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Encyclopedia > Dromedary
Wikipedia:How to read a taxobox
How to read a taxobox
Dromedary Camel

Conservation status
Domesticated (IUCN)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Camelidae
Genus: Camelus
Species: C. dromedarius
Binomial name
Camelus dromedarius
Linnaeus, 1758

Dromedary range

The Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius) (often referred to simply as the "Dromedary") is a large even-toed ungulate native to northern Africa, Greater Middle East area and western India, also the land of east Africa, Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia. Yet, the world's only population of wild dromedaries are in Australia. Camelus dromedarius Photo taken by Hajor, December 2002. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... Scientific classification or biological classification is a method by which biologists group and categorize species of organisms. ... Animalia redirects here. ... Typical Classes Subphylum Urochordata - Tunicates Ascidiacea Thaliacea Larvacea Subphylum Cephalochordata - Lancelets Subphylum Myxini - Hagfishes Subphylum Vertebrata - Vertebrates Petromyzontida - Lampreys Placodermi (extinct) Chondrichthyes - Cartilaginous fishes Acanthodii (extinct) Actinopterygii - Ray-finned fishes Actinistia - Coelacanths Dipnoi - Lungfishes Amphibia - Amphibians Reptilia - Reptiles Aves - Birds Mammalia - Mammals Chordates (phylum Chordata) include the vertebrates, together with... Subclasses Subclass Allotheria* Order Docodonta (extinct) Order Multituberculata (extinct) Order Palaeoryctoides (extinct) Order Triconodonta (extinct) Order Volaticotheria (extinct) Subclass Prototheria Order Monotremata Subclass Theria Infraclass Trituberculata (extinct) Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals are a class of vertebrate animals characterized by the production of milk in females for the nourishment of... Families Suidae Hippopotamidae Tayassuidae Camelidae Tragulidae Moschidae Cervidae Giraffidae Antilocapridae Bovidae The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... Species  Lama glama  Lama pacos  Lama guanicoe  Vicugna vicugna  Camelus dromedarius  Camelus bactrianus The four llamas and two camels are camelids: members of the biological family Camelidae, the only family in the suborder Tylopoda. ... For other uses, see Camel (disambiguation). ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 23, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Families Antilocapridae Bovidae Camelidae Cervidae Giraffidae Hippopotamidae Moschidae Suidae Tayassuidae Tragulidae Leptochoeridae † Chaeropotamidae † Dichobunidae † Cebochoeridae † Entelodontidae † Anoplotheriidae † Anthracotheriidae † Cainotheriidae † Agriochoeridae † Merycoidodontidae † Leptomerycidae † Protoceratidae † Xiphodontidae † Amphimerycidae † Helohyidae † Gelocidae † Merycodontidae † Dromomerycidae † Raoellidae † Choeropotamidae † Sanitheriidae † The even-toed ungulates form the mammal order Artiodactyla. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... The traditional Middle East and the G8s Greater Middle East. ...


It is also the best-known member of the camel family. Other members of the camel family include the llama and the alpaca in South America. The dromedary camel has one hump on its back, in contrast to the Bactrian Camel which has two. The dromedary is sometimes called an Arabian Camel. Some maintain that the name "dromedary" should be used to refer only to racing camels (the name comes from the Greek for to run). To quote the Oakland Zoo's website, Species  Lama glama  Lama pacos  Lama guanicoe  Vicugna vicugna  Camelus dromedarius  Camelus bactrianus The four llamas and two camels are camelids: members of the biological family Camelidae, the only family in the suborder Tylopoda. ... Binomial name Camelus bactrianus Linnaeus, 1758 The Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) is a large even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of eastern Asia. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Zoos in the United States | California landmarks | Oakland, California ...

