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Encyclopedia > Duke Nukem Forever
Duke Nukem Forever
Duke Nukem Forever artwork
Developer(s) 3D Realms
Publisher(s) Take Two Interactive
Engine modified Unreal Engine 2[1]
Platform(s) Windows
Release date "When it's done." [2]
Genre(s) First-person shooter
Mode(s) Single-player, Multiplayer
Media DVD
Input methods Keyboard, Mouse


Duke Nukem Forever (DNF) is a first-person shooter video game being developed by 3D Realms, and is slated to be the next game in the Duke Nukem series. Like its predecessor, Duke Nukem 3D, Forever is being directed by George Broussard, one of the creators of the original Duke Nukem game. It stars its eponymous character, Duke Nukem. 3D Realms has not set a release date for the game, only saying "When It's Done"(WID).[2] Computer and video games redirects here. ... Image File history File links Dnf1. ... A video game developer is a software developer (a business or an individual) that creates video games. ... 3D Realms is the name of a computer game publisher and developer based in Garland, Texas. ... Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. ... A game engine is the core software component of a computer video game or other interactive application with real-time graphics. ... The Unreal Engine is a widely-used game engine developed by Epic Games. ... In computing, a platform describes some sort of framework, either in hardware or software, which allows software to run. ... Windows redirects here. ... Further information: Game classification Video games are categorized into genres based on their gameplay interaction. ... This article is about video games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Online gaming redirects here. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... A 104-key PC US English QWERTY keyboard layout The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and QWERTY. A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially modelled after the typewriter keyboard. ... A contemporary computer mouse, with the most common standard features: two buttons and a scroll wheel. ... This article is about video games. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... 3D Realms is the name of a computer game publisher and developer based in Garland, Texas. ... Duke Nukem is a platform video game developed and published by Apogee Software (now 3D Realms), featuring the adventures of Duke Nukem. ... Duke Nukem 3D is a first-person shooter computer game developed by 3D Realms and published by Apogee Software. ... Image:George-Broussard-Photo. ... An eponym is a person (real or fictitious) whose name has become identified with a particular object or activity. ... Duke Nukem is an action hero created by computer game developers Todd Replogle, George Broussard, Allen Blum and Scott Miller of 3D Realms/Apogee Software. ...


It is famous for its protracted development schedule, which began in April 1997. The game has been hindered by poor management and direction, several internal rewrites, as well as game engine technology restarts. Promotional information has been released in the years 1997, 1998, 2001, 2007, and most recently June 2008.[3][4] Development hell is media-industry jargon for a film, television screenplay, or computer program[1] (or sometimes just a concept or idea) getting stuck in development and never going into production. ...


The game has been subject to intense speculation. It has won several vaporware awards and the name Duke Nukem Forever has been associated with any game that is taking an extremely long time to develop. Vaporware is software or hardware product which is announced by a developer well in advance of release, but which then fails to emerge, either with or without a protracted development cycle. ...

Contents

Plot

The plot of Forever has been presented through released footage and screenshots. 3D Realms released trailers at the 1998 and 2001 E3 conventions and screenshots between those years. However, as Forever has gone through extensive changes since its last trailer, the plot still remains unclear as of 2008. E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The status of several secondary characters also remains unclear. In the November 1997 issue of PC Gamer, Scott Miller stated that Doctor Proton, Duke's original nemesis, would return. It is unknown if Doctor Proton is still in the game. In the 1998 trailer, Duke was paired up with a female sidekick named Bombshell, but she did not appear in the trailer released in 2001. PC Gamer is a magazine founded in 1993 devoted to PC gaming and published monthly by Future Publishing. ... Scott Miller is an entrepreneur and former game programmer. ...


The 2001 trailer shows an alien invasion in Las Vegas. It features Duke fighting with several weapons. Duke fights the aliens in many areas: a mine, some rural areas, the streets of Las Vegas, on water, and indoor areas.[5] For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ...


As of 2003, the 3D Realms website states that "the screenshots and videos that were there have been removed as they no longer represent the game's current look and feel."[2] 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, and also: The International Year of Freshwater The European Disability Year Events January events January 1 Luíz Inácio Lula Da Silva becomes the 37th President of Brazil. ...


Development history

Screenshot of Forever from 1999.
Screenshot of Forever from 1999.
Front cover of PC-Gamer Magazine, November 1997.

