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Encyclopedia > Duck
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
How to read a taxobox
Ducks

A duck (female) and drake (male) Mallard
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Anseriformes
Family: Anatidae
Subfamilies

Dendrocygninae
Oxyurinae
Anatinae
Aythyinae
Merginae Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2600x1733, 786 KB) Summary Ducks in Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States. ... Binomial name Anas platyrhynchos Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies See Mexican Duck, Anas, and article text The Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos[1]), also known as the wild duck, is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and sub-tropical areas of North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Digimon, the only known animals. ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... “Aves” redirects here. ... Families Anhimidae Anseranatidae Anatidae †Cnemiornithidae †Dromornithidae †Presbyornithidae The order Anseriformes contains about 150 species of birds in three families: the Anhimidae (the screamers), Anseranatidae (the Magpie-goose), and the Anatidae, which includes over 140 species of waterfowl, among them the ducks, geese, and swans. ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Thalassorninae Anserinae Stictonettinae Plectropterinae Tadorninae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Oxyurinae and see text Anatidae is the biological family that includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl, such as geese and swan. ... Genera Dendrocygna Thalassornis Dendrocygninae is a subfamily of the duck, goose and swan family of birds, Anatidae. ... The Anatinae is one of the subfamilies of the family Anatidae, which includes the swans, geese and ducks. ... Genera see article text The 15 or so living species of diving duck, commonly called pochards or scaups, are part of the diverse and very large duck, goose, and swan family, Anatidae. ... Genera Polysticta Somateria Histrionicus Camptorhynchus Melanitta Clangula Bucephala Mergellus Lophodytes Mergus † For other ducks, see also: Anatidae The seaducks, Merginae, form a subfamily of the duck, goose and swan family of birds, Anatidae. ...

Duck is the common name for a number of species in the Anatidae family of birds. The ducks are divided between several subfamilies listed in full in the Anatidae article. Ducks are mostly aquatic birds, mostly smaller than their relatives the swans and geese, and may be found in both fresh water and sea water. Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Thalassorninae Anserinae Stictonettinae Plectropterinae Tadorninae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Oxyurinae and see text Anatidae is the biological family that includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl, such as geese and swan. ... “Aves” redirects here. ... Subfamilies Dendrocygninae Thalassorninae Anserinae Stictonettinae Plectropterinae Tadorninae Anatinae Aythyinae Merginae Oxyurinae and see text Anatidae is the biological family that includes the ducks and most duck-like waterfowl, such as geese and swan. ... Species 6-7 living, see text. ... Look up goose in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the village on the Isle of Wight, see Freshwater, Isle of Wight. ... Sea water is water from a sea or ocean. ...


