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Encyclopedia > Dryas octopetala
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How to read a taxobox
Dryas octopetala

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Dryas
Species: D. octopetala
Binomial name
Dryas octopetala
L.
Seed head of Dryas octopetala
Seed head of Dryas octopetala

Dryas octopetala (common names include mountain avens, white dryas, and white dryad) is an arctic-alpine flowering plant in the family Rosaceae. It is a small prostrate evergreen subshrub forming large colonies, and is a popular flower in rock gardens. The specific epithet octopetala derives from the Greek octo (eight) and petalon (petal), referring to the eight petals of the flower, an unusual number in the Rosaceae, where five is the normal number. However flowers with up to 16 petals also occur naturally. Image File history File links Mountainavens2. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Divisions Green algae Chlorophyta Charophyta Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta—liverworts Anthocerotophyta—hornworts Bryophyta—mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) †Rhyniophyta—rhyniophytes †Zosterophyllophyta—zosterophylls Lycopodiophyta—clubmosses †Trimerophytophyta—trimerophytes Pteridophyta—ferns and horsetails Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta—seed ferns Pinophyta—conifers Cycadophyta—cycads Ginkgophyta—ginkgo Gnetophyta—gnetae Magnoliophyta—flowering plants... It has been suggested that Angiospermae, and Anthophyta be merged into this article or section. ... Magnoliopsida is the botanical name for a class: this name is formed by replacing the termination -aceae in the name Magnoliaceae by the termination -opsida (Art 16 of the ICBN). ... Families Barbeyaceae Cannabaceae (hemp family) Dirachmaceae Elaeagnaceae Moraceae (mulberry family) Rosaceae (rose family) Rhamnaceae (buckthorn family) Ulmaceae (elm family) Urticaceae (nettle family) For the Philippine municipality, see Rosales, Pangasinan. ... Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ... Dryas Categories: Plant stubs | Plants ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Alanblazeonfire 19:54, 27 March 2007 (UTC) Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 1365 pixel, file size: 127 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) == Licensing == File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dryas octopetala... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 1365 pixel, file size: 127 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) == Licensing == File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dryas octopetala... It has been suggested that Trivial name be merged into this article or section. ... An arctic-alpine taxon is one whose natural distribution includes the Arctic and more southerly mountain ranges, particularly the Alps. ... It has been suggested that Angiospermae, and Anthophyta be merged into this article or section. ... In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is 1) a rank or 2) a taxon in that rank. ... Subfamilies Rosoideae Spiraeoideae Maloideae Amygdaloideae or Prunoideae The Rosaceae or rose family is a large family of plants, with about 3,000-4,000 species in 100-120 genera. ... A Silver Fir shoot showing three successive years of retained leaves In botany, an evergreen plant is a plant which retains its leaves year-round, with each leaf persisting for more than 12 months. ... A subshrub (Latin suffrutex) is a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category of woody perennial plant, distinguished from a shrub by variously its ground-hugging stems and lower height, with overwintering perennial woody growth typically less than 10-20 cm tall, or by being only weakly woody and/or only... A rock garden, also known as a rockery or an alpine garden, is a type of garden that features extensive use of rocks or stones, along with plants native to rocky or alpine environments. ... A specific epithet is a biological epithet of a species. ... It has been suggested that Corolla be merged into this article or section. ...


Dryas octopetala has a widespread occurrence throughout mountainous areas where it is generally restricted to limestone outcrops. These include the entire Arctic, as well as the mountains of Scandinavia, the Alps, Carpathian Mountains, Balkans, Caucasus and in isolated locations elsewhere. In Great Britain, it occurs in the Pennines (northern England), at two locations in Snowdonia (north Wales), and more widely in the Scottish Highlands; in Ireland it occurs on The Burren and a few other sites. In North America, it reaches as far south as Colorado in the Rocky Mountains. For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... Scandinavia is a historical and geographical region centered on the Scandinavian Peninsula in Northern Europe and includes the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. ... The west face of the Petit Dru above the Chamonix valley near the Mer de Glace. ... Satellite image of the Carpathians. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Caucasus Mountains. ... Typical Pennine scenery. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the country. ... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... A road winds down Corkscrew Hill towards Ballyvaughan. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Confectionary Company, see Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory. ...


