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Encyclopedia > Dreamcast
Dreamcast
Manufacturer Sega
Type Video game console
Generation Sixth generation era
First available JP November 27, 1998
NA September 9, 1999
EU October 14, 1999
CPU 200 MHz Hitachi SH4 RISC
GPU 100 MHz PowerVR2 CLX2
Media CD, 1.2 GB GD-ROM, DVD (unreleased)
System storage VMU, Nexus Memory Card, Zip Drive (unreleased)
Online service SegaNet, Dreamarena
Units sold 10.6 million[1][2]
Best-selling game Sonic Adventure, 2.5 million (as of June 2006)[3]
Predecessor Sega Saturn

The Dreamcast (ドリームキャスト Dorīmukyasuto?, code-named White Belt, Black Belt, Dural, Dricas, Vortex, Katana, Shark, and Guppy during development) is Sega's last video game console and the successor to the Sega Saturn. An attempt to recapture the console market with a next-generation system, it was designed to supersede the PlayStation and Nintendo 64. Originally released sixteen months before the PlayStation 2 (PS2) and three years before the Nintendo GameCube and the Xbox, the Dreamcast is part of the sixth generation of video game consoles, Dreamcast was widely hailed as ahead of its time, and is still held in high regard for pioneering online console gaming.[4] Nevertheless, it failed to gather enough momentum before the release of the PlayStation 2 in March 2000, and Sega decided to discontinue the Dreamcast in March of 2001 and to withdraw entirely from the console hardware business; however, support continued in Japan where consoles were still sold and new games are still being made by the homebrew community. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Dreamcast_logo. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 471 pixelsFull resolution (1700 × 1000 pixel, file size: 1. ... A console manufacturer is a company that manufactures and distributes video game consoles. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Game console redirects here. ... Video games were introduced as a commercial entertainment medium in 1971, becoming the basis for an important entertainment industry in the late 1970s/early 1980s in the United States, Japan, and Europe. ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... This article is about the country in East Asia. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... North American redirects here. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... CPU redirects here. ... A megahertz (MHz) is one million (106) hertz, a measure of frequency. ... The SuperHichem (or SH) is brandname of a certain microcontroller and microprocessor architecture. ... Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC), is a microprocessor CPU design philosophy that favors a smaller and simpler set of instructions that all take about the same amount of time to execute. ... “GPU” redirects here. ... CD redirects here. ... GD-ROM is the proprietary optical disc format used by the Sega Dreamcast. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Sega Dreamcast VMU The VMU, initialism of Visual Memory Unit (called VMS, Visual Memory System in Japan or Virtual Memory Unit), is a memory card peripheral for the Sega Dreamcast. ... Nexus Memory Card with USB / Serial Port cable. ... Iomega ZIP-100 Drive Logo An internal Zip drive. ... SegaNet was a short-lived internet service operated by Sega, geared for dial-up based online gaming on their Dreamcast game console. ... The Dreamarena was an online gaming service provided with all Sega Dreamcast consoles in Europe. ... This is a list of video game consoles and handheld game consoles that have sold five million units or more. ... This is a list of video games that have sold one million copies or more, including the top ten best-selling franchises. ... Sonic Adventure ) is a video game created by Sonic Team and released on December 23, 1998 in Japan by Sega for the Sega Dreamcast. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... A code name or cryptonym is a word or name used clandestinely to refer to another name or word. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Game console redirects here. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... PlayStation redirects here. ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... Homebrew is a term frequently applied only to video games that are produced by consumers on proprietary game platforms; in other words, game platforms that are not typically user-programmable, or use proprietary hardware for storage. ...

Contents

History

In 1997, the Saturn was struggling in North America, and Sega of America president Bernie Stolar pressed for Sega's Japanese headquarters to develop a new platform which eventually became the Dreamcast. At the 1997 E3, Stolar made public his opinion on the Saturn with his comment, "The Saturn is not our future" and referred to the doomed console as "the stillbirth". The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... Sega (セガ) is a video game software and hardware developer, and a former console manufacturer. ... Bernard Bernie Stolar worked in the video game industry for several important companies. ... E³ logo The Electronic Entertainment Expo, commonly known as E³, was an annual trade show for the computer and video games industry presented by the Entertainment Software Association. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Launch

The Sega Dreamcast was released on November 27, 1998 in Japan; on September 9, 1999 in North America (the date 9/9/99 featured heavily in U.S. promotion); and on October 14, 1999 in Europe. The tagline used to promote the console in the U.S. was, "It's thinking", and in Europe, "Up to [6 Billion] Players." Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... North American redirects here. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A tagline is a variant of a branding slogan typically used in marketing materials and advertising. ...


Sega Dreamcast was the first console to include a built-in modem and Internet support for online gaming. Previous consoles such as the Genesis, Saturn, NES and SNES had online capabilities, but these were comparably limited and/or required extra hardware (XBAND, NetLink, Sega Channel). For other uses, see Modem (disambiguation). ... Online games refer to games that are played over some form of computer network. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... XBAND was an early online console gaming network for SNES and Sega Genesis systems. ... Netlink is used to transfer information between kernel modules and user space processes. ... Sega Channel logo and mascot Sega Pat Sega Channel was a project developed by Sega for the 16-bit Sega Genesis console. ...


Sega Dreamcast enjoyed brisk sales in its first season, and was one of Sega's most successful hardware units. In the United States alone, a record 300,000 units[5] had been pre-ordered and Sega sold 500,000 consoles in just two weeks (including 225,132 sold on the first 24 hours which became a video game record). In fact, due to brisk sales and hardware shortages, Sega was unable to fulfill all of the advance orders.


Sega confirmed that it made US$98.4 million on combined hardware and software sales with Dreamcast with its September 9, 1999 launch. Sega even compared the record figure to the opening day gross of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, which made $28.5 million during the first 24 hours in theaters. is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ...


Chris Gilbert, senior vice president of sales, Sega of America, said on November 24, 1999: "By hitting the one million units sold landmark, it is clear that the Sega Dreamcast consumer has moved beyond the hard-core gamer and into the mass market." He also likened it to a music album going platinum or a film netting $100 million in box office receipts. Christopher Robert Gilbert (born April 16, 1984, Scarborough, Yorkshire) is a cricketer who represented England at various age levels. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ...


Before the launch in the United States, Sega had already taken extra steps in displaying Dreamcast's capabilities in stores nationwide. Much like the PlayStation's launch in North America, the displays of titles such as Soul Calibur, Sonic Adventure, Power Stone, and Hydro Thunder helped Dreamcast succeed in the first year. PlayStation redirects here. ... North American redirects here. ... Super Mario Brothers was a launch title for the NES. A launch title is a video game that has been made available to consumers synchronously with its respective video game console, meaning they are the only available games at the time of the consoles launch. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sonic Adventure ) is a video game created by Sonic Team and released on December 23, 1998 in Japan by Sega for the Sega Dreamcast. ... Power Stone is a fully 3D arena fighting game series made by Capcom. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ...


