnels beneath the office towers of downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Aerial view of Queens Park in winter, facing north. ... Southern facade of R.C. Harris Filtration Plant. ... The southeast corner of Robarts Library Rear corner of Robarts Library Looking up the side of the Library Robarts Library is the main humanities and social sciences library of the University of Toronto. ... The Royal Ontario Museum, commonly known as the ROM (rhyming with Tom), is a major museum for world culture and natural history in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... St. ... St. ... St. ... St. ... Todmorden Mills was a small settlement located in the Don River valley in Toronto, Ontario. ... Toronto City Hall The City Hall of Toronto, Ontario, Canada is one of the most distinctive landmarks of the city. ... The Toronto Eaton Centre is a large shopping mall and office complex in downtown Toronto, Ontario Canada, named after the now-defunct Eatons department store chain. ... Toronto Islands as seen from CN Tower. ... Toronto Pearson International Airport, or Toronto/Lester B. Pearson International Airport (IATA: YYZ, ICAO: CYYZ), straddling Mississaugas northeastern boundary with neighbouring Toronto, is Canadas busiest airport and part of the National Airports System. ... The Toronto Zoo is a zoo which is open 364 days a year, located in the north eastern part of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Union Station is a major railway, subway, and streetcar station at 65 Front Street West between Bay Street and York Street in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Launched in 1995 the Waterfront trail is a series of trails along the shores of Lake Ontario currently begining in Niagara on the Lake and extending to Brockville. ... Categories: Stub | Cooperatives ... North Entrance Atrium View from CN Tower The Air Canada Centre, often referred to simply as The ACC, is a multi-purpose arena located on Bay Street in downtown Toronto, Ontario. ... BMO Field is a soccer-specific stadium under-construction located in Exhibition Place in the city of Toronto. ... Maple Leaf Gardens, 2006 Exterior signage as of 2006, with letters missing Maple Leaf Gardens was an indoor arena in Toronto, on the northwest corner of Carlton Street and Church Street. ... Ricoh Coliseum is an arena at Exhibition Place in downtown Toronto, Ontario. ... Rogers Centre, formerly known as (and often still unofficially called) SkyDome, [1] is a multi-purpose stadium in Toronto, Ontario, situated next to the CN Tower near the shores of Lake Ontario. ... Varsity Arena is an arena in Toronto, Ontario. ...


Performing arts: Bathurst Street Theatre | Canon Theatre | Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres | Four Seasons Centre | Hummingbird Centre | Massey Hall | Princess of Wales Theatre | Royal Alexandra Theatre | Roy Thomson Hall Bathurst Street Theatre, 736 Bathurst Street, Toronto. ... The Canon Theatre is one of Torontos live entertainment venues. ... The entrance to the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres Interior of Winter Garden Theatre The Elgin and Winter Garden Theatres are a pair of stacked theatres in Toronto, Canada. ... Construction and fundraising for the Four Seasons Centre in May 2006. ... The Hummingbird Centre The Hummingbird Centre is a major performing arts venue in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Inside Massey Hall in 1945. ... The Princess of Wales Theatre is a 2000-seat theatre located at 300 King Street West in the heart of Torontos Entertainment District. ... The Royal Alexandra theatre The Royal Alexandra Theatre is a theatre in Toronto, Ontario Canada. ... Roy Thomson Hall Roy Thomson Hall is a concert hall in Toronto, Canada. ...

Coordinates: 43.656563° N 79.379461° W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Eye Weekly - Bare Square dares - 06.12.03 (1005 words)
Dundas Square tries to be many things to many people: tourist magnet, meeting place, advertising platform, entertainment venue, public forum.
Officially, Dundas Square is owned by the city, whereas other civic spaces are publicly owned (it's the same difference that exists between streets and sidewalks, which are public, and City Hall, which is city-owned).
Though the square is governed by the same rules and regulations as other public spaces in Toronto, its legal distinction as city-owned allows for the use of private security personnel to enforce the by-laws on public squares (often ignored elsewhere) 24 hours a day.
Dundas Square: Information from Answers.com (3128 words)
Yonge Dundas Square is a public square in downtown Toronto, Ontario, on the southeast corner of Yonge Street and Dundas Street.
Dundas Square is part of a Business Improvement Area (BIA), which city councillor Kyle Rae has pointed to Times Square in New York City as a model to emulate, with its canyon of billboards and animated advertising screens.
The square is surrounded on all sides by gigantic commercial billboards; with city funds going towards what appears to be a large advertising experiment, many have pointed to the square as a prime example of the creeping privatization of public space.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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