Duke Nukem Forever was officially announced on April 28, 1997 along with the purchase of a license to use the Quake II engine[6][7] and the intention of releasing the game no later than mid-1998.[8] The game engine is important as it provides the underlying technologies and simplifies development. Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 636 KB) Screenshot for Duke Nukem Forever This image was collected from http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 636 KB) Screenshot for Duke Nukem Forever This image was collected from http://www. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... id Tech 2, formerly known as the Quake II engine is a game engine developed by id Software for use in their games, most notably Quake II. Since its release, id Tech 2 has been licensed for use in several other games. ... A game engine is the core software component of a computer video game or other interactive application with real-time graphics. ...


Original prototype work on the game had begun as early as January. In August and September, the first screenshots of Forever were released in PC Gamer. In its November issue, Scott Miller restated that the intended release date was 1998. However, 3D Realms did not get the Quake II engine code until November 1997, and the earlier screenshots were simply mock-ups with the Quake engine that the team had made in their spare time.[9] 3D Realms unveiled the first video footage of Forever using the Quake II engine at the 1998 E3 conference.[10] PC Gamer is a magazine founded in 1993 devoted to PC gaming and published monthly by Future Publishing. ... id Tech 2, formerly known as the Quake II engine is a game engine developed by id Software for use in their games, most notably Quake II. Since its release, id Tech 2 has been licensed for use in several other games. ...


Change to Unreal engine

In June 1998, the 3D Realms team switched to Epic's Unreal Engine.[11] Fans were concerned because switching game engines requires more development time and further delays the release of the game. Broussard said that the transition from the Quake to the Unreal engine would take from "a month to 6 weeks" and that the game would not be significantly delayed. He also reassured gamers that the items unveiled in the May 1998 E3 demo would carry over on the Epic engine. He also said that Forever would be released in 1999.[11] Epic Games, also known as Epic and formerly as Epic MegaGames, is a computer game development company based in Cary, North Carolina, United States. ... The Unreal Engine is a widely-used game engine developed by Epic Games. ...


In 1999, 3D Realms announced that they had upgraded to the newer version of the Unreal Engine. They released a second batch of screenshots on November 1 that showcased Forever on the Unreal engine for the first time.[12] In December, 3D Realms released a Christmas card that suggested that Forever would be released in 2000.[13]


In early December 2000, publisher Gathering of Developers announced that they had acquired the publishing rights for Forever.[14] Shortly afterwards, 3D Realms released another Christmas card that suggested that Forever would be released in 2001.[15] Gathering of Developers (aka God Games and Gathering) was a Texas-based PC and video games publishing company, founded in January 1998 with the mission to bridge the gap between publishers and independent game developers. ...


At the May 2001 E3, 3D Realms released a second video that showed a couple of minutes of in-game footage[5], which notably showed the player moving in a very large city in a non-linear way, and a certain level of interactivity (the player buys a sandwich from a vending machine and pushing the keypads). In August, Gathering closed down and Take-Two Interactive took over the publishing rights for Forever.[16] Take Two redirects here. ...


In 2002, after hiring several new programmers, the team completely rewrote the renderer and other game engine modules, beginning work on a new generation of game content. Broussard estimated that around 95% of the previous level design work was scrapped in the process. He also later stated that they were never less than two years away from shipping with the UT based version of the game. The engine, which now contains parts of an early version of Unreal Engine 2.0 (the team branched off from the engine in 2001) supports such features as pixel shading, normal mapping and high dynamic range based lighting.[17][18] Level design or game mapping is the creation of levels—locales, stages, or missions—for a video game (such as a console game or computer game). ... The Unreal Engine is a widely-used game engine developed by Epic Games. ... Vertex and pixel (or fragment) shaders are computer programs that run on a graphics card, executed once for every vertex or pixel in a specified 3D mesh. ... Normal mapping used to re-detail simplified meshes. ... An example of a rendering of a high dynamic range image into an 8-bit JPEG image (for display on a typical low dynamic-range computer screen). ...


Broussard has stated several times that the only parts of the Unreal engine that are still part of their code base are UnrealScript, the networking code, and the UnrealEd. Everything else (except the current physics engine) has been written from scratch by 3D Realms. The principal technical reason given by Broussard for the extensive delays was the unstable tech base. Once it was stabilized, 3D Realms expanded their team considerably, from 22 to 31 members.[citation needed] UnrealScript is the scripting language of the Unreal engine and is used for authoring game code and gameplay events. ... UnrealEd (UEd for short) is the level editor used to create levels for Unreal. ... A physics engine is a computer program that simulates Newtonian physics models, using variables such as mass, velocity, friction and wind resistance. ...