The name "Dromedary" is properly reserved for the Arabian racing camel such as those used in the various military camel corps.[1]

Originally native to western Asia and East Africa, dromedaries were first domesticated in central or southern Arabia some thousands of years ago. Experts are divided regarding the date: some believe it was around 4000 BC, others as recently as 1400 BC. There are currently almost 13 million domesticated dromedaries, mostly in the area from Western India via Pakistan through Iran to northern Africa. None survive in the wild in their original range, although the escaped population of Australian feral camels is estimated to number at least 500,000.[2] Around the second millennium BCE, the dromedary was introduced to Egypt and North Africa. Languages Arabic other minority languages Religions Predomiantly Sunni Islam, as well as Shia Islam, Greek Orthodoxy, Greek Catholicism, Maronite, Alawite Islam, Druze, Ibadi Islam, and Judaism An Arab (Arabic: ) is any member of the Semitic group of people whose cultural, linguistic, and in certain cases, ancestral origins trace back to... World map showing the location of Asia. ...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... The Arabian Peninsula The Arabian Peninsula is a mainly desert peninsula in Southwest Asia at the junction of Africa and Asia and an important part of the greater Middle East. ... A map of West India. ... The one-humped dromedary Australian (non-native) camels were imported to provide transport through inland Australia and they have since made it their domain. ...  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic North Africa, including the UN subregion North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, generally divided politically from Sub-Saharan Africa. ...

A caravan of dromedaries in Algeria
A caravan of dromedaries in Algeria

Although there are several other camelids, the only other surviving species of true camel today is the Bactrian Camel. The Bactrian camel was domesticated sometime before 2500 BC in Asia, well after the earliest estimates for the dromedary. The Bactrian camel is a stockier, hardier animal, being able to survive from Iran to Tibet.[3] The dromedary is taller and faster: with a rider they can maintain 8-9 mph for hours at a time. By comparison, a loaded Bactrian camel moves at about 2.5 mph.[4] Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Species  Lama glama  Lama guanicoe  Vicugna pacos  Vicugna vicugna  Camelus dromedarius  Camelus bactrianus The four llamas and two camels are camelids: members of the biological family Camelidae, the only family in the suborder Tylopoda. ... Binomial name Camelus bactrianus Linnaeus, 1758 The Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) is a large even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of eastern Asia. ... Tibet (older spelling Thibet; Tibetan: བོད་; Wylie: Bod; Lhasa dialect IPA: [; Simplified and Traditional Chinese: 西藏, Hanyu Pinyin: XÄ«zàng; also referred to as 藏区 (Simplified Chinese), 藏區 (Traditional Chinese), ZàngqÅ« (Hanyu Pinyin), see Name section below) is a plateau region in Central Asia and the indigenous home to the Tibetan people. ...


Around the second millennium BC, camels became established to the Sahara region but disappeared again from the Sahara beginning around 900 BC.They are usually hunted by humans.The Persian invasion of Egypt under Cambyses introduced domesticated camels to the area. Domesticated camels were used through much of North Africa, and the Romans maintained a corps of camel warriors to patrol the edge of the desert. The Persian camels, however, were not particularly suited to trading or travel over the Sahara; rare journeys made across the desert were made on horse-drawn chariots. The Persian Empire was a series of historical empires that ruled over the Iranian plateau, the old Persian homeland, and beyond in Western Asia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. ... Cambyses (or Cambese) is the Greek version of the name of several monarchs of Achaemenid line of ancient Persia. ... Dogs and sheep were among the first animals to be domesticated. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent, c. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ...


The stronger and more durable Bactrian Camels first began to arrive in Africa in the fourth century. It was not until the Islamic conquest of North Africa, however, that these camels became common. While the invasion was accomplished largely on horseback, the new links to the Middle East allowed camels to be imported en masse. These camels were well-suited to long desert journeys and could carry a great deal of cargo. For the first time this allowed substantial trade over the Sahara. Binomial name Camelus bactrianus Linnaeus, 1758 The Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) is a large even-toed ungulate native to the steppes of eastern Asia. ... The Islamic conquest of North Africa began early in the century of rapid Arab and Islamic expansion following the death of Mohammed in 632 CE. By 640 the Arabs controlled Mesopotamia, had invaded Armenia, and were concluding their conquest of Byzantine Syria. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The Great Mosque of Djenné, founded in 800, an important trading base, now a World Heritage Site Trans-Saharan trade, refers to trade across the Sahara between Mediterranean countries and West Africa. ...


