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Encyclopedia > Duke University
Duke University

Latin: Universitas Dukiana
Motto: Eruditio et Religio
("Knowledge and Faith")
Established: 1838
(Duke University from 1924)
Type: Private
Endowment: $5.9 billion
President: Richard H. Brodhead
Faculty: 2,730
Students: 12,991
Undergraduates: 6,247
Postgraduates: 6,744
Location: Durham, North Carolina, United States
Campus: Urban
8,610 acres (34.8 km²)
Former names: Brown School (1838)
Union Institute (1841)
Normal College (1851)
Trinity College (1859)
Colors: Duke blue and white[1]
         
Nickname: Blue Devils
Athletics: NCAA Division I FBS
26 varsity teams
Affiliations: AAU, ACC, UMC
Website: www.duke.edu
Logo of Duke University
Latin text from university archives.[2] Population data for fall 2007; financial data for FY07.[3] UMC ties historic and symbolic, but governance-independent.[4][5][6]

Duke University is a private research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892.[7] In 1924, tobacco industrialist James Buchanan Duke established The Duke Endowment, prompting the institution to change its name in honor of his deceased father, Washington Duke. Image File history File links Duke_shield. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Richard Halleck Brodhead (b. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... A fiscal year (or financial year or accounting reference date) is a 12-month period used for calculating annual (yearly) financial statements in businesses and other organizations. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Quaker redirects here. ... Trinity is a city located in Randolph County, North Carolina. ... James B. Duke James B. Dukes statue can be seen in front of Duke Chapel James Buchanan Duke (December 23, 1856 – October 10, 1925) was a U.S. tobacco and electric power industrialist best known for his involvement with Duke University. ... The Duke Endowment is a private foundation established in 1924 by industrialist and philanthropist James B. Duke. ... Washington Duke (December 18, 1820 – May 08, 1905) was an American tobacco industrialist and philanthropist. ...


The University is organized into two undergraduate and eight graduate schools. The undergraduate student body, which includes 40% racial or ethnic minorities, comes from all 50 U.S. states and 106 countries.[8][9] In its 2008 edition, U.S. News & World Report ranked the undergraduate division eighth in the nation,[10] while ranking the medical, law, and business schools among the top 11 in the country.[11] In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “Minority” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Duke University School of Medicine The Medical School of Duke University. ... The Duke University School of Law is the law school and a constituent academic unit of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The Fuqua School of Business The Fuqua School of Business is the business school of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ...


Duke's research expenditures are among the largest 20 in the U.S. and its athletic program is one of the nation's elite.[12][13] Competing in the Atlantic Coast Conference, the athletic teams have won nine national championships, including three by the men's basketball team. Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... NCAA Tournament Champions 1991, 1992, 2001 NCAA Tournament Final Four 1963, 1964, 1966, 1978, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004 Conference Tournament Champions 1938, 1941, 1942, 1944, 1946, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1978, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006 Conference Regular Season...


Besides academics, research, and athletics, Duke is also well known for its sizable campus and Gothic architecture, especially Duke Chapel. The forests surrounding parts of the campus belie the University's proximity to downtown Durham. Duke's 8,610 acres (35 km²) contain three contiguous campuses in Durham as well as a marine lab in Beaufort. Construction projects have updated both the freshmen-populated Georgian-style East Campus and the main Gothic-style West Campus, as well as the adjacent Medical Center over the past five years. The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Duke Chapel Duke Chapel, located at the heart of the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, is an ecumenical Christian chapel and the center of religion at Duke. ... Beaufort (pronounced BO-furt / IPA: ) is a town that everybody loves in Carteret County, North Carolina, United States. ... A Georgian house in Salisbury For the unrelated architecture of the country Georgia, see Architecture of Georgia (country). ... The Duke University Health System, combines the Duke University School of Medicine, the Duke University School of Nursing, the Duke Clinic, and the member hospitals into a system of research, clinical care, and education. ...

Contents

History

Duke Chapel, completed in 1935, serves as a frequent icon for the university. ...

Beginnings

One of the first buildings on the original Durham campus (East Campus), the Washington Duke Building ("Old Main") was destroyed by a fire in 1911.
One of the first buildings on the original Durham campus (East Campus), the Washington Duke Building ("Old Main") was destroyed by a fire in 1911.

Duke started as Brown's Schoolhouse, a private subscription school founded in 1838 in Randolph County in the present-day town of Trinity.[14] The school was organized by the Union Institute Society, a group of Methodists and Quakers, and in 1841 North Carolina issued a charter for Union Institute Academy. The academy was renamed Normal College in 1851 and then Trinity College in 1859 because of support from the Methodist Church. [14] In 1892, Trinity moved to Durham, largely due to generosity from Washington Duke and Julian S. Carr, powerful and respected Methodists who had grown wealthy through the tobacco industry.[7] Washington Duke gave what was then known as Trinity College a $100,000 endowment in 1896, with the stipulation that the college "open its doors to women, placing them on an equal footing with men."[15] Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Randolph County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Trinity is a city located in Randolph County, North Carolina. ... For other uses, see Methodism (disambiguation). ... Quaker redirects here. ... Washington Duke (December 18, 1820 – May 08, 1905) was an American tobacco industrialist and philanthropist. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1924, Washington Duke's son, James B. Duke, established The Duke Endowment with a $40 million ($434 million in 2005 dollars) trust fund. The annual income of the fund was to be distributed to hospitals, orphanages, the Methodist Church, three colleges, and Trinity College. William Preston Few, the president of Trinity College, insisted that the university be named Duke University, and James B. Duke agreed that it would be a memorial to his father.[7] Money from the endowment allowed the University to grow quickly. Duke's original campus (East Campus) was rebuilt from 1925 to 1927 with Georgian-style buildings. By 1930, the majority of the Gothic style buildings on the campus one mile (1.6 km) west were completed, and construction on West Campus culminated with the completion of Duke Chapel in 1935.[7] James B. Duke James B. Dukes statue can be seen in front of Duke Chapel James Buchanan Duke (December 23, 1856 – October 10, 1925) was a U.S. tobacco and electric power industrialist best known for his involvement with Duke University. ... The Duke Endowment is a private foundation established in 1924 by industrialist and philanthropist James B. Duke. ... For the concept in cosmology, see cosmic inflation. ... William Preston Few (1867—1940) was the first president of Duke University. ...

James B. Duke established the Duke Endowment, which provides funds to numerous institutions including Duke University.

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 556 pixelsFull resolution (1803 × 1252 pixel, file size: 454 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a two-dimensional representation of a copyrighted sculpture, statue or any other three-dimensional work of art. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 556 pixelsFull resolution (1803 × 1252 pixel, file size: 454 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a two-dimensional representation of a copyrighted sculpture, statue or any other three-dimensional work of art. ...

Expansion and growth

Engineering, which had been taught since 1903, became a separate school in 1939. In athletics, Duke hosted and competed in the only Rose Bowl ever played outside California in Wallace Wade Stadium in 1942.[14] Increased activism on campus during the 1960s prompted Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to speak at the University on the civil rights movement's progress on November 14, 1964. The former governor of North Carolina, Terry Sanford, was elected president in 1969, propelling the Fuqua School of Business's opening, the William R. Perkins library completion, and the founding of the Institute of Policy Sciences and Public Affairs. The separate Woman's College merged back with Trinity as the liberal arts college for both men and women in 1972. Beginning in the 1970s, Duke administrators began a long-term effort to strengthen Duke's reputation both nationally and internationally. Interdisciplinary work was emphasized, as was recruiting minority faculty and students.[16][17][18] Duke University Hospital was finished in 1980 and the student union was fully constructed two years later. In 1986, the men's soccer team captured Duke's first NCAA championship, and the men's basketball team followed with championships in 1991, 1992.[14] The Edmund T. Pratt School of Engineering is one of two undergraduate schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Wallace Wade Stadium is a stadium on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The Governor of North Carolina is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... James Terry Sanford (August 20, 1917 – April 18, 1998) was a Southern Democratic politician. ... The Fuqua School of Business The Fuqua School of Business is the business school of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke University is named after former Duke president and Governor of North Carolina Terry Sanford, who established the universitys Institute for Public Policy Studies in 1971. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion because: it contains no encyclopedic content If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Soccer redirects here. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... The 1991 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The 1992 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...


Recent history

The Levine Science Research Center is the largest single-site interdisciplinary research facility of any American university.
The Levine Science Research Center is the largest single-site interdisciplinary research facility of any American university.[19]

Duke University's growth and academic focus have contributed to the university's reputation as an academic and research institution. The school has regularly sent three-member teams to the William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition, earning the title of the best collegiate undergraduate math team in the United States and Canada in 1993, 1996 and 2000. In nine out of the past ten years, Duke's team has finished in the top three, the only school besides Harvard to do so.[20] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 3333 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 3333 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition, often abbreviated to Putnam Competition, is an annual mathematics competition for undergraduate college students, awarding scholarships and cash prizes ranging from $250 to $2,500 for the top students and $5,000 to $25,000 for the top schools. ... Harvard redirects here. ...


