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Encyclopedia > Dress shirt

In American English, a dress shirt is a men's shirt with a collar, a full-length opening up the front from the collar to the hem, and full length sleeves with cuffs. The opening fastens closed along a placket using buttons or studs, and the cuffs close with buttons or cuff links. Some very formal shirts have separable collars attached with studs. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... Business shirt In American English, shirt can refer to almost any upper-body garment other than coats and bras (the term top is sometimes used in ladieswear). ... William Shakespeare in a sheer linen collar of the early 17th century, a direct ancestor of the modern shirt collar. ... Cuffs is the bondage, discipline, domination and sadomasochism group for Iowa State University. ... Mens dress shirt with centre-front placket. ... For other uses of the word button, see Button (disambiguation). ... Shirt studs are small, usually metal objects used to fasten the front of pleated or stiff-front shirts in lieu of buttons. ... This set of cuff links and studs features pearl inlays. ...


In British English, that garment is simply called a shirt, while a dress shirt is specifically a smarter shirt of the style worn with black tie or white tie. The majority of this article discusses dress shirts in the American English sense. British English (BrE, BE, en-GB) is the broad term used to distinguish the forms of the English language used in the United Kingdom from forms used elsewhere in the Anglophone world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Formal evening dress is more strictly regulated than other forms of dress, and properly consists of: Black tailcoat with silk (ribbed or satin) facings, sharply cut-away at the front Black trousers with a single stripe of satin or braid in the US or two stripes in Europe White stiff... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ...


Dress shirts are normally made from woven cloth, and can be worn with a jacket and tie (including suits and formal wear). Less-formal variations on the standard pattern are also common. An alternative term is button-front, button-up or button-down shirt. It has been suggested that Textile be merged into this article or section. ... A jacket is a lightweight, sleeved thigh- or waist-length coat that may be worn by anyone, as jackets are now made for children, adults, the elderly, and even infants. ... For the grappling position, see double collar tie. ... Look up Suit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Formal wear (more often in the United States) or formal dress (in the United Kingdom) is a general fashion term used to describe clothing suitable for formal events, including weddings, debutante cotillions, etc. ...


The analogous garment to a men's dress shirt for women is a blouse. A blouse A blouse most commonly refers to a womans shirt, although the term is also used for some mens military uniform shirts. ...

Men's dress shirt

Contents

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2124x1392, 207 KB) Shows a european-tailored, typical button-down business shirt. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2124x1392, 207 KB) Shows a european-tailored, typical button-down business shirt. ...

Components

A traditional tailored shirt has the following components:

  • Collar: The flaps of the collar are known as points; the open space or gap between the points (when the shirt is on) is called the spread.
  • Yoke: This is the most difficult part of the shirt. This is the shaped section at the shoulders that connects all the other parts of the shirt. A split yoke has two pieces sewn together to help shape it to the shoulders.
  • Two sleeves:
  • Two cuffs:
  • Two front panels:
  • Back
  • Placket

Collars

Dress shirt with button-down collar
Dress shirt with button-down collar
Main article: Collar (clothing)
  • Spread : a collar with anywhere from 3½ to 6 inches between the collar points. The wider collars are often referred to as a Cutaway collar or Windsor after the Duke of Windsor. The spread is the most formal style outside of formal wear.
  • Point or Straight also the Small : a collar that appears narrow, with 2½ to 3¼ inches between the points of the collar.
  • Tab : a point collar that has two loops of fabric extending from the middle of the collar which meet behind the tie. Meant to give the tie an arc, the tabs can be closed with either a metal snap, button or stud.
  • Eyelet : a collar which requires a barbell-style collar bar
  • Club : a collar with a rounded edge, very popular in the first few decades of the 20th Century.
  • Button-down : a collar, usually a point, that buttons to the front of the shirt at its points. Introduced by Brooks Brothers in 1896, it was patterned after the shirts of polo players and was considered a sport shirt until the 1950s in America. It is still today a more casual style and not recommended to wear with a suit. The term "button-down" is also commonly used to mean all dress shirts, as opposed to just those with a button-down collar.
  • Varsity : a type of spread collar in which the points curve outward from the placket of the shirt.
  • Tony Collar : an extremely formal collar in which the entire collar covers the wearer's neck and also encloses the top part of the tie, usually the entire knot.
  • Tall : this collar is bold enough for the dress down-down look. If you have a large neck, the tall collar helps to minimise the effect. It may often fasten with two buttons.