Most ducks have a wide flat beak adapted for dredging. They exploit a variety of food sources such as grasses, aquatic plants, fish, insects, small amphibians[1], worms, and small molluscs. Diving ducks and sea ducks forage deep underwater; Dabbling ducks feed on the surface of water or on land. Dabbling ducks have in their beaks special plates called lamellae[1] similar to a whale's baleen. These tiny rows of plates along the inside of the beak let them filter water out of the side of their beaks and keep food inside. To be able to submerge more easily, the diving ducks are heavier than dabbling ducks, and therefore have more difficulty taking off to fly. A few specialized species such as the Smew, Goosander, and the mergansers are adapted to catch large fish. The beak—otherwise known as the bill or rostrum—is an external anatomical structure which serves as the mouth in some animals. ... Dredging is the process by which either new waterways are created or existing waterways are deepened. ... Subfamilies There are 7 subfamilies: Subfamily Arundinoideae Subfamily Bambusoideae Subfamily Centothecoideae Subfamily Chloridoideae Subfamily Panicoideae Subfamily Pooideae Subfamily Stipoideae The true grasses are monocotyledonous plants (Class Liliopsida) in the Family Poaceae, also known as Gramineae. ... Aquatic plants — also called hydrophytic plants or hydrophytes — are plants that have adapted to living in or on aquatic environments. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are typically cold-blooded; covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... Orders See taxonomy Insects (Class Insecta) are a major group of arthropods and the most diverse group of animals on the Earth, with over a million described species—more than all other animal groups combined. ... Subclasses and Orders    Order Temnospondyli - extinct Subclass Lepospondyli - extinct Subclass Lissamphibia    Order Anura    Order Caudata    Order Gymnophiona Amphibians (class Amphibia; from Greek αμφις both and βιος life) are a taxon of animals that include all living tetrapods (four-legged vertebrates) that do not have amniotic eggs, are ectotherms, and generally spend part... Earthworm A worm is an elongated soft-bodied invertebrate animal. ... Classes Caudofoveata Aplacophora Polyplacophora - Chitons Monoplacophora Bivalvia - Bivalves Scaphopoda - Tusk shells Gastropoda - Snails and Slugs Cephalopoda - Squids, Octopuses, etc. ... Genera Marmaronetta Netta (including Rhodonessa) Aythya † See also dabbling duck The 16 species of diving duck, also known as pochards, make up a sub-group of the biological subfamily Anatinae, which itself is part of the diverse and very large duck, goose and swan family, Anatidae. ... Genera Polysticta Somateria Histrionicus Camptorhynchus Melanitta Clangula Bucephala Mergellus Lophodytes Mergus † For other ducks, see also: Anatidae The seaducks, Merginae, form a subfamily of the duck, goose and swan family of birds, Anatidae. ... Genera Pteronetta Cairina Aix Nettapus Anas Callonetta Chenonetta Amazonetta See also Diving duck The dabbling ducks are a group of eight genera and about 55 species of ducks, including some of the most familiar Northern Hemisphere species. ... Genera Pteronetta Cairina Aix Nettapus Anas Callonetta Chenonetta Amazonetta See also Diving duck The dabbling ducks are a group of eight genera and about 55 species of ducks, including some of the most familiar Northern Hemisphere species. ... Lamellae is a term for several very different biological and material structures. ... Baleen hair is attached to the baleen plate Baleen (also called whalebone) is a substance made of keratin and is therefore stiff but somewhat elastic. ... Binomial name Mergellus albellus (Linnaeus, 1758) The Smew (Mergellus albellus) is a small duck which is intermediate between the mergansers and the goldeneyes, and has interbred with the Common Goldeneye. ... Binomial name Mergus merganser Linnaeus, 1758 Common Merganser range The Common Merganser, (Goosander in Europe), Mergus merganser, is a large sized duck, which is distributed over Europe, North Asia and North America. ... † For other related ducks, see also: Merginae Mergus is a genus of ducks in the seaduck subfamily Merginae. ...


The males (drakes) of northern species often have extravagant plumage, but that is moulted in summer to give a more female-like appearance, the "eclipse" plumage. Southern resident species typically show less sexual dimorphism. Many species of ducks are temporarily flightless while moulting; they seek out protected habitat with good food supplies during this period. This moult typically precedes migration. Closeup on a single white feather A feather is one of the epidermal growths that forms the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on a bird. ... In animals, moulting (Commonwealth English) or molting (American English) is the routine shedding off old feathers in birds, or of old skin in reptiles, or of old hairs in mammals (see also coat (dog)). In arthropods, such as insects, arachnids and crustaceans, moulting describes the shedding of its exoskeleton (which... Female (left) and male Common Pheasant, illustrating the dramatic difference in both color and size between the sexes Sexual dimorphism is the systematic difference in form between individuals of different sex in the same species. ... In animals, moulting (Commonwealth English) or molting (American English) is the routine shedding off old feathers in birds, or of old skin in reptiles, or of old hairs in mammals (see also coat (dog)). In arthropods, such as insects, arachnids and crustaceans, moulting describes the shedding of its exoskeleton (which... Flock of Barnacle Geese during autumn migration Many species of birds undertake seasonal journeys of various lengths, a phenomenon known as Bird migration. ...


Some duck species, mainly those breeding in the temperate and arctic Northern Hemisphere, are migratory, but others, particularly in the tropics, are not. Some ducks, particularly in Australia where rainfall is patchy and erratic, are nomadic, seeking out the temporary lakes and pools that form after localised heavy rain. The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 88-90% of the human population. ...


Some people use "duck" specifically for adult females and "drake" for adult males, for the species described here; others use "hen" and "drake", respectively.


Ducks are sometimes confused with several types of unrelated water birds with similar forms, such as loons or divers, grebes, gallinules, and coots. Falcated Duck at Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands centre, Gloucestershire, England Wildfowl or waterfowl, also waterbirds, is the collective term for the approximately 147 species of swans, geese and ducks, classified in the order Anseriformes, family Anatidae. ... Global distribution of Gaviidae (breeding and winter ranges combined) Species Gavia stellata Gavia arctica Gavia pacifica Gavia immer Gavia adamsii The Loons (N.Am. ... Genera Podiceps Tachybaptus Podilymbus Aechmophorus Poliocephalus Rollandia Grebes are members of the Podicipediformes order, a widely distributed order of freshwater diving birds, some of which visit the sea when migrating and in winter. ... Gallinule is a common name that refers to some birds of the rail family Rallidae. ... Species Fulica cristata Fulica atra Fulica alai Fulica americana Fulica caribaea Fulica leucoptera Fulica ardesiaca Fulica armillata Fulica rufifrons Fulica gigantea Fulica cornuta Fulica newtoni Fulica chathamensis The coots are medium-sized water birds which are members of the rail family. ...