Construction continued on campus, with the 314,000-square-foot (29,200 m²) Levine Science Research Center (LSRC) opening in 1994 to house interdisciplinary research, and construction has continued. These projects have updated both the freshmen-housed Georgian-style East Campus and the main Gothic-style West Campus, as well as the adjacent Medical Center in the past five years. Other projects are underway on all three campuses, including a 50- to 75-year overhaul of Central Campus, the first phase of which is expected to be completed in early 2011.[21][22] The $77 million LSRC The Levine Science Research Center (LSRC) is a 341,000-square-foot facility on Duke Universitys west campus. ... Interdisciplinarity is the act of drawing from two or more academic disciplines and integrating their insights to work together in pursuit of a common goal. ... Part of the Divinity School addition, Goodson Chapel The recent construction projects at Duke University represent a period of growth unheard of in Duke University history, except for when the campus was initially built in the 1920s and 1930s (see History of Duke University). ... A Georgian house in Salisbury For the unrelated architecture of the country Georgia, see Architecture of Georgia (country). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion because: it contains no encyclopedic content If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ...


In 1998, Duke President Nan Keohane initiated a five-year $1.5 billion Campaign for Duke fundraising effort. Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. ('47) endowed the Pratt School of Engineering with a $35 million gift in 1999. The Campaign for Duke ended in 2003 with $2.36 billion raised, making it the fifth largest campaign in the history of American higher education.[23] Nannerl Overholser Keohane is an American political scientist. ... Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. ... The Edmund T. Pratt School of Engineering is one of two undergraduate schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ...


In the 2004 fiscal year, research expenditures surpassed $490 million, leading to myriad important breakthroughs.[24] The first working demonstration of an invisibility cloak was unveiled by Duke researchers in October 2006.[25] In 2005, three students were named Rhodes Scholars, a number only surpassed by one university. Overall, Duke is fifth among private universities in the number of Rhodes Scholars it has produced.[26] Since 1990, 19 students have been honored with this scholarship.[27] An example of how an object could appear to be invisible through the use of mirrors Invisibility is the state of an object which cannot be seen. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ...


In 2006, three lacrosse team members were falsely accused of rape; charges against the players were later dropped, the initial prosecutor was disbarred for ethical improprieties, and the incident garnered significant media attention.[28] The 2006 Duke University lacrosse case was a scandal that started in March 2006 when Crystal Gail Mangum,[1][2][3] a stripper and escort, and an African-American student at North Carolina Central University, falsely accused three white members of Duke Universitys mens lacrosse team[4] of... The 2006 Duke University lacrosse case resulted in a great deal of coverage in the media and a widespread community response at Duke and in the Durham, North Carolina area. ...


Academics

Profile

Duke Chapel, a frequent icon for the university, can seat nearly 1,600 people and contains a 5,200-pipe organ.
Duke Chapel, a frequent icon for the university, can seat nearly 1,600 people and contains a 5,200-pipe organ.

Duke's student body consists of 6,247 undergraduates and 6,744 graduate and professional students (as of Fall 2007).[3] The undergraduate student body, containing 40% ethnic minorities,[29][30][31] come from all 50 U.S. states and 106 countries (as of 2007-08).[9] For the undergraduate class of 2012, Duke received 20,337 applications, and accepted 18% of them.[32] For the class of 2012, 96% of admitted students ranked in the top 10% of their high school class. The average SAT score was 1490 (old scale) or 2210 (new scale), and the ACT average was 32.[33][34][35] In 2007 the School of Medicine received 5,076 applicants for 100 spots (2.0% of applicants), while the average GPA and MCAT scores for accepted students were 3.88 and 36, respectively.[36] The School of Law accepted approximately 21% of its applicants for the class of 2010, while enrolling students had a median GPA of 3.74 and median LSAT of 169.[37] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 969 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University User talk:ProhibitOnions User talk:QuizQuick/Archive to 2006 April 23 Duke Chapel Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1536x2048, 969 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University User talk:ProhibitOnions User talk:QuizQuick/Archive to 2006 April 23 Duke Chapel Metadata This... In sociology and in voting theory, a minority is a sub-group that is outnumbered by persons who do not belong to it. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ... Duke University School of Medicine The Medical School of Duke University. ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a standardized test administered by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) to prospective medical students as a means to standardise comparison between them for purposes of admission to medical school. ... The Duke University School of Law is the law school and a constituent academic unit of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) is a standardized test used for admission to law schools in the United States of America and Canada that are members of the Law School Admissions Council. ...


Duke University has two schools for undergraduates: Trinity College of Arts and Sciences and Pratt School of Engineering.[29] The University's graduate and professional schools include the Graduate School, the Pratt School of Engineering, the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, the School of Medicine, the School of Nursing, the Fuqua School of Business, the School of Law, and the Divinity School.[38] Trinity College of Arts and Sciences is the name of the undergraduate liberal arts college at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Edmund T. Pratt School of Engineering is one of two undergraduate schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Graduate School of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina is currently one of ten colleges and schools that comprise the university. ... The Edmund T. Pratt School of Engineering is one of two undergraduate schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Nicholas School Shield The Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences is one of seven graduate and professional schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Duke University School of Medicine The Medical School of Duke University. ... The Duke University School of Nursing is located in Durham, NC and is affiliated with Duke University. ... The Fuqua School of Business The Fuqua School of Business is the business school of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Duke University School of Law is the law school and a constituent academic unit of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The Divinity School at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina is one of thirteen seminaries founded and supported by the United Methodist Church. ...


In the past decade, Duke has had the sixth highest number of Fulbright, Rhodes, Truman, and Goldwater scholarships in the nation among private universities.[26][39][40][41] The University practices need-blind admissions and meets 100% of admitted students' demonstrated need. More than 40% of students in 2007–08 received financial aid, with the average grant being $26,700.[42] Roughly 60 merit-based scholarships are also offered, many of which are geared toward students in North Carolina, African-American students, and high achieving students requiring financial aid.[43] Fulbright redirects here. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... President Harry S. Truman The Harry S. Truman Scholarship is a federal scholarship granted to U.S. college juniors for demonstrated leadership potential and a commitment to public service. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... Need-blind admission is a U.S. term denoting a college admission policy in which the admitting institution claims not to consider an applicants financial situation when deciding admission. ... Grants are funds given to tax-exempt nonprofit organizations or local governments by foundations, corporations, governments, small business and individuals. ...


Duke University's endowment was valued at US $5.9 billion in 2007.[3] The University's special academic facilities include an art museum, several language labs, the Duke Forest, the Duke Herbarium, a lemur center, a phytotron, a free electron laser, a nuclear magnetic resonance machine, a nuclear lab, and a marine lab. Duke also is a leading participant in the National Lambda Rail Network and runs a program for gifted children known as the Talent Identification Program, or TIP.[44][45] A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... The Nasher Museum of Art is the art museum of Duke University, and is located on Dukes campus in Durham, North Carolina, USA. The $23 million museum was designed by architect Rafael Viñoly, and opened on October 2, 2005. ... A crowned lemur at the Lemur Center In 1966, a prosimian colony of approximately 90 individuals was relocated from the Center for Prosimian Biology at Yale University to Duke University, and thus began the Duke Lemur Center (DLC). ... A phytotron is a completely closed greenhouse that can be used for study of environmental conditions on plant growth. ... X-ray free electronic laser schema of operation A free electron laser, or FEL, is a laser that shares the same optical properties as conventional lasers such as emitting a beam consisting of coherent electromagnetic radiation which can reach high power, but which uses some very different operating principles to... NMR redirects here. ... Nuclear engineering is the practical application of the breakdown of atomic nuclei and/or other sub-atomic physics, based on the principles of nuclear physics. ... The National Lambda Rail is a high speed national ethernet based network that runs over fibre-optic lines. ... The Talent Identification Program (TIP) is a gifted education program based at Duke University. ...

Entrance to Duke's Bostock Library, which opened in the fall of 2005
Entrance to Duke's Bostock Library, which opened in the fall of 2005

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 619 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 619 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner...

Undergraduate

See also: Degree programs at Duke University

Duke offers 36 arts and sciences majors, five engineering majors, and 46 additional majors that have been approved under Program II, which allows students to design their own interdisciplinary major. Sixteen certificate programs also are available. Students may pursue a combination of a total of up to three majors/minors/certificates. Eighty percent of undergraduates enroll in the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, while the rest are in the Pratt School of Engineering.[46] Degree programs at Duke University include 36 arts and sciences majors in addition to 5 engineering majors, and 46 additional majors have been approved under Program II. Program II allows students to design their own interdisciplinary major. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... Trinity College of Arts and Sciences is the name of the undergraduate liberal arts college at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Edmund T. Pratt School of Engineering is one of two undergraduate schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ...


