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Encyclopedia > Dublin
Dublin city centre at night
Dublin
Baile Átha Cliath
Coat of arms of Dublin
Obedientia Civium Urbis Felicitas
Latin: literally, "The citizens' obedience is the city's happiness" (rendered more loosely as "Happy the city where citizens obey" by the council itself [1])
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
53°20′50″N 6°15′33″W / 53.3472, -6.2592
Statistics
Province: Leinster
County: County Dublin
Dáil Éireann: Dublin Central, Dublin North Central, Dublin North East, Dublin North West, Dublin South Central, Dublin South East
European Parliament: Dublin
Dialling Code: +353 1
Postal District(s): D1-24, D6W
Area: 114.99 km² (44 sq mi)
Population (2006) Dublin City:
505,739
Dublin Urban Area:
1,045,769
Dublin Region:
1,186,821
Greater Dublin Area:
1,661,185
Website: www.dublincity.ie

Dublin (IPA: /ˈdʌblɨn, ˈdʊblɨn/, or /ˈdʊbəlɪn/, Irish: Baile Átha Cliath, meaning Town of the Hurdled Ford,[2] IPA: [bˠalʲə a:ha klʲiəh] or [bˠɫaː cliə(ɸ)]) is the largest city in Ireland and the capital of the Republic of Ireland. It is located near the midpoint of Ireland's east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey and at the centre of the Dublin Region. Founded as a Viking settlement, the city has been Ireland's primary city for most of the island's history since medieval times. Today, it is an economic, administrative and cultural centre for the island of Ireland, and has one of the fastest growing populations of any European capital city.[3][4] Dublin is the capital city of Ireland located in County Dublin. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x681, 148 KB) Summary Night time photo of OConnell Street, Dublin, Ireland showing the Spire and GPO Author is Peter Guthrie who has given this image Creative Commons 2. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x681, 148 KB) Summary Night time photo of OConnell Street, Dublin, Ireland showing the Spire and GPO Author is Peter Guthrie who has given this image Creative Commons 2. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... County Dublin map with inset location on island of Ireland. ... GPS redirects here. ... When under Gaelic rule, Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the túatha. ... Statistics Area: 19,774. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist, while several county names have changed. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dublin Code: D Area: 921 km² Population (2006) 1,186,821 County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath), or more correctly today the Dublin Region[1] (Réigiúin Átha Cliath), is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city... This article is about the current Irish body. ... Dublin Central is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland, located in the heart of the capital city, Dublin. ... Dublin North Central is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland, located in the capital city, Dublin. ... Dublin North East is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland. ... Dublin North West is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland. ... Dublin South Central is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland. ... Dublin South East is a parliamentary constituency in the Republic of Ireland. ... Established 1952, as the Common Assembly President Hans-Gert Pöttering (EPP) Since 16 January 2007 Vice-Presidents 14 Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou (EPP) Alejo Vidal-Quadras (EPP) Gérard Onesta (Greens – EFA) Edward McMillan-Scott (ED) Mario Mauro (EPP) Miguel Angel Martínez Martínez (PES) Luigi Cocilovo (ALDE) Mechtild... Dublin is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Subscriber trunk dialling (STD) (also known as Subscriber toll dialling) is an obsolete term for the UK telephone system allowing subscribers to dial trunk calls without operator assistance. ... Postal addresses in Ireland are similar to those in the rest of the English-speaking world, but there is no national post code system. ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dublin Code: D Area: 921 km² Population (2006) 1,186,821 County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath), or more correctly today the Dublin Region[1] (Réigiúin Átha Cliath), is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city... Greater Dublin Area (GDA) is a loosely defined term which is used to describe the city of Dublin and the counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, Kildare, Meath, South Dublin and Wicklow of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Liffey in West Wicklow The Liffey (An Life in Irish) is a river in the Republic of Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dublin Code: D Area: 921 km² Population (2006) 1,186,821 County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath), or more correctly today the Dublin Region[1] (Réigiúin Átha Cliath), is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city... For other uses, see Viking (disambiguation). ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


In a 2003 European-wide survey by the BBC, questioning 11,200 residents of 112 urban and rural areas, Dublin was the best capital city in Europe to live in, and Ireland the most content country in Europe.[5] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Name

Dublin's Ha'penny Bridge over the River Liffey.

The name Dublin is a Hiberno-English derivative of 'Dubh Linn' (Irish, dubh -> black, and linn -> pool). Historically, in the traditional Gaelic script used for the Irish language, 'bh' was written with a dot over the 'b', viz 'Du Linn' or 'Dulinn'. The French-speaking Normans omitted the dot and spelled the name variously as 'Develyn' or 'Dublin'. view of the Dublin from the river liffey. ... view of the Dublin from the river liffey. ... Dublins famous Hapenny Bridge Beyond it, the dome of the eighteenth century Custom House and Liberty Hall, Dublins tallest building. ... The Liffey in West Wicklow The Liffey (An Life in Irish) is a river in the Republic of Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The word Corcaigh in the Gaelic-script font of same name. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Some sources doubt this derivation, and suggest that 'Dublin' is of Scandinavian origin, cf. Icelandic: djúp lind ('deep pond'). However, the name 'Dubh Linn' pre-dates the arrival of the Vikings in Ireland, and the Old Norse (and modern Icelandic) name for Dublin is simply the words 'Dubh Linn' re-spelled as if they were Old Norse: 'Dyflinn' (correctly pronounced "Duev-linn"). For other uses, see Scandinavia (disambiguation). ... Old Norse or Danish tongue is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age). ...


The common name for the city in Modern Irish is 'Baile Átha Cliath' ('The Settlement of the Ford of the Reed Hurdles'), which is a place-name referring to a fording point of the Liffey in the vicinity of Heuston Station. This place-name was applied to an early Christian monastery which is believed to have been situated in the area of Angier Street currently occupied by St Valentine's (R.C.) church.


The subsequent Scandinavian settlement was on the River Poddle, a tributary of the Liffey, to the East of Christchurch, in the area known as Wood Quay. The Dubh Linn was a lake used by the Scandinavians to moor their ships and was connected to the Liffey by the Poddle. The Dubh Linn and Poddle were covered during the early 1800s, and as the city expanded they were largely forgotten about. The Dubh Linn was situated in the area of the park of the Chester-Beaty Library in Dublin Castle. The River Poddle rises in Fettercairn, Tallaght, flows through Templeogue and eventually into the Liffey near Wood Quay. ... Christ Church Cathedral (exterior) Christ Church Cathedral (The Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity) in Dublin is the elder of the citys two mediæval cathedrals, the other being St. ...


History

Main article: History of Dublin
The old Irish Houses of Parliament

The writings of the Greek astronomer and cartographer Ptolemy provide perhaps the earliest reference to human habitat in the area now known as Dublin. In around A.D. 140 he referred to a settlement he called Eblana Civitas. The settlement 'Dubh Linn' dates perhaps as far back as the first century BC and later a monastery was built there, though the town was established in about 841[6] by the Norse. The City of Dublin can trace its origin back more than 1000 years, and for much of this time it has been Irelands principal city and the cultural, educational and industrial centre of the country. ... Photograph by Jtdirl of old irish parliament. ... Photograph by Jtdirl of old irish parliament. ... This article is about the geographer, mathematician and astronomer Ptolemy. ... Eblana is the name of an ancient Irish settlement believed by some to have occupied the same site as the modern city of Dublin. ... Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ...


The modern city retains the Anglicised Irish name of the former and the original Irish name of the latter. After the Norman invasion of Ireland, Dublin became the key centre of military and judicial power, with much of the power centering on Dublin Castle until independence. From the 14th to late 16th centuries Dublin and the surrounding area, known as the Pale, formed the largest area of Ireland under government control. The Parliament was located in Drogheda for several centuries, but was switched permanently to Dublin after Henry VII conquered the County Kildare in 1504. A tower house near Quin. ... Dublin Castle. ... The Pale or the English Pale comprised a region in a radius of twenty miles around Dublin which the English in Ireland gradually fortified against incursion from Gaels. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Earl of Kildare is an Irish peerage title. ...

Dublin CastleSeat of the Lord Lieutenant and his court until 1922
Dublin Castle
Seat of the Lord Lieutenant and his court until 1922

Dublin also had local city administration via its Corporation from the Middle Ages. This represented the city's guild-based oligarchy until it was reformed in the 1840s on increasingly democratic lines. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Dublin Castle. ... Official standard of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (plural: Lords Lieutenant), also known as the Judiciar in the early mediaeval period and as the Lord Deputy as late as the 17th century, was the Kings representative and head of the Irish executive during the... Dublin Corporation is the former name given to the city government and its administrative organisation in Dublin between the twelfth century and 1 January 2002. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Oligarchy (Greek , Oligarkhía) is a form of government where political power effectively rests with an elite segment of society (whether distinguished by wealth, family or military powers). ...


