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Encyclopedia > Duke Blue Devils
The Duke Blue Devils
University Duke University
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
NCAA Division I-A
Athletics Director Joe Alleva
Location Durham, NC
Varsity Teams 26 varsity teams
Football Stadium Wallace Wade Stadium
Basketball Arena Cameron Indoor Stadium
Mascot Blue Devil
Nickname Stupid Rainbow lovers from the north

fightsong = 1) Fight! Blue Devils, Fight!
2) Blue & White Image File history File links Duke_logo. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Durham is a city located in Durham County, North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Wallace Wade Stadium is a stadium on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Summer 06 Cameron Indoor Stadium is a basketball arena located at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ...

Fight Song
Colors Duke Blue and White

              Alternate meanings: White (disambiguation) White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ...

Homepage www.GoDuke.com

Duke University's 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The name comes from the French "Chasseursles Diables Bleus" or "Blue Devils."[1] Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ...


Duke's varsity teams have won nine NCAA national championships. The women's golf team has won five times (1999, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007)[2], the men's basketball team has won three (1991, 1992, and 2001), and the men's soccer team has won one (1986). Duke's major historic rival, especially in basketball, has been the Tar Heels of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, (see "UNC-Duke rivalry"). The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... This refers to the athletic teams for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). The name Tar Heel is also often used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... Tipoff of UNC-Duke game The UNC-Duke rivalry, sometimes referred to as The Battle of Tobacco Road or The Battle of the Blues, is a fierce rivalry, particularly in mens college basketball, between Duke University and the University of North Carolina athletic teams. ...


In the past ten years, Duke has finished in the top 30 every year in the NACDA Director's Cup, an overall measure of an institution's athletic success. Most recently, Duke finished 11th in 2007, eighth in 2006 and fifth in 2005.[3][4][5] Duke has the smallest undergraduate enrollment of any institution that has been in the top 35 the past two years.[4][5] Furthermore, Duke is the only school besides Stanford that has finished in the top 11 in the past three years that has fewer than 15,000 undergraduates.[4][5] The National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics is a professional organization for college and university athletic directors in the United States. ... The NACDA Directors Cup is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities with the most success in collegiate athletics. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... “Stanford” redirects here. ...


Duke teams that have been ranked in the top ten nationally in the 2000s include men's and women's basketball, men's and women's tennis, men's and women's soccer, men's and women's cross country, men's and women's lacrosse, women's field hockey, and men's and women's golf. Eight of these teams were ranked either first or second in the country during 2004-05.[6] According to a 2006 evaluation conducted by the NCAA, Duke's student-athletes have the highest graduation rate of any institution in the nation at 91%.[7] Excluding students who leave or transfer in good academic standing, the graduation rate of student-athletes is 97%.[8] In 2005, 2006, and 2007, Duke ranked first among Division I schools in the National Collegiate Scouting Association Power Rankings—a combination of the institution's Director's Cup standing, its athletic graduation rate, and its academic rank in U.S. News & World Report.[9][10][11] This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... This article is about the sport. ...

Contents

History of the mascot

"Les Diables Bleus" French military unit
"Les Diables Bleus" French military unit