Trinity's curriculum operates under the revised version of "Curriculum 2000".[47] It ensures that students are exposed to a variety of "areas of knowledge" and "modes of inquiry." The curriculum aims to help students develop critical faculties and judgment by learning how to access, synthesize, and communicate knowledge effectively, acquiring perspective on current and historical events, conducting research and solving problems, and developing tenacity and a capacity for hard and sustained work.[47] In addition, freshmen can elect to participate in the FOCUS Program, which allows students to engage in an interdisciplinary exploration of a specific topic in a small group setting.[48] For a curriculum vitae, see Résumé. In formal education, a curriculum (plural curricula) is the set of courses, and their content, offered at a school or university. ... The FOCUS Program is a voluntary, interdisciplinary academic curriculum for freshmen at Duke University. ...


Pratt's curriculum, on the other hand, is narrower in scope, but still accommodates double majors in a variety of disciplines. The school emphasizes undergraduate research—opportunities for hands-on experiences arise through internships, fellowship programs, and the structured curriculum. Furthermore, for the class of 2007, more than 27% of Pratt undergraduates studied abroad,[49] small compared to the percentage for Trinity undergraduates (46%), but much larger than the national average for engineering students (1.5%).[50][51][52][53] For information about a medical intern, see the article on Medical residency. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ...


Research

The Allen Building, opened in 1954, is home to many of the university's top-level administrative offices.
The Allen Building, opened in 1954, is home to many of the university's top-level administrative offices.

Duke University’s research expenditures topped $490 million in 2004.[24] In the 2005 fiscal year, Duke University Medical Center received the fifth-largest amount of funding from the National Institute of Health, netting $349.8 million. Duke's funding increased 14.8% from 2004, representing the largest growth of any top-20 recipient.[54] Throughout history, Duke researchers have made several important breakthroughs, including the biomedical engineering department's development of the world's first real-time, three-dimensional ultrasound diagnostic system and the first engineered blood vessels.[55] In the mechanical engineering department, Adrian Bejan developed the constructal theory, which explains the shapes that arise in nature. Duke has pioneered studies involving nonlinear dynamics, chaos, and complex systems in physics. In May 2006, Duke researchers mapped the final human chromosome, which made world news as the Human Genome Project was finally complete.[56] Reports of Duke researchers' involvement in new AIDS vaccine research surfaced in June 2006.[57] The biology department combines two historically strong programs in botany and zoology, while the divinity school's leading theologian is Time's 2001 "America's Best Theologian", Stanley Hauerwas.[58] The graduate program in literature boasts several internationally renowned figures, including Fredric Jameson,[59] Michael Hardt,[60] and Alice Kaplan,[61] while philosophers Robert Brandon and Lakatos Award-winner Alexander Rosenberg make Duke a leading center for research in philosophy of biology.[62] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 3220 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 3220 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... The National Institutes of Health is an institution of the United States government which focuses on medical research. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... For other uses, see Ultrasound (disambiguation). ... f you all The blood vessels are part of the circulatory system and function to transport blood throughout the body. ... Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... Adrian Bejan (born September 24, 1948), Ph. ... Constructal design of a cooling system The constructal theory of global optimization under local constraints explains in a simple manner the shapes that arise in nature. ... Chaos theory, in mathematics and physics, deals with the behaviour of certain nonlinear dynamical systems that (under certain conditions) exhibit the phenomenon known as chaos, most famously characterised by sensitivity to initial conditions (see butterfly effect). ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For information about chromosomes in genetic algorithms, see chromosome (genetic algorithm). ... The Human Genome Project (HGP) is an international scientific research project. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... A vaccine is an antigenic preparation used to establish immunity to a disease. ... Pinguicula grandiflora commonly known as a Butterwort Example of a cross section of a stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... TIME redirects here. ... Stanley Hauerwas (b. ... Fredric Jameson (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alice Kaplan is a Professor of Romance Studies and Literature at Duke University. ... The Lakatos Award is given annually for a widely interpreted outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, in the form of a book published in English during the previous six years. ... Alexander Rosenberg is an American philosopher, and the R. Taylor Cole Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. ... Philosophy of biology (also called, rarely, biophilosophy) is a subfield of philosophy of science, which deals with epistemological, metaphysical, and ethical issues in the biological and biomedical sciences. ...

Built in 1932, Old Chemistry has carved scientific symbols above the main doorway.
Built in 1932, Old Chemistry has carved scientific symbols above the main doorway.

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Rankings

In the 2008 U.S. News & World Report ranking of undergraduate programs at doctoral granting institutions, Duke ranked eighth.[10] In the past decade, U.S. News has placed Duke as high as third and as low as eighth.[63] Duke was ranked the 13th-best university in the world in 2007 by the THES - QS World University Rankings.[64][65] Duke was ranked 32nd globally and 24th nationally by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 2005 in terms of quality of scientific research and number of Nobel Prizes.[66]The Wall Street Journal ranked Duke sixth (fifth among universities) in its "feeder" rankings in 2006, analyzing the percentage of undergraduates that enroll in what it considers the top five medical, law, and business schools.[67] A survey by the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education in 2002 ranked Duke as the best university in the country in regard to the integration of African American students and faculty.[68] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ...


In U.S. News & World Report's "America's Best Graduate Schools 2009," Duke's medical school ranked 6th for research and tied for 41st for primary care, while the law school ranked 10th.[69][70][71] Among business schools in the United States, the Fuqua School of Business was ranked 12th by U.S. News in 2007 and 9th by BusinessWeek in 2006.[72][73] The graduate program for the Pratt School of Engineering was ranked 30th by U.S. News and 2nd by The Princeton Review in 2006 among national engineering schools.[74][75] In the rankings of doctoral programs by U.S. News & World Report in its 2008 edition, Duke ranked 1st in literary criticism and theory,[76] 5th in ecology and evolutionary biology,[77] 5th in biomedical engineering,[78] tied for 12th for doctoral programs in the sciences, tied for 21st in mathematics,[79] tied for 25th in computer science,[80] tied for 29th in physics,[81] and ranked 38th in chemistry.[82] Duke University School of Medicine The Medical School of Duke University. ... Primary care may be provided in community health centres. ... The Duke University School of Law is the law school and a constituent academic unit of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The Fuqua School of Business The Fuqua School of Business is the business school of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... The Edmund T. Pratt School of Engineering is one of two undergraduate schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... In the humanities and social sciences, critical theory has two quite different meanings with different origins and histories, one originating in social theory and the other in literary criticism. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... Evolutionary biology is a sub-field of biology concerned with the origin of species from a common descent, and descent of species; as well as their change, multiplication, and diversity over time. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ... For the scientific journal named Science, see Science (journal). ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ...


Political science,[83] sociology, history, economics, and cultural anthropology departments also frequently rank in the top 20 of their respective disciplines among U.S. universities.[84] The Philosophical Gourmet Report placed Duke's philosophy program as the 27th best in the nation in 2006,[85] while ranking Duke as the best program in the U.S. in philosophy of biology.[86] The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Philosophical Gourmet Report (also known as the Leiter Report) attempts to score and rank the university philosophy departments in the English-speaking world, based on a survey of philosophers who are nominated as evaluators by the Advisory Board of the Report. ... Philosophy of biology (also called, rarely, biophilosophy) is a subfield of philosophy of science, which deals with epistemological, metaphysical, and ethical issues in the biological and biomedical sciences. ...


Campus

Part of the Divinity School addition, Goodson Chapel
Part of the Divinity School addition, Goodson Chapel

Duke University owns 220 buildings on 8,611 acres (35 km²) of land, which includes the 7,200 acre (29 km²) Duke Forest.[3] The campus is divided into four main areas: West, East, and Central campuses, and the Medical Center. All the campuses are connected via a free bus service that runs frequently throughout the week. On the Atlantic coast in Beaufort, Duke owns 15 acres as part of its Marine Lab. One of the major public attractions on the Duke Campus is the 55 acre Sarah P. Duke Gardens, established in the 1930s.[3] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 468 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 468 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Atlantic and North Atlantic redirect here. ... Beaufort (pronounced BO-furt / IPA: ) is a town that everybody loves in Carteret County, North Carolina, United States. ... The Sarah P. Duke Gardens consist of approximately 55 acres of landscaped and wooded areas at Duke University. ...


Duke students often refer to the campus as "the Gothic Wonderland," a nickname referring to the Gothic revival architecture of West Campus.[87] Much of the campus was designed by Julian Abele, one of the first prominent African American architects.[88] The residential quadrangles are of an early and somewhat unadorned design, while the buildings in the academic quadrangles show influences of the more elaborate late French and Italian styles. Its freshman campus (East Campus) is composed of buildings in the Georgian architecture style.[3] Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Julian Abele Julian Abele (April 30, 1881–April 23, 1950) was a prominent African-American architect, known best for his work on the Philadelphia Museum of Art. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... A Georgian house in Salisbury For the unrelated architecture of the country Georgia, see Architecture of Georgia (country). ...