From the 17th century the city expanded rapidly, helped by the Wide Streets Commission. Georgian Dublin was, for a short time, the second city of the British Empire after London. Much of Dublin's most notable architecture dates from this time. The Guinness brewery was also established at this time. The 1800s were a period of decline relative to the industrial growth of Belfast; by 1900 the population of Belfast was nearly twice as large. Whereas Belfast was prosperous and industrial, Dublin had become a city of squalor and class division, built on the remains of lost grandeur, as best described in the novel 'Strumpet City', by James Plunkett, and in the works of Sean O'Casey. Dublin was still the primary centre of administration and transport for much of Ireland, though completely bypassed by the Industrial revolution. The Easter Rising of 1916 occurred in the city centre, bringing much physical destruction. The Anglo-Irish War and Irish Civil War contributed even more destruction, leaving many of its finest buildings in ruins. The Irish Free State rebuilt many of the buildings and moved parliament to Leinster House. Through The Emergency (World War II), until the 1960s, Dublin remained a capital out of time: the city centre in particular remained at an architectural standstill. Interestingly enough, this made the city perfect ideal for historical film production, with many productions including The Blue Max, and My Left Foot, capturing the cityscape at this time. This became the foundation of later successes in cinematography and film-making. With increasing prosperity, modern architecture was introduced to the city, though a vigorous campaign started in parallel to restore the Georgian greatness of Dublin's streets, rather than lose the grandeur forever. Since 1995, the landscape of Dublin has changed immensely, with enormous private and state development of housing, transport, and business. (See also Development and Preservation in Dublin). Some well-known Dublin street corners are still named for the pub or business which used to occupy the site before closure or redevelopment. The Wide Streets Commission was established by Dublin Corporation in 1757. ... Georgian Dublin is a phrase used that has two interwoven meanings, to describe a historic period in the development of the city of Dublin from 1714 (the beginning of the reign of King George I of Great Britain and of Ireland) to the death in 1830 of King George IV... Guinness logo Guinness is Good for You — Irish language advertisement. ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ... Combatants Irish Volunteers, Irish Citizen Army, Irish Republican Brotherhood British Army Royal Irish Constabulary Commanders Patrick Pearse, James Connolly Brigadier-General Lowe General Sir John Maxwell Strength 1250 in Dublin, c. ... An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerrilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament... The Irish Civil War (June 28, 1922 – May 24, 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the prior state. ... Leinster House The former palace of the Duke of Leinster. ... The Emergency was an official euphemism used by the Irish Government (of the State now known as the Republic of Ireland) during the 1940s to refer to its position during World War II. The State was officially neutral during World War II and in government media, direct references to the... The Blue Max is a 1966 United Kingdom World War I film directed by John Guillermin and starring George Peppard, James Mason, Ursula Andress, Karl Michael Vogler, Derren Nesbitt, Harry Towb and Jeremy Kemp. ... My Left Foot, is a 1989 film which tells the story of Christy Brown, an Irishman born with cerebral palsy, who can only move his left foot. ... Dublin is one of the oldest capital cities in Europe — dating back over two millenia. ... Several well-known junctions in Dublin city still carry the name of the pub or business which used to occupy the corner. ...

The Custom House was burned down during the civil war, and was subsequently restored
The Custom House was burned down during the civil war, and was subsequently restored

Since the beginning of Anglo-Norman rule in the 12th century, the city has served as the capital of the island of Ireland in the varying geopolitical entities: Download high resolution version (2262x861, 1116 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2262x861, 1116 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The south facade of the Custom House by night The Custom House is a [neoclassical] 18th century building in Dublin, Ireland which houses the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Geopolitics is the study which analyses geography, history and social science with reference to international politics. ...

From 1922, following the partition of Ireland, it became the capital of the Irish Free State (1922–1949) and now is the capital of the Republic of Ireland. (Many of these states co-existed or competed within the same timeframe as rivals within either British or Irish constitutional theory.) One of the memorials to commemorate that time is the Garden of Remembrance. Coat of arms1 Capital Dublin Language(s) Norman French, Irish, Welsh, English Government Monarchy Lord of Ireland  - 1171-1189 Henry II  - 1509-1541 Henry VIII Lord Lieutenant  - 1528-1529 Piers Butler  - 1540–1548 Anthony St Leger Legislature Parliament of Ireland  - Upper house Irish House of Lords  - Lower house Irish House... Coat of arms1 Capital Dublin Language(s) Irish, English Government Monarchy King2  - 1542-1547 Henry VIII  - 1760-1801 George III Chief Secretary  - 1660 Matthew Lock  - 1798-1801 Viscount Castlereagh Legislature Parliament of Ireland  - Upper house Irish House of Lords  - Lower house Irish House of Commons History  - Act of Parliament 1541... This article is about the historical state called the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1801–1927). ... This article is about the prior state. ... The Garden of Remembrance is an Irish memorial garden, created in Dublin to commemorate all those killed in the Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) between 1919 and 1922. ...


Culture

Statue of James Joyce on North Earl Street, Dublin.
Statue of James Joyce on North Earl Street, Dublin.
Oscar Wilde

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (654x1842, 247 KB) Sumari James Joyce statue next to OConnell street in Dublin Llicència dús File links The following pages link to this file: James Joyce ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (654x1842, 247 KB) Sumari James Joyce statue next to OConnell street in Dublin Llicència dús File links The following pages link to this file: James Joyce ... Oscar Wilde in his favourite coat. ... Oscar Wilde in his favourite coat. ...

Literature, theatre and the arts

The city has a world-famous literary history, having produced many prominent literary figures. Indeed, as birthplace of William Butler Yeats, George Bernard Shaw and Samuel Beckett, Dublin has produced three winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature - more than any other city in the world.[8] Other, influential writers and playwrights from Dublin include Oscar Wilde, Jonathan Swift and the creator of Dracula, Bram Stoker. It is arguably most famous, however, as the location of the greatest works of James Joyce. Dubliners is a collection of short stories by Joyce about incidents and characters typical of residents of the city in the early part of the 20th century. His most celebrated work, Ulysses, is also set in Dublin and full of topographical detail. Additional widely celebrated writers from the city include J.M. Synge, Seán O'Casey, Brendan Behan, Maeve Binchy, and Roddy Doyle. Ireland's biggest libraries and literary museums are found in Dublin, including the National Print Museum of Ireland and National Library of Ireland. William Butler Yeats, 1933. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... Samuel Barclay Beckett (13 April 1906 – 22 December 1989) was an Irish dramatist, novelist and poet. ... The Nobel Prize in literature is awarded annually to an author from any country who has produced the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency. The work in this case generally refers to an authors work as a whole, not to any individual work, though individual works are sometimes... ‹ The template below (Proseline) is being considered for deletion. ... Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift (November 30, 1667 – October 19, 1745) was an Irish cleric, satirist, essayist, political pamphleteer (first for Whigs then for Tories), and poet, famous for works like Gullivers Travels, A Modest Proposal, A Journal to Stella, The Drapiers Letters, The Battle of the Books, and... This article is about the novel. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847 – April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... This article is about the writer and poet. ... For the Irish folk band, see The Dubliners. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... John Millington Synge John Millington Synge (April 16, 1871 - March 24, 1909) was an Irish dramatist, poet, prose writer, and collector of folklore. ... Sean OCasey Sean OCasey (March 30, 1880 - September 18, 1964) was a major Irish dramatist and memorist. ... Brendan Francis Behan (Irish: Breandán Ó Beacháin) (February 9, 1923 - March 20, 1964) was an Irish poet, short story writer, novelist and playwright who wrote in both Irish and English. ... Maeve Binchy (born May 28, 1940, Dalkey, Ireland) is a popular Irish novelist and newspaper columnist. ... Roddy Doyle (Irish: , born May 8, 1958 in Dublin) is an Irish novelist, dramatist and screenwriter. ... The National Print Museum of Ireland is based in a soldiers chapel in the Beggars Bush area of Dublin, Republic of Ireland. ... National Library of Ireland is a national library located in Dublin, Ireland. ...


There are several theatres within the city centre, and various world-famous actors have emerged from the Dublin theatrical scene, including Noel Purcell, Brendan Gleeson, Stephen Rea, Colin Farrell and Gabriel Byrne. The best known theatres include the Gaiety, the Abbey, the Olympia and the Gate. The Gaiety specialises in musical and operatic productions, and is popular for opening its doors after the evening theatre production to host a variety of live music, dancing, and films. The Abbey was founded in 1904 by a group that included Yeats with the aim of promoting indigenous literary talent. It went on to provide a breakthrough for some of the city's most famous writers, such as Synge, Yeats himself and George Bernard Shaw. The Gate was founded in 1928 to promote European and American Avante Guarde works. The largest theatre is the Mahony Hall in The Helix at Dublin City University in Glasnevin. Noel Purcell (born 23 December 1900 — March 3, 1985) was an Irish film and television actor. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Stephen Rea (born October 31, 1946) is an Irish actor. ... Colin James Farrell (born May 31, 1976) is an Irish actor who has appeared in several high-profile Hollywood films including Daredevil, Miami Vice, Minority Report, Phone Booth and S.W.A.T.. // Farrell was born prematurely. ... Gabriel Byrne (born 12 May 1950) is an Irish actor. ... The Gaiety Theatre is a theatre on South King Street in Dublin, Ireland, off of Grafton Street and close to St. ... This article is about the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. ... The Gate Theatre, in Dublin, was founded in 1928 by Hilton Edwards and Micheál MacLiammoir, initially using the Abbey Theatres Peacock studio theatre space to stage important works by European and American dramatists. ... The Gaiety Theatre is a theatre on South King Street in Dublin, Ireland, off of Grafton Street and close to St. ... This article is about the Abbey Theatre, Dublin. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933. ... John Millington Synge John Millington Synge (April 16, 1871 - March 24, 1909) was an Irish dramatist, poet, prose writer, and collector of folklore. ... George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856–2 November 1950) was an Irish dramatist, literary critic, and socialist. ... The Gate Theatre, in Dublin, was founded in 1928 by Hilton Edwards and Micheál MacLiammoir, initially using the Abbey Theatres Peacock studio theatre space to stage important works by European and American dramatists. ... The Helix (Side View) The Helix is a building on the Dublin City University campus at Whitehall on Dublins Northside originally to be called the Aula Maxima. ... Dublin City University (DCU) is a university situated between Glasnevin and Whitehall on the Northside of Dublin in Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O158368 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Population () Glasnevin (Glas Naíon, Glas Na’on - Stream of the Infants; also known as Glas Naedhe - ONaeidhe’s Stream (after an ancient Chieftain) - in Irish) is a largely residential neighbourhood of Dublin, Ireland. ...

Local Art is sometimes displayed around the perimeter of St. Stephen's Green park
Local Art is sometimes displayed around the perimeter of St. Stephen's Green park

Dublin is also the focal point for much of Irish Art and the Irish artistic scene. The Book of Kells, a world-famous manuscript produced by Celtic Monks in A.D. 800 and an example of Insular art, is on display in Trinity College. The Chester Beatty Library houses the famous collection of manuscripts, miniature paintings, prints, drawings, rare books and decorative arts assembled by American mining millionaire (and honorary Irish citizen) Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (1875-1968). The collections date from 2700 B.C. onwards and are drawn from Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and Europe. Work by local artists is often put on public display around St. Stephen's Green, the main public park in the city centre. In addition large art galleries are found across the city, including the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery, the Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery, The City Arts Centre, The Douglas Hyde Gallery, The Project Arts Centre and The Royal Hibernian Academy. Fountain in the center of St. ... Fountain in the center of St. ... This page (folio 292r) contains the lavishly decorated text that opens the Gospel of John. ... This page (folio 292r) of the Book of Kells contains the lavishly decorated text that opens the Gospel of John. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... The Chester Beatty Library was established in Dublin, Ireland in 1950, to house the remarkable collections of mining magnate, Sir Alfred Chester Beatty. ... Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (1875 - 1968) was born in New York city, he graduated from Columbia University as a mining engineer. ... St. ... The Irish Museum of Modern Art, also known as IMMA, opened in May 1991 and is Irelands leading national institution exhibiting and collecting modern and contemporary art. ... The National Gallery of Ireland houses the Irish national collection of Irish and European art. ... Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane is an art gallery funded by Dublin City Council and located in Charlemont House in Dublin, Ireland. ... The City Arts Centre in Dublin is a local community arts organization founded in 1973. ... The Douglas Hyde Gallery located in Trinity College, Dublin is a contemporary art gallery which hosts and curates temporary exhibition of visual art. ... The Project Arts Centre is a venue for cutting-edge visual art and performance located in Dublins Temple Bar. ... The Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA) is an artist based and artist orientated institution in Ireland dedicated to developing, affirming and challenging the publics appreciation and understanding of traditional and innovative approaches to the visual arts. ...