As World War I ended, Duke's Board of Trustees, then called the "Trinity College Board of Trustees," lifted their quarter century ban of football on campus leading to an interest in naming the athletic teams.[12] The team was then known as the Trinity Eleven, the Blue and White, or the Methodists (as opposed to the Baptists of nearby rival Wake Forest University). Because of the ambiguity, the student newspaper, the Trinity Chronicle (now called The Chronicle) launched a campaign to create a new mascot. Nominations for a new team name included Catamounts, Grizzlies, Badgers, Dreadnaughts, and Captains. The Trinity Chronicle editor narrowed the many nominations down to those that utilized the school colors of dark blue and white. The narrowed list consisted of Blue Titans, Blue Eagles, Polar Bears, Blue Devils, Royal Blazes, and Blue Warriors. None of the nominations proved to be a clear favorite, but the name Blue Devils elicited criticism that could potentially engender opposition on campus. That year, the football season passed with no official selection. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... The header of The Chronicles online edition The Chronicle is the student newspaper at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Binomial name Felis concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Felis concolor) is a type of big cat found in North, Central and South America. ... Grizzly may refer to: The Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis), a subspecies of the Brown Bear (Ursus arctos). ... Genera  Arctonyx  Melogale  Meles  Mellivora  Taxidea For other uses, see Badger (disambiguation). ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... This article is about the race of Titans in Greek mythology. ... Genera Several, see below. ... Binomial name Phipps, 1774 Polar bear range Synonyms Ursus eogroenlandicus Ursus groenlandicus Ursus jenaensis Ursus labradorensis Ursus marinus Ursus polaris Ursus spitzbergensis Ursus ungavensis Thalarctos maritimus The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a bear native to the Arctic. ... Look up Blaze, blaze in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Drawing of a Thracian peltast of 400 BC A warrior is a person habitually engaged in warfare. ...



During the 1922-1923 academic year, campus student leaders and the editors of the two other student publications, The Archive and The Chanticleer, decided that the newspaper staff should decide the name on their own because the nomination process had proved inconclusive. Editor-in-chief William H. Lander and managing editor Mike Bradshaw began referring to the athletic teams as the Blue Devils. Though the name was not officially used that year, no opposition to the name arose. The Chronicle's staff continued to use the name and eventually “Blue Devils” became the official mascot and nickname of the Duke athletics program. Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Editor in chief is a publications primary editor. ...


Men’s basketball

Duke wins over UNC 87-83 on February 9, 2006

Duke University's men's basketball team is one of the best-known in US college sports, and its rivalry with North Carolina is widely noted. The fourth-winningest college basketball program of all-time, the team has had great success over the past 25 years under coach Mike Krzyzewski (often simply called 'Coach K'), whom the basketball court is named after. Image File history File linksMetadata UNC-Duke_tipoff. ... Image File history File linksMetadata UNC-Duke_tipoff. ... Head Coach Mike Krzyzewski 27th year, 648-187 Home Stadium Cameron Indoor Stadium Capacity 9,314 Outfitter Nike Conference Affiliation Independent (1910-1928) Southern Conference (1929-1953) Atlantic Coast Conference (1954-Present) Team Records All-Time: 1799-792 (.694) NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Champions (3) 1991, 1992, 2001... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... This article is about the sport. ... Tipoff of UNC-Duke game The UNC-Duke rivalry, sometimes referred to as The Battle of Tobacco Road or The Battle of the Blues, is a fierce rivalry, particularly in mens college basketball, between Duke University and the University of North Carolina athletic teams. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Duke has won three NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championships and been in 14 Final Fours. Seventy-one players have been drafted in the NBA Draft. Additionally, Duke has had an Academic All-American on the team fourteen years. Duke has 16 Atlantic Coast Conference tournament championships (1960, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1978, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006), the most of any team in the ACC. Duke also has won the regular season 18 times (1954, 1958, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1986, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2006).[13] Duke is second, behind only UCLA, in total weeks ranked as the number one team in the nation by the AP with 110 weeks.[14] The Blue Devils have the second longest streak in the AP Top 25 in history with 200 consecutive appearances from 1996 to 2007. This streak only trails UCLA's 221 consecutive polls from 1966-1980 as the longest of all-time.[15] The streak ended with the AP poll released on February 12, 2007.[16] // Final four redirects here. ... // Final four redirects here. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


Women's basketball

During the 1990s and 2000s, the Dukes women's basketball program has become a national powerhouse. Led by coach Gail Goestenkors from 1992-2007, Duke made ten NCAA Sweet Sixteen appearances, seven Elite Eight appearances, four Final Four appearances, and two appearances in the NCAA Championship game during her tenure.[17] Gail Ann Goestenkors (born February 26, 1963 in Waterford, Michigan), is the womens basketball head coach for the University of Texas. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The NCAA Womens Division I Championship is an annual basketball tournament for women. ... The playoff term Elite Eight has been popularized to refer to the final eight teams in the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, who play in the final game of each of the tournaments four regional brackets. ... Final Four is a sports term that is commonly applied to the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament. ...


