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Encyclopedia > Drybrush
An example of the drybrush technique using black acrylic paint on illustration board.
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An example of the drybrush technique using black acrylic paint on illustration board.

Drybrush is a painting technique in which a paint brush that is relatively dry but still holds a paint load is applied to a dry support such as paper or primed canvas. The resulting brush strokes have a characteristic scratchy look that lacks the smooth appearance that washes or blended paint commonly has. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Different styles of paintbrushes The term brush refers to a variety of devices mainly with bristles, wire or other filament of any possible material used mainly for cleaning, grooming hair, painting, deburring and other kinds of surface finishing, but also for many other purposes like (but not limited to) seals... Dried green paint Paint is the general term for a family of products used to protect and add color to an object or surface by covering it with a pigmented coating. ... Piece of A4 paper Paper is a thin, flat material produced by the amalgamation of plant fibres, which are subsequently held together without extra binder, largely by hydrogen bonds and to a small degree by fiber entanglement. ... Primer is a preparatory coating put on materials before painting. ... Canvas is an extremely heavy-duty fabric used for making sails, tents, marquees, backpacks, and other functions where sturdiness is required. ... The term wash can mean several things: Cleaning A wash is the act of cleaning. ...


The drybrush technique can be achieved by doing the following:

  • With water-based media such as inks, acrylic paints, tempera paints or watercolor paints, the brush should be dry or squeezed dry of all water. The brush should then be loaded with paint that is high viscosity or thick. The loaded brush should then be applied to a dry support.
  • With water-based media, the brush should be loaded with paint then squeezed dry. The dry but sparsely loaded brush should then be applied to a dry support.
  • With oil-based media such as oil paint, a similar techique as outlined above may be used though instead of water, the brush should be dry or squeezed dry of oil and solvent. Because oil paint has a longer drying time than water-based media, brushing over or blending drybrush strokes should be avoided to preserve the distinctive look of the drybrush technique.

 
 

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