Conflict with Take-Two

On May 20, 2003, Jeffrey Lapin, then CEO of Take Two, told reporters that the game would not be out by the end of 2003.[19] In response, George Broussard commented on Shacknews, saying that "Take Two needs to STFU imo."[20] Later in the year, on December 18, 2003, Jeffrey Lapin said that 3D Realms had told him that Duke Nukem Forever was expected to be finished by the end of 2004, or the beginning of 2005.[16] is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chief Executive redirects here. ... Shacknews, commonly referred to as The Shack, is a website offering news, features, editorial content, and forums relating to computer games and console games. ... Look up STFU in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On September 9, 2004, GameSpot reported that Duke Nukem Forever had switched to the Doom 3 engine.[21] Many gaming news sites mailed George Broussard, asking him to confirm or deny the rumor. After receiving no answer from him, they published the rumor as fact, ending the article with "Attempts to contact 3D Realms for comment were unsuccessful as of press time." Later that day, George Broussard explicitly denied the rumor and explained that he was not able to answer the emails because he was working elsewhere in the building.[21] is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Doom 3 is a science fiction, survival horror, first-person shooter video game. ...


On March 20, 2007, Scott Miller explained in an interview with YouGamers that they were still using the Unreal Engine, albeit a heavily modified version at this point.[22] is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Scott Miller is an entrepreneur and former game programmer. ...


Physics engine switch

On September 14, 2004, 3D Realms announced that they had replaced the Karma physics engine with one designed by Meqon. Several sites have speculated that Forever will be using the latest generation of this technology, which was designed for next-gen consoles.[23] is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Unreal Engine is a widely-used game engine developed by Epic Games. ... Meqon is a real-time physics engine for computer entertainment software. ...


2005-2007

Rumors in April 2005 suggested that the game would appear at 2005 E3, along with 3D Realms' previously canceled Prey. While Prey did make an appearance, the rumors of Forever's appearance turned out to be false.[24] E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... Prey is a first-person shooter video game developed by Human Head Studios and produced by 3D Realms. ...


In February 2006, Broussard gave an interview and updated the status on Forever. He reported that everything was together and in full production, and that the guns, creatures, and everything else had been finished. Broussard said that the development team was tweaking and polishing the game and putting it all together.[25] In April, Broussard demonstrated samples of the game, including an early level, a vehicle sequence, and a few test rooms.[26]


On March 21, 2006, 3D Realms CEO Scott Miller stated "of course as soon as Duke is done we'll begin a new one." [27] is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In June, in a filing with the SEC, Take-Two revealed that they had renegotiated the deal and will receive $4.25 million instead of $6 million upon the release of the game.[28] The filing also revealed that Take-Two was offering a $US 500,000 bonus if Forever was commercially released by December 31, 2006.[29] However, Broussard denied the rumors that Forever would be released, saying that 3D Realms never cared for or asked for the bonus. He stated that he would "never ship a game early."[30] SEC redirects here. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On August 30, 2006, Shacknews reported that several key employees had left 3D Realms.[31] They speculated that the departures would lead to further delays for Forever. However, 3D Realms strongly denied these claims, stating that the employees had left over a number of months and that the game was still moving ahead.[32] is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Shacknews, commonly referred to as The Shack, is a website offering news, features, editorial content, and forums relating to computer games and console games. ...


2007-present

Duke Nukem Forever 2007 teaser screenshot
Duke Nukem Forever 2007 teaser screenshot

On January 25, 2007 and May 22, 2007, George Broussard posted two Gamasutra job ads with small (200x125 pixel) screenshots of Duke Nukem holding two guns and an enemy (mutated pig). Broussard later confirmed that these were real in-game screenshots.[33][34] is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Founded in 1997, Gamasutra is a web site for those interested in video games including video game developers. ... This article is about the picture element. ...


In July 2007, Game Informer released two new, low-res screenshots, one of which appears to be a previously unseen shot of an in-game level, the other being the front shot of Duke seen in the first 2007 screen, but from a slightly different angle. [35] Game Informer (often abbreviated to GI) is an American-based monthly magazine featuring articles, news, strategy, and reviews of popular video games and associated consoles. ...