Contrast-collar shirts are occasionally made. In almost all cases, if there is a contrast collar it is a spread collar in white on a colored shirt. The shirt fabric is often an end-on-end or pinpoint fabric in which there are white threads along with coloured threads. Contrast collars are also often found on striped shirts where there is a white stripe in the shirt body. White collars on otherwise non-white shirts are an aesthetic reference to the mostly-obsolete detachable collars, which were made separately from shirts. White collars on non-white shirts are considered more formal than non-white shirts with matching collars. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (962x1153, 444 KB) One of a series of common objects I photographed in the summer of 2005 to illustrate Wikipedia:Basic English picture wordlist. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (962x1153, 444 KB) One of a series of common objects I photographed in the summer of 2005 to illustrate Wikipedia:Basic English picture wordlist. ... William Shakespeare in a sheer linen collar of the early 17th century, a direct ancestor of the modern shirt collar. ... The peerage title Duke of Windsor was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1937 for The Prince Edward, formerly King of the United Kingdom, as well as each of the other Commonwealth realms. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... For other uses, see Polo (disambiguation). ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ...


Cuffs

Main article: cuff
  • Barrel : a cuff that is fastened by one or more buttons. Sized dress shirts (i.e. 15½ x 34) have only one set of buttons while an averaged shirt (i.e. 15½ x 33-34) has two sets of buttons arranged horizontally along the cuff.
  • Double or French : a cuff that is twice as long as a barrel cuff and is folded over itself. A Double cuff can be closed with either a cuff link or a silk knot.
  • Mitre : this cuff is named after the bishop's hat. The Mitre is a daytime cuff, but it differs from the button cuff as it has a slight fold at the end.

For other uses, see Cuff (disambiguation). ... Jermyn Street is a street in central London, England, parallel and adjacent to Piccadilly that is famous for its resident shirtmakers. ... Turnbull & Asser is a British clothier established in 1885. ... This article is about the spy series. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A cuff link, cufflink or cuff-link is a decorative fastener used to fasten or link the two portions of a french cuff, typically on a shirt or blouse. ... Cuff link This set of cuff links and studs features pearl inlays. ... Morning dress is a particular category of mens formal dress. ... Black tie, known in the United Kingdom (and also in the north-eastern United States, and Canada) as a dinner jacket and in the United States generally as a tuxedo, is a dress code for formal evening events that are not formal enough to require white tie. ... Formal evening dress is more strictly regulated than other forms of dress, and properly consists of: Black tailcoat with silk (ribbed or satin) facings, sharply cut-away at the front Black trousers with a single stripe of satin or braid in the US or two stripes in Europe White stiff...

Other features

There are almost always at least seven buttons on the front of a dress shirt, regardless of size. Eight buttons is standard with higher end dress shirts. A vertical band running down the front opening that contains the buttonholes is called the placket; it is located on the wearer's left side, to fit overlap the button row on the edge of the right half of the shirt (this is the reverse of blouses). A blouse A blouse most commonly refers to a womans shirt, although the term is also used for some mens military uniform shirts. ...


There are often pleats on the back on either side or, less formally, a box pleat on the centre of the back. Pleats are also found on the sleeves just above the cuffs. The more formal shirts in England will have no pockets, but the standard dress shirt in America has a single discreet pocket on the wearer's left side, which is a sewn-on patch with a plain upper hem, optionally with a single button for closure. This small pocket is just large enough to hold a small piece of paper or a few pens and a pocket protector. Less-formal dress shirts may feature larger pockets, dual pockets, or pockets with flap closures. Skirt with narrow knife pleats at the hip line, 1929. ... A pocket protector promoting the Barber Colman company. ...


A more formal feature that can be found is a white collar and white cuffs on a coloured or striped dress shirt. These are most appropriate when worn with a suit.