In the 2000-01 season, the Blue Devils posted a 30-4 record, won the ACC Tournament and ACC regular season championships, and earned a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. The 2001-02 season produced similar success. She led the Blue Devils to a 31-4 record and a NCAA Final Four appearance. Duke became the first ACC school to produce an undefeated 19-0 record in the ACC by winning the regular season and Tournament titles. The NCAA Womens Division I Championship is an annual basketball tournament for women. ...


Goestenkors led the Blue Devils to an ACC-record 35-2 ledger in the 2002-03 season and their second straight NCAA Final Four appearance. For the second consecutive year, Duke posted a 19-0 record against ACC opponents.


In 2003-04, with Player of the year Alana Beard leading the way, the Blue Devils advanced to the NCAA Elite Eight, boasting a 30-4 record, and won a fourth-straight Atlantic Coast Conference regular season title and a fifth-straight ACC Tournament championship. Duke also broke the University of Connecticut's 76-game home winning streak with a 68-67 buzzer-beater victory in Hartford, Connecticut. [18] Alana Beard on the Washington Mystics Alana Monique Beard (born on May 14, 1982 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is a professional basketball player for the Washington Mystics of the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ...


The 2006-07 season ended with a 32-2 record and notched the school's first ever undefeated regular season (30-0). This also set an NCAA-record seventh straight 30-win season. Goestenkors is often known as the "winningest coach not to have won a championship," having finished runner-up two times in fifteen years.


On April 18, 2007, Joanne P. McCallie, or Coach P, was introduced as the new coach of Duke's women's basketball team after Goestenkors left for the University of Texas. [19] [20] [21] To date, the Blue Devils have won 5 ACC Championships, the second most in the ACC. Joanne P. McCallie (born in Monterey, California in 1966) is the head coach of the Duke University womens basketball team. ...


Football

Wallace Wade Stadium, home to Duke football and site of the 1942 Rose Bowl.
Wallace Wade Stadium, home to Duke football and site of the 1942 Rose Bowl.

The football team has fallen on hard times over the past ten years, but there have been times in the program's history when the football team was competitive. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x975, 1095 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Wallace Wade Stadium Duke Blue Devils User:BigDT Metadata This file contains additional information... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x975, 1095 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Duke University Wallace Wade Stadium Duke Blue Devils User:BigDT Metadata This file contains additional information... Wallace Wade Stadium is a stadium on the campus of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ...


Current status

As of September 2007, the Blue Devils currently have the longest ongoing losing streak in NCAA football. [22] [23]. The Blue Devils most recent victory came two years ago against VMI, which plays in what formerly was called Division I-AA, and the Blue Devils haven't beaten a major college opponent since 2004. [24] Coach Ted Roof is 5-35 in slightly more than three years. VMI is a 3 letter acronym for: Virginia Military Institute Vendor Managed Inventory Virtual Machine Interface Video Module Interface, a video bus standard, similar to VESA Feature Connector, VIP and AMC This page disambiguates a three-character combination which might be any or all of an abbreviation, an acronym, an...