The stone used for the West Campus has seven primary colors and 17 shades of color. The university supervisor of planning and construction wrote that the stone has "an older, more attractive antique effect" and a "warmer and softer coloring than the Princeton stone" that gave the university an "artistic look".[89] James B. Duke initially suggested the use of stone from a quarry in Princeton, New Jersey, but later amended the plans to use stone from a local quarry in Hillsborough to reduce costs.[89] Duke Chapel stands at the heart of West Campus. Constructed from 1930 to 1935, the chapel seats 1,600 people; and, at 210 feet (64 m), is one of the tallest buildings in Durham County.[90] This article is about the book. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Nassau Street, Princetons main street. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Hillsborough is a town in Orange County, North Carolina, United States. ... Duke Chapel Duke Chapel, located at the heart of the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, is an ecumenical Christian chapel and the center of religion at Duke. ... Durham County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ...


As of November 1, 2005, Duke had spent $835 million dollars on 34 major construction projects initiated since February 2001.[91] At that time, Duke initiated a five-year strategic plan, "Building on Excellence." Completed projects since 2002 include major additions to the business, law, nursing, and divinity schools, a new library, an art museum, a football training facility, two residential buildings, an engineering complex, a public policy building, an eye institute, two genetic research buildings, a student plaza, the French Family Science Center, and two new medical-research buildings.[92] is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Melinda Gates Melinda Gates, née French, is a former Microsoft employee who was the product unit manager of Microsoft Publisher, Microsoft Bob, Microsoft Encarta, and Microsoft Expedia. ...

The Gothic Reading Room of Perkins Library
The Gothic Reading Room of Perkins Library

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Libraries and museums

With more than 5.5 million volumes, the Duke University Library System is one of the ten largest private university library systems in the U.S.[93] It contains 17.7 million manuscripts, 1.2 million public documents, and tens of thousands of films and videos. Besides the main William R. Perkins Library, the university also contains the separately administered Ford (business), Divinity School, Duke Law, and Medical Center Libraries.[94] For other uses, see Book (disambiguation). ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business (also called firm or enterprise) is a legally recognized organizational entity designed to provide goods and/or services to consumers or corporate entities such as governments, charities or other businesses. ... For other uses, see Divinity (disambiguation) and Divine (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ...


The William R. Perkins Library system has 11 branches on campus. In addition to Perkins Library, the system contains the Biological & Environmental Science Library, Bostock Library, the Chemistry Library, the Library Service Center, Lilly Library (which houses materials on fine arts, philosophy, film & video, and performing arts), the Music Library, Pearse Memorial Library (located at the Marine Lab), and Vesic Library (collection focuses on engineering, mathematics, and physics). The University Archives and Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections are also considered part of the Perkins Library system.[95] For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... For alternate uses see: Archive (disambiguation). ...

Nasher Museum of Art cost $23 million to build.
Nasher Museum of Art cost $23 million to build.

Bostock Library, named for Board of Trustee member Roy J. Bostock, opened in the fall of 2005 as part of the University's strategic plan to supplement Duke's libraries. It contains 87 study carrels, 517 seats, and 96 computer stations, as well as 72,996 linear feet of shelving for overflow books from Perkins Library as well as for new collections.[96] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 574 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Nasher Museum of Art Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 574 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Nasher Museum of Art Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Roy J. Bostock is an American businessman who serves on the boards of directors of Morgan Stanley, Northwest Airlines and Yahoo!. From 2000 to 2001 he served as chairman of the advertising firm BCom3 Group, Inc. ...


Nasher Museum of Art opened in the fall of 2005, replacing the undersized Duke University Museum of Art (DUMA). The museum, designed by Rafael Viñoly and named for Duke alumnus and art collector Raymond Nasher, contains over 13,000 pieces of art, including works by Andy Warhol, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and Pablo Picasso.[97] The Nasher Museum of Art is the art museum of Duke University, and is located on Dukes campus in Durham, North Carolina, USA. The $23 million museum was designed by architect Rafael Viñoly, and opened on October 2, 2005. ... Rafael Viñoly, a world-famous architect, was born in 1944 in Uruguay. ... Raymond Nasher (1921 - 2007) was a Duke University alumnus (1943) who was an avid art collector. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (IPA ) (November 24, 1864 – September 9, 1901) was a French painter, printmaker, draftsman, and illustrator, whose immersion in the decadent and theatrical life of fin de siècle Paris yielded an oeuvre of provocative images of modern life. ... Picasso redirects here. ...


West, East, and Central Campuses

West Campus, the heart of Duke University, houses all the sophomores, along with some juniors and seniors.[98] In addition, most of the academic and administrative centers reside there. "Main" West Campus, with Duke Chapel at its center, contains the majority of residential quads to the south, while the main academic quad, library, and Medical Center are to the north. The campus, spanning 720 acres (2.9 km²), includes Science Drive, which consists of science and engineering buildings. Most of the campus eateries and sports facilities including the historic basketball stadium, Cameron Indoor Stadium, are on West.[3][99] Duke Chapel Duke Chapel, located at the heart of the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, is an ecumenical Christian chapel and the center of religion at Duke. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion because: it contains no encyclopedic content If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Summer 06 Cameron Indoor Stadium is a basketball arena located at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ...

The main West Campus is dominated by Gothic architecture. Shown here are typical residence halls.
The main West Campus is dominated by Gothic architecture. Shown here are typical residence halls.

East Campus, the original location of Duke University,[100] functions as a freshman campus as well as the home of several academic departments. Since the 1995-96 academic year, all freshmen—and only freshmen except for upperclassmen serving as Resident Assistants—have lived on East Campus, to build class unity. The campus encompasses 97 acres and is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) away from West Campus.[3] The Art History, History, Literature, Music, Philosophy, and Women's Studies Departments are housed on East. Programs such as dance, drama, education, film, and the University Writing Program also reside on East. East Campus, a fully self-sufficient campus, contains the freshman dormitories, a dining hall, Lilly Library, Baldwin Auditorium, a theater, Brodie Gym, tennis courts, and several academic buildings. Separated from downtown by a short walk, the area was the site of the Women's College from 1930 to 1972.[100] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (14561x1881, 6235 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (14561x1881, 6235 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Write redirects here. ...

East Campus, home to all Duke freshmen, features Georgian architecture. Baldwin Auditorium can be seen on the right side.
East Campus, home to all Duke freshmen, features Georgian architecture. Baldwin Auditorium can be seen on the right side.

Central Campus, consisting of 122 acres (0.49 km²) between East and West campuses, houses around 850 juniors and seniors and 200 professional students in apartments.[101] It is home to the Nasher Museum of Art, the Freeman Center for Jewish Life, the Duke Police Department, the Duke Office of Disability Management, a Ronald McDonald House, and administrative departments such as Duke Residence Life and Housing Services. Central has several recreation and social facilities such as basketball courts, tennis courts, a sand volleyball court, a swimming pool, barbecue and picnic shelter as well as barbecue grills, a general gathering building called Devil's Den, and a convenience store.[101] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (11596x1912, 4927 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (11596x1912, 4927 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University ... A profession is an occupation, vocation or career where specialized knowledge of a subject, field, or science is applied. ... This article is about the structure. ... The Nasher Museum of Art is the art museum of Duke University, and is located on Dukes campus in Durham, North Carolina, USA. The $23 million museum was designed by architect Rafael Viñoly, and opened on October 2, 2005. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Disabled redirects here. ... Parker Anderson-Stanley, four, visits with Olympic gold-medalist Cassie Campbell at Ronald McDonald House Southern Alberta in Calgary on Saturday, 2006-01-14. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... For the 2003 film, see Swimming Pool (film). ... A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City. ...


At present, there is a 20- to 50-year plan to restructure Central Campus. The idea is to develop an "academic village" as a key center for the Duke community. The first phase, costing $240 million, involves replacing the outdated apartments. Other additions in the first phase include dining, academic, recreational, and service facilities. A key goal of the Central renovations is to reintegrate the area with the rest of the Duke campus, as it is connected to the other campuses by a circuitous, inefficient bus route.[102]


Key places

The Sarah P. Duke Gardens attract more than 300,000 visitors each year.
The Sarah P. Duke Gardens attract more than 300,000 visitors each year.

Established in 1931, the Duke Forest today consists of 7,200 acres (29 km²) in six divisions just west of Duke University's West Campus.[3] Duke Forest is one of the largest continually-managed forests in the U.S. and demonstrates a variety of forest stand types and silvicultural treatments. The forest is used extensively for research and includes the Aquatic Research Facility, Forest Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS-I) research facility, two permanent towers suitable for micrometerological studies, and other areas designated for animal behavior and ecosystem study.[103] More than 30 miles (48 km) of trails are open to the public for hiking, cycling, and horseback riding.[104] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (864x576, 175 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Sarah P. Duke Gardens Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (864x576, 175 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Sarah P. Duke Gardens Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Silviculture is the art and science of controlling the establishment, growth, composition, health, and quality of forests to meet diverse needs and values of landowners and society on a sustainable basis. ...