Although Dreamcast had none of EA's popular sports games, due in part to EA's losses from the Sega Saturn, Sega Sports titles helped to fill that void. The biggest competition between Sega Sports and EA Sports in the U.S. was their (American) football and basketball games. This started with one of the launch titles of the Dreamcast, NFL 2K. Both Madden 2000 and NFL 2K were highly regarded, with the Dreamcast boasting a new graphics engine and Madden retaining the same engine that made it solid from the years prior. It was not until the next years release of the games where the Dreamcast proved it's worth in the video game market. This was when NFL 2K1 outsold Madden NFL 2001 with about 410,000 copies. A sports game is a computer or video game that simulates the playing of traditional sports. ... [[== Prima di tutto direi che la Sega e latto della masturbazione, mi sembra dovuto. ... current EA Sports logo EA Sports is a brand name used by Electronic Arts since 1993 to distribute games based on sports. ...


Competition

In April 1999, Sony announced its PlayStation 2. The actual release of the PS2 was not until March 2000 in Japan, and October 26, 2000 in the United States. Sony's press release, despite being a year ahead of the launch of the PS2, was enough to divert a lot of attention from Sega. With the looming PS2 launch in Japan, the Dreamcast was largely ignored in that territory. While the system had great initial success in the United States, it had trouble maintaining this momentum after news of the PS2's release. PS2 redirects here. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Dreamcast sales grew 156.5% from July 23, 2000 to September 30, 2000 putting Sega ahead of Nintendo 64 in that period. For the month of November 2000, Dreamcast passed the Nintendo 64 as the second best selling system. During that time, the PlayStation 2 was plagued by production shortages, with people often paying in excess of $1000 on eBay for Sony's next-generation console. However, Dreamcast's online capabilities through SegaNet, and a price cut around the second half of 2000 (which made it half the price of the PS2) did little to help sales once the PlayStation 2 was launched. American public attention also noted the Playstation 2's much hyped graphics and its ability to play DVDs, as it cost less than a standalone player at the time. is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the online auction center. ... SegaNet was a short-lived internet service operated by Sega, geared for dial-up based online gaming on their Dreamcast game console. ...


A key to Sony's relatively easy success with the PlayStation 2 was that they already enjoyed brand-name dominance over Sega after the huge success of the original PlayStation, while Sega's reputation had been hurt due to commercial failure of the Sega Saturn, Sega 32X, and Sega CD. In particular, Sega's attempt to quickly kill off the struggling Saturn (which lagged in North America and Europe) in favour of Dreamcast had angered many third-party developers in Japan, where the Saturn had still been able to hold its own.[6] While initial Dreamcast sales were strong, many prospective buyers and game developers were still skeptical of Sega and they held off from committing, possibly to see which console would prevail. By early 2001, game publishers abandoned Dreamcast development en masse in favor of the PlayStation 2 and canceled many nearly completed projects (notably Half-Life). This article is about brands in marketing. ... PlayStation redirects here. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The Sega 32X (Japanese: セガ スーパー32X) is an add-on for the Sega Mega Drive video game console by Sega. ... The Sega Mega-CD (Japanese: メガCD) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, and Japan. ... Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ...


In 2000, the announcements of the Microsoft Xbox and Nintendo GameCube were widely regarded as the last straw for Dreamcast, which fueled speculation that Sega did not have the resources for a prolonged marketing campaign. Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ...


Outside U.S. and Japan

Sega had problems choosing suitable companies to promote Dreamcast outside the U.S. Marketing in European countries was done somewhat poorly, whereas Sony marketed the PlayStation 2 in each country's local medias, such as newspapers and street shows. Sega recruited third-party companies to promote Dreamcast, some of which did not allocate sufficient money for advertising.


DreamArena (the European equivalent to SegaNet, the Dreamcast online service) was a fiasco in Finland because the cost of connection was more than three times the amount of a normal ISDN internet connection. This was due to the fact that Sega allowed open pricing for third-party companies. The companies stated that the price was steep due to a lack of potential customers, but most believe that the companies were just using the open pricing to their advantage. ISDN is also short for isosorbide dinitrate Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) is a type of circuit switched telephone network system, designed to allow digital (as opposed to analog) transmission of voice and data over ordinary telephone copper wires, resulting in better quality and higher speeds, than available with analog...


Many important titles were never released outside of Japan, and many were hard to find without importing them. While Dreamcast did receive a price cut in the U.S. to coincide with the PlayStation 2's American release, the European pricing remained the same, even when the PlayStation 2 was released in Europe.


End of production

On January 31, 2001, Sega announced that production of Dreamcast hardware was to be discontinued by March of that year, although the 50 to 60 titles still in production would be published. The last North American release was NHL 2K2, which was released in February 2002. With the company announcing no plans to develop a next-generation successor to Dreamcast, this was Sega's last foray into the home console business. Massive price cuts were quickly instituted in order to move the abundance of unsold hardware and the system had quickly dropped to prices as low as US$49.99 new. is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... NHL 2K is a series of hockey games by 2K Sports for the PlayStation 2, Xbox, Xbox 360, and PlayStation 3. ... USD redirects here. ...


Though Dreamcast was officially discontinued in early 2001, commercial games were still developed and released afterwards, particularly in Japan. Unreleased games like Propeller Arena and Half-Life continued to become available to the public through warez groups and independent hackers. Propeller Arena: Aviation Battle Championship is a videogame for the Dreamcast console. ... Half-Life For a quantity subject to exponential decay, the half-life is the time required for the quantity to fall to half of its initial value. ... Warez refers primarily to copyrighted works traded in violation of copyright law. ...


On February 24, 2004, Sega released their final Dreamcast game, Puyo Pop Fever. Afterwords, a small number of third-party games were still being released, such as Chaos Field released in December 2004, Trizeal released in April 2005, Radilgy released in February 2006, Under Defeat released in March 2006, and most recently Last Hope released January 2007, Trigger Heart Exelica released February 2007, and Karous released March 2007. is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Puyo Pop Fever, known in Japan as Puyo Puyo Fever ), is a puzzle game released on a wide variety of systems and was developed by Sonic Team. ... In the video game industry, a third-party developer is a developer that is not directly tied to the primary product the consumer is using. ... Chaos Field is a video game of the shoot em up genre released in 2005 by MileStone. ... This article reads like an advertisement. ... Radilgy (ラジルギ, also known as Radio Allergy, Rajirugi, and Radirgy, the title printed on the disc case) is one of the latest arcade shoot em ups ported and officially released for the Sega Dreamcast by Milestone Inc. ... Under Defeat Flyer Under Defeat is a shmup arcade game by G.rev. ... Last Hope is a single-player side-scrolling shoot em up video game for the Neo Geo AES, Neo Geo CD, and Sega Dreamcast systems. ... This article should belong in one or more categories, in addition to being in a stub category. ... Karous (pronounced karasu) is a video game by Milestone Inc. ...