History

The most famous Duke football season came in 1938, when Wallace Wade was head coach and the "Iron Dukes" were born. Wade shocked the college football world by leaving Alabama for Duke in 1930, later rationalizing the move by saying that Duke shared his belief that a school should provide its athletes with a strong academic background. Wade's success at Alabama (three national championships) translated well to Duke's program, most notably in 1938, when his "Iron Dukes" went unscored upon the entire regular season. In fact, that Duke team is one of three in college football history to have gone undefeated, unscored upon, and untied in the regular season. Duke reached the national championship game, their first Rose Bowl appearance, where they lost 7-3 when USC scored a touchdown in the final minute of the game on a pass from a second string quarterback to a third string tight end. Wade's Blue Devils lost another Rose Bowl to Oregon State in 1942, this one held at Duke's home stadium in Durham, North Carolina due to Pearl Harbor. Wade's achievements placed him in the Hall of Fame. Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... William Wallace Wade (June 15, 1892–October 7, 1986) was an American college football coach. ... Athletic teams at The University of Alabama are known as the Crimson Tide. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... // USC athletics participates in the NCAA Division I-A Pacific Ten Conference and has won 106 total team national championships, 86 of which are NCAA National Championships. ... For a landing Touchdown in aviation, see Touchdown (aviation) For the song by T.I. featuring Eminem, see Touchdown (song). ... The Oregon State Beavers is a name shared by all sports teams at Oregon State University, which is located in Corvallis, Oregon in the United States. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ...


The football program also had a string of successful years in the late 1980s when the team was coached by Steve Spurrier. Spurrier led the Blue Devils to three consecutive winning seasons from 1987-1989, culminating with the Blue Devils sharing the ACC title in 1989 and playing in the All-American Bowl, where the Blue Devils lost to Texas Tech. The 1989 ACC Title was the last title won by a school in the state of North Carolina until Wake Forest won their second ACC Title in 2006. Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ... Texas Tech University is a nationally recognized doctoral/research university located in Lubbock, Texas, established in 1923 originally as Texas Technological College. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ...


The team also rose to prominence in 1994, the first season under coach Fred Goldsmith. The team raced out to an 8-1 record, and was briefly ranked as high as #13 in the country before losing the last two games of the season 24-23 to North Carolina State and 41-40 to arch-rival North Carolina. The 1994 team played in the program's first New Years Day Bowl game since 1962, falling to Wisconsin 34-21 in the Hall Of Fame Bowl, now know as the Outback Bowl. Fredrick Ernest Goldsmith (b. ... As an Atlantic Coast Conference founding member, North Carolina State University competes in 24 intercollegiate varsity sports. ... This refers to the athletic teams for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). The name Tar Heel is also often used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. ... The Wisconsin Badgers are a variety of collegiate athletic teams from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. ... Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. ...


The Blue Devils have won seven ACC Football Championships, which is the fourth most in the ACC trailing only Clemson, FSU, and Maryland. Ten ACC Football Players of the Year have come from Duke, the most in the ACC. Additionally, three 3 Pro Football Hall of Famers have come through Duke's program, tying the Miami Hurricanes for the most in the ACC. This page lists winners of the football championship of the Atlantic Coast Conference since its founding in 1953. ... Clemson University is a member of the NCAAs Division I and is in the Atlantic Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... The Florida State Seminoles are the mens and womens sports teams of Florida State University. ... Logo, featuring Testudo the Turtle. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... This is an article about the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. ...


Duke is consistently ranked at or near the top of the list of Division I-A schools which graduate nearly all of their football players. Duke has topped the list 12 years, earning it the most Academic Achievement Awards of any university. Notre Dame has been honored six times, while Boston College and Northwestern have won the award four times each.[25] The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Catholic[4] institution located in Notre Dame, an unincorporated section of St. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Northwestern. ...


Men's lacrosse

The men's lacrosse program has been a recent powerhouse rivaling the traditional four of Syracuse, UVA, Princeton, and Johns Hopkins.[26] The team reached the national championship game in 2005 and 2007, losing to Johns Hopkins by a single goal and accumulating season records of 17-3 both times.[27][28] Syracuse University (SU) is a private nonsectarian research university located in Syracuse, New York. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ...