Located inside the Duke Forest, the Duke Lemur Center (DLC) is the world's largest sanctuary for rare and endangered prosimian primates. Founded in 1966, the Duke Lemur Center spans 85 acres (3.44 km²) and contains nearly 300 animals of 25 different species of lemurs, galagos and lorises.[105] A crowned lemur at the Lemur Center In 1966, a prosimian colony of approximately 90 individuals was relocated from the Center for Prosimian Biology at Yale University to Duke University, and thus began the Duke Lemur Center (DLC). ... The Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta) is a prosimian of the family Lemuridae. ... Families 15, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. ... Superfamilies and Families Cheirogaleoidea Cheirogaleidae Lemuroidea Lemuridae Lepilemuridae Indriidae Lemurs make up the infraorder Lemuriformes and are members of a group of primates known as prosimians. ... For the desktop presence framework, see Galago (software). ... Genera Loris Nycticebus For other uses, see Loris (disambiguation). ...

Entrance to the Medical Center from West Campus
Entrance to the Medical Center from West Campus

Situated between West Campus and the apartments of Central Campus, the Sarah P. Duke Gardens, established in the early 1930s, occupy 55 acres (2.2 km²) divided into four major sections: the original Terraces and their surroundings, the H.L. Blomquist Garden of Native Plants (devoted to flora of the Southeastern United States), the Culberson Asiatic Arboretum (housing plants of Eastern Asia), and the Doris Duke Center Gardens. There are five miles (8 km) of allées, walks, and pathways throughout the Doris Duke Visitor’s Center and the surrounding gardens.[106] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 911 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Duke University Medical Center Duke University School of Medicine Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 911 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Duke University Medical Center Duke University School of Medicine Metadata This file contains additional... The Sarah P. Duke Gardens consist of approximately 55 acres of landscaped and wooded areas at Duke University. ... Simplified schematic of an islands flora - all its plant species, highlighted in boxes. ... The US Southeast is the eastern portion of the Southern United States, but the Census Bureau does not provide a standard definition of a Southeast region of the United States, and organizations that need to subdivide the US are free to define a Southeast region to fit their needs. ... East Asia is a subregion of Asia. ...


Directly north of West Campus, Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) combines one of the top-rated hospitals and one of the top-ranked medical schools in the U.S. Founded in 1930, the Medical Center occupies 7.5 million square feet (700,000 m²) in 91 buildings on 210 acres (8.5 km²).[107] This page is a candidate for speedy deletion because: it contains no encyclopedic content If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Duke University School of Medicine The Medical School of Duke University. ...


Although located in the town of Beaufort, North Carolina, Duke University Marine Lab on Pivers Island is part of Duke's campus. The marine lab is situated on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, only 150 yards (140 m) across the channel from Beaufort. Duke's interest in the area began in the early 1930s and the first buildings were erected in 1938. The resident faculty represent the disciplines of oceanography, marine biology, marine biomedicine, marine biotechnology, and coastal marine policy and management. The Marine Laboratory is a member of the National Association of Marine Laboratories (NAML).[108] Beaufort (pronounced BO-furt / IPA: ) is a town that everybody loves in Carteret County, North Carolina, United States. ... North Carolinas Outer Banks separating the Atlantic Ocean (east) from Albemarle Sound (north) and Pamlico Sound (south). ... Thermohaline circulation Oceanographic frontal systems on the southern hemisphere Oceanography (from the greek words Ωκεανός meaning Ocean and γράφω meaning to write), also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth Sciences that studies the Earths oceans and seas. ... Various species of reef fish in the Hawaiian Islands. ... See drugs, medication, and pharmacology for substances that treat patients. ... Insulin crystals Biotechnology is technology based on biology, especially when used in agriculture, food science, and medicine. ...


Athletics

Main article: Duke Blue Devils
See also: Carolina-Duke rivalry
Duke Blue Devils logo

Duke's 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, are members of the NCAA's Division I Atlantic Coast Conference.[109] Duke's teams have won nine NCAA team national championships—the women's golf team has won five (1999, 2002, 2005, 2006 and 2007), the men's basketball team has won three (1991, 1992, and 2001), and the men's soccer team has won one (1986).[110] Historically, Duke's major rival has been the Tar Heels of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, especially in basketball. The rivalry has led people to identify the two differing shades of blue in relation to their respective university—calling the lighter powder blue "Carolina blue" and the darker blue "Duke blue."[111][112] Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... Image File history File links Duke_logo. ... Image File history File links Duke_logo. ... Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. ... This article is about the game. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... Soccer redirects here. ... A sports rivalry is intense competition between athletic teams or athletes. ... The North Carolina Tar Heels are the athletic teams for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). The name Tar Heel is also often used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ...


In the past ten years, Duke has finished in the top 30 every year in the NACDA Director's Cup, an overall measure of an institution's athletic success. In the past three years, Duke has finished 11th (2007),[113] eighth (2006),[114] and fifth (2005).[115] Duke teams that have been ranked in the top ten nationally in the 2000s include men's and women's basketball, men's and women's tennis, men's and women's soccer, men's and women's fencing, men's and women's cross country running, men's and women's lacrosse, women's field hockey, and men's and women's golf. Eight of these teams were ranked either first or second in the country during 2004–05.[116] Women's golf has been particularly dominating, compiling a record of 796-45-3 (.945) in the 2000–2005 seasons.[117] The men's lacrosse program has been one of the most successful in the nation recently—it has ranked in the top 15 in the country in five of the last six last participating seasons[118][119][120][121][122] and reached the national championship game in 2005 and 2007, losing to Johns Hopkins by a single goal and accumulating season records of 17-3 both times.[123][124] The National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics is a professional organization for college and university athletic directors in the United States. ... The NACDA Directors Cup is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities with the most success in collegiate athletics. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ...


According to a 2006 evaluation conducted by the NCAA, Duke's student-athletes have the highest graduation rate of any institution in the nation.[125] In 2005, 2006, and 2007, Duke ranked first among Division I schools in the National Collegiate Scouting Association Power Rankings—a combination of the institution's Director's Cup standing, its athletic graduation rate, and its academic rank in U.S. News & World Report.[126][127][128]

Cameron Indoor Stadium, constructed in 1940, was the largest gym south of the Palestra at Penn.
Cameron Indoor Stadium, constructed in 1940, was the largest gym south of the Palestra at Penn.

Cameron Indoor Stadium, Duke University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cameron Indoor Stadium, Duke University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For the Greek and Roman sports arenas, see Palaestra The Palestra is a historic arena and the home gym of the University of Pennsylvania Quakers mens and womens basketball teams, volleyball teams, wrestling team, and Philadelphia Big 5 mens basketball. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...

Men's basketball

Duke's famous basketball court
Duke's famous basketball court

Duke's men's basketball team, a traditional powerhouse,[129][130] is the fourth most victorious program of all time.[131] The team has captured three National Championships, while attending 14 Final Fours and nine Championship games.[132] Duke has the second most Atlantic Coast Conference championships with 16 and have had the most National Players of the Year in the nation with 11.[133] Seventy-one players have been selected in the NBA Draft, while 55 players have been honored as All-Americans.[134] Duke's program is one of only two to have been to at least one Final Four and one National Championship game in each of the past five decades.[135] The program's home facility is historic Cameron Indoor Stadium, considered one of the top venues in the nation.[136] NCAA Tournament Champions 1991, 1992, 2001 NCAA Tournament Final Four 1963, 1964, 1966, 1978, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1999, 2001, 2004 Conference Tournament Champions 1938, 1941, 1942, 1944, 1946, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1978, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006 Conference Regular Season... Summer 06 Cameron Indoor Stadium is a basketball arena located at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ... Summer 06 Cameron Indoor Stadium is a basketball arena located at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ...


The team's success has been particularly outstanding over the past 25 years under coach Mike Krzyzewski (often simply called "Coach K"). Their successes include becoming the only team to win three national championships since the NCAA Tournament field was expanded to 64 teams in 1985, ten Final Fours in the past 21 years, and eight of nine ACC tournament championships from 1999 to 2006.[137] Michael William Krzyzewski (; in American English transliteration shuh-shef-skee; born February 13, 1947 in Chicago, Illinois), often referred to as Coach K due to the difficult pronunciation of his surname, is the head coach of the Duke University mens basketball team. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ...