Short-sleeve shirts have a plain (no-button) hem above the wearer's elbow, though it has been said that the term "short-sleeved dress shirt" is an oxymoron. Short-sleeve shirts are considered casual wear, though it is not uncommon for them to be worn under jackets or coats where the lack of sleeves is less obvious.


Western-style shirts often feature slash pockets and snap fasteners throughout instead of buttons. Gene Autry in the western wear typical of the singing cowboys of the 1950s. ... Snap fastener (male and female discs) A snap fastener is a pair of interlocking discs commonly used in place of buttons to fasten clothing. ...


Materials

Dress shirts are made of woven cloth, most commonly cotton; linen, polyester, polyester blends, and silk are also used. Some standard formal options are cotton broadcloth and cotton poplin. A wide variety of fabric textures are available for less-formal garments, including: Oxford cloth, corduroy, denim, flannel and twill. For other uses, see Cotton (disambiguation). ... Torn linen cloth, recovered from the Dead Sea Linen is a material made from the fibers of the flax plant. ... SEM picture of a bend in a high surface area polyester fiber with a seven-lobed cross section Polyester (aka Terylene) is a category of polymers which contain the ester functional group in their main chain. ... For other uses of this word, see Silk (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Poplin, also called tabinet, is a heavy, durable fabric consisting of a silk warp with a weft of worsted yarn. ... Oxford refers to a type of weave employed to make the fabric in oxford shirts. ... Corduroy is a fabric composed of twisted fibers that when woven lie parallel (similar to twill) to one another to form the cloths distinct pattern, a cord. ... This article is about the material denim. ... A young man wearing a tartan flannel shirt. ... A twill weave can easily be identified by its diagonal lines. ...


Formal and casual usage

Bill Gates wearing a dress shirt
Bill Gates wearing a dress shirt

A dress shirt is ironed free of wrinkles and may be treated with starch for added smoothness and stiffness. The hem is tucked inside the waistband of the trousers. For most modes of formal wear, a coat and necktie or bowtie are mandatory. In this case, the top button of the shirt is fastened, so that the tie can fit snugly around a gentleman's neck with a neat appearance. Standard colours for dress shirts are shades of white and light blue. In informal attire, solid pink, yellow, gray, ecru, and fine stripe and check patterns are common. The dress codes of black tie and white tie have highly specific requirements for shirts. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... An iron Ironing or smoothing is the work of using a heated tool to remove wrinkles from washed clothes. ... Starch (CAS# 9005-25-8, chemical formula (C6H10O5)n,[1]) is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin (usually in 20:80 or 30:70 ratios). ... Germanic trousers of the 4th century found in the Thorsberg moor, Germany Early use of trousers in France: a sans-culotte by Louis-Léopold Boilly. ... Double-breasted coat, 1876 For other meanings than clothing, see Coat (Disambiguation) A coat (a term frequently interchangeable with jacket) is an outer garment worn by both men and women, for warmth and/ or fashion. ... For the grappling position, see double collar tie. ... One option to tie a bowtie The bowtie is a fashion accessory, popularly worn with other formal attire, such as suits or dinner jackets. ... A Top Button is the highest button on a shirt, holding the collar of the shirt together. ... This article is about the color. ... This article is about the colour. ... This article is about the color. ... A yellow Tulip. ... Gray (Gy) is the derived SI unit for absorbed dose, specific energy and kerma (kinetic energy in matter). ... Look up ecru in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Formal evening dress is more strictly regulated than other forms of dress, and properly consists of: Black tailcoat with silk (ribbed or satin) facings, sharply cut-away at the front Black trousers with a single stripe of satin or braid in the US or two stripes in Europe White stiff...


Casual usage is highly variable. A wider variety of colors and materials are worn. Most men omit the necktie and may eschew ironing their shirt and tucking the hem in. It is common to leave the top button unfastened. Dress shirts are a typical garment of business casual attire, a position shared with tennis shirts. Casual dress shirts are sometimes referred to as sport shirts. Business casual, sometimes called smart casual, is a potentially confusing dress code, due to its oxymoronic construction. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Dress shirts for black tie and white tie

In the United Kingdom, the term dress shirt is reserved for particular type of formal shirt, always white with French cuffs to be worn with eveningwear. In the USA, this shirt is often called a tuxedo shirt or tux shirt. It has been suggested that cuff link be merged into this article or section. ...