Women's golf

While the men's basketball team gets the most press, the women's golf team has recently been the most successful team on campus. In the 2000-2005 seasons, Duke's head-to-head record was 796-45-3, a winning percentage of .945.[29] The team won national championships in 1999, 2002, 2005, 2006, and 2007 as well as 12 consecutive ACC championships from 1995-2007 [30]. A number of successful professional golfers have gone through Duke's program. Jenny Chuasiriporn and Brittany Lang finished as runner-ups in the U.S. Women's Open while still undergraduates in 1998 and 2006, respectively. NCAA Champions for Womens Golf Division One 1982 Tulsa 1983 TCU 1984 Miami (Fla) 1985 Florida 1986 Florida 1987 San Jose St. ... The U.S. Womens Open Golf Championship is one of the LPGAs major championships along with the LPGA Championship, the Womens British Open, and the Kraft Nabisco Championship. ...


ACC Athletes of the Year

The following Duke athletes have been honored as an ACC Athlete of the Year. The men’s award, the Anthony J. McKelvin Award, began when the ACC was formed in 1954. The women’s award, the Mary Garber Award, began in 1990. The Atlantic Coast Conference Athlete of the Year award is given to the male and female athlete who show extraordinary talent throughout the entire season. ...

General location of athletic facilities
Male Athlete of the Year
Year Athlete Sport

1954 Joel Shankle Track & Field
1956 Dave Sime Track & Field/Basketball
1960 Mike McGee Football
1963 Art Heyman Basketball
1964 Jeff Mullins Basketball
1988 Danny Ferry Basketball
1989 Danny Ferry Basketball
1990 Clarkston Hines Football
1991 Christian Laettner Basketball
1992 Christian Laettner Basketball
1999 Elton Brand Basketball
2001 Shane Battier Basketball
2006 J.J. Redick Basketball
Female Athlete of the Year
Year Athlete Sport

1998 Vanessa Webb Tennis
2003 Alana Beard Basketball
2004 Alana Beard Basketball

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x557, 148 KB) source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (896x557, 148 KB) source: http://www. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... The draft for the 1960 American Football League season was held in late 1959, shortly after the organization of the AFL. The first AFL draft, lasting 33 rounds, took place on November 22, 1959. ... Jeffrey Vincent Mullins (born March 18, 1942) is an American basketball player and coach who is best known for his playing career with the Duke Blue Devils, the Golden State Warriors of the NBA, and later as the head basketball coach at UNC Charlotte. ... Daniel John Willard Danny Ferry (born October 17, 1966 in Hyattsville, Maryland) is a former pro basketball player and current General Manager of the Cleveland Cavaliers. ... The 1990 NFL Draft // 1990 NFL Draft Category: ... Christian Donald Laettner (born August 17, 1969 in Angola, New York) is an American former professional basketball player who played 13 seasons in the NBA on six different teams. ... Elton Tyron Brand (born March 11, 1979 in Peekskill, New York) is an American All-Star professional basketball player for the National Basketball Associations Los Angeles Clippers and the USA National Team. ... Shane Courtney Battier (born September 9, 1978 in Birmingham, Michigan) is an American professional basketball player with the Houston Rockets of the National Basketball Association and the U.S. national team. ... Jonathan Clay J.J. Redick (born June 24, 1984 in Cookeville, Tennessee) is an American professional basketball player at the shooting guard position who was selected 11th overall by the Orlando Magic in the 2006 NBA Draft. ... Alana Beard on the Washington Mystics Alana Monique Beard (born on May 14, 1982 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is a professional basketball player for the Washington Mystics of the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ...

