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Encyclopedia > Duff Cooper Prize

The Duff Cooper Prize is a prize which goes to the best work of history, biography, or political science published in English or French. First awarded in 1956, the prize is worth £5,000. The prize was established in honour of Duff Cooper, a British diplomat, Cabinet member and acclaimed author. As an academic field, history is the study of past human activities and is generally considered a social science. ... // Today, films and television programs surrounding the lives of famous people are a major part of the entertainment industry. ... Political science is the field of the social sciences concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alfred Duff Cooper, 1st Viscount Norwich (February 22, 1890 - January 1, 1954), known universally as Duff Cooper, was a British diplomat, Cabinet member and acclaimed author. ...


Notable past winners:

2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mark Mazower is a notable British historian. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anne Applebaum (born 1964) is a journalist and author who has written extensively about issues related to communism and the development of civil society in Eastern Europe and the USSR / Russia. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... This article is about the year 2001. ... Margaret Olwen MacMillan OC (born 1943 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a historian and professor at the University of Toronto and is also Provost of Trinity College. ... Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World is a work of non-fiction based upon the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Professor Lord Robert Skidelsky, more properly Robert Jacob Alexander Skidelsky, Baron Skidelsky of Tilton, is a British economist, author of a major biography in three volumes of John Maynard Keynes, and a life peer. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Adam Hochschild (born 1942) is an American writer. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Richard Holmes is the name of: a jazz organist (Richard Groove Holmes) two British historians - historian and military historian a British biographer - biographer who has written on Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Samuel Johnson and Richard Savage, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and others. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Sir John Keegan (born 1934) is an English military historian. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Studley Forrest Hughes (born July 28, 1938), usually known simply as Robert Hughes, OA is an Australian art critic, writer, documentary broadcaster and republican (anti-monarchist). ... The Fatal Shore, by Robert Hughes, published 1987, is a history of Britains settlement of Australia as a penal colony. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Humphrey William Bouverie Carpenter (April 29, 1946 – January 4, 2005) was an English biographer, author and radio broadcaster. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Seamus Heaney Seamus Heaney (born 13 April 1939) is an Irish poet, writer and lecturer from County Londonderry, Northern Ireland. ... 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906–19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family in Edwardian London. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alan Moorehead (1910-1983), born in Melbourne, Australia, went to England in 1937 and became a foreign correspondent for the London Daily Express. ...

See also

A list of British literary awards: Booker Prize British Book Awards -- the Nibbies Commonwealth Writers Prize Duff Cooper Prize Hawthornden Prize Hessell-Tiltman Prize John Llewellyn Rhys Prize Orange Prize for Fiction Samuel Johnson Prize Somerset Maugham Award Whitbread Awards Alice Hunt Bartlett Prize Bridport Prize Cholmondeley Award Eric Gregory... This is a list of literary awards from around the world: // Nobel Prize in Literature Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award for childrens and youth literature. ... A list of famous prizes, medals, and awards including cups, trophies, bowls, badges, state decorations etc. ... This is a list of prizes that are named after people. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... British literature is literature from the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. ...

External links

  • The Duff Cooper Prize

  Results from FactBites:
 
Duff Cooper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (831 words)
The son of fashionable society doctor Sir Alfred Cooper, and Lady Agnes Duff (sister of the Duke of Fife), he was the youngest of four children and the only son, and enjoyed a typical gentleman's upbringing of country estates, London Society, Eton College and Oxford.
The couple's marriage was fraught with infidelities, notably Duff's affairs with the Singer sewing-machine heiress Daisy Fellowes, the French novelist Louise Leveque de Vilmorin, and Susan Mary Patten, the wife of an American diplomat.
Duff Cooper himself was the subject of a biography by John Charmley, and a major British literary award, the Duff Cooper Prize, was established in his name.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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