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Encyclopedia > Dublin Airport
Dublin Airport
Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

IATA: DUB – ICAO: EIDW
Summary
Airport type Public/commercial
Operator Dublin Airport Authority
Serves Dublin
Elevation AMSL 242 ft / 73.76 m
Coordinates 53°25′54″N 6°15′20″W / 53.43167, -6.25556
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
10/28 8,650 2,637 Concrete
11/29 4,023 1,200 Asphalt
16/34 6,800 2,073 Asphalt
Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport

Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. Located in Collinstown, in the Fingal part of County Dublin, it is by far the busiest airport in Ireland and is ranked as 14th busiest in Europe by passenger numbers for 2006, when more than 21.1 million passengers travelled through the airport. To put this into context, the population of Greater Dublin is approx. 1.6 million, that of the Republic of Ireland just over 4 million, and the island of Ireland just under 6 million. In 2006, the airport was the 17th busiest international airport in the world, up from 20th in 2005. Two major milestones occurred at Dublin Airport in 2006. Passenger numbers in June passed the two million mark for the first time in a single month (this was repeated in July, August, and September). On 8 December the airport welcomed its 20 millionth passenger of the year. Passenger traffic at Dublin Airport is predominantly international; only 810,000 of its 21.1 million passengers in 2006 were domestic. 23.2 million passengers are expected to use the airport during 2007. An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... The term above mean sea level (AMSL) refers to the elevation (on the ground) or altitude (in the air) of any object, relative to the average sea level. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... This article is about the construction material. ... The term asphalt is often used as an abbreviation for asphalt concrete. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... An IATA airport code, also known an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier [1], is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Swords Code: D (FL proposed) Area: 448. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dublin Code: D Area: 921 km² Population (2006) 1,186,821 County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath), or more correctly today the Dublin Region[1] (Réigiúin Átha Cliath), is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following is a list of the worlds busiest airports by international passenger traffic. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The airport is located approximately 10 kilometres north of Dublin City in a once rural area near Swords, and is served by buses and taxis. An underground railway line called 'Metro North' which will connect the airport to Swords and Dublin city centre has been approved and is in development (see below). For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... swords redirects here. ...


The airport is the headquarters of Ireland's flag carrier Aer Lingus, and Europe's largest no-frills airline Ryanair. Ireland's third airline, CityJet, is based in the nearby town of Swords. Irish domestic and regional airline, Aer Arann, provides several domestic and UK routes from Dublin, but while part of its administration is based at Dublin Airport, its base is Galway Airport in the west of Ireland. Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ... Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... CityJet is an airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ... Aer Arann is a regional airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ... Galway Airport (IATA: GWY, ICAO: EICM), or Aerphort na Gaillimhe in Irish, is located at Carnmore about 6. ...


The airport has an extensive short and medium haul network, served by an array of carriers. Domestic services are offered to most regional Irish airports. The Dublin-London route is the second most popular in the world (After Hong Kong-Taipei). There are approx. 50 daily departures from Dublin to all five London Airports (Stansted, Luton, Gatwick, Heathrow and London-City). There is also a reasonably sized Long-Haul network. Aer Lingus serves many popular US Destinations, and has been able to add more thanks to the new Open Skies deal. US Legacy Carriers also serve the airport from major US Hubs. Two years ago, Aer Lingus launched a direct route to Dubai, however it has been recently announced that this service will be suspended from March. Etihad Airways recently inaugurated a new service between Dublin and Abu Dhabi. It has proved popular, and will operate 6 times per week. Coordinates: , Emirate Government  - Emir Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Area [1]  - Metro 4,114 km² (1,588. ... Etihad Airways (Arabic: الإتحاد, ʼal-Ê»itiħād) is the flag carrier of the United Arab Emirates. ... Abu Dhabi or Abu Zaby (Arabic language: أبوظبي) is the largest of the seven emirates that comprise the United Arab Emirates and was also the largest of the former Trucial States. ...


U.S. border preclearance services are available at the airport for US Bound Passengers. Dublin and Shannon are the only two European airports with this service. It allows passengers to have their paperwork dealt with before departure saving time upon arrival in the US. However, due to congestion there are numerous flights that do not use this facility. It is planned to have Customs and Dept. of Agriculture checks implemented into the new terminal, meaning flights will not have to land in International Terminals as all checks will have been completed. The United States maintains border preclearance facilities at a number of ports and airports in foreign countries. ...

Contents

History

In 1936 the Irish Government established a new civil airline, Aer Lingus, which began operating from the military aerodrome at Baldonnel to the south of Dublin. However, the decision was made that a civil airport should replace Baldonnel as the city's airport. Collinstown, to the north of Dublin, was selected as the location for the new civil aerodrome. Construction of the new airport began in 1937. By the end of 1939 a grass runway, internal roads, car parks and electrical power and lighting were set up. The inaugural flight from Dublin took place on January 19, 1940 to Liverpool. In 1940 work began on a new airport terminal building. The terminal building design was penned by the architect Desmond Fitzgerald, brother of politician Garret Fitzgerald.[1] It opened in 1941 and was modelled on the bridge of a luxury liner. It was also awarded the Triennial Gold Medal of the Royal Hibernian Institute of Architects and is today a listed building. Services were severely curtailed at Dublin Airport due to World War II; however, afterwards three new concrete runways were built and completed by 1947. The Government (Irish: ) [ral̪ˠt̪ˠəs̪ˠ n̪ˠə heːɼən̪ˠ] is the cabinet that exercises executive authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Garret FitzGerald (Irish: ; born February 9, 1926) was the seventh Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland, serving two terms in office; July 1981 to February 1982, and December 1982 to March 1987. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Throughout the 1950s Dublin Airport expanded with virtually uninterrupted traffic growth. Runway extensions and terminal enhancements were carried out to deal with the influx of traffic and passengers. New airlines began serving the airport also. These included British European Airways, Sabena and BKS. In 1958 a new transatlantic service was started by Aer Lingus via Shannon Airport. During the 1960s the number of scheduled carriers continued to grow and aircraft continued to evolve with technological, advancement. By the close of the sixties, a sizeable number of Boeing 737s, BAC One-Elevens, Boeing 707s, and Hawker Siddeley Tridents were using Dublin Airport on a regular basis. During 1969, 1,737,151 passengers travelled through Dublin Airport. For other uses of BEA see Bea British European Airways, or BEA, was formed in 1946 by an Act of Parliament. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Shannon Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN), or Aerfort na Sionna in Irish is one of Irelands primary three airports (Dublin, Shannon, Cork). ... The Boeing 737 is an American short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... The British Aircraft Corporation One-Eleven, also known as the BAC 1-11, the BAC-111 or the BAC-1-11, was a British short-range jet airliner of the 1960s and 1970s. ... The Boeing 707 is an American four-engine commercial passenger jet airliner developed by Boeing in the early 1950s. ... Trident 1E The Trident, model DH121 or HS121, was a short/medium-range airliner designed by de Havilland in the 1950s, and built by the Hawker-Siddeley Group in the 1960s when de Havilland was merged, along with several other British aviation firms. ...