All-Americans

There have been numerous All-Americans in Duke University history. As of March 2006, 307 athletes have been honored 470 times as All-Americans.[31] In men's sports, this status has been achieved 297 times by 204 athletes. In women's sports, it has occurred 172 times by 103 athletes. The breakdown for men's sports is as follows (times, number of different athletes): baseball (13, 8); basketball (55, 31); cross country (3, 2); fencing (9, 5); football (60, 53); golf (12, 9); lacrosse (57, 37); soccer (42, 28); swimming and diving (3, 3); tennis (26, 15); track and field (17, 13). The breakdown for women's sports is as follows (times, number of different athletes): basketball (14, 8); cross country (8, 6); fencing (4, 2); field hockey (19, 12); golf (31, 16); lacrosse (23, 11); rowing (5, 3); soccer (10, 8); swimming and diving (1, 1); tennis (36, 22); track and field (15, 9); volleyball (7, 5). The term All-American has two uses: It can be used as a reference to an athlete selected as a member of an All_America team, as in Eddie George was named an All-American football player by both wire services in 1995. ...


Olympians

Duke Olympians [32]
Athlete Sport Location Country Medal/Note
Joel Shankle Track & Field 1956 Melbourne United States Bronze in 110 Hurdles
Dave Sime Track & Field 1960 Rome United States Silver in 100 Meters
Jeff Mullins M Basketball 1964 Tokyo United States Team Won Gold
Bob Wheeler Track & Field 1972 Munich United States Semifinals in 1500 run
Al Buehler* Track & Field 1972 Munich United States Team Manager
Tate Armstrong M Basketball 1976 Montreal United States Team Won Gold
Cameron Hall M Basketball 1976 Montreal Canada Team Placed 4th
Nancy Hogshead Swimming 1980 Moscow United States United States Boycotted Games
Nancy Hogshead Swimming 1984 Los Angeles United States 3 Gold Medals and 1 Silver Medal
Dan Meagher M Basketball 1984 Los Angeles Canada Team Placed 4th
Tom Kain Soccer 1984 Los Angeles United States Injured, Did Not Compete
Bert Govig Wrestling 1984 Los Angeles United States Injured, Did Not Compete
Al Buehler* Track and Field 1984 Los Angeles United States Team Manager
Al Buehler* Track and Field 1988 Seoul United States Team Manager
Christian Laettner M Basketball 1992 Barcelona United States Team Won Gold
Mike Krzyzewski* M Basketball 1992 Barcelona United States Assistant Coach, Team Won Gold
John Moore Rowing 1992 Barcelona United States 8th in Men's Pair
Randy Jones Bobsled 1994 Lillehammer United States 13th in 2-Man
Grant Hill M Basketball 1996 Atlanta United States Team Won Gold
Curt Clausen Track & Field 1996 Atlanta United States 50th in 20k Race Walk
Leslie Marx Fencing 1996 Atlanta United States Top 16 in Epee
Horace Holden Canoe/Kayak 1996 Atlanta United States 11th in 2-Man Whitewater Slalom
Will Martin Yachting 1996 Atlanta United States 23rd in Single-Handed Dinghy
Carla Overbeck* W Soccer 1996 Atlanta United States Team Won Gold
Liz Tchou* Field Hockey 1996 Atlanta United States Team Placed 5th
Randy Jones Bobsled 1998 Nagano United States 5th in 4-Man
Crawford Palmer M Basketball 2000 Sydney France Team Won Silver
Greg Newton M Basketball 2000 Sydney Canada Team Placed 7th
Curt Clausen Track and Field 2000 Sydney United States 22nd in 50k Race Walk
Evan Whitfield M Soccer 2000 Sydney United States Team Placed 4th
Vanessa Webb W Tennis 2000 Sydney Canada Competed in Doubles
Carla Overbeck W Soccer 2000 Sydney United States Team Won Silver
Lynda Blutreich* Track & Field 2000 Sydney United States 11th in Javelin Qualifying
Randy Jones Bobsled 2002 Salt Lake City United States Silver in 4-Man
Curt Clausen Track & Field 2004 Athens United States 32nd in 50k Race Walk
Carlos Boozer M Basketball 2004 Athens United States Team Won Bronze
Jilian Schwartz Track & Field 2004 Athens United States Competed in Pole Vault
Gail Goestenkors* W Basketball 2004 Athens United States Assistant Coach, Team Won Gold
Randy Jones Bobsled 2006 Torino United States His Fourth Olympics