Visual Novel games were still released even when the Dreamcast was discontinued. There was a big support until 2004. The last Visual Novel game released on Dreamcast was Angel Wish, in early 2005. A visual novel is an interactive fiction game featuring mostly static graphics, usually with anime-style art. ... A visual novel is an interactive fiction game featuring mostly static graphics, usually with anime-style art. ...


Despite its short lifespan, as of 2007, Dreamcast is still a popular and highly-regarded console among many fans due to its impressive library of both mainstream and more offbeat titles. It is even starting to gain a cult following, as the system is becoming harder to find. This article does not discuss cultist groups, personality cults, or cult in its original sense of religious practice. See cult (disambiguation) for more meanings of the term cult. A cult following is a group of fans devoted to a specific area of pop culture. ...


Sega would later re-release the Dreamcast through the Sega Direct division of Japan in early 2006. Although they were only refurbished units, they did come with the new Radilgy game and a phone card. Radilgy (ラジルギ, also known as Radio Allergy, Rajirugi, and Radirgy, the title printed on the disc case) is one of the latest arcade shoot em ups ported and officially released for the Sega Dreamcast by Milestone Inc. ...


Several Dreamcast emulation projects have emerged after Dreamcast's end of production, with Chankast being the most notable, along with the recently released nullDC. Chankast is a freeware Sega Dreamcast emulator for x86 platforms. ...


Hardware

The power light, like the Dreamcast logo in NTSC regions, was orange (this color was chosen because the Japanese consider it to be lucky). Games were sold in jewel cases. In North America, these initially had the Dreamcast name and logo on a white background, but later games used a black background, similar to the PlayStation's. Japanese games used an orange-and-white scheme, and European and Australian games used blue. NTSC is the analog television system in use in Canada, Japan, Mexico, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, the United States, and some other countries, mostly in the Americas (see map). ... The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... Optical disc packaging is the packaging that accompanies CDs, DVDs, and other formats of optical media. ...


The unit was packaged with a video cable which supported composite video and stereo sound. Available separately were an RGB SCART cable, an S-Video cable, an RF connector (included as standard in the UK, Germany and Portugal), and a VGA adapter (see accessories below). Composite video, also called CVBS (Composite Video Blanking and Sync), is the format of an analog television (picture only) signal before it is combined with a sound signal and modulated onto an RF carrier. ... Label for 2. ... REDIRECT RGB color model ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... S-Video (also known as Y/C) is a baseband analog video format offering a higher quality signal than composite video, but a lower quality than RGB and component video. ... An RF connector is an electrical connector designed to work at radio frequencies in the multi-megahertz range. ... Video Graphics Array (VGA) is a computer display standard first marketed in 1987 by IBM. VGA belongs to a family of earlier IBM video standards and largely remains backward compatible with them. ...


Although there was no reset button on the Dreamcast system itself, there was a way to reset a game during play. If the player wanted to reset a game, they would have to press the A, B, X, and Y buttons all together and then press the start button. This would then take them to the game's main menu. If repeated, it would take players to the Dreamcast menu.


In North America, a black Dreamcast was released in limited numbers with a sports pack which included two Sega Sports titles. This was the same as other models except for the black casing and the Sega Sports logo located directly below the Dreamcast logo on the lid. Electronics Boutique offered a blue Dreamcast through its website. Similar offerings were sold through the Lik Sang website. Cases of different colors like blue, red, orange, and green were sold for replacements of the original casing. In Japan, Sega released many varieties of the system, including a limited edition Sonic anniversary version, a pink Sakura Taisen version, and a Hello Kitty version released in 2000 in Japan which, due to its limited production, has become an extremely rare collector's piece. The package contains a keyboard, controller, VMU, mouse, and a Hello Kitty trivia game. The console and accessories came in both translucent pink and blue in color with some printed designs. The current EB Games logo EB Games EDGE card Electronics Boutique is an international computer and video games retailer, established as an American company in 1977 by James Kim with a single, electronics-focused kiosk, located in a suburban Philadelphia mall in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. ... Lik Sang is a popular distributor of Asian electronics. ... The Sonic the Hedgehog series is a franchise of video games released by Sega starring their mascot character Sonic the Hedgehog. ... Sakura Wars, also known as Sakura Taisen, is a popular series of video game and animation products created by Sega. ... Hello Kitty by Sanrio. ... A 104-key PC US English QWERTY keyboard layout The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and QWERTY. A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially modelled after the typewriter keyboard. ... A game controller is an input device used to control a video game. ... Sega Dreamcast VMU The VMU, initialism of Visual Memory Unit (called VMS, Visual Memory System in Japan or Virtual Memory Unit), is a memory card peripheral for the Sega Dreamcast. ... Operating a mechanical 1: Pulling the mouse turns the ball. ... Look up trivia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the color. ... This article is about the colour. ...


The Brazilian version, manufactured by Tec Toy under license, was essentially the same as the North American version, but its video output was converted to the PAL-M standard and did not come with the modem, which was available separately. Tec Toy (often misspelled as TecToy) is a Brazilian videogame and electronics company. ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ...


Dreamcast in Europe had a blue spiral logo, similar to the logo on earlier Sega systems. This change is thought to have been for copyright reasons: German company Tivola Publishing[1] had been using a similar swirl logo years before Sega branded Dreamcast with the orange swirl. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with copywriting. ...


As well as the VGA mode to connect to a PC monitor (again using an adapter), the European Dreamcast supported PAL video, in both 50 Hz and 60 Hz modes. This was a first for game consoles, as no previous PAL console had offered the option to play games at full speed, using the ability of many PAL televisions to operate at 60 Hz. This feature was exploited in previous consoles but only by modifying the console with a chip to allow it to run NTSC games (e.g., Sony's PlayStation), or by adding switches to the internal circuitry to manually select between 50 Hz and 60 Hz (e.g., SEGA's Master System, Mega Drive or Saturn). Although the 60 Hz code had to be enabled on the disc, doing so was a simple matter, and only a small number of games lacked it. The 60 Hz feature has become standard on all major consoles released since. A computer display monitor, usually called simply a monitor, is a piece of electrical equipment which displays viewable images generated by a computer without producing a permanent record. ... Console may be: An organ term for the area of an organ including the keys, stops, and foot pedals manipulated by the organist. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... PlayStation redirects here. ... Sega Master System The Sega Master System (SMS for short) (Japanese: マスターシステム), was an 8-bit cartridge-based gaming console manufactured by Sega. ... Sega MegaDrive 2 European version with joypad, game cart + box Sega Mega Drive (Japanese: メガドライブ Mega Doraibu) was a 16-bit video game console released by Sega. ... This article is about the planet. ...


Games in Europe were sold in jewel cases exactly twice as thick as their North American counterparts, possibly to enable the inclusion of thick instruction booklets containing instructions in multiple languages.