Three centres of the National Museum of Ireland are in Dublin. The National Museum of Ireland (NMI) is the main museum in Ireland. ...


Nightlife and entertainment

U2 performing in Dublin in 2005

There is a vibrant nightlife in Dublin and it is reputedly one of the most youthful cities in Europe - with estimates of 50% of inhabitants being younger than 25.[9][10] Furthermore in 2007, it was voted the friendliest city in Europe.[11] Like the rest of Ireland, there are pubs right across the city centre. The area around St. Stephen's Green - especially Harcourt Street, Camden Street, Wexford Street and Leeson Street - is a centre for some of the most popular nightclubs and pubs in Dublin. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 853 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 853 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... St. ...


The most internationally notorious area for nightlife is the Temple Bar area just south of the River Liffey. To some extent, the area has become a hot spot for tourists, including stag and hen parties from Britain, causing some (though by no means all) locals to steer clear at night. Nonetheless, it was developed as Dublin's cultural quarter (an idea proposed by local politician Charlie Haughey), and does retain this spirit as a centre for small arts productions, in the form of street performers and intimate small music venues. Temple Bar (Barra an Teampaill in Irish) is an area on the south bank of the River Liffey in central Dublin, Ireland. ... Charles James Haughey (born September 16, 1925) was the sixth Taoiseach of the Republic of Ireland. ...


Live music is popularly played on streets and at venues throughout Dublin in general and the city has produced several rock bands of international success, including Thin Lizzy, U2, and Boyzone. The two best known cinemas in the city centre are the Savoy Cinema and the Cineworld Cinema, both north of the Liffey. Alternative and special-interest cinema can be found in the Irish Film Institute in Temple Bar, and in the Screen Cinema on d'Olier Street. Across suburban Dublin are located large modern multiscreen cinemas. Thin Lizzy are a hard rock band who formed in Dublin, Ireland in 1969. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Boyzone were an Irish boy band (pop group) of the 1990s. ... Cineworld Cinemas is a multiplex cinema chain in the United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland and Jersey. ... The Irish Film Institute is a national body dedicated to supporting Irish film heritage. ...


Sport

Croke ParkEurope's 4th biggest stadium and home to the Gaelic Athletic Association.
Croke Park
Europe's 4th biggest stadium and home to the Gaelic Athletic Association.

The headquarters of almost all of Ireland's sporting organisations are in Dublin, and the most popular sports in Dublin are those that are most popular throughout Ireland: Gaelic football, Soccer, Rugby and Hurling. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 263 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 337 pixel, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 263 pixels Full resolution (1024 × 337 pixel, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... Soccer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ...


The city is host to the 4th largest stadium in the European Union, and 6th largest in Europe as a whole,[12] Croke Park, the 82,500-capacity headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association. It traditionally hosts Gaelic football and Hurling games during the summer months, as well as International rules football in alternating years. It also hosts concerts, with acts such as U2 and Robbie Williams having played there in recent years. The Dublin branch of the Gaelic Athletic Association play their league games at Parnell Park. Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... For other uses, see GAA (disambiguation). ... Gaelic Football (Irish: Peil, Peil Gaelach or Caid ), commonly referred to as football, or Gaelic , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. ... For the Cornish sport, see Cornish Hurling. ... International Rules Football match at the Telstra Dome - Australia vs Ireland. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... For other people with the same name, see Robbie Williams (disambiguation). ... The Dublin County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cummann Luthchleas Gael Coiste Contae Ath Cliath) or Dublin GAA is one of the 32 county boards of the GAA in Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic Games in County Dublin. ... Parnell Park is a GAA stadium in Dublin, Ireland. ...


Lansdowne Road stadium (previously owned by the Irish Rugby Football Union) was the venue for home games of both the Irish Rugby Team and the Republic's national soccer team. Until recently, it had a mixed standing and seating capacity of 49,000. However, as part of a joint venture between the IRFU and the FAI, it is currently being demolished and is expected to be replaced with a 50,000 all-seated stadium by 2009.[13] Accordingly, rugby and soccer home internationals have been temporarily moved to Croke Park. A DART train passes under the Lansdowne Road Rugby Football Stadium and over the level crossing as it enters the station of the same name. ... The Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) is the body managing rugby union in Ireland. ... First international  England 7 - 0 Ireland  (15 February 1875) Largest win  United States 3 - 83 Ireland  (10 June , 2000) Worst defeat  New Zealand 59 - 6 Ireland  (6 June 1992) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Quarter Finals, 1987, 1991, 1995, 2003, The Ireland rugby union team, represents... First international Irish Free State 1 - 0  Bulgaria (Stade Olympique, Colombes, France; May 28, 1924) Biggest win Republic of Ireland 8 - 0 Malta (Dalymount Park, Republic of Ireland; 16 November 1983) Biggest defeat Brazil 7 - 0 Republic of Ireland (Uberlândia, Brazil; 27 May 1982) World Cup Appearances 3 (First... The Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU) is the body managing rugby football in Ireland. ... The Football Association of Ireland (FAI; Irish: Cumann Peile na h-Éireann) is the organising body for the sport of association football (soccer) in the Republic of Ireland. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ...


Donnybrook Rugby Ground is the home of the Leinster Rugby team, which plays in the Magners League. They also play some important league and Heineken Cup matches at Lansdowne Road and have recently played these matches in the RDS. Donnybrook Rugby Ground is a multi-use stadium in Donnybrook, Republic of Ireland. ... Official website www. ... The Celtic League (also known as the Magners League for sponsorship reasons) is an annual rugby union competition involving regional sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales. ... The Heineken Cup sponsored by Heineken (known as the H Cup in France due to alcohol advertising laws) is an annual rugby union competition involving leading club, regional and provincial teams from England, France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. ...


Dalymount Park, in Phibsboro and the traditional Home of Irish Soccer, is now used only for home games of local club Bohemian FC. Rivals Shelbourne FC play at Tolka Park, in Drumcondra, while St Patrick's Athletic play in Richmond Park in Inchicore on the south west edge of the city. Shamrock Rovers, Ireland's most successful club, are originally from Milltown but have spent the last two decades in search of a home, and hope to complete a new stadium in Tallaght in 2007. The other senior soccer clubs are University College Dublin F.C., based in Belfield, and the now defunct Dublin City F.C. (formerly Home Farm F.C.). Dalymount Park is a football stadium situated in north Dublin. ... Phibsborough, (Baile Phib, Phibsboro), is a neighborhood of Dublin, Ireland. ... Bohemian F.C. (Irish: An Cumann Peile Bóithéimeach) is an Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Shelbourne FC is an Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Tolka Park is located in the Dublin City, in the suburb of Drumcondra. ... Drumcondra (Irish: Droim Conrach) is a fashionable residential area on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... St Patricks Athletic F.C. is a Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Richmon Park is the home ground to the Football team St. ... Inchicore (Inse Chór in Irish) is a suburb of Dublin, Ireland south of the River Liffey and west of the city centre, in the Dublin 8 postal district. ... Shamrock Rovers FC is a Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Milltown is the name of several locations: In the United States of America: Milltown, Indiana Milltown, New Jersey Milltown, South Dakota Milltown, Wisconsin Milltown (town), Wisconsin In Ireland: Milltown, County Kerry Milltown, Dublin, a station on the LUAS light rail system, just after the Milltown Viaduct. ... // WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O093265 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 90 m Population (2006) 64,282  Tallaght (Irish:Tamhlacht), is a large town within the traditional county of Dublin in Ireland. ... University College Dublin Football Club is an Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ... Belfield is a suburb located in the south of Irelands capital city Dublin. ... Dublin City F.C. was an Irish football club playing in the Football League of Ireland. ...


The National Aquatic Centre in Blanchardstown is the first building to open in the Sports Campus Ireland. There are several race courses in the Dublin area including Shelbourne Park (Greyhound racing) and Leopardstown (Horse racing). The world famous Dublin Horse Show takes place at the RDS, Ballsbridge, which hosted the Show Jumping World Championships in 1982. The national boxing arena is located in Harold's Cross, though larger fights take place in the Point Depot in the docklands area. There are also Basketball, Handball, Hockey and Athletics stadia — most notably Morton Stadium in Santry, which held the athletics events of the 2003 Special Olympics. Opened in March 2003, the National Aquatic Centre in Eire, is Europes largest indoor water leisure facility. ... Several greyhounds before a race. ... Horse-racing is an equestrian sporting activity which has been practiced over the centuries; the chariot races of Roman times were an early example, as was the contest of the steeds of the god Odin and the giant Hrungnir in Norse mythology. ... The Royal Dublin Society (RDS) was founded in 1731 by members of the Dublin Philosophical Society in their Trinity College Dublin rooms as the Dublin Society. ... Ballsbridge, Dublin 4, Dublin Ireland, is named for the bridge spanning the River Dodder on the south side of the city. ... 81. ... This article is about the sport. ... Gaelic handball (Irish: Liathróid Láimhe) (also known as handball, Irish handball, court handball or wall handball) is a sport similar to racquetball and squash in that it is one of the four Gaelic Games organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... Morton stadium is an athletics stadium in Dublin in Ireland. ... Santry (Irish: , meaning Old tribe) is a suburb on the Northside of Dublin, bordering Coolock, Glasnevin and Ballymun. ... The crowd at the 2003 Special Olympics World Summer Games Opening Ceremonies in Croke Park, Dublin, Ireland. ...


The Dublin Marathon has been run since 1980. The Dublin Marathon is a marathon run every year in Dublin, Ireland. ...