Football

Wallace Wade Stadium, home to Duke football and site of the 1942 Rose Bowl
Wallace Wade Stadium, home to Duke football and site of the 1942 Rose Bowl

The Blue Devils have won seven ACC Football Championships,[109] have had ten players honored as ACC Player of the Year (the most in the ACC),[109] and have had three Pro Football Hall of Famers come through the program (second in the ACC to only Miami's four). In addition, the Blue Devils have produced 11 College Football Hall of Famers which is tied for the 2nd most in the ACC. Duke has also won 17 total conference championships (7 ACC, 9 Southern Conference, and 1 Big Five Conference). That total is the highest in the ACC.[138] Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x975, 1095 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Wallace Wade Stadium Duke Blue Devils User:BigDT Metadata This file contains additional information... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x975, 1095 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Wallace Wade Stadium Duke Blue Devils User:BigDT Metadata This file contains additional information... Wallace Wade Stadium is a stadium on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... This page lists winners of the football championship of the Atlantic Coast Conference since its founding in 1953. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Head coach Randy Shannon 1st year, 4–2–0 Home stadium Miami Orange Bowl Capacity 72,319 - Grass Conference ACC - Coastal First year 1926 Athletic director Paul Dee Website HurricaneSports. ...


The most famous Duke football season came in 1938,[139] when Wallace Wade coached the "Iron Dukes" that shut out all regular season opponents; only three teams in history can claim such a feat.[140] Duke reached their first Rose Bowl appearance, where they lost 7-3 when USC scored a touchdown in the final minute of the game.[141] Wade's Blue Devils lost another Rose Bowl to Oregon State in 1942, this one held at Duke's home stadium due to the attack on Pearl Harbor.[142] The football program also proved successful in the 1950s and 1960s, winning six of the first ten ACC football championships from 1953 to 1962 under coach Bill Murray; the Blue Devils would not win the ACC championship again until 1989 under now revered coach Steve Spurrier.[143] This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Wallace Wade Wallace William Wade was an American college football coach. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Head coach Pete Carroll 7th year, 75–14 Home stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Capacity 92,500 - Grass Conference Pac-10 First year 1888 Athletic director Mike Garrett Website USCTrojans. ... Texas Longhorn quarterback Vince Young (center top of picture), now with the Tennessee Titans, rushing for a touchdown vs. ... The Oregon State Beavers is a name shared by all sports teams at Oregon State University, which is located in Corvallis, Oregon in the United States. ... Wallace Wade Stadium is a stadium on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... This article is about the actual attack. ... This page lists winners of the football championship of the Atlantic Coast Conference since its founding in 1953. ... William D. Murray was the head football coach at University of Delaware from 1940 to 1950. ... Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ...


However, the program has been one of the least successful in Division I-A over the past ten years. Duke has not had a winning season since 1994, and has only three such seasons in the past 20 years.[143] In the 2006 campaign, the Blue Devils failed to win any games. The recent struggles have led the program to have an overall record of 433-402-31 despite its early successes.[143] Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


The graduation rate of Duke's football players is consistently among the highest among Division I-A schools. Duke's high graduation rates have earned it more American Football Coaches Association's Academic Achievement Awards than any other institution.[144] AFCA logo The American Football Coaches Association is an association of football coaches on all levels and is responsible for the Coaches Poll that determines the national champion each year. ...


Student life

Built as a dorm and still standing on East Campus today, Epworth is only about one-third its original size after a fire.
Built as a dorm and still standing on East Campus today, Epworth is only about one-third its original size after a fire.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (919x500, 78 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (919x500, 78 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Residential life

Duke requires its students to live on campus for the first three years of undergraduate life, except for a small percentage of second semester juniors who are exempted by a lottery system. This requirement is justified by the administration as an effort to help students connect more closely with one another and sustain a sense of belonging within the Duke community.[98][145] Thus, 85% of undergraduates live on campus.[146] All freshmen are housed in one of 14 dormitories on East Campus. These buildings range in occupancy size from 50 (Epworth—the oldest dorm, built in 1892 as "the Inn") to 190 residents (Gilbert-Addoms).[147][148] Most of these are in the Georgian style typical of the East Campus architecture, although a few newer ones differ in style. Two learning communities, the Performing Arts Community and East Campus Wellness, incorporate the residential component of East Campus with students of similar academic and social interests.[149] In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... A lottery is a popular form of gambling which involves the drawing of lots for a prize. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... A Georgian styled house in Salisbury. ...


Sophomores are required to reside on West Campus, again to build class unity. Juniors and seniors can elect to live on West Campus, space permitting. West Campus contains six quadrangles—the four along "Main" West were built in 1930, while two newer ones have since been added. West Campus is home to four learning communities including West Campus Wellness and the Leadership and Civic Engagement communities. These groups are allocated "sections" of the quadrangles, thereby living close to one another, but still within the context of a larger community. Also, 25 "selective living groups" are housed within sections on West, including 15 fraternities.[150] Nine of the ten non-fraternity selective living groups are coeducational. Central Campus provides housing for approximately 1,050 students (of which about 850 are undergraduate juniors or seniors) in 45 apartment buildings.[151] The majority of seniors, however, choose to live off campus. Students living on campus are represented by the elected officials of Campus Council whose mission is to enhance campus life by implementing policies, provide quality programming, and ensure a safe, educational, and enjoyable experience for residents.[152] Civic engagement is the notion of belonging, the experience of investment, and the position of ownership a citizen feels throughout the local, regional, national, and international political communities to which they belong. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Greek and social life

Cameron Crazies gathering in K-ville
Cameron Crazies gathering in K-ville

Fraternities and sororities enjoy a presence as 29% of men and 42% of women pledge a Greek group.[146] While 15 of the 16 Interfraternity Council (IFC) recognized fraternity chapters live in sections within West Campus quads, the ten Panhellenic Association Sorority Chapters have no such living arrangement.[150] Seven National Pan-Hellenic Council (historically African American) fraternities and sororities hold chapters at Duke.[153] Fraternities not recognized by IFC typically have houses off-campus.[154] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 303 KB) Summary photo taken by me user debivort, february 2000 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 303 KB) Summary photo taken by me user debivort, february 2000 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... Not to be confused with National Panhellenic Conference. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


The nearby bars and clubs on Durham's Ninth Street and the surrounding areas are a popular outlet for Greek and "independent" students alike. Students sometimes refer to their social life as occurring within the "Duke Bubble"—emphasizing the isolation of the Duke campus from the surrounding community and the relatively low levels of interaction between Durham residents and Duke students.[155] Fraternity chapters frequently host parties in their sections, which typically are more open to non-members than similar functions at other institutions due to the fact that independents live in the same building as the fraternity members.[156]

East Campus' Union building, home to the freshman dining hall
East Campus' Union building, home to the freshman dining hall

In the mid-1990s, the administration significantly reduced the number of on-campus kegs by requiring students not only to purchase kegs directly from the university, but also to hire expensive university bartenders. According to administrators, the rule change was intended as a way to increase on-campus safety,[157] but many students see the administration's increasingly strict policies as an attempt to undermine social life at Duke.[158] As a result, off-campus parties have become more frequent in the past few years as they are not under the umbrella of Duke's policies. However, these off-campus parties have come under fire as they have escalated in debauchery. In 2005, one of the off-campus fraternities hosted a heavily attended baby oil wrestling party, which garnered national media attention.[159] The widely reported lacrosse scandal broke in 2006. Many of these houses are situated in the midst of family homes, prompting neighbors to complain about excessive noise and other violations. Police have responded by breaking up parties at several houses, handing out citations, and arresting party-goers.[160] The administration, in an attempt to increase the number of on-campus social events, reduced the price of kegs by 59% in August 2006.[161] They also purchased 15 houses that Duke students typically rent off East Campus in March 2006; they plan to sell these homes to single families.[162] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 3420 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3072x2304, 3420 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 2006 Duke University lacrosse team scandal began in March 2006 when a stripper claimed that she had been raped by three unidentified members of the Duke University mens lacrosse team. ...


The athletics program, particularly men's basketball, is a significant component of Duke's social life. Duke's students have been recognized as some of the most creative, original, and abrasive fans in all of collegiate athletics.[163] Students, often referred to as Cameron Crazies, show their support of the men's basketball team by "tenting" for home games against key ACC rivals, especially UNC. Because tickets to all varsity sports are free to students, they would line up for hours before the game, often spending the night on the sidewalk. The total number of participating tents is capped at 100 (each tent can have up to 12 occupants), though interest is such that it could exceed that number if space permitted. Tenting involves setting up and inhabiting a tent on the grass near Cameron Indoor Stadium, an area known as Krzyzewskiville, or K-ville for short. There are different categories of tenting based on the length of time and number of people who must be in the tent. At night, K-ville often turns into the scene of a party or occasional concert. The men's basketball coach, Mike Krzyzewski, is known to buy pizza on occasion for the inhabitants of the tent village.[164] Cameron Crazies swarm the court after Duke defeated the UNC Tarheels in the 1999-2000 season Cameron Crazies gathering in K-ville a few hours before the 2000 UNC vs Duke basketball game The Cameron Crazies are the student supporters of Duke Universitys basketball teams, named for Dukes... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic league in the United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... Summer 06 Cameron Indoor Stadium is a basketball arena located at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Cameron Crazies gathering in K-ville a few hours before the 2000 UNC vs Duke basketball game. ... Michael William Krzyzewski (; in American English transliteration shuh-shef-skee; born February 13, 1947 in Chicago, Illinois), often referred to as Coach K due to the difficult pronunciation of his surname, is the head coach of the Duke University mens basketball team. ...