A third-party company from China named Treamcast released a portable modified Dreamcast which used the original first-party Dreamcast components with a custom made plastic casing. This small system with its fold-down display resembled the later PS One. Many companies included software and a remote with the unit that enabled it to play MP3s and Video CDs. When the Internet import video game store Lik Sang contacted Sega to ask permission to sell a modified version of the system with Sega trademarks on the system, they were told that Sega did not approve of the unit, and felt that it violated their trademarks. In reality, this system is no different from a Dreamcast pre-modified with a third party shell, as the system's internals still use first party hardware, and the only modifications are the outside casing and internal sound and video adjustments. Treamcast is a third-party developed Dreamcast clone from China. ... PlayStation redirects here. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... VCD redirects here. ... Lik Sang is a popular distributor of Asian electronics. ...


In 2005, the internet import store Lan-Kwei started selling a "Treamcast" portable modified Dreamcast with a 16:9 widescreen LCD. Aside from the cosmetic differences in the case to accommodate the larger screen, there are no differences between the original Treamcast and the newer widescreen model. Treamcast is a third-party developed Dreamcast clone from China. ... LCD redirects here. ... Treamcast is a third-party developed Dreamcast clone from China. ...


Technical specifications

Internal view of a Dreamcast console
Internal view of a Dreamcast console
The mainboard of the Sega Dreamcast
The mainboard of the Sega Dreamcast

Processor Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1000 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Internal shot of a dreamcast console Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1000 × 1000 pixel, file size: 206 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Internal shot of a dreamcast console Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU...

  • SH-4 RISC CPU with 32-bit Instruction Set and 128-bit FPU functions (operating frequency: 200 MHz, 360 MIPS, 1.4 GFLOPS)

Graphics Engine The SuperHichem (or SH) is brandname of a certain microcontroller and microprocessor architecture. ... Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC), is a microprocessor CPU design philosophy that favors a smaller and simpler set of instructions that all take about the same amount of time to execute. ... A megahertz (MHz) is one million (106) hertz, a measure of frequency. ... Instructions per second (IPS) is a measure of a computers processor speed. ...

  • CLX2, 7.0 Mil polygons/second peak performance, supports Trilinear filtering. Actual maximum in game performance (with full textures, lighting, gameplay, etc.) of over 5 Mil polygons/second.
  • Tile Based Deferred Rendering eliminates overdraw by only drawing visible fragments. This makes required fillrate almost independent from scene depth complexity, thus making up for a low, compared to other 6th generation consoles, nominal fillrate of 100 MPixels/s as effective fillrate can be triple that amount.
  • Graphics hardware effects include gouraud shading, z-buffering, anti-aliasing and bump mapping.

Memory PowerVR is the business division of the processor design and implementation company, Imagination Technologies (formerly VideoLogic), which designs the IP for the visual processors part of their business. ... Trilinear filtering is an extension of the bilinear texture filtering method, which also performs linear interpolation between mipmaps. ... Gouraud shaded sphere - note the inaccuracies towards the edges of the polygons. ... Z-buffer data In computer graphics, z-buffering is the management of image depth coordinates in three-dimensional (3-D) graphics, usually done in hardware, sometimes in software. ... In digital signal processing, anti-aliasing is the technique of minimizing the distortion artifacts known as aliasing when representing a high-resolution signal at a lower resolution. ... A sphere without bump mapping. ...

  • Main RAM: 16 MiB 64 Bit 100 MHz
  • Video RAM: 8 MiB 4x16 Bit 100 MHz
  • Sound RAM: 2 MiB 16 Bit 66 MHz
  • VQ Texture Compression (5:1 texture compression)[7]

Sound Engine formula here</math></math></math></math></math>The three-letter acronym MIB may refer to any of several concepts: Management Information Base, a computing information repository used (for example) by Simple Network Management Protocol An abbreviation for mebibyte (MiB) or mebibit (Mib) Men in Black, a group of mysterious agents...

  • Yamaha AICA Sound Processor: 22.5 MHz 32-Bit ARM7 RISC CPU: 45 MHz,[7] 64 channel PCM/ADPCM sampler (4:1 compression), XG MIDI support, 128 step DSP

Storage The headquarters of Yamaha Corporation Yamaha redirects here. ... The ARM architecture (previously, the Advanced RISC Machine, and prior to that Acorn RISC Machine) is a 32-bit RISC processor architecture developed by ARM Limited that is widely used in a number of embedded designs. ... Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC), is a microprocessor CPU design philosophy that favors a smaller and simpler set of instructions that all take about the same amount of time to execute. ... PCM redirects here. ...

Input/Output Yamaha may refer to: Yamaha Corporation – A manufacturer of a diverse range of musical instruments and electronics. ... GD-ROM is the proprietary optical disc format used by the Sega Dreamcast. ... Constant Angular Velocity (CAV) refers to how information is written to or read from a rotating data disk. ... GD-ROM is the proprietary optical disc format used by the Sega Dreamcast. ... GB may stand for: // Gordon Brown, the new British Prime Minister George W. Bush, the US President Gb (digraph), a digraph in the Latin alphabet Government and binding, theory by Noam Chomsky Sarin, nerve gas (NATO designation: GB) Gigabit (symbol: Gb or Gbit) Gigabyte (symbol: GB) Game Boy line, a... Sega Dreamcast VMU The VMU, initialism of Visual Memory Unit (called VMS, Visual Memory System in Japan or Virtual Memory Unit), is a memory card peripheral for the Sega Dreamcast. ... The megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... According to the International Electrotechnical Commission a kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage. ...

Dimensions USB redirects here. ... Color depth is a computer graphics term describing the number of bits used to represent the color of a single pixel in a bitmapped image or video frame buffer. ... Truecolor (also spelled Truecolour; called Millions on a Macintosh) graphics is a method of storing image information in a computers memory such that each pixel is represented by three or more bytes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of common resolutions. ...

  • 189 mm × 195 mm × 76 mm (7 7/16in × 7 11/16in × 3in)
  • Weight: 1.9 kg (4.2 lb)
  • Color: Majority are white.
  • Japan: Various limited edition designs and colored consoles were produced
  • North America: Only a black "Sega Sports"-labeled model and a blue model from Electronics Boutique were officially available
  • PAL: No known alternate designs or colors

Networking Kg redirects here. ... Look up pound in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

A black 56k Dreamcast modem
A black 56k Dreamcast modem
  • Modem: Removable; speed varied among regions:
  • Original Asia/Japan model had a 33.6 kbit/s; consoles sold after September 9, 1999 had a 56 kbit/s modem
  • All American models had a 56 kbit/s
  • All PAL models had a 33.6 kbit/s
  • Broadband: these adapters are available separately and replace the removable modem
  • HIT-401 "Broadband Adapter", the more common model, this used a Realtek 8139 chip and supported 10 and 100 Mbit speeds, this device was released in Japan.
  • HIT-400: "Broadband Adapter", the more common model, this used a Realtek 8139 chip and supported 10 and 100 Mbit speeds, this device was released in US.
  • HIT-300: "Lan Adapter", this version used a Fujitsu MB86967 chip and supported only 10 Mbit speed.