The advent of wide-bodied aircraft posed opportunities and challenges for aviation. In 1971 Aer Lingus took delivery of two new Boeing 747 aircraft (a third Boeing 747 was delivered later that decade). To cope with this, a new passenger terminal capable of handling five million passengers per year was opened in 1972. The growth which was anticipated at the airport (and provided for through heavy investment by the airport and Aer Lingus) during the 1970s did not materialise immediately. Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ... The Boeing 747, sometimes nicknamed the Jumbo Jet,[4][5] is a long-haul, widebody commercial airliner manufactured by Boeing in the United States. ...


In 1983 Aer Lingus opened its 'Aer Lingus Commuter' division which took delivery of Shorts, Saab, and Fokker turboprop aircraft to open regular daily domestic services to and from Ireland's smaller regional airports for the first time, as well as to serve existing routes to smaller regional airports in the United Kingdom. At various stages of its operations, flights were operated to several Irish regional airports to feed passengers into Aer Lingus's international network. These domestic destinations included Cork Airport, Shannon Airport, Kerry Airport, Galway Airport, Knock Airport, Waterford Airport, Sligo Airport, and City of Derry Airport in Northern Ireland. Aer Lingus Commuter has since been re-absorbed into the main company. The domestic routes have been taken over by Aer Arann, with British Airways taking over the route to Derry in Northern Ireland. Aer Lingus has continued with the remaining Dublin-UK flights. Cork Airport, (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) or Aerfort Chorcaí, in Irish, is one of the three principal international airports in Ireland (Cork, Dublin and Shannon). ... Shannon Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN), or Aerfort na Sionna in Irish is one of Irelands primary three airports (Dublin, Shannon, Cork). ... Kerry Airport (IATA: KIR, ICAO: EIKY), or Aerphort Chiarraí in Irish, often called Farranfore Airport, is an airport in County Kerry, Republic of Ireland. ... Galway Airport (IATA: GWY, ICAO: EICM), or Aerphort na Gaillimhe in Irish, is located at Carnmore about 6. ... Horan International Airport (IATA Airport Code: NOC) more commonly called Knock International Airport (see Knock), is located near Charlestown, County Mayo, Ireland. ... Waterford Airport or Aerphort Phort Láirge in Irish (IATA: WAT, ICAO: EIWF), also known as the South East Regional Airport, is located near Waterford on the south-east coast of the Republic of Ireland. ... Sligo Airport (IATA Airport Code: SXL) is located in Strandhill, near Sligo in the Republic of Ireland. ... City of Derry Airport Entrance. ... Aer Arann is a regional airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ...


During the 1980s, major competition, especially on the Dublin-London routes, resulted in passenger numbers swelling to 5.1 million in 1989. In the same year a new 8,650-foot runway and a state-of-the-art air traffic control centre were opened. Dublin Airport continued to expand rapidly in the 1990s. Pier A, which had been the first extension to the old terminal building, was significantly extended. A new Pier C, complete with air bridges, was built and as soon as this was completed, work commenced to extend it to double its capacity. The ground floor of the original terminal building, which is today a listed building, was returned to passenger service after many years to provide additional departure gates.


In 1993 a major milestone for the airport was the signing of a new United States-Republic of Ireland bilateral agreement which allowed airlines to operate some direct transatlantic services for the first time to/from Dublin Airport instead of touching down en route at Shannon Airport on the west coast of Ireland (Shannon had once been a major transatlantic refuelling stop for pre-jet aircraft, and this agreement was designed to protect the interests of the Shannon region when modern jets no longer required a refuelling stop and Shannon saw a fall-off in traffic). Airlines still had to provide an equal number of flights either to or through Shannon as to Dublin. A gradual further watering down of Shannon's so-called 'stopover' status will come into effect in November 2006 when more direct flights to Dublin will be allowed, until the stopover requirement disappears completely in 2008. At that time, airlines will be allowed to fly direct to the US from Dublin without having to match these with any to/from Shannon. It is expected that this will result in a huge increase in services between Dublin and the US, and Aer Lingus has identified 16 destinations that it would like to serve direct from Dublin.


This of course casts doubt on the future of transatlantic flights to Shannon. However, there is definitely a large demand, and up until now, the 'stopover' has not deterred Aer Lingus and several US airlines from offering either dedicated Shannon-US flights to allow them to fly to Dublin direct, or stopping at Shannon on one leg of their Dublin-US flights. Either way, the business community in Ireland believes that the removal of the 'stopover' is long overdue and has long prevented Dublin, with its perfect location at the western end of Europe, from becoming a major hub between that continent and North America.[citation needed] One counter-argument to that has been that Dublin did not generate sufficient traffic of its own to support this 'hub' theory. However that is certainly no longer the case.[citation needed] An airline hub is an airport that an airline uses as a transfer point to get passengers to their intended destination. ...