In recent years rugby league as a sport in Dublin has began to become popular, with two teams, the Dublin Blues and the North Dublin Eagles, from Ireland's Lucozade elite League being based in the nation's capital. Such popularity has been increased with the Irish National Team's success in their qualifiers for the Rugby League World Cup to be held in Australia in 2008.


Shopping

Clery's department store on O'Connell Street.

Dublin is a popular shopping spot for both Irish people and tourists. Dublin city centre has several shopping districts, including Grafton Street and Henry Street and the adjacent Stephen's Green Shopping Centre, Jervis Shopping Centre and newly refurbished Ilac Shopping Centre (all popular meet-up spots for decades). On Grafton street, the most famous shops include Brown Thomas and its sister shop BT2, being akin to Bloomingdales in New York City, for example. Brown Thomas also contains "mini-stores" such as Hermes and Chanel on its Wicklow Street frontage. This is Dublin's nearest equivalent to a Designer shopping street such as Bond Street in London or 5th Avenue in New York City. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Shoppers on Grafton Street Grafton Street (Sráid Grafton in Irish) is one of the two principal shopping streets in Dublin city centre, running from St. ... Shopping in Henry Street View of The Spire from Arnotts department store Henry Street (Sráid Anraí in Irish) is located on Dublins Northside and is one of the two principal shopping streets of Dublin, running from the Spire of Dublin and the General Post Office on OConnell... Interior of the shopping centre. ... The Jervis Shopping Centre is a large indoor shopping centre located at the top of Henry Street in the Northside of Dublin City. ... Ilac Shopping Centre is one of the two shopping malls in Henry Street, Dublin, Republic of Ireland. ... Brown Thomas is a chain of four department stores located in Dublin, Galway, Cork and Limerick. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Bloomingdales is an upscale department store owned by Federated Department Stores, which is also the owner of Macys. ... An arcade in Old Bond Street Bond Street is a major shopping street in London which runs through Mayfair from Piccadilly in the south to Oxford Street in the north. ... Street sign at Fifth Avenue and East 57th street Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare in New York City. ...


Dublin city is the location of large department stores, such as Clerys on O'Connell Street, Arnotts on Henry Street, Brown Thomas on Grafton Street and Debenhams (formerly Roches Stores) on Henry Street. Categories: Stub | Retail companies of Ireland ... Logo of Arnotts department store in Ireland Arnotts is an Australian biscuit company famous for, among others, the Tim Tam. ... Brown Thomas is a chain of four department stores located in Dublin, Galway, Cork and Limerick. ...


A major €750 m development for Dublin city centre has been given the green light. The development of the so-called Northern Quarter will see the construction of 47 new shops, 175 apartments and a four-star hotel. Dublin City Council gave Arnotts planning permission for the plans to change the area bounded by Henry Street, O'Connell Street, Abbey Street and Liffey Street. The redevelopment will also include 14 new cafes along with a 149-bed hotel. It is expected that work on the new area will start in the second half of 2008. Prince's Street, which runs off O'Connell Street, will become a full urban street and pedestrian thoroughfare. Dublin City Council (Comhairle Cathrach Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish) refers to two different entities. ... Logo of Arnotts department store in Ireland Arnotts is an Australian biscuit company famous for, among others, the Tim Tam. ... Daniel OConnell, 19th century nationalist leader, whose statue by John Henry Foley, stands on the street named after him. ... Abbey Street (Sráid na Mainistreach in Irish) is located on Dublins Northside and is one of the principal shopping streets of Dublin, running from the Customs House in the east to Capel Street in the west. ... Daniel OConnell, 19th century nationalist leader, whose statue by John Henry Foley, stands on the street named after him. ...


Since the mid 1990s, suburban Dublin has seen the completion of several modern retail centres. These include Blanchardstown Centre, The Square in Tallaght (Luas Red Line), Liffey Valley Shopping Centre in Clondalkin, OmniPark in Santry, Northside Shopping Centre in Coolock, and Pavilions Shopping Centre in Swords. Blanchardstown (Baile Bhlainséir in Irish) is a sprawling suburb of Dublin, Ireland. ... The Square is a shopping centre in Tallaght in south-west Dublin. ... // WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O093265 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 90 m Population (2006) 64,282  Tallaght (Irish:Tamhlacht), is a large town within the traditional county of Dublin in Ireland. ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(É™)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... Clondalkin (Cluain Dolcáin in Irish, meaning Dolcans meadow) is a town/suburb and parish 10 km west of Dublin City, Ireland, situated in South County Dublin. ... Santry (Irish: , meaning Old tribe) is a suburb on the Northside of Dublin, bordering Coolock, Glasnevin and Ballymun. ... Coolock (An Chúlóg in Irish, The Little Corner) is a large suburban area on Dublin citys Northside in Ireland. ... The word swords can refer to: Swords, Dublin swords (blades) Swords, a suit in the Tarot SWORDS, a ground-based military robot This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


Multicultural Dublin

The Grand Canal in Dublin.
The Grand Canal in Dublin.

Despite having a long tradition of emigration that continued up until the early 1990s, Dublin now has a sizeable number of immigrants. Foreign nationals in Dublin are primarily young and single[14] and the biggest numbers come from across the European Union, particularly The United Kingdom, Poland and Lithuania but also from right across the European continent. There are also considerable and growing numbers from outside Europe, particularly China, Nigeria, the Philippines, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand and Russia. This immigration has stimulated a new diversity in Dublin that, while still relatively moderate when compared to other European capital cities such as Paris and London, has brought a new dimension to life in the city and looks set to grow considerably in the future. 10% of the Republic of Ireland's population is now made up of foreign nationals, and Dublin is home to a disproportionate number of new arrivals to the country - for example, 60% of Ireland's Asian population lives in Dublin even though less than 40% of the overall population live in the Greater Dublin Area.[15] One tangible manifestation of this multiculturalism is in the spread of new ethnic food stores, notably on Parnell Street and Moore Street. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 529 pixelsFull resolution (896 × 592 pixel, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 529 pixelsFull resolution (896 × 592 pixel, file size: 233 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Greater Dublin Area (GDA) is a loosely defined term which is used to describe the city of Dublin and the counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, Kildare, Meath, South Dublin and Wicklow of the Republic of Ireland. ...


Northside and Southside

The River Liffey divides the city into Northside and Southside.
The River Liffey divides the city into Northside and Southside.

A north-south division has traditionally existed in Dublin for some time, with the dividing line being the River Liffey. The Northside is seen by some as working-class, while the Southside is seen as middle and upper middle class. But this is not a clear divide in reality by any means. Dublin postal districts have odd numbers for districts on the Northside — for example, Phibsboro is in Dublin 7 — and even numbers for the Southside — for example, Sandymount is in Dublin 4. An exception to the rule is Dublin 8, which straddles the river. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 285 pixel Image in higher resolution (3964 × 1412 pixel, file size: 847 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Liffey Metadata... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 285 pixel Image in higher resolution (3964 × 1412 pixel, file size: 847 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): River Liffey Metadata... Traffic passing the Independent Bridge at Drumcondra The harbour at Howth The Northside (Taobh Ó Thuaidh in Irish) is the area in Dublin City, Ireland bounded to the south by the River Liffey, to the east by Dublin Bay and to the north and west by the M50 motorway. ... The Southside (Taobh Ó Dheas in Irish) is not an official administrative area but a colloquial term. ... The Liffey in West Wicklow The Liffey (An Life in Irish) is a river in the Republic of Ireland, which flows through the centre of Dublin. ... Traffic passing the Independent Bridge at Drumcondra The harbour at Howth The Northside (Taobh Ó Thuaidh in Irish) is the area in Dublin City, Ireland bounded to the south by the River Liffey, to the east by Dublin Bay and to the north and west by the M50 motorway. ... The Southside (Taobh Ó Dheas in Irish) is not an official administrative area but a colloquial term. ... Street sign in Dublin, displaying name of the street in Irish and English, with postal district number. ... Phibsborough, (Baile Phib, Phibsboro), is a neighborhood of Dublin, Ireland. ... Sandymount (Dumhach Thrá in Irish) is a seaside village/suburb in the district of Dublin 4 in Ireland. ...


This division dates back some centuries, certainly to the point when the Earl of Kildare built his residence on the then less-regarded Southside. When asked why he was building on the Southside, he replied "Where I go, fashion follows me", and he was promptly followed by most other Irish peers. Earl of Kildare is an Irish peerage title. ... The Peerage of Ireland the term used for those peers created by British monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland. ...


The Northside/Southside divide is punctuated by examples of Dublin "sub-culture" stereotypes, with upper-middle class constituents seen as tending towards an accent and demeanour synonymous with (but not exclusive to) the Dublin 4 postcode on the Southside (see Dublin 4, Ross O'Carroll-Kelly), and working-class Dubliners seen as tending towards accents and demeanour associated with (but not exclusive to) Northside and inner-city Dublin neighbourhoods often exemplified by the works of modern writer Roddy Doyle. Dublin 4 is a postal district of Dublin, Ireland including the suburbs of Sandymount, Ballsbridge, Donnybrook, Ringsend and Irishtown on Dublins Southside Dublin. ... Ross OCarroll-Kelly is a fictional character created by Irish journalist Paul Howard. ... Roddy Doyle (Irish: , born May 8, 1958 in Dublin) is an Irish novelist, dramatist and screenwriter. ...