See Also: Dreamcast Broadband Adapter Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (640 × 640 pixel, file size: 719 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 600 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (640 × 640 pixel, file size: 719 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Modem (disambiguation). ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... A 56 kbit/s line is a digital connection (possibly a leased line, possibly switched) capable of carrying 56 kilobits per second (kbit/s), the data rate of a normal single channel digital telephone line in North America. ... Realtek Semiconductor Corp. ... 10BASE-T cable 10BASE-T plug 10BASE-T is an implementation of Ethernet which allows stations to be attached via twisted pair cable. ... 100BASE-TX is the predominant form of Fast Ethernet, providing 100 Mbit/s Ethernet. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... Realtek Semiconductor Corp. ... 10BASE-T cable 10BASE-T plug 10BASE-T is an implementation of Ethernet which allows stations to be attached via twisted pair cable. ... 100BASE-TX is the predominant form of Fast Ethernet, providing 100 Mbit/s Ethernet. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... 10BASE-T cable 10BASE-T plug 10BASE-T is an implementation of Ethernet which allows stations to be attached via twisted pair cable. ... The Megabit is a unit of information storage, abbreviated Mbit or sometimes Mb. ... The American version comes in this box The Dreamcast Broadband Adapter (Also know has BBA) was an accessory released for the Sega Dreamcast, the console originally came equiped with a 56K modem however a Broadband adapter was released on January 10, 2001. ...


Accessories

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sega Dreamcast

Visual Memory Unit The Visual Memory Unit, or "VMU", was the Dreamcast memory card. It featured a monochrome LCD screen, a D-Pad, and two gaming buttons. The VMU could play mini-games loaded onto it from certain Dreamcast games, such as a Chao game transferable from Sonic Adventure. It could also display a list of the saved game data stored on it, and two VMUs could be connected together end-to-end to exchange data. Also while playing games such as Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2 or Crazy Taxi messages like "Awesome", "Rad", and "Nice Combo" would appear on the VMU screen. Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Sega Dreamcast VMU The VMU, initialism of Visual Memory Unit (called VMS, Visual Memory System in Japan or Virtual Memory Unit), is a memory card peripheral for the Sega Dreamcast. ... Four major types of memory cards (from left to right: CompactFlash, Memory Stick, Secure Digital, and xD. A memory card or flash memory card is a solid-state electronic flash memory data storage device used with digital cameras, handheld and Mobile computers, telephones, music players, video game consoles, and other... A photograph of a sign in grayscale The same photograph in black and white Monochrome comes from the two Greek words mono (μωνο, meaning one), and chroma (χρωμα, meaning surface or the color of the skin). A monochromatic object has a single color. ... LCD redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into output device. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Official Chao art. ... Tony Hawks Pro Skater 2, often called THPS2, is the second game in the Tony Hawks series. ... Crazy Taxi is a video game developed by Hitmaker and published by Sega. ...


Standard memory cards could also be purchased without the additional features of the VMU. Most of these were manufactured by third-party companies, (such as the Nexus Memory Card), although Sega eventually released a 4X memory card. The 4X cards did not have the VMU screen or stand-alone abilities, but they had four times the space thanks to the ability to switch between four 200-block sectors. Nexus Memory Card with USB / Serial Port cable. ...


The VMU design cannot be considered a full success, as it was fairly power-intensive, draining the two watch batteries at an alarmingly fast rate, and the architecture could not be expanded. However, contrary to popular belief, the VMU does not need the batteries to retain the saved data once the VMU is disconnected from the controller, as it incorporates flash memory storage for this purpose — the batteries are only used when the VMU is disconnected from the controller in order to browse/exchange saved data and play mini-games in a handheld fashion away from the console. A USB flash drive. ...


Controller and Rumble Pack Most Dreamcast games supported a rumble pack, or "Jump Pack", which was sold separately and could be plugged into the controller. In Japan, the Jump Pack was named the "Puru Puru Pack". This article is about haptic technology. ...


The Dreamcast controller featured a similar design to the Sega Saturn's analog controller, offering an analog stick, a D-pad, a Start button, four action buttons (labeled A, B, X, and Y, two buttons less than the Saturn), and two analog triggers on the underside. It also contained two slots which could hold memory cards or the rumble pack, with a window on the front of the controller through which the VMU's display could be seen. The Dreamcast controller was somewhat larger than many other controllers, and some players found it difficult to hold. Other players complained about the odd positioning of its controller cord, which comes out from the bottom of the controller. An analog stick from the Nintendo GameCube game controller An analog stick, sometimes called thumbstick, often mistakenly referred to as a joystick, is an input device for a controller (often a game controller) that is used for two-dimensional input. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ...


VGA Adapter Unique to Dreamcast was a VGA adapter for output to a computer display or HDTV compatible sets, providing much better quality than a standard television set. Not all games were compatible with the VGA adapter, but work-arounds existed to trick all but a handful of games into working with it. There are also certain models of the VGA adapter that have Composite and S-Video out, which is helpful those games that do not support VGA. A first and third party peripheral for the Sega Dreamcast, the VGA adapter allowed the Dreamcast to be connected to a computer monitor. ... VGA Port VGA plug Video Graphics Array (VGA) is an analog computer display standard first marketed in 1987 by IBM. It has been technologically outdated in the PC market for some time. ... High-definition television (HDTV) is a digital television broadcasting system with greater resolution than traditional television systems (NTSC, SECAM, PAL). ...


Dreamcast mouse and keyboard Dreamcast supported a mouse as well as a keyboard, which were useful when using the included web browser, and also supported by certain games such as The Typing of the Dead, Quake 3, Phantasy Star Online and Railroad Tycoon 2. Other games such as REZ offered undocumented mouse support. Operating a mechanical 1: Pulling the mouse turns the ball. ... A 104-key PC US English QWERTY keyboard layout The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard layout A standard Hebrew keyboard showing both Hebrew and QWERTY. A computer keyboard is a peripheral partially modelled after the typewriter keyboard. ... The Typing of the Dead is an arcade game (later ported to the Sega Dreamcast and Microsoft Windows), released in 2000 based on The House of the Dead 2. ... This article or section should include material from Anarki For an overview of the Quake game franchise go to Quake series. ... Phantasy Star Online (PSO) was an online title for Sega Dreamcast released in 2000. ... Railroad Tycoon is a computer strategy game. ... For other uses, see Rez (disambiguation). ...


Fishing Rod A motion sensitive fishing rod was released for the few fishing games on the system. The fishing rod can actually be used with SoulCalibur and Tennis 2k2 like the Wii Remote. A fiberglass spinning rod and reel circa 1997. ... For the live-action developing project based on the video game series, see Soul series#Film. ...