With the success of the Republic of Ireland's 'Celtic Tiger' economy, Dublin Airport has seen growth in the 1990s and 2000s. This demand has been driven by an increased demand for business travel to and from the country, together with an increase in inward tourism, and a surge in demand for foreign holidays and city breaks from the Irish, who are now one of the wealthiest populations in the world. In January 2006, the number of trips abroad taken by the Irish outnumbered the number of inbound trips for the first time since records began. Christmas shopping weekends in New York have increased in popularity (although London is still the top destination from Dublin). A further source of demand has been for flights to holiday homes and investment properties which have been snapped up by the property-hungry Irish across southern European holiday hotspots, the emerging economies of Eastern Europe, and beyond. For the Irish dance show, see Celtic Tiger Live. ...


Finally, the demand from Ireland's migrant workers, principally those from Eastern Europe, has resulted in a large number of new routes opening to destinations in the European Union accession states. Ireland was one of only three European Union countries (as well as the United Kingdom and Sweden) to open its borders freely to workers from the ten accession states that joined the European Union in 2004. This resulted in hundreds of thousands of people moving to Ireland from these countries since then.


To give just one example of the 'Eastern Europe' effect, both LOT Polish Airlines and Aer Lingus separately opened a Warsaw-Dublin route in 2004 to coincide with Poland joining the European Union. A patchy schedule was operated at first to test demand, but both airlines have since gone daily with this route, with LOT going double daily several days a week and Aer Lingus putting the larger Airbus A321 on the route. As of early 2007 - three years after Poland joined the European Union - there are direct flights to ten cities in Poland alone, with a choice of several airlines on many routes. The Polish market grew from 143,000 passengers in 2005 to 580,000 in 2006 - an increase of over 400%. The Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania are also connected with direct flights to Dublin, as are the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, and Slovenia. Boeing 737-500 LOT redirects here. ... Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ...


Long-haul traffic

The Dublin Airport Authority has ambitious long-haul expansion plans and has successfully added new routes to North America and the Middle East in recent years. It has yet to secure a direct route to East Asia. Like most airports, the effects of the September 11 atrocities affected transatlantic traffic but this has since recovered to record levels. Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ...


In 2005 Gulf Air launched a direct route to Bahrain in the Middle East. This was followed by Aer Lingus's service to Dubai in March 2006, and Etihad Airways' service to Abu Dhabi in July 2007. Despite reportedly high loads, the Gulf Air service to Bahrain was cancelled in July 2007 as part of a restructuring plan which also saw the airline pull out of Sydney. This move prompted Etihad Airways to bring forward the start date of its Abu Dhabi service by a number of months, and this too is reportedly performing very well for the airline. The Dublin Airport Authority announced as far back as the late 1990s that it would like to add a route to East Asia, however this has yet to materialise. Gulf Air (Arabic: ) is the flag carrier of the Kingdom of Bahrain. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ... Coordinates: , Emirate Government  - Emir Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Area [1]  - Metro 4,114 km² (1,588. ... Etihad Airways (Arabic: الإتحاد, ʼal-Ê»itiħād) is the flag carrier of the United Arab Emirates. ... Abu Dhabi or Abu Zaby (Arabic language: أبوظبي) is the largest of the seven emirates that comprise the United Arab Emirates and was also the largest of the former Trucial States. ... Gulf Air (Arabic: ) is the flag carrier of the Kingdom of Bahrain. ... Etihad Airways (Arabic: الإتحاد, ʼal-Ê»itiħād) is the flag carrier of the United Arab Emirates. ... Abu Dhabi or Abu Zaby (Arabic language: أبوظبي) is the largest of the seven emirates that comprise the United Arab Emirates and was also the largest of the former Trucial States. ... Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ...


Etihad Airways are the only airline to offer the Kangaroo Route from Dublin, flying to Sydney and Brisbane via Abu Dhabi. Passengers can also fly the Kangaroo Route via Dubai, but using a combination of airlines, Aer Lingus and Emirates, which connects to Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney as well as Auckland and Christchurch in New Zealand. Etihad Airways (Arabic: الإتحاد, ʼal-Ê»itiħād) is the flag carrier of the United Arab Emirates. ... The Kangaroo Route is a term trademarked by Qantas[1] to denote passenger airline flights between Australia and the United Kingdom, via the Eastern Hemisphere. ... Sydney Airport Control Tower International Terminal forecourt Sydney International Terminal International Terminal, Qantas check-in lounge International Terminal car park Memorial to Charles Kingsford Smith, International Terminal Qantas AVRO 504K replica, first plane flown by Qantas, Domestic Terminal Sydney Domestic Terminal entrance Terminal Control Unit including the old Control Tower... BNE redirects here. ... Abu Dhabi International Airport (Arabic: ) (IATA: AUH, ICAO: OMAA) is an airport located in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. ... Interior view of Dubai International Airport Dubai International Airport (IATA: DXB, ICAO: OMDB) (Arabic: مطار دبي الدولي) is the international airport serving Dubai, the largest city of the United Arab Emirates. ... Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ... Emirates redirects here. ... BNE redirects here. ... For other uses, see Melbourne Airport (disambiguation). ... Perth Airport (IATA: PER, ICAO: YPPH) is an Australian domestic and international airport located south of Guildford, Western Australia, and is the major commercial airport servicing Western Australias capital city, Perth. ... Sydney Airport Control Tower International Terminal forecourt Sydney International Terminal International Terminal, Qantas check-in lounge International Terminal car park Memorial to Charles Kingsford Smith, International Terminal Qantas AVRO 504K replica, first plane flown by Qantas, Domestic Terminal Sydney Domestic Terminal entrance Terminal Control Unit including the old Control Tower... Location of the airport relative to Auckland urban area Typical scene at the international terminal at Auckland International Airport Auckland International Airport (IATA: AKL, ICAO: NZAA) is the largest and busiest international airport in New Zealand with over 12 million (some 7 million international and 6 million domestic) passengers a... Christchurch International Airport (IATA: CHC, ICAO: NZCH) is the main airport that serves Christchurch, New Zealand. ...