The shirt required for white tie is very specific. It should have a wing collar and be fastened with shirt studs instead of buttons on the front. The studs should be either gold or silver with a mother of pearl inlay. Black onyx inlay is also permissible. The cufflinks should match the studs. The front panels of the shirt are heavily starched and polished so that they are stiff. Traditionally, collarless shirts with a detachable wing collar fastened on with collar studs have been used, but all-in-one designs are increasingly common. An even more formal alternative to the piqué shirt front is a shirt with heavily starched front panels of a plain material, fastened in the same manner. Such shirts are now uncommon. Cuffs will ideally be single, but heavily starched and polished. Formal evening dress is more strictly regulated than other forms of dress, and properly consists of: Black tailcoat with silk (ribbed or satin) facings, sharply cut-away at the front Black trousers with a single stripe of satin or braid in the US or two stripes in Europe White stiff... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary. ...


Black tie offers more leeway. Shirts may be soft (not starched), and often have a regular collar (turndown collar). In past decades, particularly the 1970s, ruffled-shirt fronts were fashionable, although they are now out of favour. Studs are optional, they are usually black. Cufflinks are generally black (ideally silver with a black onyx inlay), but can alternatively be an old school, college, or regimental design. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Sizing

In the United States, sizes of dress shirts traditionally consist of two numbers like 15½ 34 (the second number is often below the first on the label). This example means that the shirt has a neck that is 15.5 inches in girth (measured from centre of top button to center of corresponding buttonhole) and a sleeve 34 inches long (measured from midpoint of the back and shoulders to the wrist).


However, in response to economic pressures to reduce the number of sizes needed to be manufactured and stocked, sizing is now frequently seen with average sleeve lengths in the form of three numbers like 15½ 34/35. This example means that the shirt has a neck that is 15.5 inches in girth and a sleeve 35 inches long. However, the cuff frequently features two buttons, allowing the cuff diameter to be tightened so that the cuff does not come down over the hand. This allows the shirt to fit the shorter length.


Casual button-front shirts are usually sized as small, medium, large, XL, etc. The meaning of these ad-hoc sizes is not standardized and varies between manfacturers.


Differences between the UK and the US

Standards for the style of shirts differs from in UK and the US. The most accepted style of collar in the UK is the spread collar, while in the US the point and button-down collars are more often seen on dress shirts. The French cuff is much more popular in the UK than in the US. Many shirts in the US feature a centre back box pleat, where in the UK it is common to find the side pleats. The breast pocket is a common feature on dress shirts in the US, but not popular amongst the English shirt makers. The colours, patterns, and stripes are often subtler in the US than in the UK, where people more freely wear bold stripes and checks.[citation needed]


Notable makers of dress shirts

For the company, see Polo Ralph Lauren. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Charles Tyrwhitt Founded in 1986 by Nicholas Charles Tyrwhitt Wheeler while he was a student at Bristol University, the company has gone from strength to strength and is now the largest mail order supplier of dress shirts in the UK. Since conquering the shirt and tie market, Charles Tyrwhitt has... Image:Jermyn Street Store c1920. ... Thomas Pink is a retail clothing business which started in London in 1984. ... Turnbull & Asser is a British clothier established in 1885. ... Phillips Van Heusen is noted for dress shirts In 1881, Moses Phillips and his wife Endel began sewing shirts by hand and sold them from pushcarts to local Pottsville, Pennsylvania coal miners. ... Jeff Banks (born March 17, 1943 in Ebbw Vale, Wales) is a renowned British Designer of both Mens and Womens Clothing, Jewellery, and Home Furnishings. ... Pierre Cardin dress, 1967 For the Canadian Minister of Transport from 1940 to 1942, see Pierre Cardin (politician). ...