Microphone There was a microphone peripheral used for version 2.6 of the Planetweb web browser (providing long distance calling support), the European Planet Ring collection, Alien Front Online, and Seaman, the first console game to use speech recognition in the U.S. Microphones redirects here. ... For an account of the words periphery and peripheral as they are used in biology, sociology, politics, computer hardware, and other fields, see the periphery disambiguation page. ... An example of a Web browser (Mozilla Firefox) A web browser is a software application that enables a user to display and interact with text, images, videos, music and other information typically located on a Web page at a website on the World Wide Web or a local area network. ... Planet Ring is a Dreamcast game. ... Alien Front Online is a Sega Dreamcast video game originally released for the console in 2001. ... This page is about a video game. ... Speech recognition (in many contexts also known as automatic speech recognition, computer speech recognition or erroneously as voice recognition) is the process of converting a speech signal to a sequence of words in the form of digital data, by means of an algorithm implemented as a computer program. ...


Lightgun Sega also produced a light gun for the system, although this was not sold in the United States, possibly because Sega did not want its name on a gun in light of recent school shootings (the Columbine High School massacre). American versions of light gun games even blocked out using the official gun. However, several third parties made compatible guns for the American Dreamcast. One of them was Mad Catz's Dream Blaster which became the official Sega Dreamcast light gun for use in the United States. The games that did not work in United States with the official Dreamcast light gun were The House of the Dead 2 and Confidential Mission. Other light gun compatible games were Death Crimson OX and its Japanese prequel Death Crimson 2, Virtua Cop 2 on the Sega Smash Pack, and a light gun minigame in Demolition Racer No Exit. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Columbine High School massacre occurred on Tuesday, April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School in unincorporated Jefferson County, Colorado (the CDP of Columbine) near Denver and Littleton. ... Mad Catz Interactive, Inc. ... The House of the Dead 2 is a light gun arcade game with a horror theme and the first sequel to the House of the Dead series of video games, developed by Sega for video arcades in 1998 and later ported to the Sega Dreamcast, PC, and Microsoft Xbox as... Confidential Mission is an on the rails light gun game on the Sega Dreamcast, in the same style as the Virtua Cop series, with support for one or two players. ... Death Crimson OX is a light gun shooting game published by Sammy for the Sega Dreamcast console. ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... Virtua Cop 2 is a light gun arcade game, released in 1995 and developed internally at Sega by their AM2 studio. ... Sega Smash Pack is a series of game compilations featuring mostly Sega Genesis games. ... Demolition Racer No Exit was a game developed for the Sega Dreamcast. ...

For more details on this topic, see Dreamcast light guns.

Arcade Stick A heavy-duty Arcade Stick was put out by Sega, featuring a digital joystick with six buttons using the same microswitch assemblies as commercial arcade machines. Although it could not be used for many Dreamcast games due to the lack of an analog joystick, it was well-received and helped cement Dreamcast's reputation for playing 2D shooters and fighting games. Adaptors are now available to use the Arcade Stick on other hardware platforms. The Sega Dreamcast video game console had several light guns between the years of 2000 and 2003. ...


Third-party sticks were also made, like the ASCII Dreamcast fighting pad, which some regard as having a more comfortable 6-button configuration and a more precise digital direction pad. Image:ASCII fullsvg There are 95 printable ASCII characters, numbered 32 to 126. ...


Twin Sticks A twin stick peripheral was released specifically for use with the game Virtual-On. This add-on mimicked the original dual arcade stick setup and made gameplay much more precise. This peripheral is extremely rare and often quite expensive. This article or section needs copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone and/or spelling. ...


Dreameye Sega developed the Dreameye, a digital camera for Dreamcast, but it was only released in Japan. The Dreameye was a digital camera released for the Dreamcast home video console by Sega, The Dreameye was a digital camera which came with Visual Park software. ... Look up digital camera in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Dream Karaoke Developed as a Karaoke add-on for the Dreamcast by Sega and released only in Japan. It included a Microphone and built in modem (due to Japanese Dreamcast's not including the modems) It would download Karaoke songs onto the system to be played; however, it could not save any songs so you had to re-download the songs if you wanted to play them again. The servers for the system went offline in 2006. For other uses see Karaoke (disambiguation) A karaoke machine Karaoke from Japanese kara, empty or void, and ōkesutora, orchestra) (pronounced IPA: or ; in Japanese IPA: ;  ) is a form of entertainment in which amateur singers sing along with recorded music using a microphone and a PA system. ... For other uses see Karaoke (disambiguation) A karaoke machine Karaoke from Japanese kara, empty or void, and ōkesutora, orchestra) (pronounced IPA: or ; in Japanese IPA: ;  ) is a form of entertainment in which amateur singers sing along with recorded music using a microphone and a PA system. ...


Samba de Amigo controller Sega developed a special maraca controller for the Samba de Amigo music game. Maracas Maracas (sometimes called rhumba shakers) are simple percussion instruments (idiophones), usually played in pairs, consisting of a dried calabash or gourd shell (cuia - kOO-ya) or coconut shell filled with seeds or dried beans. ... Samba de Amigo is a rhythm game developed by Sonic Team and released in 1999 by Sega in arcades, and in 2000 for the Sega Dreamcast video game console. ...


Densha De Go! 2 controller A special controller made specific to Densha De Go! 2 only. The controller was only available in Japan and is very rare because of the few numbers produced.


Canceled Accessories Toward the end of Dreamcast's lifespan, Sega created and displayed prototypes of a high-capacity VMU/MP3 player, DVD player, and Zip drive peripherals. None of these items became available to the public. Iomega ZIP-100 Drive Logo An internal Zip drive. ...


Games

See also: List of Dreamcast games

As of November 2007, the Dreamcast has more than 325 official games available in its library.[8] This is a list of games and other titles released for the Sega Dreamcast computer system, organized alphabetically by name. ...


Copying

The Dreamcast's proprietary GD-ROM format served as a means of copy protection. It was ultimately circumvented. By using a combination of reverse-engineering and exploits in firmware, a standard CD could boot code in the Dreamcast BIOS to enable multimedia functions. This utilized functionality designed for Mil-CD a special type of multimedia CD released to the Japanese market. Soon, creations such as the Utopia bootdisk appeared, which allowed the ability to boot burned CD games. Mil-CD support was removed from the final Dreamcast revision. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... GD-ROM is the proprietary optical disc format used by the Sega Dreamcast. ... CD redirects here. ... In computing, booting (booting up) is a bootstrapping process that starts operating systems when the user turns on a computer system. ... For other uses, see Bios. ... Mil-CD is a compact disc format created by the video game company Sega in 1999. ... Utopia Bootdisk was a booting program that allowed the playing of burnt Sega Dreamcast games. ... In computing, optical disc authoring, including CD authoring and DVD authoring, known often as burning, is the process of recording source material—video, audio or other data—onto an optical disc (compact disc or DVD). ...