On 22 March 2007, the Open Skies agreement between the US and EU was ratified. Aer Lingus immediately announced the launch of three new direct routes - Orlando, San Francisco, and Washington-Dulles, to commence between August and October 2007.[1] The Open Skies system is an integrated web-enabled reservation and inventory system suite that includes Internet, call center, airport departure control functionality and more. ... Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ...


The number of transatlantic flights having to land at Shannon will reduce from a ratio of 1:1 to 3:1 and will be abolished when the Open Skies agreement comes into effect in March 2008. This means that airlines will be able to operate as many direct non-stop flights from any airport in Ireland to any airport in the US. According to the Irish Department of Transport, 22 US cities have expressed interest in direct flights to Ireland. Further expansion by Aer Lingus and other airlines is therefore expected. Northwest Airlines and United Airlines are expected to join the existing American carriers at Dublin. This would mean that all six legacy US carriers (American Airlines, Continental Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Northwest Airlines, United Airlines, and US Airways) would be serving Dublin. [2] [3] [The Irish Times, 23 March 2007] The Open Skies system is an integrated web-enabled reservation and inventory system suite that includes Internet, call center, airport departure control functionality and more. ... Northwest Airlines (NYSE: NWA), occasionally known as NWA, is an American airline headquartered in Eagan, Minnesota, near Minneapolis-St. ... United Airlines is a major airline of the United States. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL) is a U.S. certificated air carrier. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Northwest Airlines (NYSE: NWA), occasionally known as NWA, is an American airline headquartered in Eagan, Minnesota, near Minneapolis-St. ... United Airlines is a major airline of the United States. ... US Airways is an American low-cost airline[1] headquartered in Tempe, Arizona, owned by US Airways Group, Inc. ...


Aer Rianta and Dublin Airport Authority plc

In October 2004, Aer Rianta (which means 'Air Ways' or 'Air Tracks' in the Irish language) was renamed the Dublin Airport Authority plc, following the State Airports Act 2004. All assets and liabilities previously owned by Aer Rianta were transferred to Dublin Airport Authority plc. The State Airports Act 2004 also established new airport authorities at Shannon and Cork Airports. The Shannon Airport Authority plc and the Cork Airport Authority plc have separate boards of directors and have been authorised under the Act to prepare business plans, which may in time lead to their full separation from the Dublin Airport Authority plc.


As the largest gateway to Ireland, over 21.1 million passengers travelled through the airport in 2006, a 2.7 million (or 15%) increase over 2005. The main contributors to the growth in traffic in 2005 were the airport's routes to continental Europe (particularly Poland and the Baltic region), North America, and the Middle East. Domestic and UK traffic had showed a small decline in 2005, but grew by 25% and 4% respectively in 2006. The decline in 2005 was due to a reduction in connecting traffic between Ireland's regional airports and the UK. This was as a result of a growing direct network of routes between those airports and the UK and continental Europe, dispensing with the need to transit at Dublin. But the organic demand at Dublin resulted in a net increase in those markets in 2006. Dublin Airport also welcomes over one million passengers per annum from across the border in Northern Ireland, whose largest airport is less than a quarter the size of Dublin in terms of passenger numbers.


Capacity

The sun comes up over Dublin airport.
The sun comes up over Dublin airport.

Due to the phenomenal growth experienced at Dublin Airport in recent years, the facility is chronically congested.[2] 'Catch-up' has been a feature of how the authorities have been dealing with the growth in demand. One part or another of the airport has been a building site for the past two decades. Despite massive building works and extensions, it is widely accepted that the existing terminal building and infrastructure are insufficient to deal with the volume of passengers. Both the Irish Government and the Dublin Airport Authority have come under pressure from airlines and passengers alike to once-and-for-all provide a realistic increase in capacity for the future. As a result, the DAA plans to invest €2 billion in a 10-year capital development programme to effectively double the size of the passenger facilities at Dublin Airport. A new pier (Pier D) has been added to the original terminal which has provided significant additional airside capacity, with 12 gate lounges serving 14 aircraft stands. This pier became operational on 28 October 2007. Terminal 2 is to be built and operational by 2010, as will a new pier (Pier E) to Terminal 2. A third terminal is provided for in the blueprint for the future development of the airport. In the interim, a new check-in area has been built in the basement of the terminal building with 25 check-in desks. This is used by Aer Lingus for their flights to the UK and Germany. Concerns remain that the airport's road network will become further congested until the Metro to the airport is up and running (see below) and the new road network is completed in 2011. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x750, 120 KB) Description: The sun comes up over Dublin airport. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x750, 120 KB) Description: The sun comes up over Dublin airport. ... Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


A new runway is to be built parallel to the existing runway 10/28 (opened in 1989). Detailed proposals and planning permission were submitted to Fingal County Council (under whose jurisdiction Dublin Airport lies) and approved in April 2006. An appeal to An Bord Pleanála (The Irish Planning Appeals Board), which determines appeals and other cases under the national planning acts, was heard in September 2006, and this resulted in the granting of permission in August 2007, with 31 planning conditions attached. According to the Dublin Airport Authority the new parallel runway needs to be operational by arond 2012 to ensure that the airfield at Dublin Airport continues to operate effectively and airline operations are not subjected to growing delays on arrival and departure. In the meantime, the Authority has invested heavily in extending aprons and creating rapid exit taxiways to derive maximum efficiency from the existing main runway. One of the oldest, and the shortest runways, 11/29, is now closed to allow overspill aircraft parking. This runway will disappear under the new parallel runway in due course.