Male dromedaries have a soft palate, which they inflate to produce a deep pink sack, called a doula in Arabic, hanging out of the sides of their mouth to attract females during the mating season. Dromedaries are also noted for their thick eyelashes and small, hairy ears. The palate is the roof of the mouth in humans and vertebrate animals. ... Arabic ( or just ) is the largest living member of the Semitic language family in terms of speakers. ... An eyelash or simply lash is one of the hairs that grow at the edge of the eyelid. ...


Gestation in the dromedary lasts around 12 months. Usually a single calf is born, and nursed for up to 18 months. Females are sexually mature after 3 to 4 years, males after 5 to 6 years. Lifespan in captivity is typically about 25 years, with some animals reaching the age of 50.

This drawing illustrates a camel skeleton structure.
This drawing illustrates a camel skeleton structure.

Adults grow to a length of 10 feet and height of six to seven feet. Weight is usually in the range of 1000-1500 pounds. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 365 × 246 pixelsFull resolution (365 × 246 pixel, file size: 13 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: Richard Owen - On the Anatomy of Vertebrates (1866) Fair use, copyright has expired (Author died more than 100 years ago). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 365 × 246 pixelsFull resolution (365 × 246 pixel, file size: 13 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Author: Richard Owen - On the Anatomy of Vertebrates (1866) Fair use, copyright has expired (Author died more than 100 years ago). ... For other uses, see Camel (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Modern domesticated dromedaries are used for milk and meat and as beasts of burden for cargo and passengers. Unlike horses, they kneel for the loading of passengers and cargo. Dromedaries have an ill-deserved reputation for being bad-tempered and obstinate creatures that spit and kick. In reality, they tend to be amiable, patient, and intelligent. A camel will show displeasure by stamping its feet and running. At many of the desert located tourist sites in Egypt, mounted police on camels can be seen.


See also

Camel wrestling is a sport in which two male dromedary camels wrestle in response to a female camel in heat being led before them. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Camelus_dromedarius
Wikispecies has information related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... GFDL Wikispecies logo File links The following pages link to this file: Solanaceae Species Asterias Homo (genus) Human Wikipedia:Template messages/Links Wikipedia:Template messages/All Homo floresiensis User talk:Tuneguru Template:Wikispecies Categories: GFDL images ... Wikispecies is a sister project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that anybody can edit with a great potential use to students and researchers. ...

References

  1. ^ Animals A-Z Arabian Camel. Oakland Zoo. Retrieved on 2006-03-01.
  2. ^ Farmnote 122/2000 : Feral camel [Western Australia]. Retrieved on 2005-12-05.
  3. ^ Creature Features - Pet Facts: Camels. Retrieved on 2005-12-05.
  4. ^ Camel. Retrieved on 2005-12-05.


For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Camelids
Afro-Asiatic Camelids: Bactrian camel - Dromedary
South American Camelids: Alpaca - Guanaco - Llama - Vicuña
Hybrid: Cama

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dromedary - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (654 words)
The Dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) is a large even-toed ungulate native to northern Africa and western Asia, and is the best-known member of the camel family.
Dromedaries are also noted for their thick eyelashes and small, hairy ears.
Modern domesticated dromedaries are used for milk and meat and as beasts of burden for cargo and passengers.
Dromedary - definition of Dromedary in Encyclopedia (364 words)
Originally native to northern Africa and western Asia, Dromedaries were first domesticated in central or southern Arabia some thousands of years ago.
At present there are almost 13 million domesticated Dromedaries, mostly in the area from India to northern Africa.
None survive in the wild, although there is an escaped feral population of about 32,000 in Australia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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