Contents

Predators

A worldwide group like the ducks has many predators. Ducklings are particularly vulnerable, since their inability to fly makes them easy prey not only for avian hunters but also large fish like pike, crocodilians, and other aquatic hunters, including fish-eating birds such as herons. Nests may also be raided by land-based predators, and brooding females may sometimes be caught unaware on the nest by mammals (e.g. foxes) and large birds, including hawks and eagles). Species  E. americanus–       grass and redfin pickerels  E. lucius– northern pike  E. masquinongy– muskellunge  E. niger– chain pickerel  E. reichertii– Amur pike Esox Linnaeus, 1758, is a genus of freshwater fish, the only member of the pike family (family Esocidae) of order Esociformes. ... Families Gavialidae Alligatoridae Crocodylidae Crocodilia is an order of large reptiles that appeared about 84 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous Period (Campanian stage). ... Genera See text. ... Subclasses Allotheria* Order Multituberculata (extinct) Order Volaticotheria (extinct) Order Palaeoryctoides (extinct) Order Triconodonta (extinct) Prototheria Order Monotremata Theria Infraclass Marsupialia Infraclass Eutheria The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in females for the nourishment of young, from mammary glands present on most species... This article is about the animal. ... Hawks redirects here. ... Genera Several, see below. ...


Adult ducks are fast fliers, but may be caught on the water by large aquatic predators. This can occasionally include fish such as the muskie in North America or the pike in Europe. In flight, ducks are safe from all but a few predators such as humans and the Peregrine Falcon, which regularly uses its speed and strength to catch ducks. Muskie may refer to: Ed Muskie, an American Politician, or Muskellunge, a freshwater fish native to North America that can be caught with large lures like the Grunt from www. ... Species  E. americanus–       grass and redfin pickerels  E. lucius– northern pike  E. masquinongy– muskellunge  E. niger– chain pickerel  E. reichertii– Amur pike Esox Linnaeus, 1758, is a genus of freshwater fish, the only member of the pike family (family Esocidae) of order Esociformes. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Human beings are defined variously in biological, spiritual, and cultural terms, or in combinations thereof. ... Binomial name Falco peregrinus Tunstall, 1771 The Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus), sometimes formerly known in North America as Duck Hawk, is a medium-sized falcon about the size of a large crow: 380-530 millimetres (15-21 in) long. ...


Etymology

The word duck (from Anglo-Saxon dūce), meaning the bird, came from the verb "to duck" (from Anglo-Saxon supposed *dūcan) meaning "to bend down low as if to get under something" or "to dive", because of the way many species in the dabbling duck group feed by upending (compare the Dutch word duiken = "to dive"). Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... Genera Pteronetta Cairina Aix Nettapus Anas Callonetta Chenonetta Amazonetta See also Diving duck The dabbling ducks are a group of eight genera and about 55 species of ducks, including some of the most familiar Northern Hemisphere species. ...


This happened because the older Old English word for "duck" came to be pronounced the same as the word for "end": other Germanic languages still have similar words for "duck" and "end": for example, Dutch eend = "duck", eind = "end", German ente = "duck", ende = "end"; this similarity goes back to Indo-European: compare Latin anas (stem anat-) = "duck", Lithuanian antis = "duck", Ancient Greek νησσα, νηττα (nessa, netta) = "duck"; Sanskrit anta = "end". Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century. ... The Indo-European languages comprise a family of several hundred related languages and dialects [1], including most of the major languages of Europe, as well as many spoken in the Indian subcontinent (South Asia), the Iranian plateau (Southwest Asia), and Central Asia. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The Greek language (Greek Ελληνικά, IPA // – Hellenic) is an Indo-European language with a documented history of some 3,000 years. ... The Sanskrit language ( , for short ) is an old Indo-Aryan language from the Indian Subcontinent, the classical literary language of the Hindus of India[1], a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ...