Central Tallaght, West of The Square
Central Tallaght, West of The Square

This simplification of economic and social communities in Dublin ("Southside rich, liberal and snobby"/"Northside poor, industrial and common") does not survive more than a few real-world examples however. For example, the President of Ireland's residence, Áras an Uachtaráin, is on the Northside, although its postal district is Dublin 8, a "Southside" number. Similarly, some of Dublin's majority working-class suburbs such as Tallaght, Dolphin's Barn, Crumlin, Inchicore, Ringsend, Irishtown, Clondalkin and Ballyfermot, are south of the river while wealthier suburbs such as Castleknock, Clontarf, Glasnevin, Howth, Malahide, Portmarnock and Sutton are on the Northside. Areas of the north inner city such as Smithfield, the IFSC and Spencer Dock are also associated with affluence in recent times. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 538 pixel Image in higher resolution (2589 × 1741 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 538 pixel Image in higher resolution (2589 × 1741 pixel, file size: 1. ... Áras an Uachtaráin (formerly the Viceregal Lodge) is the official residence of the President of Ireland, located in the Phoenix Park on the Northside of Dublin1. ... // WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O093265 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 90 m Population (2006) 64,282  Tallaght (Irish:Tamhlacht), is a large town within the traditional county of Dublin in Ireland. ... Dolphins Barn (Carnán Cloc) is an inner city suburb of Dublin, Ireland, situated on the Southside of the city in the Dublin 8 and partially in the Dublin 12 districts. ... Crumlin (Croimghlinn in Irish) is a suburb of Dublin, Ireland, situated on the Southside of the city between Walkinstown Perrystown Drimnagh and Kimmage. ... Inchicore (Inse Chór in Irish) is a suburb of Dublin, Ireland south of the River Liffey and west of the city centre, in the Dublin 8 postal district. ... Ringsend is a suburb of Dublin, the capital of Ireland. ... Irishtown is a district of Dublin, Ireland. ... Clondalkin (Cluain Dolcáin in Irish, meaning Dolcans meadow) is a town/suburb and parish 10 km west of Dublin City, Ireland, situated in South County Dublin. ... Ballyfermot Road Ballyfermot (Baile Formaid in Irish) is a predominantly working and middle class suburb in south west Dublin, Ireland. ... Castleknock (Caisleán Cnucha in Irish meaning Castle of the Hill or Cnuchas Castle[1] is a Barony, village and district at the edge of County Dublin, located 8 km west of the centre of Dublin, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O158368 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Population () Glasnevin (Glas Naíon, Glas Na’on - Stream of the Infants; also known as Glas Naedhe - ONaeidhe’s Stream (after an ancient Chieftain) - in Irish) is a largely residential neighbourhood of Dublin, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O283393 Statistics County: Elevation: sea level Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   8706  n/a Howth (pronounced to rhyme with both; known as Binn Éadair in Irish) is a generally affluent residential area in the Fingal County Council administrative area of County Dublin, Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O225462 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: sea level Population (2002) 11,596  Website: www. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O238432 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: sea level Population (2002) 8,376  Portmarnock (Port Mearnóg in Irish) is a suburban village north of the city of Dublin, in the part of traditional County Dublin now governed as County Fingal, Ireland. ... Sutton (Irish: Cill Fhionntáin - Fintans cell) is a residential suburb of Dublin, Ireland. ... Smithfield (Irish: Margadh na Feirme, meaning Farmers Market) is an area on the northside of Dublin. ... Famine sculpture in front of the International Financial Services Centre, Dublin. ... Spencer Dock (Irish: Duga Spencer) is a location in Dublin, Ireland. ...


The north-south divide has mellowed considerably in the past number of years. This is primarily due to the favourable economic conditions currently in Ireland and the emergence of the Celtic Tiger economy in Ireland, and to pressure on housing stock. Correspondingly, Dublin has progressed to become one of the wealthiest cities in Europe. Cartoon of the Celtic Tiger. ...


The economic divide in Dublin is east-west as well as north-south, the east side generally being wealthier than the west. There are significant social divisions between the coastal suburbs in the east of the city, including those on the Northside, and the newer developments further to the west.


Education

Trinity College, Dublin.

Dublin is the primary centre of education in Ireland, with three universities and several other higher education institutions. There are 20 third-level institutes in the city.[16] The University of Dublin is the oldest university in Ireland dating from the 16th century. Its sole constituent college, Trinity College, was established by Royal Charter under Elizabeth I and was closed to Roman Catholics until Catholic Emancipation; the Catholic hierarchy then banned Roman Catholics from attending it until 1970. The National University of Ireland has its seat in Dublin, which is also the location of the associated constituent university of University College Dublin (UCD), the largest university in Ireland; although it is located in Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, just outside the city boundary. Dublin City University (DCU) is the most recent university and specialises in business, engineering, and science courses, particularly with relevance to industry. The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) is a medical school which is a recognised college of the NUI, it is situated at St. Stephen's Green in the city centre. The National University of Ireland, Maynooth, another constituent university of the NUI, is in neighbouring Co. Kildare, about 25 km (16 mi) from the city centre. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University of Dublin, corporately designated the Chancellor, Doctors and Masters of the University of Dublin located in Dublin, Ireland, was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, making it Irelands oldest university. ... For other institutions named Trinity College, see Trinity College. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Catholic Emancipation was a process in Great Britain and Ireland in the late 18th century and early 19th century which involved reducing and removing many of the restrictions on Roman Catholics which had been introduced by the Act of Uniformity, the Test Acts and the Penal Laws. ... The National University of Ireland (NUI) is a federal university system of constituent universities, previously called constituent colleges, and recognised colleges set up under the Irish Universities Act, 1908, and significantly amended by the Universities Act, 1997. ... University College Dublin - National University of Ireland, Dublin - more commonly University College Dublin (UCD) - is Irelands largest university, with over 20,000 students. ... Dun Laoghaire–Rathdown1 (Irish: Dún Laoghaire–Ráth an Dúin) is an administrative county in the Republic of Ireland forming part of the traditional county of Dublin. ... Dublin City University (DCU) is a university situated between Glasnevin and Whitehall on the Northside of Dublin in Ireland. ... The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI), (Irish: ) is a Dublin based private medical institution, situated on St. ... The National University of Ireland (NUI) is a federal university system of constituent universities, previously called constituent colleges, and recognised colleges set up under the Irish Universities Act, 1908, and significantly amended by the Universities Act, 1997. ... St. ... The National University of Ireland, Maynooth (NUIM) was founded in 1997 by the Universities Act, 1997 as a constituent university of the National University of Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2002) 163,944 Website: www. ...


Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) is a modern technical college and is the country's largest non-university third-level institution; it specialises in technical subjects but also offers many arts and humanities courses. It is soon to move to a new campus at Grangegorman. Two suburbs of Dublin, Tallaght and Blanchardstown have Institutes of Technology: Institute of Technology, Tallaght, and Institute of Technology, Blanchardstown. The Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) was established officially in 1992 under the Dublin Institute of Technology Act but had been previously set up in 1978 on an ad-hoc basis. ... Grangegorman is on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... // WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O093265 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 90 m Population (2006) 64,282  Tallaght (Irish:Tamhlacht), is a large town within the traditional county of Dublin in Ireland. ... Blanchardstown (Baile Bhlainséir in Irish) is a sprawling suburb of Dublin, Ireland. ... Institute of Technology, Tallaght (ITT) formerly Regional Technical College, Tallaght, located in Tallaght, County Dublin, Ireland. ... Institute of Technology, Blanchardstown (ITB) is the most recent Institute of Technology opened in Ireland. ...


The National College of Art and Design (NCAD) and Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology (DLIADT) support training and research in art, design and media technology. The National College of Art and Design is an art school in Dublin, Ireland. ... Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology (DLIADT) is located at Dún Laoghaire, Ireland and was created in the 1960s as an arts school of Dún Laoghaire Vocational Education Committee. ...


There are also various other smaller specialised colleges, including private ones:

  • Griffith College Dublin is located at the former Griffith Barracks on the South Circular Road, offering courses in Accountancy, Business, Law, Computing, Media & Journalism and Design.
  • The Gaiety School of Acting hosts both a two year intensive degree in acting and a three year undergraduate BA degree in acting in conjunction with Dublin City University, and Dublin Business School, located on Aungier Street.
  • The New Media Technology College provides specialised courses in film, performing arts, information technology, photography, interactive media and music technology (including a Master's degree and FETAC courses).

The college logo Griffith College Dublin (GCD) is a private college located on South Circular Road in Dublin, Ireland. ... The Gaiety School of Acting is probably Irelands best known drama school. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Dublin City University (DCU) is a university situated between Glasnevin and Whitehall on the Northside of Dublin in Ireland. ... Dublin Business School (DBS) is one of the leading independent business colleges in Ireland and provides a comprehensive range of undergraduate, graduate, professional and executive education programms. ... NMTC was set up in 2000 to offer highly specialised programmes in Digital Media. ... The Further Education and Training Awards Council is the authority that grants extra-university further education awards in Ireland, these awards have not yet been finalised but are been so by the National Qualifications Authority of Ireland. ...

Population

The city of Dublin is the entire area administered by Dublin City Council, but can also refer to the contiguous suburban areas that run into the adjacent counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal and South Dublin. This area is sometimes known as 'Urban Dublin' or the 'Dublin Metropolitan Area'. Dublin City Council (Comhairle Cathrach Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish) refers to two different entities. ... Dun Laoghaire–Rathdown1 (Irish: Dún Laoghaire–Ráth an Dúin) is an administrative county in the Republic of Ireland forming part of the traditional county of Dublin. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Swords Code: D (FL proposed) Area: 448. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Tallaght Code: D (SN proposed) Area: 222. ... Dublin Metropolitan Area (GDA) is a term used by various bodies to describe the area of Dublin and its surrounding counties which have an urban designation; between these bodies its definition is not always consistent. ...


The population of the administrative area controlled by Dublin City Council was 505,739 at the census of 2006. At the same census, the Dublin Region population was 1,186,159, and the Greater Dublin Area 1,661,185. The city's population is expanding rapidly, and the Greater Dublin Area is estimated by the CSO to reach 2.1 million by 2021. Today, approximately 40% of the population of Ireland live within a 100 km (62 mi) fan radius of this east coast city.[17] Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Dublin Code: D Area: 921 km² Population (2006) 1,186,821 County Dublin (Irish: Contae Bhaile Átha Cliath), or more correctly today the Dublin Region[1] (Réigiúin Átha Cliath), is the area that contains the city of Dublin, the capital and largest city... Greater Dublin Area (GDA) is a loosely defined term which is used to describe the city of Dublin and the counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, Kildare, Meath, South Dublin and Wicklow of the Republic of Ireland. ... Greater Dublin Area (GDA) is a loosely defined term which is used to describe the city of Dublin and the counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, Kildare, Meath, South Dublin and Wicklow of the Republic of Ireland. ... The Central Statistics Office (CSO) is the statistical agency responsible for the gathering of information relating to economic, social and general activities and conditions in the Republic of Ireland, in particular the National Census which is held every five years. ...