Terminal Two

On 30 August 2006, the Dublin Airport Authority revealed its plans for a second terminal at Dublin Airport, to be located between the existing passenger terminal and the cargo terminal. London-based Pascall + Watson architects, specialists in airport design and master planning won the competition to design the facility. The cost of the overall project is put at €600 million which includes the terminal building itself, a new Pier building (Pier E) as well as upgrades to the internal road network at Dublin Airport and other associated infrastructure. The proposed second terminal would be capable of handling 15 million passengers, thereby allowing the airport to handle 35 million passengers a year. The new Terminal & Pier will provide 19 airbridges for aircraft, however it will also incorporate the existing Pier C which currently provides airlines with 6 airbridges. Another Pier will be built to the south of Terminal 2, accommodating additional passenger aircraft, however this will require the relocation of the current cargo terminal. According to the airport authority, Aer Lingus and other long-haul carriers would move to the new facility.[4] is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dublin Airport Authority plc (known until 1st October 2004 as Aer Rianta cpt1) is the state owned airport authority in the Republic of Ireland. ... Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ...


The plans for Terminal 2 were met with objections from those who argued that, once built, it could not be extended to provide any additional capacity, owing to its location. Indeed, the proposed location of T2 would reduce the capacity of T1 because airbridges and departure gates would have to be removed from Pier C to provide space for aircraft stands at T2. It is argued that a second terminal should be located between the main runway and the proposed parallel runway. This arrangement, adopted by major hub airports such as Dallas-Fort Worth and Atlanta-Hartsfield, would provide space for T2 to expand and provide additional capacity before a third terminal would be required. A third terminal, which is in the blueprint for the future of the airport, would most likely be located between the parallel runways.[5]


The greatest objections came from Ryanair[6][7][8]. The no-frills carrier has long lobbied for Terminal 2 to be built as a low-cost facility, and run by a competing operator. They have even offered to build and operate such a facility. However the Irish government decided that the DAA would build T2 and that its operation would be put out to tender. Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of...


Fingal County Council approved planning permission for the second terminal on 25 October 2006.[9][10] and this decision was appealed by a number of parties including Ryanair. An Bord Pleanála (The Irish Planning Appeals Board) started an oral hearing on the development on 16 April 2007. On 28 August 2007, An Bord Pleanála gave planning approval for T2, with c30 planning conditions attached. Having satisfied those that had to be achieved prior to the commencement of construction, the DAA started work on Terminal Two on 1 October 2007. The terminal was planned to be fully built and operational by Autumn 2009, but due to the delay in planning approvals, the opening date is now April 2010. [11] Fingal County Council has 24 directly elected members. ...


Ryanair has launched a legal challenge to the terminal proceeding as currently proposed, calling for a judicial review of An Bord Pleanála's decision.


Ground transport

Outside Dublin Airport
Outside Dublin Airport

Dublin Airport is located just off the M1 motorway (Dublin-Belfast road) approximately 10 km (6 mi) north from the city centre and 2 km (1 mi) south of the town of Swords. The most comprehensive and up-to-date information about how to get to and from Dublin Airport can be found on Dublin Airport's 'To & From the Airport' web page. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2100x1400, 477 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dublin Airport ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2100x1400, 477 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dublin Airport ... The N1 road is a National Primary Route in the Republic of Ireland, partly connecting Dublin and Belfast along the east of Ireland (mostly as the M1 motorway). ... “km” redirects here. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... swords redirects here. ...


Until the rail link (Metro North) to Dublin city centre is completed (see below), the public transport options to the city are taxis, buses, and private transport. Passengers can however connect by bus or taxi to Dublin's railway stations.

  • Taxi

To Dublin Airport: Passengers arriving by taxi will be set down on the Departures roadway directly outside the terminal building.


From Dublin Airport: Taxis are available from the forecourt on the Arrivals level road. A taxi dispatcher is available at the taxi rank to provide information and assistance.

  • Bus

Dublin Airport is served by over 700 bus and coach services daily. Dublin Bus is the major provider of bus services to and from Dublin Airport. Some of these routes connect to Busáras (Dublin's central bus station for intercity and regional bus services), Dublin Connolly railway station and Dublin Heuston railway station. There are several other operators which provide bus service to the airport, both city services and national coach service. The most up-to-date information can be found on Dublin Airport's 'Bus & Coach' web page. Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dublin Connolly railway station. ... Dublin Heuston, commonly called Heuston station, is located in Dublin, Ireland is one of the countrys main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west of Ireland. ...


City bus services from Dublin Airport:

  1. Bus services are available on the arrivals level.
  2. Bus services which connect to Busáras (Dublin's central bus station for intercity and regional bus services) also serve Dublin Connolly railway station and the Luas Red Line (both of which are beside Busáras).
  3. Bus services which connect to Dublin Heuston railway station also serve the Luas Red Line, which has a stop at Heuston.
  4. Some services serve Drumcondra suburban railway station, which is on the Connolly to Maynooth railway line.
  5. Dublin Bus operates two express 'Airlink' services which operate to the city's bus and railway stations via the Dublin Port Tunnel to avoid suburban traffic, and are therefore quicker than other bus services, especially in rush hour. These services are 'Airlink' route 747 to Busáras (Dublin Connolly railway station and the Luas Red Line are also beside Busáras), and 'Airlink' route 748 to Busáras and Dublin Heuston railway station.
  6. Aircoach operates non-stop service to Dublin city centre, and the southside suburbs of Ballsbridge, Donnybrook, Leopardstown, and Sandyford, with stops at some of Dublin's major hotels. Aircoach also provides national coach service from Dublin Airport to Cork and Belfast with stops in between.
  7. Urbus provide bus service between the airport and the northside suburbs of Swords, Castleknock, and Blanchardstown (also Blanchardstown Shopping Centre, Blanchardstown Institute of Technology, and Blanchardstown Business Park).