Online

See also: List of Dreamcast network games

Dreamcast was the first system to have online functionality in this generation. It was composed of online servers run by SegaNet, Dreamarena, and GameSpy networks. Online servers were sustained by the lifespan of the system although in Japan it was generally considered as a more popular online system because of its superior arcade game play. Hence more available network modes in games such as Frame Gride, Tech Romancer, and Project Justice. Dreamcast was previously online before the emergence of online play upon its release. Browser technology was made by independent companies such as Planetweb in order to customize the Dreamcast web service into standard HTML coding. This as well as Java, was available for uploads, movies, and mouse support in its later browsers. Dreamarena came with games such as Sonic Adventure, and Chu Chu Rocket while Planetweb offered free browsers with the Dreamcast demo disc inside the Official Dreamcast Magazine. Its final browser, Planetweb version 3.0, was available with all the support and was sold separately. This is a list of Dreamcast games that were or are online for Segas 33k, 56k modem and broadband adapter. ... SegaNet was a short-lived internet service operated by Sega, geared for dial-up based online gaming on their Dreamcast game console. ... The Dreamarena was an online gaming service provided with all Sega Dreamcast consoles in Europe. ... GameSpy, also known as GameSpy Industries, is a division of IGN Entertainment, which operates a network of game Web sites and provides online video game-related services and software. ... Tech Romancer (Japanese name: Choukou Senki Kikaioh) is a 1998 3D fighting arcade game by Capcom that draws heavily from the various sub-genres of Mecha anime. ... Project Justice (released in Japan as Moero! Justice Gakuen Burning! Justice Academy), and suffixed with the subtitle Rival Schools 2 in Latin America and Europe), is a fighting game developed by Capcom. ... The Sega Dreamcast (Japanese: ドリームキャスト; code-named Katana, Black Belt and Dural at various stages during development) was Segas last video game console. ... HTML, an initialism of Hypertext Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. ... ChuChu Rocket! is a puzzle game, written by Sonic Team. ...


Homebrew

See also: List of commercially released independently developed Dreamcast games
Last Hope, a homebrew Dreamcast game.

The Dreamcast continues to have a modest hacking enthusiast community. The availability of the KallistiOS software development kit on the Internet, as well as ports of Linux[9] and NetBSD/Dreamcast[10] operating systems, gave programmers a selection of familiar development tools to work with. This is a list of Commercially Released Independently Developed Dreamcast Games for the Sega Dreamcast computer system, organised alphabetically by name. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A hack in progress in Lobby 7 at MIT. Hack is a term in the slang of the technology culture which has come into existence over the past few decades. ... The top three games (pictured above) were developed using open source development systems such as KallistiOS. KallistiOS (KOS) is a free, BSD licensed development system for the Sega Dreamcast game console created by a team of free software developers over the internet. ... A software development kit (SDK or devkit) is typically a set of development tools that allows a software engineer to create applications for a certain software package, software framework, hardware platform, computer system, video game console, operating system, or similar. ... This article is about operating systems that use the Linux kernel. ... NetBSD is a freely redistributable, open source version of the Unix-like BSD computer operating system. ...


KallistiOS is a homebrew minimal operating system that offers support for a majority of the Dreamcast's hardware and peripherals. Its license allows hobbyist programmers to release games created with this SDK to be released commercially. Recent examples being Cryptic Allusion's Feet of Fury (2003), S+F Software's Inhabitants (2005), JMD's Maqiupai (2005), Harmlesslion's Cool Herders (2006), and NG:DEV.TEAM's Last Hope (2007). The top three games (pictured above) were developed using open source development systems such as KallistiOS. KallistiOS (KOS) is a free, BSD licensed development system for the Sega Dreamcast game console created by a team of free software developers over the internet. ... The BSD license is a permissive license and is one of the most widely used free software licenses. ... Cryptic Allusion, LLC is an American video game and computer game developer. ... Feet of Fury is a beat/dancing game for the Sega Dreamcast. ... S+F Software is an American video game and computer game developer. ... A resident is a person who lives in a particular place permanently, or for an extended period of time, i. ... JMD is an French video game and computer game developer. ... Maqiupai is a version of the chinese board game Mahjong for the Sega Dreamcast. ... Harmlesslion is a video game and computer game developer. ... Cool Herders is an independently developed commercial party game for the Sega Dreamcast. ... Last Hope is a single-player side-scrolling shoot em up video game for the Neo Geo AES, Neo Geo CD, and Sega Dreamcast systems. ...


Using the free KallistiOS SDK, a port of the Neo Geo Homebrew game Last Hope, developed by NG:DEV.TEAM was sold via various online stores on January 31, 2007. The BSD license is a permissive license and is one of the most widely used free software licenses. ... The top three games (pictured above) were developed using open source development systems such as KallistiOS. KallistiOS (KOS) is a free, BSD licensed development system for the Sega Dreamcast game console created by a team of free software developers over the internet. ... A Software Development Kit, or SDK for short, is typically a set of development tools that allows a software engineer to create applications for a certain software package, software framework, hardware platform, computer system, operating system or similar. ... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... Last Hope is a single-player side-scrolling shoot em up video game for the Neo Geo AES, Neo Geo CD, and Sega Dreamcast systems. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Using KallistiOS, many free games, emulators and other tools such as MP3 and DivX players and image viewers have been ported to or written for the console, taking advantage of the relative ease with which a home user can burn a CD that can be booted by any unmodified Dreamcast. One of the unusual but interesting hack examples is QNX Dreamcast Project.[11] Free software is software that can be used, studied, and modified without restriction, and which can be copied and redistributed in modified or unmodified form either without restriction, or with minimal restrictions only to ensure that further recipients can also do these things. ... For other uses, see MP3 (disambiguation). ... This article is about the video codec. ... QNX (pronounced either Q-N-X or Q-nix) is a commercial POSIX-compliant Unix-like real-time operating system, aimed primarily at the embedded systems market. ...


In popular culture

  • As part of Sega's promotions of the Dreamcast in Europe, the company sponsored four European football clubs: English team Arsenal F.C.,[12] French team AS Saint-Étienne,[13] Italian team U.C. Sampdoria[14] and Spanish club Deportivo de La Coruña.[15]
  • Sega was a sponsor of the 1999 and 2000 MTV Video Music Awards. During the 2000 program, Ulala (of Space Channel 5 fame) announced the nominees for the Viewers' Choice category.
  • Mega64, a comedy show parodying video games, made a song about the history of Dreamcast from illegal copies, Phantasy Star Online, etc.
  • In the TV series Dancehall Complications, the main character Görkem is often seen playing several games on a Dreamcast between rehearsals.
  • The plot of the fourth season episode of South Park entitled "The Tooth Fairy Tats 2000" centers around the children trying to gather enough money to buy a Dreamcast.
  • Sponsored the 2000 run of OZZFest.
  • A Dreamcast can be seen among Greg's possessions in the Dharma and Greg episode "Your Place or Mine".
  • Nick and Warrick are seen playing NFL 2K on a Dreamcast during the first season of CSI: Crime Scene Investigation.
  • In the 2007 Nickelodeon telefilm Shredderman Rules, one of the characters, Max, is seen playing a Dreamcast.
  • In the webcomic Penny Arcade, the character Gabe is a great Dreamcast fan.
  • The rap artist Del is seen with a Dreamcast controller on the cover of his album Phoney Phranchise.
  • In a 2000 episode of MTV Cribs featuring the Wu-Tang Clan, A Dreamcast console can be seen in the living room area. Several clan members are playing NFL 2K1.
  • In an episode of Arthur, a videogame console that looks like the Dreamcast is seen.
  • In the Disney movie "The Other Me" the main character, Will Browneing, is seen playing a Dreamcast which is striped of its swirly logo on the controller.

