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Encyclopedia > Dublin core

Dublin Core is a scheme of metadata that describes content and context of a digital work such as video, sound, image, text and composite media like web pages. An implementation of Dublin Core is currently XML and Resource Description Framework based. Where the XML namespaces that are in use is Resource Description Framework and that of Dublin Core. Metadata (Greek: meta- + Latin: data information), literally data about data, are information about another set of data. ... The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a W3C-recommended general-purpose markup language for creating special-purpose markup languages, capable of describing many different kinds of data. ... Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of specifications for a metadata model that is often implemented as an application of XML. The RDF family of specifications is maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). ... Many modern computer languages provide support for namespaces. ... Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a family of specifications for a metadata model that is often implemented as an application of XML. The RDF family of specifications is maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). ...


The Dublin Core is one standard for a set of descriptors (such as the title, publisher, subjects, etc.) that are used to catalog a wide range of networked resources, such as digitized text documents, photographs and audiovisual media. This information about the item, or metadata, is embedded within the electronic item itself, and enables the documents/objects to be found using controlled vocabulary and keyword searching. The card catalog at Yale Universitys Sterling Memorial Library goes almost completely unused, but adds to the austere atmosphere. ... Metadata (Greek: meta- + Latin: data information), literally data about data, are information about another set of data. ... A controlled vocabulary is a carefully selected list of words and phrases, which are used to tag units of information so that they may be more easily retrieved by a search. ... In computer science, a keyword is an identifier which indicates a specific command. ...


The term "Dublin Core" has no connection with Dublin, Ireland; rather, it is a basic but expandable "core" list of descriptors that were developed at OCLC, a library consortium which is based in Dublin, Ohio. The semantics of Dublin Core were established and are continually refined by an international, cross-disciplinary group of professionals from librarianship, computer science, text encoding, the museum community, and other related fields of scholarship and practice. The OCLC, or Online Computer Library Center, was founded in 1967, and originally named the Ohio Computer Library Center. ... Motto: Where yesterday meets tomorrow Nickname: Location in Ohio Founded 1810 Incorporated 1881 County Franklin, Delaware, and Union counties Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Marilee Chinnici-Zuercher Area  - Total  - Water 54. ...


The Dublin Core standard includes two levels: Simple and Qualified. Simple Dublin Core comprises fifteen elements; Qualified Dublin Core includes three additional elements (Audience, Provenance and RightsHolder), as well as a group of element refinements (also called qualifiers) that refine the semantics of the elements in ways that may be useful in resource discovery.

Contents


Simple Dublin Core

The Simple Dublin Core Metadata Element Set (DCMES) consists of 15 metadata elements:

  1. Title
  2. Creator
  3. Subject
  4. Description
  5. Publisher
  6. Contributor
  7. Date
  8. Type
  9. Format
  10. Identifier
  11. Source
  12. Language
  13. Relation
  14. Coverage
  15. Rights

Each Dublin Core element is optional and may be repeated. The Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI) has established standard ways to refine elements and encourage the use of encoding and vocabulary schemes. There is no prescribed order in Dublin Core for presenting or using the elements.


Full information on element definitions and term relationships can be found in the Dublin Core Metadata Registry (see References). The Dublin Core is a metadata standard for describing digital objects (including webpages) to enhance visibility, accessibility and interoperability, often encoded in XML. It was named so because the first meeting of metadata and web specialists who saw its birth was held in the town of Dublin, Ohio in the...


Qualified Dublin Core

Subsequent to the specification of the original 15 elements, an ongoing process to develop exemplary terms extending or refining the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set (DCMES) was begun. The additional terms were identified, generally in working groups of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, and judged by the DCMI Usage Board to be in conformance with principles of good practice for the qualification of Dublin Core metadata elements.


Element refinements make the meaning of an element narrower or more specific. A refined element shares the meaning of the unqualified element, but with a more restricted scope. The guiding principle for the qualification of Dublin Core elements, colloquially known as the "Dumb-Down Principle," states that an application that does not understand a specific element refinement term should be able to ignore the qualifier and treat the metadata value as if it were an unqualified (broader) element. While this may result in some loss of specificity, the remaining element value (without the qualifier) should continue to be generally correct and useful for discovery.


In addition to element refinements, Qualified Dublin Core includes a set of recommended encoding schemes, designed to aid in the interpretation of an element value. These schemes include controlled vocabularies and formal notations or parsing rules. A value expressed using an encoding scheme will thus be a token selected from a controlled vocabulary (e.g., a term from a classification system or set of subject headings) or a string formatted in accordance with a formal notation (e.g., "2000-12-31" as the standard expression of a date). If an encoding scheme is not understood by an application, the value may still be useful to a human reader.