National Coach services from Dublin Airport: Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dublin Connolly railway station. ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(ə)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dublin Heuston, commonly called Heuston station, is located in Dublin, Ireland is one of the countrys main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west of Ireland. ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(ə)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dublin Port Tunnel Construction, 2004 December 2006, southbound entrance The Dublin Port Tunnel (Tollán Calafoirt Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish) is a road traffic tunnel in Dublin, Ireland, that forms part of the M50 motorway. ... Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dublin Connolly railway station. ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(ə)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ... Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dublin Heuston, commonly called Heuston station, is located in Dublin, Ireland is one of the countrys main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west of Ireland. ... Look up cork in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ...

  1. To connect to the national coach services of Ireland's largest national bus company Bus Éireann (English: Irish Bus), passengers must first get to Busáras (Dublin's central bus station) using one of the many city services available from the airport. Bus Éireann also provide several national coach services direct from the airport.
  2. Several other companies offer national coach services from the airport, details of which can be found on Dublin Airport's 'Bus & Coach' web page.

Connecting with city/intercity rail services and Luas trams: Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ...

  1. Irish Rail provide suburban and intercity railway services from Dublin Connolly railway station and Dublin Heuston railway station. There are direct regular bus services to both stations from the airport.
  2. Some city bus services serve Drumcondra suburban railway station, which is on the Connolly to Maynooth railway line.
  3. Bus services to Busáras/Dublin Connolly railway station and Dublin Heuston railway station connect with the Luas Red Line. Passengers wishing to connect with the Luas Green Line should use the Aircoach service. This does not stop directly at the St Stephen's Green Luas Green Line stop so passengers should consult with Aircoach staff. Alternatively passengers could take Dublin Bus service 16A from the airport which will connect with the Harcourt Street stop on the Luas Green Line.

Dublin Connolly railway station. ... Dublin Heuston, commonly called Heuston station, is located in Dublin, Ireland is one of the countrys main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west of Ireland. ... Busáras is the Central bus station and hub for inter-city and regional bus services on Bus Éireann in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dublin Connolly railway station. ... Dublin Heuston, commonly called Heuston station, is located in Dublin, Ireland is one of the countrys main railway stations, serving the south, southwest and west of Ireland. ...

Plans for rail link

For many years, it was expected that Irish Rail, the state railway company, would extend the DART (Dublin Area Rapid Transit) with a rail spur off the Dublin to Belfast line that would serve the airport and Swords. However these plans have been replaced with plans for an underground metro line, which would bypass the DART line and run from the city centre to the town of Swords, via the Airport. Following public consultation, the route for the new line, to be called 'Metro North' was announced on 19 October 2006 and is designed to connect with several other modes of transport. [12] The Dublin Area Rapid Transit (DART), (Irish: ), is part of the suburban railway network in Ireland, running mainly along the coastline of Dublin Bay on the Trans-Dublin route, from Greystones in County Wicklow, through Dublin to Howth and Malahide in County Dublin. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At St Stephen's Green, in Dublin's southern city centre, 'Metro North' will connect with the Luas (Dublin's light rail tram system) Green line, as well as the proposed DART underground interconnector between Heuston and Connolly inter-city railway stations. From there 'Metro North' will run through the city centre, with a stop at O'Connell Bridge, providing access from both sides of the River Liffey, and a connection with the Luas Red line. The third city centre stop will be at Parnell Square, in Dublin's northern city centre, in an area which the city council is redeveloping into a new cultural/museum quarter. Luas [l̪ˠuː(ə)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(ə)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ...


The line will then take in a stop at the Mater, one of Dublin's major hospitals, and then Drumcondra railway station, which will provide a connection with the line to Maynooth, a commuter and university town. Dublin City University and the suburb of Ballymun are also on the route.


From there, 'Metro North' will continue to the airport and onwards to the commuter town of Swords, which has many business links with the airport and where thousands of workers at the airport live. There will also be a number of 'Park & Ride' stops along the route. [13]


Although 'Metro North' will provide Dublin with an airport rail link, it is designed to provide many travel possibilities, whether they are to include the airport or not. Journey time between the airport and St Stephen's Green will be 18 minutes. Construction of the station at the airport, which will be centrally located for the two terminals, is expected to start in 2010.


Together with the proposed extensions to the Luas Green and Red tram lines, the metro to Dublin Airport will connect with Dublin's bus and rail termini giving access to all major modes of transportation in and from the city: Dublin Bus's vast bus network, Bus Éireann's nationwide bus network, Luas light rail, DART electrified overground railway, 'Arrow' outer suburban rail services, as well as Irish Rail's inter-city rail services to Rosslare, Waterford, Cork, Tralee, Limerick, Galway, Westport, Ballina, and Sligo, and the high-speed cross-border 'Enterprise' service to Belfast. Luas [l̪ˠuː(É™)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... Photomontage of proposed metro tunneling on O Connell Street (looking north). ... Dublin Bus (Irish: ) is a public transport operator in the Republic of Ireland. ... Bus Éireann, or Irish Bus, provides bus services in the Republic of Ireland with the exception of those operated entirely within the Dublin Region, which are provided by Dublin Bus. ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(É™)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... Iarnród Éireann (IÉ; in English Irish Rail), is the largest passenger railway system in Ireland. ...