The stems are woody, tortuose, with short, horizontal rooting branches. The leaves are glabrous above, densely white-tomentose beneath. The flowers are produced on stalks 3-10 cm long, and have eight creamy white petals. The style is persistent on the fruit with white feathery hairs, functioning as a wind-dispersal agent. The feathery hairs of the sea head first appear twisted together and glossy before spreading out to an expanded ball which the wind quickly disperses. “Foliage” redirects here. ... Tomentose is a term in entomology and plant morphology describing a taxonomic component which is covered in hairs. ... A Phalaenopsis flower Rudbeckia fulgida A flower, (<Old French flo(u)r<Latin florem<flos), also known as a bloom or blossom, is the reproductive structure found in flowering plants (plants of the division Magnoliophyta, also called angiosperms). ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ...


It grows in dry localities where snow melts early, on gravel and rocky barrens, forming a distinct heath community on calcareous soils. For the American hard rock band, see Soil (band). ...


Climatology

The Younger Dryas and Older Dryas stadials are named after Dryas octopetala, because of the great quantities of its pollen found in cores dating from those times. During these cold spells, Dryas octopetala was much more widely distributed than it is today, as large parts of the northern hemisphere that are now covered by forests were replaced in the cold periods by tundra. Three temperature records, the GRIP one clearly showing the Younger Dryas event at around 11 kyr BP The Younger Dryas stadial, named after the alpine / tundra wildflower Dryas octopetala, and also referred to as the Big Freeze [1], was a brief (approximately 1300 ± 70 years [1]) cold climate period following... The Older Dryas was a cold, dry Blytt-Sernander period and pollen zone of North Europe dated to roughly 14,000-13,600 BP calibrated, 12,000-11,700 uncalibrated. ... A stadial is a period of even-colder temperatures during an ice age. ... SEM image of pollen grains from a variety of common plants: sunflower (Helianthus annuus), morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea), prairie hollyhock (Sidalcea malviflora), oriental lily (Lilium auratum), evening primrose (Oenothera fruticosa), and castor bean (Ricinus communis). ... The Northern Hemisphere is the half of a planets surface (or celestial sphere) that is north of the equator (the word hemisphere literally means half ball). On the Earth, the Northern Hemisphere contains most of the land and about 88-90% of the human population. ... FOREST, which describes itself as the voice and friend of the smoker, is a United Kingdom political pressure group that campaigns for the right of people to smoke tobacco and opposes attempts to ban or reduce tobacco consumption, as well as casting doubt on medical claims of the health risks... In physical geography, tundra is an area where the tree growth is hindered by low temperatures and short growing seasons. ...


Gallery


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dryas octopetala - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (376 words)
Dryas octopetala (common names include mountain avens, white dryas, and white dryad) is an arctic-alpine flowering plant in the family Rosaceae.
The specific epithet octopetala derives from the Greek octo (eight) and petalon (petal), referring to the eight petals of the flower, an unusual number in the Rosaceae, where five is the normal number.
Dryas octopetala has a widespread occurrence throughout mountainous areas where it is generally restricted to limestone outcrops.
Younger Dryas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1164 words)
The Younger Dryas saw a rapid return to glacial conditions in the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere between 12,900 – 11,500 years before present (BP)[2] in sharp contrast to the warming of the preceding interstadial deglaciation.
The prevailing theory holds that the Younger Dryas was caused by a significant reduction or shutdown of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation in response to a sudden influx of fresh water from Lake Agassiz and deglaciation in North America [5].
While there exists relative consensus regarding the role of the Younger Dryas in the changing subsistence patterns during the Natufian, its connection to the beginning of agriculture at the end of the period is still being debated [15].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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