Economy and infrastructure

Industry, employment and standard of living

Dublin has been at the centre of Ireland's phenomenal economic growth over the last 10-15 years, a period (often of double-digit growth) referred to as the Celtic Tiger years. Living standards in the city have risen dramatically, although the cost of living has also soared. Dublin is now the planet's 16th most expensive city (8th most expensive city in Europe, excluding Russian cities).[18] However, it has the fourth highest wages for a city in the world, ahead of both New York City and London, though behind Zürich, Geneva and Oslo.[19] Cartoon of the Celtic Tiger. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ...


Historically, brewing has probably been the industry most often associated with the city: Guinness has been brewed at the St. James's Gate Brewery since 1759. Since the advent of the Celtic Tiger years, however, a large number of global pharmaceutical, information and communications technology companies have located in Dublin and the Greater Dublin Area. For example, Microsoft, Google, Amazon, PayPal, Yahoo! and Pfizer (among others) now have European headquarters and/or operational bases in the city and its suburbs. Intel and Hewlett-Packard have large manufacturing plants in Leixlip, County Kildare, 15 km (9 mi) to the west. A 16th century brewer A 21st century brewer This article concerns the production of alcoholic beverages. ... Guinness logo Guinness is Good for You — Irish language advertisement. ... St. ... Greater Dublin Area (GDA) is a loosely defined term which is used to describe the city of Dublin and the counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, Kildare, Meath, South Dublin and Wicklow of the Republic of Ireland. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... This article is about the corporation. ... Amazon. ... eBays North First Street satellite office campus (home to PayPals corporate headquarters) PayPal is an e-commerce business allowing payments and money transfers to be made through the Internet. ... Yahoo redirects here. ... Pfizer Incorporated (NYSE: PFE) is the worlds largest research-based pharmaceutical company[1].[1] The company is based in New York City. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... The Hewlett-Packard Company (NYSE: HPQ), commonly known as HP, is a very large, global company headquartered in Palo Alto, California, United States. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O003360 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 46 m Population (2002)  - Town:  - Rural:   15,016  15,154 Website: kildare. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Naas Code: KE Area: 1,693 km² Population (2006) 186,075 Website: www. ...

Banking, finance and commerce are also important in the city — the IFSC alone handles over €1 trillion a year. Many international firms have established major headquarters in the city (eg. Citibank, Commerzbank). Also located in Dublin is the Irish Stock Exchange (ISEQ), Internet Neutral Exchange (INEX) and Irish Enterprise Exchange (IEX). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 716 KB) Summary Looking north up the major thoroughfare of central Dublin from the OConnell Bridge over the River Liffey: a statue of the streets namesake and the Spire of Dublin are seen in the streets central... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 716 KB) Summary Looking north up the major thoroughfare of central Dublin from the OConnell Bridge over the River Liffey: a statue of the streets namesake and the Spire of Dublin are seen in the streets central... Looking south along OConnell Street at night: the Spires tip is illuminated. ... Daniel OConnell, 19th century nationalist leader, whose statue by John Henry Foley, stands on the street named after him. ... The International Financial Services Centre (IFSC) is a major financial services center in Dublin, Ireland. ... Citibank is a major international bank, founded in 1812 as the City Bank of New York. ... Commerzbank AG (DAX: CBK) is the second-largest bank in Germany (after Deutsche Bank) and headquartered in Frankfurt am Main. ... The Irish Stock Exchange (ISE) is Irelands stock exchange and can trace its history to 1793. ... Internet Neutral Exchange (INEX) is an Internet exchange located in the Republic of Ireland, with points of presence in Dublin at Citywest and Kilcarbery Park. ... The Irish Enterprise Exchange (IEX) was launched on 12 April 2005 to replace the Irish Stock Exchanges Exploration Securities Market and Developing Companies Market. ...


The economic boom years have led to a sharp increase in construction, which is now also a major employer, especially for immigrants. Redevelopment is taking place in large projects such as Dublin Docklands, Spencer Dock and others, transforming once run-down industrial areas in the city centre. Dublin City Council seems to now have loosened the former limits on "high-rise" structures. The tallest building, Liberty Hall, is only 59.4 m (194.9 ft) tall; already under construction in the city is Heuston Gate, a 117 m (384 ft) building (134 m including spire). The 120 m (394 ft) Britain Quay Tower and the 120 m (394 ft) Point Village Watchtower have been approved. Construction has started on the latter. Also the U2 Tower will be the tallest building on the Island of Ireland when it is finished. Liberty Hall, Dublins tallest building, stands in the background. ... The Point Village (Irish: Sráidbhaile an Phointe) is a planned new city quarter for Dublin, Ireland. ... The U2 Tower in Dublin will be the tallest building in the Republic of Ireland when it is finished. ...


In 2005, around 800,000 people were employed in the Greater Dublin Area, of whom around 600,000 were employed in the services sector and 200,000 in the industrial sector.[20]


Economic growth is expected to slow in the coming years, with the Irish central bank predicting medium-term growth rates of around 3–5%.[21] While this represents a slowdown relative to the early Celtic Tiger years, it is still stronger than growth in most other wealthy countries.


Transport

Main article: Transport in Dublin
December 2006, southbound entrance of the Dublin Port Tunnel

This article deals with transport in the Greater Dublin Area centered on Dublin in the Republic of Ireland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1419 KB) M50 Port Tunnel entrance southbound. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2592x1944, 1419 KB) M50 Port Tunnel entrance southbound. ... Dublin Port Tunnel Construction, 2004 December 2006, southbound entrance The Dublin Port Tunnel (Tollán Calafoirt Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish) is a road traffic tunnel in Dublin, Ireland, that forms part of the M50 motorway. ...

Road network

Dublin is also the main hub of the country's road network. The M50 motorway (the busiest road in Ireland), a semi-ring road runs around the south, west and north of the city, connecting the most important national primary routes in the state that fan out from the capital to the regions. As of 2007, a toll of €1.90 applies on what is called the West-Link, two adjacent concrete bridges that tower high above the River Liffey near the village of Lucan. The M50 motorway is a motorway and National Primary Route in the Republic of Ireland running in a C-shaped ring around the northern, western and southern sides of the capital city, Dublin. ... A beltway (American English), ring road or orbital motorway (British English) is a circumferential highway found around many cities. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The West-Link is a toll bridge on the M50 motorway to the west of Dublin, Ireland. ... Lucan redirects here. ...


To complete the ring road, an eastern bypass is also proposed for the city of Dublin. The first half of this project is the Dublin Port Tunnel which opened in late 2006 and mainly caters to heavy vehicles. Dublin Port Tunnel Construction, 2004 December 2006, southbound entrance The Dublin Port Tunnel (Tollán Calafoirt Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish) is a road traffic tunnel in Dublin, Ireland, that forms part of the M50 motorway. ...


The capital is also surrounded by an inner and outer orbital route. The inner orbital route runs roughly around the heart of the Georgian city and the outer orbital route runs largely along the natural circle formed by Dublin's two canals, the Grand Canal and the Royal Canal, as well as the North and South Circular Roads. The Grand Canal begins on the Southside of Dublin, Ireland. ... Picture of the Royal Canal near Mullingar taken in October 2004 The Royal Canal is a canal originally built for freight transportation from the River Liffey at Dublin to the River Shannon in the Republic of Ireland. ...


Bus

Main article: Dublin Bus
A DART train, forming part of the Dublin Suburban Rail network.
A DART train, forming part of the Dublin Suburban Rail network.
A train entering Pearse Station
A train entering Pearse Station

The bulk of the public transport system in Dublin is made up of bus services operated by Bus Átha Cliath (Dublin Bus) but a number of smaller operators provide services as well. Dublin Bus (Irish: Bus Átha Cliath) is a public transport operator in the Republic of Ireland. ... Dublin Area Rapid Transit 1500v DC Unit No. ... Dublin Area Rapid Transit 1500v DC Unit No. ... The Dublin Area Rapid Transit (DART), (Irish: ), is part of the suburban railway network in Ireland, running mainly along the coastline of Dublin Bay on the Trans-Dublin route, from Greystones in County Wicklow, through Dublin to Howth and Malahide in County Dublin. ... The Dublin Suburban Rail network (now branded DART/Commuter) is a railway network that serves the city of Dublin, Ireland, aswell as most of the Greater Dublin Area. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (813 × 542 pixel, file size: 85 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 2003 photo of Loop Line Railway entering Pearse Station in Westland Row, Dublin File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (813 × 542 pixel, file size: 85 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) 2003 photo of Loop Line Railway entering Pearse Station in Westland Row, Dublin File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared... Dublin Pearse, commonly called Pearse station, is located on Westland Row in the Southside in Dublin is a DART and Intercity railway station owned by Coras Iompair Eireann. ... Dublin Bus - or less well known by the Irish language name Bus Átha Cliath - provides an extensive bus network of nearly 200 routes in the City of Dublin and the greater County Dublin area. ...


Suburban Rail and DART

The Dublin Suburban Rail network is a system of five rail lines serving mainly commuters in the Greater Dublin Area, though some trains go even further to commuter towns such as Drogheda. One of these is an electrified line that runs along Dublin Bay and is known as the Dublin Area Rapid Transit (DART) line. The Dublin Suburban Rail network (now branded DART/Commuter) is a railway network that serves the city of Dublin, Ireland, aswell as most of the Greater Dublin Area. ... Greater Dublin Area (GDA) is a loosely defined term which is used to describe the city of Dublin and the counties of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, Fingal, Kildare, Meath, South Dublin and Wicklow of the Republic of Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O088754 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 1 m Population (2006)  - Proper  - Environs    28,973[1]  6,117[1] Website: www. ... Dublin Bay in relation to Ireland. ... The Dublin Area Rapid Transit (DART), (Irish: ), is part of the suburban railway network in Ireland, running mainly along the coastline of Dublin Bay on the Trans-Dublin route, from Greystones in County Wicklow, through Dublin to Howth and Malahide in County Dublin. ...


Luas

A two-line light rail/tram network called the Luas opened in 2004 and has proved popular in the (limited) areas it serves, although the lack of a link between the two lines is widely criticised. Five new luas lines are planned, the last of which will be opened in 2014, with the two existing lines set to be joined up by 2012. This article is about light rail systems in general. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(ə)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ...