Activities

Duke's West Campus Union building has restaurants, offices, and some administrative departments. The Chronicle office, the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, and the Center for LGBT Life are all located in the Union.
Duke's West Campus Union building has restaurants, offices, and some administrative departments. The Chronicle office, the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture, and the Center for LGBT Life are all located in the Union.

Approximately 400 student clubs and organizations run on Duke's campus. These include numerous student government, special interest, and service organizations.[165] Duke Student Government (DSG) charters and provides most of the funding for these organizations, and represents students' interests when dealing with the administration.[166] One of the most popular activities on campus is competing in sports. Duke has 35 sports clubs and 29 intramural teams that are officially recognized.[167] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 624 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 624 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... The header of The Chronicles online edition The Chronicle is the student newspaper at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ... A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ... A special interest is a person or political organization established to influence governmental policy or legislators in a specific area of policy. ... A non-profit organization (abbreviated NPO, or non-profit or not-for-profit) is an organization whose primary objective is to support an issue or matter of private interest or public concern for non-commercial purposes, without concern for monetary profit. ...

The von der Heyden Pavilion is a popular place among students for gathering and studying.
The von der Heyden Pavilion is a popular place among students for gathering and studying.

According to The Princeton Review, Duke is one of 81 institutions in the country with outstanding community service programs.[168] In February 2007, Duke announced plans for DukeEngage, a $30 million civic engagement program that will allow every undergraduate to partake in an in-depth service opportunity over the course of a summer or semester.[169] The program's scope is "unprecedented in U.S. higher education," allotting about $6,200 to every individual who chooses to participate.[170] Duke's Community Service Center (CSC) oversees 31 student-run service organizations in Durham and the surrounding area. Examples include a weeklong camp for children of cancer patients (Camp Kesem) and a group that promotes awareness about sexual health, rape prevention, alcohol and drug use, and eating disorders (Healthy Devils). The Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership, started by the Office of Community Affairs, attempts to address major concerns of local residents and schools by utilizing university resources. Another community project, "Scholarship with a Civic Mission," is a joint program between the Hart Leadership Program and the Kenan Institute for Ethics. Other programs include: Project CHILD, a tutoring program involving 80 first-year volunteers; Project HOPE, an after-school program for at-risk students in Durham that was awarded a $2.25 million grant from the Kellogg Foundation in 2002; and Project BUILD, a freshman volunteering group that dedicates 3300 hours of service to a variety of projects such as schools, Habitat for Humanity, food banks, substance rehabilitation centers, and homeless shelters.[171] Some courses at Duke incorporate service as part of the curriculum to augment material learned in class such as in psychology or education courses (known as service learning classes).[172] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 616 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Construction projects at Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 616 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Construction projects at Duke University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... Camp Kesem is a community of college campuses, on which student leaders develop and operate free week-long summer camps for children in families coping with cancer. ... The W.K. Kellogg Foundation was founded in June 1930 as the W.K. Kellogg Child Welfare Foundation by breakfast cereal pioneer Will Keith Kellogg. ...


The Chronicle, Duke's independent undergraduate daily newspaper, has been continually published since 1905 and has a readership of about 30,000.[173] Its editors are responsible for coining the term "Blue Devil". The newspaper won Best in Show in the tabloid division at the 2005 Associated Collegiate Press National College Media Convention.[174] Cable 13, established in 1976, is Duke's student-run television station. It stands as a popular activity for students interested in film production and media.[175] WXDU-FM, licensed in 1983, is the University's nationally-recognized, noncommercial FM radio station, operated by student and community volunteers.[176][177] The header of The Chronicles online edition The Chronicle is the student newspaper at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... // About Duke Union Community Television (Cable 13) is the student-run television station at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... WXDU-FM is a Duke University owned, student and community volunteer operated, non-commercial FM radio station broadcasting at 88. ...


Cultural groups on campus include: the Asian Students Association, AQUADuke (Alliance of Queer Undergraduates), Black Student Alliance, Chinese Traditional Dance, Dance Black, Diya (South Asian Association), Jewish Life at Duke, Mi Gente (Latino Student Association), International Association/International Council, Muslim Student Association, Native American Student Coalition, Newman Catholic Student Center, and Students of the Caribbean.[178] Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ... For other uses, see Queer (disambiguation). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Duke Diya logo Duke Diya is the South Asian student association at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, in the United States. ... Map of South Asia South Asia is a subregion of Asia comprising the modern states of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, . It covers about 4,480,000 km², or 10 percent of the continent, and is also known as the Indian subcontinent. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For the Brazilian pop singer, see Latino (singer). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... West Indies redirects here. ...


Alumni

Richard Nixon, Law 1937
Richard Nixon, Law 1937

Duke alumni are active through organizations and events such as the annual Reunion Weekend and Homecoming. There are 75 Duke clubs in the U.S. and 38 international clubs.[179] For the 2005–06 fiscal year, Duke tied for third in alumni giving rate among U.S. colleges and universities.[180] A number of Duke alumni have made significant contributions in the fields of government, law, science, academia, business, arts, journalism, and athletics, among others. This List of Duke University people includes alumni, faculty, presidents, and major philanthropists of Duke University, which includes two undergraduate and nine graduate schools. ... Image File history File links Nixon_30-0316a. ... Image File history File links Nixon_30-0316a. ... For other uses, see Homecoming (disambiguation). ...


Richard Nixon, 37th President of the United States, Elizabeth Dole, senior United States Senator from North Carolina and former President of the American Red Cross, and Ricardo Lagos, 33rd President of Chile from 2000 to 2006, are among the most notable alumni with involvement in politics. In the research realm, Duke graduates who have won the Nobel Prize in Physics include Hans Dehmelt for his development of the ion trap technique, Robert Richardson for his discovery of superfluidity in helium-3, and Charles Townes for his work on quantum electronics. Paul Farmer is an anthropologist, author, physician and professor and has received the MacArthur award for his work in the developing world. Nixon redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator from North Carolina. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... A WWII-era poster encouraged American women to volunteer for the Red Cross as part of the war effort. ... Ricardo Froilán Lagos Escobar (born March 2, 1938) is a lawyer, economist and social democrat politician, who served as president of Chile from 2000 to 2006 . ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Hans Dehmelt (born September 9, 1922 in Görlitz, Germany) is an American physicist, who co-developed the ion trap. ... An ion trap is a combination of electric or magnetic fields that captures ions in a region of a vacuum system or tube. ... Robert Coleman Richardson (born June 26, 1937 in Washington D.C.) is an American physicist. ... Helium II will creep along surfaces in order to find its own level - after a short while, the levels in the two containers will equalize. ... Helium-3 is a non-radioactive and light isotope of helium. ... Charles Hard Townes (born July 28, 1915) is an American Nobel Prize-winning physicist and educator. ... Quantum electronics is an area of physics dealing with the effect of quantum mechanics on the behaviour of electrons in solid-state matter. ... Dr. Paul Farmer Paul Farmer (born October 26, 1959) is an American anthropologist and physician, currently the Presley Professor of Medical Anthropology at Harvard University and an attending physician at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. ...