Facts and figures

  • The 10 busiest international routes from Dublin
  1. London, UK
  2. Paris, France
  3. Manchester, UK
  4. New York, USA
  5. Birmingham, UK
  6. Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  7. Frankfurt, Germany
  8. Glasgow, UK
  9. Malaga, Spain
  10. Edinburgh, UK
  • The airport had 21.1 million passengers and around 197,000 aircraft movements in 2006.
  • Over 90 airlines serve the airport, with over 160 destinations (scheduled and chartered).
  • Around 88% of the flights are scheduled and 12% are chartered.
  • The country with the most flights from the airport is the UK.
  • The busiest domestic route from the airport is to Cork.
  • The busiest short-haul route from the airport is to London-Heathrow.
  • The busiest continental European route from the airport is to Paris-Charles de Gaulle.
  • The busiest long-haul route from the airport is to New York-JFK.
  • There are 142 check-in desks at the airport.
  • The airport operates 24 hours a day, 364 days of the year (the airport closes on Christmas day).
  • There are around 22,000 car parking spaces at the airport (18,000 long term and 4,000 short term).
  • There are 73 aircraft stands at the airport.

[14]


Airlines and destinations

The following airlines have scheduled services to and from Dublin Airport.[3]

  • Adria Airways (Ljubljana)
  • Aer Arann (Cardiff, Cork, Donegal, Galway, Inverness, Isle of Man, Kerry, Knock, Sligo)
  • Aer Lingus (Agadir, Alicante, Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Berlin-Schönefeld, Bilbao, Birmingham, Bologna, Bordeaux, Boston, Brussels, Bucharest-Otopeni, Budapest, Chicago-O'Hare, Copenhagen, Dubai, Dubrovnik, Düsseldorf, Edinburgh, Faro, Frankfurt, Funchal, Geneva, Glasgow-International, Hamburg, Helsinki, Ibiza [begins 17 June 2008], Jersey, Kraków, Lanzarote, Las Palmas, Lisbon, London-Gatwick, London-Heathrow, Los Angeles, Lyon, Madrid, Malaga, Manchester, Milan-Linate, Milan-Malpensa, Munich, Naples, Newcastle, New York-JFK, Nice, Orlando, Palma de Mallorca, Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Poznań, Prague, Rennes, Riga, Rome-Fiumicino, Salzburg, San Francisco, Santiago de Compostela, Seville, Shannon, Tenerife, Toulouse, Turin, Venice, Vienna, Vilnius, Warsaw, Washington-Dulles, Zürich) [some destinations are seasonal]
  • Air Canada (Toronto-Pearson) [seasonal]
  • Air Europa (Las Palmas)
  • Air France
    • operated by CityJet (London-City, Paris-Charles de Gaulle)
  • Air Southwest (Newquay, Plymouth [begins 28 April])
  • Air Transat (Montreal [begins 7 May 2008], Toronto-Pearson)
  • airBaltic (Riga, Vilnius)
  • American Airlines (Chicago-O'Hare)
  • Blue1 (Helsinki)
  • bmi (London-Heathrow)
  • British Airways (London-Gatwick)
  • Centralwings (Gdansk, Katowice, Krakow, Szczecin, Warsaw, Wroclaw)
  • Clickair (Barcelona)
  • Continental Airlines (Newark)
  • Czech Airlines (Prague)
  • Delta Air Lines (Atlanta, New York-JFK)
  • Estonian Air (Tallinn)
  • Etihad Airways (Abu Dhabi)
  • Eurocypria Airlines (Paphos)
  • Finnair (Helsinki)
  • Flybe (Exeter, Jersey, Norwich, Southampton)
  • Flyglobespan (Calgary [begins May 2008], Toronto-Hamilton [seasonal], Vancouver [begins 12 May, 2008])
  • FlyLal (Vilnius)
  • Futura Gael (Alicante, Faro, Malaga, Nice, Tenerife-South)
  • Iberia (Madrid)
  • LTE International Airways (Las Palmas, Lanzarote)
  • Lufthansa (Frankfurt)
  • Luxair (Luxembourg, Manchester)
  • Malév Hungarian Airlines (Budapest)
  • Ryanair (Aberdeen, Alghero, Alicante, Almeria, Basel, Berlin-Schönefeld, Biarritz, Billund, Birmingham, Blackpool, Bologna-Forli, Bournemouth, Bratislava, Bremen, Bristol, Brussels-Charleroi, Budapest, Bydgoszcz, Carcassonne, Cork, Doncaster/Sheffield, Durham-Tees Valley, Edinburgh, Eindhoven, Faro, Frankfurt-Hahn, Friedrichshafen, Fuerteventura, Gdańsk, Girona, Glasgow-Prestwick, Gothenburg-City, Grenoble, Karlsruhe-Baden, Katowice, Kaunas, Kraków, La Rochelle, Leeds/Bradford, Liverpool, Łódź, London-Gatwick, London-Luton, London-Stansted, Lübeck, Madrid, Malaga, Malta, Manchester, Marseille, Milan-Bergamo, Murcia, Nantes, Newcastle, Nice, Nottingham/East Midlands, Oslo-Torp, Palma [begins Spring, 2008], Paris-Beauvais, Pisa, Porto, Poznań, Prague, Pula, Reus, Riga, Rome-Ciampino, Rzeszow, Salzburg, Santander [begins Spring, 2008], Seville, Shannon, Stockholm-Skavsta, Szczecin, Tampere, Tenerife-South, Trapani, Turin, Valencia, Venice, Vitoria, Warsaw, Wroclaw, Zadar [begins Spring, 2008])
  • SATA International (Ponta Delgada)
  • Scandinavian Airlines System (Copenhagen, Oslo-Gardermoen, Stockholm-Arlanda)
  • SkyEurope (Bratislava)
  • Spanair (Las Palmas, Lanzarote, Malaga)
  • Swiss International Air Lines (Zürich)
  • S7 Airlines (Moscow-Domodedovo) [begins April 2008][15]
  • Turkish Airlines (Istanbul-Atatürk)
  • US Airways (Philadelphia)
  • XL Airways (Burgas, Faro, Lanzarote, Paphos, Palma, Reus, Santorini, Skiathos)