A new video was released[36][37] on December 19, 2007 claimed to be made by employees of 3D Realms during their spare time to show at the annual Christmas party.[38] The announcement had also confirmed earlier speculation that composer Jeremy Soule (Total Annihilation, Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, Secret of Evermore, Prey, Guild Wars, The Elder Scrolls: Oblivion) had joined the team. George Broussard made clear that the video was a teaser, rather than a trailer. He noted that all other media related to Duke Nukem Forever was no longer relevant, including the trailer released in 2001, and that a brand-new trailer would be released in the coming months. Broussard also confirmed that the video was shot real-time from the game, with the exception of some introduction and ending shots. [39] As of Thursday February 7, 2008, an official teaser trailer is available for download. is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Jeremy Soule is a BAFTA Award-winning American composer of video game music. ... Total Annihilation (abbr. ... Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic (KotOR) is an RPG video game originally for the Microsoft Xbox and later for PCs running Microsoft Windows. ... Secret of Evermore, released in North America on September 18, 1995, is a role playing video game for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System video game console. ... Prey is a first-person shooter video game developed by Human Head Studios and produced by 3D Realms. ... This article is for the Guild Wars series. ... Image:George-Broussard-Photo. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Trailer (film). ... Movie trailers are film advertisements for films that will be exhibited in the future at a cinema, on whose screen they are shown; they are commonly known as previews of coming attractions. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


3D Realms has made it clear there is no set release date for the game and any shops claiming to have "insider" information are lying. [2]


Miller "confirmed" a 2008 release date in an email sent to the Dallas Business Journal on February 6, 2008, although this was reportedly "off the record", and as such, no official release date has yet been given to the public. Broussard later denounced the statement.[40] A small screenshot of an enemy character was displayed alongside one of Dallas Business Journal's articles on the game. [41] is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Off the record is a term used mainly in journalism to refer to information given to a journalist, where the identity of the source is to be protected, but the information can be used. ...


On June 5, 2008, in-game footage of the game was featured on the premiere episode of The Jace Hall Show. Filmed entirely on hand-held cameras but not originally expected to be publicly released[42], the video showed host Jason Hall playing through parts of a single level [43] on a PC at 3D Realms' offices. The footage was confirmed to have been shot 6 months prior[44] to the episode air date and according to Broussard, contained outdated particle and combat effects that have since been replaced. [45] is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Jason Jace Hall (born May 20, 1971 in Buffalo, New York) is a video game producer. ...


Another job ad update for "Level Designers or Programmers" appeared on June 20, 2008 at Gamasutra with a company message board post by George Broussard saying, "Need more help. Must go faster." [46] [47] The advertisement featured another thumbnail-sized, in-game screenshot of Duke Nukem Forever, showing an updated model of Duke Nukem wielding a pistol and pipebomb in his hands, posed within a daylight outdoor environment. The job ad was later carried on the 3D Realms website. [48] is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Founded in 1997, Gamasutra is a web site for those interested in video games including video game developers. ... The ThumbsPlus image file manager showing folder tree in the upper left and 12 thumbnail-size images to the right. ...


Press coverage

Wired News has awarded Duke Nukem Forever its Vaporware Awards several times. It placed second in June 2000 and topped the list in 2001 and 2002.[49][50][51] Wired created the Vaporware Lifetime Achievement Award exclusively for Forever and awarded it in 2003. George Broussard accepted the award, simply stating, "We're undeniably late and we know it."[52] In 2004, the game did not make the top 10; Wired editors said that they had given Forever the Lifetime Achievement Award to get it off of the list.[53] However, upon readers' demands, Wired changed its mind, and Forever won first place in 2005, 2006 and 2007.[54][55][56] Wired News, online at Wired. ... Vaporware is software or hardware product which is announced by a developer well in advance of release, but which then fails to emerge, either with or without a protracted development cycle. ...


Forever has drawn a number of jokes related to its development timeline. The video gaming media and public have substituted several names in place of Forever, calling it "ForNever", "Forever Delayed", "Forever Waiting", "Forever Not Played," "Never", "Whenever", "If Ever", "(In Development) Forever", "(Is Taking) Forever" and "Neverever".[49][51][53]


When the GameSpy editors compiled a list of the "Top 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming History" in June 2003, Duke Nukem Forever placed #18.[57] GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ...


In an interview with 1UP.com on June 5, 2008, Jason Hall, host of The Jace Hall Show spoke of his exclusive premiere episode feature on Duke Nukem Forever and his hands-on play experience with the game which he described as "amazing", suggesting it would be worth the wait. [58] ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Jason Jace Hall (born May 20, 1971 in Buffalo, New York) is a video game producer. ...