See also

US standard clothing sizes were developed from statistical data in the 1940s-1950s. ... A baby wearing many items of winter clothing: headband, cap, fur-lined coat, shawl and sweater. ... A blouse A blouse most commonly refers to a womans shirt, although the term is also used for some mens military uniform shirts. ... Crop tops (also cropped tops) are T-shirts or blouses that are cut off, resulting in the exposure of some of the wearers abdomen, worn by gay/effeminate men and women. ... Two women wearing halternecks Halterneck refers to a type of womens clothing with one strap around the back of the neck instead of two over the shoulders. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Man wearing a hoodie A hoodie (also hoody, bunnyhug), at one time hooded sweatshirt, is a heavy upper-body garment with a hood. ... A Lacoste tennis shirt A polo shirt, originally called a tennis shirt and also known as a golf shirt, is a T-shaped shirt with a collar, (typically) two or three buttons down a slit below the collar, two small slits on the bottom of either side, and an optional... Business shirt In American English, shirt can refer to almost any upper-body garment other than coats and bras (the term top is sometimes used in ladieswear). ... A male wearing a wifebeater A sleeveless shirt, tank top, singlet, or vest is a shirt manufactured without sleeves, or one where the sleeves have been cut off. ... A jumper from Marks & Spencer A sweater (also called sweatshirt, pullover, jumper, and jersey) is a relatively heavy garment intended to cover the torso and arms of the human body (though, in some cases, sweaters are made for dogs and occasionally other animals) and typically to be worn over a... T-Shirt A T-shirt (or tee shirt) is a shirt with short or long sleeves, a round neck, put on over the head, without pockets. ... A polo neck (UK) (or turtle neck in the US) is a garment—usually a sweater—with a close-fitting, round, and high collar that folds over and covers the neck. ... Germanic trousers of the 4th century found in the Thorsberg moor, Germany Early use of trousers in France: a sans-culotte by Louis-Léopold Boilly. ... Germanic trousers of the 4th century found in the Thorsberg moor, Germany Early use of trousers in France: a sans-culotte by Louis-Léopold Boilly. ... Bell bottoms are trousers that become more wide from the knees downwards. ... This page is a candidate to be copied to Wiktionary using the Transwiki process. ... Boxer shorts (also known as loose boxers or, imprecisely, as boxers) are a type of underwear worn by men. ... Capri pants (often just called capris) are a style of trousers worn during the summer. ... Cargo pants are much like regular khaki pants, but are baggier and have several additional cargo pockets. ... Culottes are a split or divided skirt. ... Daniel Czajkowski wearing cycling shorts Cycling shorts (also known as bike shorts or bicycling shorts) are short, skin-tight legwear designed to improve comfort and efficiency while cycling. ... This article is about the type of clothing. ... Look up overall in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Shorts (disambiguation). ... Three male athletes wearing grey sweatpants Sweatpants are an informal variety of trousers intended for comfort or athletic purposes. ... A skirt is a traditionally feminine tube- or cone-shaped garment which is worn from the waist and covers the legs. ... Ballerina skirt is a full skirt that reaches to just above the ankles. ... This is a type of skirt that is characterized by its amount of fabric. ... A hobble skirt is a skirt with a narrow enough hem to significantly impede the wearers stride, thus earning its name. ... A woman wears a jean skirt. ... A leather skirt is a skirt made of leather. ... A kilt in the Black Watch tartan A kilt is a traditional garment of modern Scottish and Celtic culture typically worn by men. ... A poodle skirt is a wide swing skirt worn with layers of petticoats underneath, often on its own (worn with a cardigan) or sometimes as part of a dress. ... A prairie skirt is a American style of skirt, an article of womens and girls clothing. ... A woman modelling a miniskirt The miniskirt (often hyphenated as mini-skirt) is a skirt with a hemline well above the knees (generally 20 cm—about 8 inches—or more above knee level). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up dress in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Ball gowns of the 1860s A Ball gown is the most formal female attire for social occasions. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An evening gown is a ladys dress worn to a formal affair. ... Wedding - Bridesmaid in long gown A gown or evening gown is a womans evening wear, corresponding to mens formal wear for white tie and black tie events. ... A jumper dress (or jumper in American English; pinafore dress, pinafore, or pinny in British English) is a sleeveless, collarless dress intended to be worn over a blouse or sweater. ... Audrey Hepburn wore a little black dress in the 1954 movie Sabrina. ... Madame de Pompadour in an elaborately embroidered gown with matching petticoat, 1760s A petticoat or underskirt is an article of clothing for women; specifically an undergarment to be worn under a skirt, dress or sari. ... For the city, see Sari, Iran. ... A tea gown or tea-gown is a womans at-home dress of the late 19th to mid-20th centuries characterized by unstructured lines, light fabrics, and frothy or feminine detail. ... For other uses, see Wedding dress (disambiguation). ... At the Treaty of Versailles signing, in 1919, the heads of state wore morning dress and lounge suits for informal meetings, but frock coats for formal daytime meetings. ... For other uses, see Uniform (disambiguation). ... A pantsuit is a womans suit of clothing consisting of trousers and a matching or coordinating coat or jacket. ... Scrubs are the shirts and trousers/dresses worn by surgeons, nurses, and other operating room personnel when scrubbing in for surgery. ... Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and U.S. President Ronald Reagan wearing black tie with wives in Quebec, Canada, March 18, 1985. ... Fashion accessories are items apart from the garment itself, which complement the whole outfit. ... Bold textA belt is a flexible band, typically made of leather or heavy cloth, and worn around the waist. ... One option to tie a bowtie The bowtie is a mens fashion accessory, popularly worn with other formal attire, such as suits. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Girl wearing modern leggings Leggings are any of several sorts of fitted clothing to cover the legs. ... For the grappling position, see double collar tie. ... A man wearing classic suspenders, which hook directly into the trousers instead of using clips. ... Three women wearing different styles of tights. ... It has been suggested that Sportcoat be merged into this article or section. ... Double-breasted coat, 1876 For other meanings than clothing, see Coat (Disambiguation) A coat (a term frequently interchangeable with jacket) is an outer garment worn by both men and women, for warmth and/ or fashion. ... A jacket is a lightweight, sleeved thigh- or waist-length coat that may be worn by anyone, as jackets are now made for children, adults, the elderly, and even infants. ... The raincoat, a garment worn to protect the upper body from rain, is a compromise between fashion and utility. ... World War I example For the film, see Trenchcoat (film). ... A traditional waistcoat, to be worn with a two-piece suit or separate jacket and trousers A waistcoat (sometimes called a vest in Canada and the US) is a sleeveless upper-body garment worn over a dress shirt and necktie (if applicable) and below a coat as a part of... High-heeled shoe Footwear consists of garments worn on the feet. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... For other senses of this word, see boot (disambiguation). ... A dress shoe is a shoe used as a component of formal wear. ... Hosiery describes undergarments worn directly on the feet and legs. ... Modern multi-colored Sandalette Yoga sandals In some parts of the United States, this type of sandal is referred to in slang as the mandal in that it is worn primarily by men. ... For other uses, see Shoe (disambiguation). ... A pair of open-heeled slippers. ... For other uses, see Sock (disambiguation). ... Headgear, headwear or headdress is the name given to any element of clothing which is worn on ones head. ... A hat is an item of clothing which is worn on the head; a kind of headgear. ... A cap is a form of headgear. ... A person wearing a helmet. ... Adaptive clothing refers to clothing deigned to accomodate living assistance items such as diapers required by persons with physical or developmental disabilities. ... A back closure can be a zipper or one or more buttons found on the back of a garment that is used for fastening the garment. ... Archeological bronze buckles from southern Sweden A buckle (from Latin buccula) is a clasp used for fastening two things together, such as the ends of a belt, or for retaining the end of a strap. ... For other uses, see Button (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cuff (disambiguation). ... The hemline of a garment is its lower edge. ... Lapels are the decorative revers on the face of mens formal jackets. ... For other uses, see Pocket (disambiguation). ... A woman wearing a sweater with padded shoulders. ... Sleeve (O. Eng. ... Snap fastener (male and female discs) A snap fastener is a pair of interlocking discs commonly used in place of buttons to fasten clothing. ... A Top Button is the highest button on a shirt, holding the collar of the shirt together. ... The waistline is the line of demarcation between the upper and lower portions of a garment, which notionally corresponds to the natural waist but may vary with fashion from just below the bust to below the hips. ... Zipper slider brings together the two sides A zipper (British English: zip fastener or zip) is a popular device for temporarily joining two edges of fabric. ...

 
 

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