Adria Airways is an airline based in Ljubljana, Slovenia. ... Aer Arann is a regional airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ... Aer Lingus is Irelands national airline. ... Air Canada is Canadas largest airline and flag carrier. ... Air Europa Boeing 737-800 landing Boeing 737-85P at Madrid Barajas International Airport Air Europa Líneas Aéreas, S.A. is an airline based in Palma, Majorca, Spain. ... Air France (formally Société Air France) is Europes largest airline company. ... CityJet is an airline based in Dublin, Ireland. ... Air Southwest is an airline based at Plymouth City Airport, Plymouth, England. ... Air Transat is an airline based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, operating scheduled and charter flights and serving 90 destinations in 25 countries. ... airBaltic is the Latvian national airline, based in the capital of Latvia, RÄ«ga. ... American Airlines, Inc. ... Blue1 is an airline based in Helsinki, Finland. ... bmi is a scheduled airline based in the United Kingdom. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ... Loganair is an airline based at Glasgow International Airport (GLA) in Scotland. ... Centralwings is a low-cost airline based in Łódź, Poland. ... Clickair is a low-cost airline based in Barcelona, Spain, that operates services from a number of Spanish cities to nearly 40 destinations in Europe. ... Continental Airlines (NYSE: CAL) is a U.S. certificated air carrier. ... CSA Czech Airlines (in Czech: ÄŒeské aerolinie (abbreviation: ÄŒSA) is the Czech national airline company, and former national carrier of Czechoslovakia based at RuzynÄ› International Airport, Prague. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Estonian Air is an airline based in Tallinn, Estonia. ... Etihad Airways (Arabic: الإتحاد, ʼal-Ê»itiħād) is the flag carrier of the United Arab Emirates. ... Eurocypria Airlines is an airline based in Larnaca, Cyprus. ... Finnair is Finlands largest airline and the flag carrier. ... Flybe is a British airline based at Exeter Airport, England. ... Flyglobespan Boeing 737-683 registered G-CDKD, landing on Runway 05 Glasgow International Airport, Scotland. ... FlyLAL (also known as Lithuanian Airlines and LAL) is the national airline of Lithuania based in Vilnius. ... Futura Gael is an airline based in Dublin, Ireland, wholly owned by Futura International Airways, operating charter flights to Mediterranean countries, Eastern Europe and Egypt. ... Airbus A319-100 McDonnell Douglas MD-88 Iberia Airlines or Iberia, full name Iberia Airlines of Spain (Spanish: ), (IBEX-35:IBLA) is the largest airline of Spain, based in Madrid and is the Spanish flag carrier. ... LTE International Airways is an airline based in Spain. ... Deutsche Lufthansa AG (ISIN: DE0008232125) (pronounced ) is the second largest airline in Europe (after Air France - KLM). ... Luxair (Luxair Société Luxembourgeoise de Navigation Aérienne SA) is the national airline of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. ... Malév Hungarian Airlines, (where Malév is an acronym of the Hungarian Magyar Légiközlekedési Vállalat), is the national airline of Hungary, based in Budapest. ... Ryanair (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQ: RYAAY) is an Irish airline headquartered in Dublin, with its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europes largest low-cost carrier and is one of the worlds largest and most successful airlines (whether in terms of... SATA International (full name SATA INTERNACIONAL - Serviços e Transportes Aéreos, S.A.) is an airline based in Ponta Delgada, the Azores, Portugal. ... Scandinavian Airlines System or SAS is a multi-national airline for Denmark, Norway and Sweden, and the leading carrier in the Scandinavian countries, based in Stockholm, Sweden and owned by SAS AB. It is a founding member of the Star Alliance. ... SkyEurope (officially SkyEurope Airlines) is a low-cost airline with its main base at M. R. Stefanik Airport (BTS) in Bratislava, Slovakia, and other bases in Kraków, Prague and Budapest. ... Spanair S.A. (IATA: JK, ICAO: JKK, and Callsign: Spanair), is an airline based in Palma, Mallorca, Spain. ... Swiss International Air Lines (short: Swiss) is the principal airline of Switzerland operating scheduled services in Europe and to North America, South America, Africa and Asia. ... S7 Airlines is an airline based in Ob, Russia. ... Turkish Airlines, Inc. ... US Airways is an American low-cost airline[1] headquartered in Tempe, Arizona, owned by US Airways Group, Inc. ... XL Airways is a British charter airline with headquarters at Crawley in the United Kingdom, it is part of the XL Leisure Group. ...

References

  1. ^ Desmond Fitzgerald on Archiseek
  2. ^ 'Service to passengers at Airport defended', The Irish Times, 4 August 2006
  3. ^ Dublin Airport Flight Information

is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dublin Airport - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3425 words)
Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW) is operated by Dublin Airport Authority plc and is the busiest airport in Ireland.
Dublin Airport is the 5th fastest growing European airport, the 14th busiest ariport in Europe, the 66th busiest airport in the world, and the 19th busiest in the world for international flights.
Dublin Airport is located just off the M1 motorway (Dublin-Belfast road) approximately 10 km north from the city centre and 2 km south of the town of Swords.
Dublin Airport Authority - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (433 words)
The authority runs Dublin Airport and controls the Cork Airport Authority and the Shannon Airport Authority which are responsible for Cork International Airport and Shannon Airport respectively.
The three new authorities have power to formulate business plans for their respective airports, however they will not take charge of running the airports until further date to be determined by the Minister for Transport, which by law will not be before 1 May 2005.
The State Airports Act was heavily criticised by Noel Hanlon, the outgoing chairman of Aer Rianta, and by the company's unions, who believed it a precursor to privatisation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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