Hunting, domestication, and urbanization

In many areas, wild ducks of various species (including ducks farmed and released into the wild) are hunted for food or sport, by shooting, or formerly by decoys. From this came the expression "a sitting duck", which means "an easy target". To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A decoy is usually a person, device or event meant as a distraction to conceal what an individual or a group might be looking for. ...


Ducks have many economic uses, being farmed for their meat, eggs, feathers and down feathers. They are also kept and bred by aviculturists and often displayed in zoos. All domestic ducks are descended from the wild Mallard Anas platyrhynchos, except Muscovy Ducks[2]. Many domestic breeds have become much larger than their wild ancestor, with a "hull length" (from base of neck to base of tail) of 30 cm (12 inches) or more and routinely able to swallow an adult British Common Frog, Rana temporaria, whole. For other uses, see Farm (disambiguation). ... See also duck (disambiguation) Duck refers to the meat of several species of bird in the Anatidae family, found in both fresh and salt water. ... An egg is an ovum produced by a female animal for reproduction, often prepared as food. ... Two feathers Feathers are one of the epidermal growths that form the distinctive outer covering, or plumage, on birds. ... The down of birds is a layer of fine feathers found under the tougher exterior feathers. ... Domesticated ducks The domesticated ducks are kept for meat, eggs and down. ... Binomial name Anas platyrhynchos Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies See Mexican Duck, Anas, and article text The Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos[1]), also known as the wild duck, is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and sub-tropical areas of North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. ... Binomial name Rana temporaria Linnaeus, 1758 The Common Frog, Rana temporaria also known as the European Common Frog or European Common Brown Frog is found throughout much of Europe as far east as the Urals, except for most of Iberia, southern Italy, and the southern Balkans. ...


Foie gras is often made using the liver of domestic ducks, rather than of geese. Pâté de foie gras (right) with pickled pear. ... The liver is an organ in some animals, including vertebrates (and therefore humans). ... Other uses: Goose (disambiguation) Genera Anser Branta Chen Cereopsis † see also: Swan, Duck Anatidae Goose (plural geese) is the general English name for a considerable number of birds, belonging to the family Anatidae. ...


In a wildlife pond, the bottom over most of the area should be too deep for dabbling wild ducks to reach the bottom, to protect bottom-living life from being constantly disturbed and eaten by wild ducks dredging, and domestic ducks should not be allowed in.[citation needed] Domesticated ducks // Domesticated ducks are kept for meat, eggs and down. ...


Despite widespread misconceptions, most ducks other than female Mallards and domestic ducks do not "quack". Binomial name Anas platyrhynchos Linnaeus, 1758 Subspecies See Mexican Duck, Anas, and article text The Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos[1]), also known as the wild duck, is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and sub-tropical areas of North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. ... Domesticated ducks // Domesticated ducks are kept for meat, eggs and down. ...


A common false urban legend says that quacks do not echo.[3] An urban legend or urban myth is a kind of modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ...


Ducks have become an accepted presence in populated areas. Migration patterns have changed such that many species remain in an area during the winter months. Spring and early summer months find ducks influencing human activity through their nesting. It is not uncommon for a duck pair to nest well away from water needing a long trek to water for the hatchlings: this sometimes causes an urgent wildlife rescue operation (e.g. by the RSPCA) if the duck nested somewhere unsuitable like in a small enclosed courtyard. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) is a charity in England and Wales that promotes animal welfare. ... A court or courtyard is an enclosed area, often a space enclosed by a building that is open to the sky. ...


Humor

In 2002, psychologist Richard Wiseman and colleagues at the University of Hertfordshire (UK) finished a year-long LaughLab experiment, concluding that, of the animals in the world, the duck is the type that attracts most humor and silliness; he said "If you're going to tell a joke involving an animal, make it a duck." The word "duck" may have become an inherently funny word in many languages because ducks are seen as a silly animal, and their odd appearance compared to other birds. Of the many ducks in fiction, many are silly cartoon characters (see the New Scientist article [2] mentioning humor in the word "duck"). For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... A psychologist is a scientist and/or clinician who studies psychology, the systematic investigation of the human mind, including behavior and cognition. ... Uhm!? ... Collegiality is the relationship between colleagues. ... The University of Hertfordshire is a modern university based largely in Hatfield, in the county of Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, from which the university takes its name. ... This article describes research on the relative humour in many different jokes. ... In the scientific method, an experiment (Latin: ex-+-periri, of (or from) trying), is a set of actions of going to the bathroom. ... Look up humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A joke is a short story or series of words spoken or communicated with the intent of being laughed at or found humorous by either listener/reader or performer/writer. ... The belief that certain words are inherently funny, for reasons ranging from onomatopoeia to sexual innuendo, is widespread among people who work in humor. ... . ... A cartoon is any of several forms of illustrations with varied meanings that evolved from its original meaning. ... New Scientist is a weekly international science magazine covering recent developments in science and technology for a general English-speaking audience. ...