References

  1. ^ http://blog.shacknews.com/laryn.x?story=50481
  2. ^ a b c d 3D Realms official DNF info page. 3D Realms. Retrieved March 31, 2008.
  3. ^ Vankin, Jonathan; John Whalen (2004). The 80 Greatest Conspiracies of All Time: History's Biggest Mysteries, Coverups & Cabals. Citadel Press, 319. ISBN 0806525312. 
  4. ^ Duke Nukem Forever Trailer Hits Tomorrow. Kotaku. Retrieved December 19, 2007
  5. ^ a b IGN Staff. "Duke Nukem Forever". IGN. June 1, 2001. Accessed January 27, 2007.
  6. ^ Broussard, George. "3D Realms Licenses id Software's 'Quake II' Engine for `Duke Nukem Forever'". Planet Duke. April 28, 1997.
  7. ^ "The Official Duke Nukem Forever FAQ". Planet Duke. Last updated January 8, 2005.
  8. ^ "Duke does Quake - The Big Question Answered - Why?" 3D Realms through archive.org. Retrieved May 10, 2007.
  9. ^ "The Fall Of Duke Nukem". Eurogamer. May 30, 2003.
  10. ^ "DNF from E3past". Kotaku. March 22, 2006.
  11. ^ a b "Duke Nukem Forever Switches to Unreal Engine". 3D Realms. June 15, 1998.
  12. ^ Duke Nukem Forever screenshot gallery
  13. ^ 1999 3D Realms Christmas Card - Page 2. 3D Realms. Retrieved August 7, 2006.
  14. ^ "Duke Nukem Turns His Life Over to g.o.d.". 3D Realms. December 4, 2000.
  15. ^ 2000 3D Realms Christmas Card - Page 3. 3D Realms. Retrieved August 7, 2006.
  16. ^ a b Thorsen, Tor. "No Duke Nukem Forever 'til 2005?". December 18, 2003. GameSpot. Retrieved January 31, 2007.
  17. ^ "Duke Nukem Forever Bits". Voodoo Extreme. April 13, 2004.
  18. ^ "DNF Engine Status". Duke4.de. January 14, 2004.
  19. ^ Varanini, Giancarlo. "Take-Two reveals new games in lineup". GameSpot. May 29, 2003.
  20. ^ Morris, Chris. "Duke Nukem vs. Take Two". CNN Money. June 11, 2003.
  21. ^ a b Thorsen, Tor. "3D Realms denies Duke Nukem Forever using Doom 3 engine". GameSpot. September 10, 2004.
  22. ^ "Scott Miller interview at YouGamers"
  23. ^ "GDC: Duke Nukem Forever physics surpass Half-Life 2". Gameindustry.biz. September 3, 2005.
  24. ^ McNamara, Tom. "E3 2005: Duke Nukem Forever Not Here". IGN. May 19, 2005.
  25. ^ George Broussard Interview from 1UP.com. January 31, 2006. 1UP.com. Retrieved August 7, 2006.
  26. ^ Carless, Simon. "Broussard Updates Duke Nukem Forever Status". Gamesutra. April 12, 2006
  27. ^ 3D Realms Interview
  28. ^ Form 10-Q: Take-Two Interactive Software. Quarterly report ending April 30, 2006. Retrieved August 7, 2006.
  29. ^ Thorsen, Tor. "Take-Two stock tanks, Duke Nukem Forever due by Dec. 31?". June 9, 2006. GameSpot.
  30. ^ Thorson, Tor. "Broussard: We won't rush Duke Nukem Forever". June 13, 2006. GameSpot.
  31. ^ Remo, Chris. "3D Realms Sees Major Employee Departures, Fate of DNF in Question?". Shacknews. August 30, 2006.
  32. ^ Thorson, Tor. "Staff shift stirs 3D Realms". GameSpot. August 31, 2006.
  33. ^ Sinclair, Brendan. ""Duke Nukem Forever resurfaces"". GameSpot. Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  34. ^ Broussard, George. "" Programmer ad"". 3D Realms. Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
  35. ^ "New DNF Screenshot in Game Informer". Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  36. ^ "New DNF Trailer. Official Forums". Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  37. ^ "New DNF Trailer. Shacknews". Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  38. ^ "Teaser Video Coming 3D Realms forums". Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  39. ^ "New DNF Trailer. Official Forums". Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  40. ^ 3D Realms Disputes 'Confirmed' Reports of Duke Nukem Forever on PC and Consoles This Year - Shacknews - PC Games, PlayStation, Xbox 360 and Wii video game news, previews and downloads
  41. ^ "DNF Thumb Causes Sexplosion in Fans Worldwide". Retrieved on 2008-02-15.
  42. ^ "New Duke Nukem Forever Footage Released". Retrieved on 2008-06-05.
  43. ^ "The Jace Hall DNF Footage Thread". Retrieved on 2008-06-05.
  44. ^ "The Jace Hall DNF Footage Thread". Retrieved on 2008-06-05.
  45. ^ "The Jace Hall DNF Footage Thread". Retrieved on 2008-06-06.
  46. ^ "JobSeeker message". Retrieved on 2008-06-20.
  47. ^ "Level Designers or Programmers". Retrieved on 2008-06-21.
  48. ^ "Help Wanted!". Retrieved on 2008-06-23.
  49. ^ a b Kahney, Leander. "Vaporware 2000: Missing Inaction". December 27, 2000. Wired News.
  50. ^ Manjoo, Farhad. "Vaporware 2001: Empty Promises". January 7, 2002. Wired News.
  51. ^ a b Kahney, Leander. "Vaporware 2002: Tech Up in Smoke?". Wired News. January 3, 2003.
  52. ^ Vaporware Team Null. "Vaporware: Nuke 'Em if Ya Got 'Em". Wired News. January 20, 2004.
  53. ^ a b Kahney, Leander. "Vaporware Phantom Haunts Us All". January 7, 2005. Wired News.
  54. ^ Kahney, Leander. "Vaporware: Better Late Than Never". Wired News. February 6, 2006.
  55. ^ Calore, Michael. "Vaporware '06: Return of the King". Wired News. December 27, 2006.
  56. ^ Calore, Michael. "Vaporware '07: Long Live the King". Wired News. December 20, 2007.
  57. ^ "Never Bet on the Duke". Top 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming History. GameSpy. June 10, 2003.
  58. ^ "Jason Hall Discusses His New Online Show". Retrieved on 2008-06-05.

