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Encyclopedia > Dreamcatcher
This is about the traditional Native American object. For other uses, see Dreamcatcher (disambiguation).
A dreamcatcher.
A dreamcatcher.

In Ojibwa (Chippewa) culture, a dreamcatcher (or dream catcher; Ojibwe asabikeshiinh, the inanimate form of the word for "spider"[1][2] or bawaajige nagwaagan meaning "dream snare"[2]) is a handmade object based on a willow hoop, on which is woven a loose net or web. The dreamcatcher is then decorated with personal and sacred items such as feathers and beads. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 1200 pixel, file size: 874 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 1200 pixel, file size: 874 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Other versions File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the native North American people. ... The Anishinaabe language or the Ojibwe group of languages or Anishinaabemowin in Eastern Ojibwe syllabics) is the third most commonly spoken Native language in Canada (after Cree and Inuktitut), and the fourth most spoken in North America (behind Navajo, Cree, and Inuktitut). ... The Ojibwe language is an Algonquian American Indian language spoken throughout the Great Lakes region and westward onto the northern plains. ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... Look up net in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Spiders web redirects here. ...

Contents

Origin and legends

Dreamcatchers.
Dreamcatchers.

While dreamcatchers originated in the Ojibwa Nation, during the pan-Indian movement of the 1960s and 1970s they were adopted by Native Americans of a number of different Nations. They came to be seen by some as a symbol of unity among the various Indian Nations, and as a general symbol of identification with Native American or First Nations cultures. However, some Native Americans have come to see them as "tacky" and over-commercialized due to their acceptance in popular culture.[3] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 551 pixelsFull resolution (1717 × 1183 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) J. Ng, Raleigh, NC File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 551 pixelsFull resolution (1717 × 1183 pixel, file size: 3 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) J. Ng, Raleigh, NC File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the native North American people. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1960 to the end of 1969. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Chief Quanah Parker of the Quahadi Comanche Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory which is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in... First Nations is a term of ethnicity that refers to the indigenous peoples in what is now Canada who are neither Inuit nor Métis people. ...


Traditionally, the Ojibwa construct dreamcatchers by tying sinew strands in a web around a small round or tear-shaped frame of willow (in a way roughly similar to their method for making snowshoe webbing). The resulting "dream-catcher", hung above the bed, is then used as a charm to protect sleeping children from nightmares. Dreamcatchers made of willow and sinew are not meant to last forever but instead are intended to dry out and collapse over time as the child enters the age of adulthood. For other uses, see Snowshoe (disambiguation). ... Species About 350, including: Salix acutifolia - Violet Willow Salix alaxensis - Alaska Willow Salix alba - White Willow Salix alpina - Alpine Willow Salix amygdaloides - Peachleaf Willow Salix arbuscula - Mountain Willow Salix arbusculoides - Littletree Willow Salix arctica - Arctic Willow Salix atrocinerea Salix aurita - Eared Willow Salix babylonica - Peking Willow Salix bakko Salix barrattiana... A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue, attached on one end to a muscle and on the other to a bone. ...


The Ojibwa believe that a dreamcatcher filters a person's dreams. According to Terri J. Andrews in the article "Legend of the Dream Catcher," about the Ojibwa nation in the magazine World & I, Nov. 1998 page 204, "Only good dreams would be allowed to filter through . . . Bad dreams would stay in the net, disappearing with the light of day."


It's recommended to hang the dream catcher above someone sleeping to guard against bad dreams. Good dreams pass through and slide down the feathers to the sleeper.


Another legend (Lakota), according to St. Joseph's Indian School in Chamberlain, South Dakota, "Good dreams pass through the center hole to the sleeping person. The bad dreams are trapped in the web, where they perish in the light of dawn." Eddie Plenty Holes, a Sioux Indian photographed about 1899. ... Chamberlain is a city located in Brule County, South Dakota. ...

Close up of modern, non-traditional dreamcatcher made of grape vine and sinew with turquoise stones surrounding a large quartz crystal. Made by Dreamcatcher.com
Close up of modern, non-traditional dreamcatcher made of grape vine and sinew with turquoise stones surrounding a large quartz crystal. Made by Dreamcatcher.com

Popularization

In the course of becoming popular outside of the Ojibwa Nation, and then outside of the pan-Indian communities, "dreamcatchers" are now made, exhibited and sold by some New age groups and individuals. According to Philip Jenkins, this is considered by most traditional Native peoples and their supporters to be an undesirable form of cultural appropriation.[4] New Age describes a broad movement characterized by alternative approaches to traditional Western culture. ... Philip Jenkins is a professor of history and religious studies and Pennsylvania State University. ... Cultural appropriation is the adoption of some specific elements of one culture by a different cultural group. ...


The official portrait of Ralph Klein, former Premier of the Canadian province of Alberta and whose wife Colleen Klein is Metis, incorporates a dreamcatcher.[5] Ralph Phillip Klein (born November 1, 1942) was the premier of the Canadian province of Alberta and leader of the Alberta Progressive Conservatives from 1992 until his retirement in 2006. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ...


Notes

  1. ^ Freelang Ojibwe Dictionary
  2. ^ a b Prindle, Tara. NativeTech: Dream Catchers. Retrieved on September 23, 2007.
  3. ^ Native American Dreamcatchers
  4. ^ Jenkins, Philip (September 2004). Dream Catchers: How Mainstream America Discovered Native Spirituality. New York: Oxford University Press. 
  5. ^ Ralph Klein breaks tradition in legislature portrait. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (2007-08-31).

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

For the film, see Mandala (film). ... A Gods eye is a yarn weaving and spiritual magic: see also Namkha, Ojo de Dios and yarn cross. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Dreamcatcher

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dreamcatcher (Native American) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (160 words)
In Native American culture, a dreamcatcher is a handmade object based on a hoop (traditionally of willow), incorporating a loose net, and decorated with items unique to the particular dreamcatcher.
There is a traditional belief that a dreamcatcher filters a person's dreams, letting through only the good ones.
Dreamcatchers are an authentic American Indian tradition, from the Ojibway (Chippewa) tribe.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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