Note: * indicates Duke coach at time of participation in Olympics Jeffrey Vincent Mullins (born March 18, 1942) is an American basketball player and coach who is best known for his playing career with the Duke Blue Devils, the Golden State Warriors of the NBA, and later as the head basketball coach at UNC Charlotte. ... Christian Donald Laettner (born August 17, 1969 in Angola, New York) is an American former professional basketball player who played 13 seasons in the NBA on six different teams. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Grant Henry Hill (born October 5, 1972)) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the NBAs Orlando Magic. ... Carla Werden Overbeck (born May 9, 1968, Pasadena, California) is an American soccer player and longtime member and captain of the United States womens national soccer team. ... Greg Newton (born September 7, 1974 in Niagara Falls, Ontario) was center for the Duke Blue Devils basketball team from 1994-1997. ... Carlos Austin Boozer, Jr. ... Gail Ann Goestenkors (born February 26, 1963 in Waterford, Michigan), is the womens basketball head coach for the University of Texas. ...


External links

Notes

  1. ^ King, William E. Why a Blue Devil?. The Duke Dialogue. 28 Feb 1992.
  2. ^ http://www.goduke.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=4200&ATCLID=900363
  3. ^ Sports Academy Directors' Cup (2007). National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. 1 July 2007.
  4. ^ a b c Sports Academy Directors' Cup (2006). National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. 29 June 2006.
  5. ^ a b c Sports Academy Directors' Cup (2005). National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. 2005.
  6. ^ Duke Athletics: Rankings. GoDuke.com. URL accessed 6 Jun 2006.
  7. ^ Duke 1st in new NCAA evaluation. The Chronicle. 10 Nov 2006.
  8. ^ Faculty discuss role of Duke student athletes. The Chronicle. 10 Nov 2006.
  9. ^ 2005 NCSA Collegiate Power Rankings. National Collegiate Scouting Association, 2005. Retrieved on August 7, 2007.
  10. ^ 2006 NCSA Collegiate Power Rankings. National Collegiate Scouting Association, 2006. Retrieved on August 7, 2007.
  11. ^ 2007 NCSA Collegiate Power Rankings. National Collegiate Scouting Association, 2007. Retrieved on August 23, 2007.
  12. ^ King, William E. Why a Blue Devil?. The Duke Dialogue. 28 Feb 1992.
  13. ^ ACC Champions. Accessed on 29 June 2006.
  14. ^ NCAA stats from NCAA.org
  15. ^ Florida runaway preseason No. 1. Associated Press. Accessed on 6 Nov 2006.
  16. ^ Duke Knocked Out Of Top 25 For First Time Since 1995-96. All Headline News. Accessed on 4 Mar 2007.
  17. ^ [1]
  18. ^ [2]
  19. ^ [3]
  20. ^ [4]
  21. ^ http://www.newsobserver.com/sports/college/duke/womens_basketball/story/570191.html
  22. ^ [5]
  23. ^ [6]
  24. ^ [7]
  25. ^ SMU Receives 2006 AFCA Academic Achievement Award. American Football Coaches Association. 2006.
  26. ^ Men's Lacrosse News. GoDuke.com. Retrieved on May 25, 2007.
  27. ^ Sports Briefs: Duke lacrosse in Final Four Post-Gazette, May 21, 2007. Retrieved on June 21, 2007.
  28. ^ Wojciechowski, Joe. Duke, Hopkins endured low points to return to championship game. ESPN. Retrieved on June 21, 2007.
  29. ^ Golf-first ranking. Golf Digest. Sept 2005.
  30. ^ http://www.theacc.com/sports/w-golf/spec-rel/041507aaa.html
  31. ^ Duke University All American's. Goduke.com. URL accessed 30 June 2006.
  32. ^ All-Time Olympians. Goduke.com URL accessed 30 Jun 2006.

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