DCMI also maintains a small, general vocabulary recommended for use within the element Type. This vocabulary, consisting of 12 terms, can be found on the DCMI webpage or the Dublin Core Metadata Registry (see References). The Dublin Core is a metadata standard for describing digital objects (including webpages) to enhance visibility, accessibility and interoperability, often encoded in XML. It was named so because the first meeting of metadata and web specialists who saw its birth was held in the town of Dublin, Ohio in the...


Dublin Core Syntaxes

Syntax choices for DC metadata depend on a number of variables, and "one size fits all" prescriptions rarely apply. When considering an appropriate syntax, it is important to note that Dublin Core concepts and semantics are designed to be syntax independent, are equally applicable in a variety of contexts, as long as the metadata is in a form suitable for interpretation both by machines and by human beings.


The Dublin Core Abstract Model (see References) provides a reference model against which particular DC encoding guidelines can be compared, independent of any particular encoding syntax. Such a reference model allows implementors to gain a better understanding of the kinds of descriptions they are trying to encode and facilitates the development of better mappings and translations between different syntaxes. The Dublin Core is a metadata standard for describing digital objects (including webpages) to enhance visibility, accessibility and interoperability, often encoded in XML. It was named so because the first meeting of metadata and web specialists who saw its birth was held in the town of Dublin, Ohio in the...


Application Examples

One Document Type Definition based on Dublin Core is the Open Source Metadata Framework (OMF) specification. OMF is in turn used by ScrollKeeper, which is used by the GNOME desktop and KDE help browsers and the ScrollServer documentation server. PBCore is also based on Dublin Core. The Zope CMF's Metadata products, used by the Plone and the Nuxeo CPS Content management systems, also implement Dublin Core. die ... ScrollKeeper is a document cataloging system. ... A gnome hiding behind a toadstool. ... KDE (K Desktop Environment) is a free desktop environment and development platform built with Trolltechs Qt toolkit. ... The PBCore (Public Broadcasting Metadata Dictionary) was created by the public broadcasting community in the United States of America for use by public broadcasters and related communities. ... Zope management interface in a web browser window. ... The Zope Content Management Framework (CMF) is a series of tools for Zope that forms a framework providing many of the key services a content management system would need. ... Plone can mean: Plone (CMS), a free software content management system based on Zope and its content management framework Plone (band), an electronica band formed in Birmingham, England in 1996, after which the CMS is named This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the... Nuxeo Collaborative Portal Server (CPS) is a free and open-source content management system written in the Python programming language. ... A content management system (CMS) is a computer software system for organizing and facilitating collaborative creation of documents and other content. ...


DCMI also maintains a list of projects using Dublin Core on its website.


See also

A controlled vocabulary is a carefully selected list of words and phrases, which are used to tag units of information so that they may be more easily retrieved by a search. ... Interoperability is the ability of products, systems, or business processes to work together to accomplish a common task. ... The Open Archives Initiative (OAI) is an attempt to build a low-barrier interoperability framework for digital archives (aka institutional repositories) containing digital content (aka digital libraries). It allows people (Service Providers) to harvest metadata (from Data Providers). ... The Semantic Web is a project that intends to create a universal medium for information exchange by putting documents with computer-processable meaning (semantics) on the World Wide Web. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dublin Core/MARC/GILS Crosswalk (1372 words)
The following is a crosswalk between the fifteen elements in the Dublin Core Element Set and MARC 21 bibliographic data elements.
In the Dublin Core to MARC mapping, two mappings are provided, one for unqualified Dublin Core elements and the other for qualified.
Qualifiers used are generally based on the qualifiers approved by the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative and documented in Dublin Core Qualifiers There are some qualifiers given (for Contributor, Creator, and Publisher) that have not been approved by the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative; as these are further standardized, this crosswalk will be adjusted.
Dublin Core - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (941 words)
Dublin Core is a scheme of metadata that describes content and context of a digital work such as video, sound, image, text and composite media like web pages.
The Dublin Core is one standard for a set of descriptors (such as the title, publisher, subjects, etc.) that are used to catalog a wide range of networked resources, such as digitized text documents, photographs and audiovisual media.
The semantics of Dublin Core were established and are continually refined by an international, cross-disciplinary group of professionals from librarianship, computer science, text encoding, the museum community, and other related fields of scholarship and practice.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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