In Mexico the word "Patito" (= "duckling") is used to refer to something unimportant.


"Quacks like a duck"

See also: Duck test

The expression "quacks like a duck" is sometimes a short form for "It looks like a duck, it quacks like a duck, it swims like a duck, so it's a duck.", used as proverbial to counter abstruse arguments that something is not what it appears to be. The duck test is a specific form of inductive reasoning whereby one can infer the nature of an unknown based upon its outwardly visible traits. ... For the music piece by Steve Reich see Proverb (Reich) Look up proverb in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The expression is part of a conceptual framework for testing (see Duck test) of some computer systems. In a sense, this usage results from a need for 'behavioral' analysis of an entity (virtual or otherwise) in an attempt to know what it is or whether it is what is 'claimed' of it (by itself or another - not unlike, by the way, the current 'wiki' problem of identifying Sock puppets). One can even argue several philosophical points (see Operational definition). But, it's really in 'computing' where entities emerge (evolve) that are not 'covered' by theory or some known 'meta' view where this idea has taken hold, especially in forms related to advanced techniques. The duck test is a specific form of inductive reasoning whereby one can infer the nature of an unknown based upon its outwardly visible traits. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... An operational definition of a quantity is the description of a specific process, or set of validation tests, accessible to more persons than the definer (i. ... The word theory has a number of distinct meanings in different fields of knowledge, depending on their methodologies and the context of discussion. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Trivia

  • Some ancient Egyptian art depicts some ships of the Sea Peoples with ornamental prows shaped like a duck's head.[4]
  • In 2007, a duck in Tallahassee, Florida survived a gunshot wound and two days stored in a refrigerator whilst presumed dead. [3] The duck was operated on and was again presumed dead after a bad reaction to anesthesia. After further procedure the duck lived. [4]
  • A rare genetic mutation sees some ducks born with four legs (ie six limbs): this is a type of polymelia. [5]

The Sea Peoples is the term used for a mysterious confederacy of seafaring raiders who around 1200 BC sailed into the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, caused political unrest, and attempted to enter Egyptian territory during the late 19th dynasty, and especially during Year 8 of Ramesses III of the... Prow, the fore part of a ship, the stem and its surrounding parts, hence used like keel, by metonymy, of the ship itself. ... Location in Leon County and the state of Florida. ... Polymelia is the birth defect of having five or more limbs. ...

Gallery

See also

Look up duck in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... It has been suggested that French Wiktionary be merged into this article or section. ... A typical Duck crossing A duck crossing is either a designated place for ducks to cross a road or an informal route based on the creatures instincts. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... External links Ducks Unlimited Ducks Unlimited Canada Ducks Unlimited is an international non profit organisation dedicated to the conservation of wetlands and associated upland habitats for waterfowl, other wildlife and people. ... Domesticated ducks The domesticated ducks are kept for meat, eggs and down. ... A duck pond is a pond for ducks and other water birds. ... . ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

References

  1. ^ Ogden, Evans. Dabbling Ducks. CWE. Retrieved on November 2, 2006.
  2. ^ Mallard - Nature Notes. Ducks Unlimited Canada. Retrieved on November 2, 2006.
  3. ^ Amos, Jonathan. Sound science is quackers. BBC News. Retrieved on November 2, 2006.
  4. ^ Cornelius. The Battle of the Nile. The South African Military History Society. Retrieved on November 2, 2006.

November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Ducks (494 words)
Ducks lay an egg every day or two until they have a full clutch (usually 8 to 15); only then will the mother start to sit on them.
First is that, by about 10 weeks of age, the voice of the female is a loud quack, while that of the male is soft and whispery.
Although domestic ducks (except for Muscovies) are all descended from Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), most of them have been bred so that their bodies are too heavy and wings too small to support flying.
Chameleon duck - Encyclopedia Dramatica (663 words)
canards is example of the chameleon duck, an aquatic bird of the family Anatidae, genus Anas.
The chameleon duck is relatively sedentary and does not migrate with the mallards.
Despite the objectionable habits of "winter habitat" chameleon ducks, it is the northern "summer habitat" chameleon ducks that are cause for greater concern.
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