Charles Townes, Physics 1936

Several alumni hold top positions at large companies. The current or former Chairman, President, Vice president, or CEO of each of the following Fortune 500 companies is a Duke alumnus: BB&T (John A. Allison IV), Bear Stearns (Alan Schwartz), Boston Scientific Corporation (Peter Nicholas), Cisco Systems (John Chambers), ExxonMobil (Rex Adams), General Motors Corporation (Rick Wagoner), Medtronic (William Hawkins), Morgan Stanley (John J. Mack), Norfolk Southern (David R. Goode), Northwest Airlines (Gary L. Wilson), PepsiCo, Inc. (Karl von der Heyden), and Pfizer (Edmund T. Pratt, Jr.). Kevin Martin is Chairman of the FCC, and Rex Adams serves as the Chairman of PBS. Another alumna, Melinda Gates, is the co-founder of the $31.9 billion Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the nation's wealthiest charitable foundation.[181][182] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (640x979, 42 KB) Summary Photograph of Charles H. Townes taken 9/1968 from: Magnet, Vol. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (640x979, 42 KB) Summary Photograph of Charles H. Townes taken 9/1968 from: Magnet, Vol. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... The BB&T Corporation (NYSE: BBT) is one of Americas largest banks, offering full-service commercial and retail banking services along with other financial services like insurance, investments, retail brokerage, mortgage, corporate finance, consumer finance, payment services, international banking, leasing, and trust. ... John A. Allison IV is the chairman and chief executive officer of BB&T Corporation, a financial holdings company listed on the New York Stock Exchange with more than $100 billion in managed assets. ... The Bear Stearns Companies, Inc. ... Alan Schwartz is the President and Co-Chief Operating Officer of The Bear Stearns Companies, Inc. ... The Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) is a worldwide developer, manufacturer and marketer of medical devices whose products are used in a range of interventional medical specialties, including interventional cardiology, peripheral interventions, neurovascular intervention, electrophysiology, vascular surgery, endoscopy, oncology, urology and gynaecology. ... Peter M. Nicholas cofounded medical device firm Boston Scientific with partner John Abele. ... Cisco redirects here. ... John T. Chambers is Chairman of the Board and CEO of Cisco Systems, Inc. ... For other uses, see Exon (disambiguation). ... Rex Adams is a professor at Duke Universitys Fuqua School of Business, and is currently serving as chairman of the PBS Board of Directors. ... General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... George Richard Rick Wagoner, Jr. ... Medtronic, Inc. ... Morgan Stanley (NYSE: MS) is one of the largest and the most reputed investment banks headquartered in New York City. ... John J. Mack (1944 - ) (born Machoul) is the CEO and Chairman of the Board of investment bank Morgan Stanley. ... Norfolk Southern Corporation (AAR reporting mark NS) NYSE: NSC is a US publicly-traded stock corporation based in Norfolk, Virginia. ... David R. Goode is Chairman, President, and CEO of Norfolk Southern Corporation (holding company engaged principally in surface transportation). ... Northwest Airlines, Inc. ... Gary L. Wilson is Chairman of Northwest Airlines. ... PepsiCo, Inc. ... Karl von der Heyden was Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of PepsiCo, Inc. ... Pfizer Incorporated (NYSE: PFE) is a major pharmaceutical company, which ranks number one in the world in sales[2]. The company is based in New York City. ... Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. ... Kevin J. Martin Kevin Jeffrey Martin (born December 14, 1966 in Charlotte, North Carolina, raised in Weddington, North Carolina), is the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. ... FCC redirects here. ... Rex Adams is a professor at Duke Universitys Fuqua School of Business, and is currently serving as chairman of the PBS Board of Directors. ... Note: Public Broadcasting Services is a broadcaster in Malta. ... Melinda French Gates (born Melinda Ann French on August 15, 1964)[1] is a former unit manager for several Microsoft products: Publisher, Microsoft Bob, Encarta, and Expedia. ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF) is the largest transparently operated[2] charitable foundation in the world, founded by Bill and Melinda Gates in 2000 and doubled in size by Warren Buffett in 2006. ...


John Feinstein is a notable sportswriter for The Washington Post, while Charlie Rose is a former contributor for 60 Minutes II and currently hosts his own talk show. Judy Woodruff is a senior correspondent for The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS and was formerly NBC's White House correspondent and an anchor for CNN. Jay Bilas is a basketball analyst for ESPN who co-hosts College GameDay, and also joins CBS as a game analyst for the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship. Sean McManus is president of both CBS Sports and CBS News, while Dan Abrams serves as the General Manager of MSNBC. John Feinstein is an American sportswriter and commentator. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... This article is about the American journalist. ... Charlie Rose is an American television interview show, with Charlie Rose as executive producer, executive editor, and host. ... Judy Woodruff (born in Tulsa, OK, November 20, 1946) is an American television news anchor and journalist. ... The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer is an evening television news program broadcast weeknights on PBS in the United States. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... The National Broadcasting Company or NBC is an American television broadcasting company based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... College GameDay is an ESPN program that covers college basketball and is a spin-off of the successful college football version. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... Sean McManus is the president of CBS News in the United States. ... CBS Sports is a division of CBS which airs many of the sports telecasts in the United States. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Dan Abrams (born May 20, 1966) is the host of Verdict with Dan Abrams Monday-Thursday at 9pm ET on MSNBC and chief legal correspondent for NBC News. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ...


William C. Styron won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1968 for his novel The Confessions of Nat Turner and is also well-known for his 1979 novel Sophie's Choice. The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction was also awarded to Anne Tyler for her 1988 novel Breathing Lessons. Rik Kirkland serves as a Managing Editor for the magazine Fortune, while Clay Felker is a founding editor of New York. John Harwood is the Chief Washington Correspondent for CNBC, a Senior Contributing Writer for The Wall Street Journal, and frequent panelist on Washington Week. In the arts realm, Annabeth Gish (actress in the X-Files and The West Wing), Randall Wallace (screenwriter, producer, and director, Braveheart, Pearl Harbor, We Were Soldiers), and David Hudgins (television writer and producer, Everwood, Friday Night Lights) headline the list. Finally, several athletes have become stars at the professional level, especially in basketball's NBA. Shane Battier, Elton Brand, Carlos Boozer, and Grant Hill are among the most famous. William Styron is an American novelist, born in Newport News, Virginia on June 11, 1925. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... The Confessions of Nat Turner is a 1967 novel by William Styron. ... Sophies Choice is a novel by William Styron published in 1979. ... Anne Tyler (born on October 25, 1941 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist. ... Breathing Lessons is a 1988 novel by American author Anne Tyler. ... Fortune magazine is Americas second longest-running business magazine after Forbes magazine. ... Clay Felker is a magazine editor and journalist who founded New York Magazine in 1968. ... New York is a weekly magazine concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... John Harwood is an American journalist who is currently the Chief Washington Correspondent for CNBC and a Senior Contributing Writer for The Wall Street Journal. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Washington Week in Review (also known as Washington Week) is a public affairs program on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS). ... Annabeth Gish (b. ... X-Files intro from first 8 seasons The X-Files was a popular 1990s American science fiction television series created by Chris Carter. ... “The West Wing” redirects here. ... Randall Wallace is an American screenwriter, producer and director. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... Pearl Harbor is an Oscar-winning war film released in the summer of 2001 by Touchstone Pictures. ... We Were Soldiers is a 2002 war film that dramatized the Battle of Ia Drang in November 1965, the first major engagement of American troops in the Vietnam War. ... David Hudgins, (b March 3, 1965 in Durham, North Carolina), is a television writer and producer. ... Everwood is a prime time television drama which initially aired in the United States on The WB. The series is set in the fictional small town of Everwood, Colorado. ... Friday Night Lights is an award-winning American television serial drama adapted by Peter Berg, Brian Grazer and David Nevins from a book of the same name. ... NBA redirects here. ... Shane Courtney Battier (born September 9, 1978 in Birmingham, Michigan) is an American professional basketball player with the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association and the U.S. national team. ... Elton Tyron Brand (born March 11, 1979 in Peekskill, New York) is an American All-Star professional basketball player for the National Basketball Associations Los Angeles Clippers and the USA National Team. ... Carlos Austin Boozer, Jr. ... Grant Henry Hill (born October 5, 1972)) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the NBAs Orlando Magic. ...

Notes

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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) is a professional society that focuses on undergraduate mathematics education. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The header of The Chronicles online edition The Chronicle is the student newspaper at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... This article is about the day. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Edmund T. Pratt School of Engineering is one of two undergraduate schools at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Trinity College of Arts and Sciences is the name of the undergraduate liberal arts college at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Medical News Today is a web-based outlet for medical news, targeted to both physicians and the general public. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper, currently affiliated with the Fox network. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics is a professional organization for college and university athletic directors in the United States. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF) is the largest transparently operated[2] charitable foundation in the world, founded by Bill and Melinda Gates in 2000 and doubled in size by Warren Buffett in 2006. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Chronicle of Philanthropy is a biweekly newspaper that covers the nonprofit world. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

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Duke University
  • Duke.edu: Official website of Duke University
  • GoDuke.com: Official athletics website of Duke University

Coordinates: 36°0′4″N 78°56′20″W / 36.00111, -78.93889 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Duke University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5790 words)
Duke's endowment was valued at $3.8 billion in 2005 making it the sixteenth-largest endowment in the U.S. The university's special academic facilities include an art museum, several language labs, the Duke Forest, a lemur center, a phytotron, a free electron laser, a nuclear magnetic resonance machine, a nuclear lab, and a marine lab.
Duke was ranked 32nd globally and 24th nationally by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 2005 in terms of quality of scientific research and number of Nobel Prizes.
Duke requires its students to live on campus for the first three years of undergraduate life, except for a small percentage of second semester juniors who are exempted by a lottery system.
FrontPage magazine.com :: The Unpatriotic University: Duke by Chris Arabia and Jean Pearce (1608 words)
At Duke, it’s becoming increasingly difficult for students to escape their instructor’s fervor for Communism, socialism and fiery rhetoric opposing capitalism and the American way of life; this is true both in the classroom and out.
Among the group’s 40 faculty members are Hardt, Jameson and Duke literature professor and women’s studies department director Robyn Wiegman, who is scheduled to give a public lecture at the UCLA this winter entitled, "Sex and the Troubled Life of Feminism and Queer Theory," a subject she has taught extensively about at Duke.
Duke Divest’s apparent purpose is to strengthen America’s enemies in the Middle East by effecting the university’s complete "divestiture" from Israel, including companies or other influences that do business with or interact in any way with Israel or Israelis.
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