is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... IGN - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... GameSpot is a video gaming website that provides news, reviews, previews, downloads, and other information. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 3D Realms is the name of a computer game publisher and developer based in Garland, Texas. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Duke Nukem is an action hero created by computer game developers Todd Replogle, George Broussard, Allen Blum and Scott Miller of 3D Realms/Apogee Software. ... Duke Nukem is a platform video game developed and published by Apogee Software (now 3D Realms), featuring the adventures of Duke Nukem. ... Duke Nukem II is an MS-DOS platform game developed by Apogee Software and released December 3, 1993. ... Duke Nukem 3D is a first-person shooter computer game developed by 3D Realms and published by Apogee Software. ... Duke Nukem 64 is a Nintendo 64 port of the first-person shooter PC (MS-DOS) video game Duke Nukem 3D. There are many changes from the PC version. ... Duke Nukem is a game for Game Boy Color. ... Duke Nukem Advance is a portable video game in the Duke Nukem series. ... There exist two completely different games by Machine Works Northwest and 3D Realms with that title, one for the Tapwave Zodiac and another for a few cellular phones. ... Grabbag is the title of the theme song from Duke Nukem 3D, a 1996 first-person shooter computer game. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Duke Nukem Forever (4570 words)
Duke Nukem Forever (DNF) is a yet-to-be-released first-person shooter video game being developed by 3D Realms, and is the next game in the popular Duke Nukem series.
Duke was interacting with several characters, most notably some spooked civilians, in a scene where Duke and they were hiding in a restaurant, while the entrance door was being smashed by the aliens from the streets (other interactions include:an interaction with a general, regarding the President of The United States being kidnapped by the aliens)
Duke Nukem 3D is a first-person shooter developed by 3D Realms and released on January 29, 1996 by Apogee Software, featuring the adventures of Duke Nukem, based on a character that had appeared in earlier platform games by the company: Duke Nukem and Duke Nukem II.
Duke Nukem Forever - MegaGames previews (312 words)
Duke Nukem 3D was released in early Jan. 1996 (shareware only, with the full game releases in May).
Duke's signature phrase, "Come get some," was exactly what game players did, propelling Duke to the number one seller status for several months in a row, and number two for 1996, behind Warcraft.
Duke Nukem Forever will be the first Duke title published by Take Two Interactive, who acquired the rights by purchasing Gathering of Developers, who had bought the rights from Infogrames who in turn had them by buying GT Interactive and so on and so forth....
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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