Metro

Main article: Dublin Metro

Building work has not yet begun on the Dublin Metro (subway / underground) system set out in the Irish government's 2005 Transport 21 plan. Although not confirmed, it is believed that the metro will be fully segregated from all traffic which will mean it will not disrupt traffic when in operation, unlike an on-street Luas Tram or the DART. The Metro North will bring rail access to areas and institutions currently lacking it, such as the Mater Hospital, Drumcondra (Croke Park, inter-city and suburban rail stop), Dublin City University, Ballymun, Swords and Dublin Airport. The Metro West will serve the large suburbs of Tallaght, Clondalkin and Blanchardstown. Photomontage of proposed metro tunneling on O Connell Street (looking north). ... Luas [l̪ˠuː(É™)s̪ˠ] (Irish for speed), also promoted in the development stage as the Dublin Light Rail System, currently encompasses two unconnected on-street light rail lines in Dublin, Ireland. ... The Dublin Area Rapid Transit (DART), (Irish: ), is part of the suburban railway network in Ireland, running mainly along the coastline of Dublin Bay on the Trans-Dublin route, from Greystones in County Wicklow, through Dublin to Howth and Malahide in County Dublin. ... The Mater Misericordiae University Hospital (commonly known as Mater Hospital) is a major teaching hospital, based at Eccles Street, Phibsboro, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... Drumcondra (Irish: Droim Conrach) is a fashionable residential area on the Northside of Dublin, Ireland. ... Croke Park (Irish: Páirc an Chrócaigh) in Dublin, Ireland is the largest sports stadium in Ireland and the principal stadium and headquarters of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), Irelands biggest sporting organisation. ... Dublin City University (DCU) is a university situated between Glasnevin and Whitehall on the Northside of Dublin in Ireland. ... Ballymun (Irish:Baile Munna), nicknamed The Mun, is an area on Dublins Northside close to Dublin Airport. ... The word swords can refer to: Swords, Dublin swords (blades) Swords, a suit in the Tarot SWORDS, a ground-based military robot This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... // WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference O093265 Statistics Province: Leinster County: Elevation: 90 m Population (2006) 64,282  Tallaght (Irish:Tamhlacht), is a large town within the traditional county of Dublin in Ireland. ... Clondalkin (Cluain Dolcáin in Irish, meaning Dolcans meadow) is a town/suburb and parish 10 km west of Dublin City, Ireland, situated in South County Dublin. ... Blanchardstown (Baile Bhlainséir in Irish) is a sprawling suburb of Dublin, Ireland. ...


Air and sea transport

Dublin is at the centre of Ireland's transport system. Dublin Port is the country's busiest sea port and Dublin Airport is the busiest airport on the island. Most of the transport system in Ireland rests in public hands, both north and south of the border. ... Dublin Port (Irish: Calafort Bhaile Átha Cliath) is Irelands biggest sea port. ... Categories: Stub | Commercial item transport and distribution | Transportation ... Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ...


Communications and media

Dublin is the centre of both media and communications in Ireland, with many newspapers, radio stations, television stations and telephone companies having their headquarters there. Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ) is Ireland's national state broadcaster, and has its main offices and studios in Donnybrook, Dublin. Fair City is the broadcaster's capital-based soap, located in the fictional Dublin suburb of Carraigstown. TV3, Channel 6, City Channel and Setanta Sports are also based in Dublin. Dublin is home to national commercial radio networks Today FM and Newstalk, as well as local stations. The main infrastructure and offices of An Post and telecommunciations companies, such as the former state telephone company Eircom, as well as mobile/cellular operators Meteor, Vodafone and O2 are all located in the capital. Dublin is also the headquarters of important national newspapers such as The Irish Times and Irish Independent. Radio Telefís Éireann[1] (RTÉ; IPA: ,  ) is the Public Service Broadcaster of the Republic of Ireland. ... This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ... TV3 Ireland is the sole commercial television channel in the Republic of Ireland. ... Channel 6 redirects here. ... City Channel is a proposed cable television channel, intending to operate in Dublin, Republic of Ireland. ... Setanta Sports (pronunciation: ) is an international sports broadcaster, operating 12 channels in 24 countries. ... 100-102 Today FM, formerly called Radio Ireland, is Irelands only independent national commercial radio station (there are many other independent local commercial stations, however). ... Newstalk (formerly called NewsTalk 106) is an Independent Radio station in the Republic of Ireland. ... The An Post logo An Post (English literal translation: The Post, English official title: The Post Office) is the State-owned provider of postal services in Ireland. ... eircom Group plc is the largest telecommunications operator in the Republic of Ireland. ... Meteor Mobile Communications Limited is a mobile telecommunications company in the Republic of Ireland. ... Vodafone Ireland, part of the Vodafone Group, which is marginally the largest mobile phone company in the Republic of Ireland, and was previously called Eircell. ... O2 Ireland is a GSM mobile telecommunications operator in the Republic of Ireland. ... It has been suggested that Irish Times Trust be merged into this article or section. ... The Irish Independent is Irelands best-selling daily newspaper. ...


Government

City

Dublin City Hallformerly the Royal Exchange
Dublin City Hall
formerly the Royal Exchange

The City is governed by Dublin City Council (formerly called Dublin Corporation), which is presided over by the Lord Mayor of Dublin, who is elected for a yearly term and resides in the Mansion House. Dublin City Council is based in two major buildings. Council meetings take place in the headquarters at Dublin City Hall, the former Royal Exchange taken over for city government use in the 1850s. Many of its administrative staff are based in the controversial Civic Offices on Wood Quay. uploading image of Dublin City Hall. ... uploading image of Dublin City Hall. ... Dublin City Hall 18th Century view of the Royal Exchange one of Maltons views of Dublin The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, was built between 1769 and 1779 and is a particularly fine example of 18th century architecture. ... Dublin City Council (Comhairle Cathrach Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish) refers to two different entities. ... Dublin Corporation is the former name given to the city government and its administrative organisation in Dublin between the twelfth century and 1 January 2002. ... The Mansion House The Lord Mayor of Dublin is the symbolic head of the city government in the capital of Ireland. ... The Mansion House on Dawson Street, Dublin, is the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin and has been since 1715. ... Dublin City Hall 18th Century view of the Royal Exchange one of Maltons views of Dublin The City Hall, Dublin, originally the Royal Exchange, was built between 1769 and 1779 and is a particularly fine example of 18th century architecture. ... Wood Quay is a riverside area of Dublin that was one of the most important sites of Viking settlement in the city. ...


The City Council is a unicameral assembly of 52 members, elected every five years from Local Election Areas. The party with the majority of seats decides who sits on what committee, what policies are followed, and who becomes Lord Mayor. Chaired by the Lord Mayor, the Council passes an annual budget for spending on housing, traffic management, refuse, drainage, planning, etc. The Dublin City Manager is responsible for the implementation of decisions of the City Council.


National

Leinster House18th century ducal palace now the seat of parliament that houses both the Dáil & Seanad
Leinster House
18th century ducal palace now the seat of parliament that houses both the Dáil & Seanad

The national parliament of the Republic of Ireland, the Oireachtas, consists of the President of Ireland and two houses, Dáil Éireann (Chamber of Deputies) and Seanad Éireann (Senate). All three are based in Dublin. The President of Ireland lives in Áras an Uachtaráin, the former residence of the Governor-General of the Irish Free State in the city's largest park, Phoenix Park. Both houses of the Oireachtas meet in Leinster House, a former ducal palace on the south side. The building has been the home of Irish parliaments since the creation of the Irish Free State on December 6, 1922. photograph of Irelands parliament, Leinster House. ... photograph of Irelands parliament, Leinster House. ... Leinster House The former palace of the Duke of Leinster. ... This article is about the current Irish body. ... Type Upper house of Oireachtas Cathaoirleach Pat Moylan, Fianna Fáil since 13 September 2007 Members 60 Political groups Fianna Fáil Fine Gael Labour Party Independents Progressive Democrats Green Party Sinn Féin Last elections 2007 Meeting place Leinster House Web site www. ... The Oireachtas is the National Parliament of the Republic of Ireland. ... This article is about the current Irish body. ... Type Upper house of Oireachtas Cathaoirleach Pat Moylan, Fianna Fáil since 13 September 2007 Members 60 Political groups Fianna Fáil Fine Gael Labour Party Independents Progressive Democrats Green Party Sinn Féin Last elections 2007 Meeting place Leinster House Web site www. ... Official Seal of the President of Ireland The President of Ireland (Irish: ) [uːəxt̪ˠəɾaːn̪ˠ n̪ˠə heːɼən̪ˠ] is the head of state of the Republic of Ireland. ... Áras an Uachtaráin (formerly the Viceregal Lodge) is the official residence of the President of Ireland, located in the Phoenix Park on the Northside of Dublin1. ... The Governor-General (Irish: Seanascal) was the representative of the King in the 1922–1937 Irish Free State. ... Phoenix Park (in Irish, Páirc an Fhionn-Uisce) is a large park located 3 km to the north west of Dublin city centre in Ireland. ... Leinster House The former palace of the Duke of Leinster. ... This article is about the prior state. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Irish Government is based in the Government Buildings, a large building designed by Sir Aston Webb, the architect who created the Edwardian facade of Buckingham Palace, as the Royal College of Science. In 1921 the House of Commons of Southern Ireland met here. Given its location next to Leinster House, the Irish Free State government took over part of the building to serve as a temporary home for some ministries. Both it and Leinster House, meant to be a temporary home of parliament, became permanent homes. uploading image of Irish Govt buildings. ... uploading image of Irish Govt buildings. ... Government Buildings is a large Edwardian building enclosing a quadrangle on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland, in which several key offices of the government of the Republic of Ireland are located. ... The Royal College of Science for Ireland was created as a result of a decision of HM Treasury in 1865 to merge a number of science-orientated education bodies including the Museum of Irish Industry and Government School of Science applied to Mining and the Arts. ... Government Buildings is a large Edwardian building enclosing a quadrangle on Merrion Street in Dublin, Ireland, in which several key offices of the government of the Republic of Ireland are located. ... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... The Royal College of Science for Ireland was created as a result of a decision of HM Treasury in 1865 to merge a number of science-orientated education bodies including the Museum of Irish Industry and Government School of Science applied to Mining and the Arts. ... House of Commons of Southern Ireland was the lower house of the Irish parliament created by the Government of Ireland Act, passed in 1920, during the Irish War of Independence. ...


The old Irish Houses of Parliament of the Kingdom of Ireland are in College Green. The Irish House of Commons entrance The original entrance to the building, facing onto College Green. ... Coat of arms1 Capital Dublin Language(s) Irish, English Government Monarchy King2  - 1542-1547 Henry VIII  - 1760-1801 George III Chief Secretary  - 1660 Matthew Lock  - 1798-1801 Viscount Castlereagh Legislature Parliament of Ireland  - Upper house Irish House of Lords  - Lower house Irish House of Commons History  - Act of Parliament 1541... College Green, previously called Hoggen Green, is a three sided square in the centre of Dublin. ...


Climate

Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Dublin
Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Dublin

Dublin enjoys a maritime temperate climate characterised by mild winters, cool summers, and a lack of temperature extremes. Contrary to popular belief, Dublin does not experience as high rainfall as the West of Ireland, which receives twice that of the capital city. Dublin has fewer rainy days, on average, than London. The average maximum January temperature is 8 °C, the average maximum July temperature is 20 °C. The sunniest months, on average, are May and June. The wettest months, on average, are December and August, with 74 mm of rain. The driest month is April, with 45 mm. The total average annual rainfall (and other forms of precipitation) is 762 mm, lower than Sydney, New York City and even Dallas. Due to Dublin's high latitude, it experiences long summer days (around 19 hours of daylight) and short winter days (as short as nine hours). Like the rest of Ireland it is relatively safe from common natural disasters such as tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... London has a temperate climate, with regular but generally light precipitation throughout the year. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Dallas redirects here. ... Mount Pinatubo eruption, 1991 A natural disaster is the consequence of a natural hazard (e. ...


Strong winds from Atlantic storm systems can affect Dublin, though usually less severe than other parts of Ireland. Severe winds are most likely during mid-winter, but can occur anytime, especially between October and February. During one of the stormiest periods of recent times, a gust of 151 km/h (94 mph) was recorded at Casement Aerodrome on 24 December 1997. Casement Aerodrome or Baldonnel Aerodrome (IATA: N/A, ICAO: EIME) is an airfield to the south west of Dublin, Ireland situated off the N7 main road route to the south and south west. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...


An urban heat island effect means Dublin is a few degrees warmer than surrounding areas. There is also a slight temperature difference between the city centre and the city's suburbs, with the city centre slightly warmer, as it is more built up. There are slight differences between the city centre[22] and the Airport,[23] just 12 km (7 mi) north. An urban heat island (UHI) is a metropolitan area which is significantly warmer than its surroundings. ...


The city is not noted for its temperature extremes due to its mild climate. Typically, the coldest months are December, January and February. Temperatures in summer in recent years have been rising to substantially above average figures, e.g. 31 °C in July 2006, over 11 °C higher than the average maximum. Recent heat waves include the European heat wave of 2003 and European heat wave of 2006. The summer of 2003 was one of the hottest ever in Europe; this led to a health crisis in certain countries as well as considerable impact on crops. ... It has been suggested that British heat wave of 2006 be merged into this article or section. ...


The main precipitation in winter is rain. The city can experience some snow showers during the months from November to April, but lying snow is rare (on average, only 4/5 days). Hail occurs more often than snow, and is most likely during the winter and spring months. Another rare type of weather is thunder and lightning, most common in summer. This article is about the precipitation. ... Thunder is the sound made by lightning. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ...

Month[24] Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year 2005-2006
Average high 8°C
(46°F)
8°C
(46°F)
10°C
(50°F)
13°C
(55°F)
15°C
(59°F)
18°C
(64°F)
20°C
(68°F)
19°C
(66°F)
17°C
(63°F)
14°C
(57°F)
10°C
(50°F)
8°C
(46°F)
13°C
(56°F)
Average low 1°C
(34°F)
2°C
(36°F)
3°C
(37°F)
4°C
(39°F)
6°C
(43°F)
9°C
(48°F)
11°C
(52°F)
11°C
(52°F)
9°C
(48°F)
6°C
(43°F)
4°C
(39°F)
3°C
(37°F)
6°C
(42°F)
Total rainfall 67 mm (2.6") 55 mm (2.1") 51 mm (2") 45 mm (1.7") 60 mm (2.3") 57 mm (2.2") 70 mm (2.7") 74 mm (2.9") 72 mm (2.8") 70 mm (2.7") 67 mm (2.6") 74 mm (2.9") 762 mm (29.5")

Crime

Official statistics from An Garda Síochána for 2001-2005[25] show that the overall headline crime rate for the metropolitan area per 1,000 of population is the highest in the country. During the 1980s and 1990s, a heroin epidemic swept through working class areas of the inner city and outlying suburbs. Dublin had 80 homicides from 2004 to the end of 2006. 32 were gang-related. In 2007, as of mid July, there have been 15 homicides, in which 4 were gangland shootings. Dublin also has the largest number of fatal stabbings in Ireland.[26] A member of the motorcycle unit of the Garda Síochána. ...


Sister cities

Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... This article is about the Spanish autonomous community. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Matsue (松江市 Matsue-shi) is the capital city of Shimane Prefecture in the ChÅ«goku region of Japan. ... Shimane Prefecture ) is located in the Chugoku region on Honshu island, Japan. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - Total 365. ...

Tourist attractions

See also: :Category:Visitor attractions in County Dublin

Footnotes

  1. ^ Dublin City Council Dublin City Coat of Arms (retrieved 16 February 2007
  2. ^ 'Baile Átha Cliath' (or simply 'Áth Cliath') and 'Dubh Linn' are the two names of the city, the former being the one currently in official and common usage.
  3. ^ TalkingCities
  4. ^ The Irish Experience
  5. ^ BBC record of Survey
  6. ^ A Popular History of Ireland - Thomas D'Arcy McGee (1825-1868)
  7. ^ It should be noted that this state was unilaterally declared and was not recognised by any other country apart from Russia. The control did not extend to all of the island, particularly unionist areas in the north east.
  8. ^ Dublin Travel Guide Ireland
  9. ^ TalkingCities
  10. ^ The Irish Experience
  11. ^ Dublin voted friendliest European city March 13, 2007
  12. ^ Croke Park Fixtures - UEFA European Championship Listings 2006]
  13. ^ LRSDC.ie - Homepage of Lansdowne Road Development Company (IRFU and FAI JV)
  14. ^ Most new immigrants young and single July 12, 2007
  15. ^ Foreign nationals now 10% of Irish population 26 July 2007
  16. ^ Dublin facts
  17. ^ Call for improved infrastructure for Dublin 2 April 2007
  18. ^ Global/Worldwide Cost of Living Survey Rankings 2007/2008, Cities, International, Europe 2007
  19. ^ London is the most expensive city in the world while Swiss cities are home to highest earners
  20. ^ Dublin employmentPDF (256 KiB)
  21. ^ Central Bank predicts less growth
  22. ^ Dublin's weather
  23. ^ Dublin Airports weather
  24. ^ Weather and climate data from BBC Weather.
  25. ^ Garda Annual Reports 1999-2006
  26. ^ Irish Times 30/10/2007

“PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...

See also

The former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street which was blown up by the IRA
The former Nelson's Pillar on O'Connell Street which was blown up by the IRA

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (553x901, 25 KB) Summary Nelsons Pillar Dublin, Ireland from http://irishdancedresscanada. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (553x901, 25 KB) Summary Nelsons Pillar Dublin, Ireland from http://irishdancedresscanada. ... Nelsons Pillar on OConnell Street Nelsons Pillars viewing platform afforded views over Dublin, as this 1964 photograph of OConnell Street attests. ... Look up IRA in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dublin Castle. ... Street sign in Dublin, displaying name of the street in Irish and English, with postal district number. ... General Post Office in 2006. ... Dublins famous Hapenny Bridge Beyond it, the dome of the eighteenth century Custom House and Liberty Hall, Dublins tallest building. ... The Irish House of Commons entrance The original entrance to the building, facing onto College Green. ... The Kings of Dublin, or Dyflin. ... Dublin, as the capital city of the Republic of Ireland and the largest city in Ireland as produced several noted artists, entertainers, politicians and businesspeople. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Ireland This page aims to list articles related to the island of Ireland. ... This is a link page for cities and towns in the Republic of Ireland, including larger villages, and villages and townlands of note, as well as towns, townships or urban centres in Dublin. ... Mulligans Pub located on Poolbeg Street, Dublin 2, is one of the oldest and most popular of Dublin City Centres historic pubs. ... Traffic passing the Independent Bridge at Drumcondra The harbour at Howth The Northside (Taobh Ó Thuaidh in Irish) is the area in Dublin City, Ireland bounded to the south by the River Liffey, to the east by Dublin Bay and to the north and west by the M50 motorway. ... The Southside (Taobh Ó Dheas in Irish) is not an official administrative area but a colloquial term. ... Looking south along OConnell Street at night: the Spires tip is illuminated. ... St. ... At one stage in the history of the theatre in Britain and Ireland, the designation Theatre Royal or Royal Theatre was an indication that the theatre had a Royal Patent without which theatrical performances were illegal. ... The Pale or the English Pale comprised a region in a radius of twenty miles around Dublin which the English in Ireland gradually fortified against incursion from Gaels. ... The Whitefriar Street Carmelite Church is a church in Dublin, Ireland maintained by the Carmelite order. ... A metropolitan regions gross domestic product, or GRP, is one of several measures of the size of its economy. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Additional reading

  • Pat Liddy, Dublin A Celebration — From the 1st to the 21st century (Dublin City Council, 2000) (ISBN 0-946841-50-0)
  • Maurice Craig, The Architecture of Ireland from the Earliest Times to 1880 (Batsford, Paperback edition 1989) (ISBN 0-7134-2587-3)
  • Frank McDonald, Saving the City: How to Halt the Destruction of Dublin (Tomar Publishing, 1989) (ISBN 1-871793-03-3)
  • Edward McParland, Public Architecture in Ireland 1680–1760 (Yale University Press, 2001) (ISBN 0300090641
  • Hanne Hem, Dubliners, An Anthropologist's Account, Oslo, 1994
  • John Flynn and Jerry Kelleher, Dublin Journeys in America (High Table Publishing, 2003) (ISBN 0-9544694-1-0)

Frank McDonald is the Environment Editor of The Irish Times. ...

External links

Find more information on Dublin by searching Wikipedia's sister projects
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Learning resources from Wikiversity
  • Dublin via WikiMapia
  • Dublin travel guide from Wikitravel
  • Official Dublin Tourist Board website
  • Dublin City Council
  • Dublin.ie — community portal for Dublin
  • Irish Architecture — Dublin
  • Chapters of Dublin - Site withoriginal text of books on Dublin history

Coordinates: 53°20′34″N, 6°15′58″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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