Soccer redirects here. ... Arsenal Football Club (also known as Arsenal, The Arsenal or The Gunners) are an English professional football club based in Holloway, north London. ... Association Sportive de Saint-Étienne Loire, (ASSE or A.S. Saint-Étienne) are a French football team founded in 1920. ... Unione Calcio Sampdoria (commonly nicknamed Blucerchiati, blue-ringed) is a football club based in Genoa, Italy. ... Real Club Deportivo de La Coruña, S.A.D. (in English Corunna Royal Sports Club) is a Spanish football club. ... The MTV Video Music Awards were established in 1984 by MTV to celebrate the top music videos of the year. ... Space Channel 5 (スペース チャンネル5)is a console game, which was first released in Japan for the Dreamcast on December 16, 1999. ... Mega64 is a low-budget series of comedy skits centered around video games. ... This article is about the TV series. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Dharma & Greg was an American television situation comedy broadcast between 1997 and 2002 on ABC. The premise of the show was a relationship between two characters regarded as cultural opposites. ... CSI: Crime Scene Investigation is a popular Alliance Atlantis/CBS police procedural television series, running since October 2000, about a team of forensic scientists. ... This article is about the TV channel. ... Shredderman Rules is a 2007 television movie based on Wendelin Van Draanens Shredderman book series. ... Penny Arcade is a webcomic and blog written by Jerry Holkins and illustrated by Mike Krahulik. ... Del the Funky Homosapien, also known as Del tha Funkee Homosapien and Deltron Zero, is an alternative hip hop artist. ... Arthur is an American and Canadian educational children’s television series which airs primarily on PBS in the United States; CBC Television, Radio-Canada, Knowledge Network and TVO in Canada; and BBC One in the UK, although it has been syndicated to numerous other stations throughout the world. ...

References

  1. ^ Blake Snow (2007-05-04). The 10 Worst-Selling Consoles of All Time. GamePro.com. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  2. ^ Russell Carroll (2005-09-06). Good Enough: Why graphics aren't number one. Game Tunnel. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  3. ^ Daniel Boutros (2006-08-04). Sonic Adventure. A Detailed Cross-Examination of Yesterday and Today's Best-Selling Platform Games. Gamasutra. Retrieved on 2007-10-28.
  4. ^ Dreamcast Connects Console Gamers. GameSpy (July 2003). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  5. ^ Maclean's 24 September 1999.
  6. ^ Nick Gibson:Sega exits the console business. Games Investor (2006). Retrieved on 15 September, 2006.
  7. ^ a b Sega Dreamcast Review Part 1. FiringSquad.com (September 7, 1999). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  8. ^ MobyGames Staff:MobyGames Game Browser — Dreamcast. MobyGames (2006). Retrieved on 7 August, 2006.
  9. ^ Linux for the Sega Dreamcast
  10. ^ NetBSD/dreamcast
  11. ^ The QNX Dreamcast Project
  12. ^ Sonic signs for Gunners. BBC News (April 22, 1999). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  13. ^ SEGA EUROPE strikes third major european sponsorship deal with A.S. SAINT-ETIENNE. PRnewswire.co.uk (June 15, 1999). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  14. ^ SEGA EUROPE strikes sponsorship deal with U.C. SAMPDORIA. PRnewswire.co.uk (June 11, 1999). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.
  15. ^ SEGA announce new price for Dreamcast. SEGA (September 1, 2000). Retrieved on 2007-07-19.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... GamePro is an American video game magazine published monthly. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Founded in 1997, Gamasutra is a web site for those interested in video games including video game developers. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A cover of the Canadian magazine Macleans. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Sega Portal
Image File history File links Portal. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ... This article is about the video game company. ... This article is about the video game company. ... Wow Entertainment is a 2nd Party SEGA company previously known as AM1. ... Sega Amusement Machine Research and Development Department 2 (popularly known as Sega AM2 or simply AM2) is a research and development team for the video game company Sega. ... Hitmaker (originally AM3) is a former second-party developer for Sega Corporation. ... Amusement Vision Amusement Vision, Ltd. ... Sega Rosso is the name of a former development studio from Sega, formerly known as AM5, some of its staff came from Namco, where they helped create the original Ridge Racer. ... Smilebit is a Japanese computer and video game developer founded in 2000. ... Overworks (previously called AM7), is the Sega video game development group responsible for Skies of Arcadia, the Streets of Rage series, much of the Shinobi series, and Phantasy Star 1, 2, and 4. ... Sonic Team (ソニックチーム Sonikku ChÄ«mu) is a Japanese computer and video game developer established in 1988 originally known as Sega AM8. ... Sega Studio USA is the United States division of Sonic Team located in 650 Townsend Street, Suite 650 San Francisco, California. ... SEGA AM9 was a computer and video game second-party developer for SEGA. In 2000 AM9 became United Games Artists or (UGA). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... SegaSoft, headquartered in Redwood City, California was a joint venture Sega and CSK, created to develop and publish single and multiplayer games for the PC, primarily in the North American marketplace. ... Sega Racing Studio (also known as Sega Driving Studio) is a computer and video game developer established in 2006 (based in Solihull, England) for the sole purpose of developing AAA SEGA racing titles, the studio has radically expanded from a hand group of people to a team of over 60... Sega PC is a computer and video game publication arm of video game company Sega. ... Game console redirects here. ... The SG-1000 ), which stands for Sega Game 1000, is a cartridge-based video game console manufactured by Sega. ... The SG-1000 ), which stands for Sega Game 1000, is a cartridge-based video game console manufactured by Sega. ... The SG-1000 Mark III The SG-1000 Mark III Joypads The SG-1000 Mark III is an 8-bit video game console made by Sega. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... During its lifespan, the Sega Mega Drive and Genesis quite possibly received more officially licensed variations than any other console. ... The Sega Mega-CD ) is an add-on device for the Sega Mega Drive released in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. ... The Sega 32X (Japanese: セガ スーパー32X) is an add-on for the Sega Mega Drive video game console by Sega. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... A handheld video game is a video game designed primarily for handheld game consoles such as Nintendos Game Boy line. ... The Sega Game Gear is a handheld game console which was Segas response to Nintendos Game Boy. ... The Sega Mega Jet The Sega Mega Jet was a handheld version of the Mega Drive video game console. ... The Sega Nomad was a handheld game console sold in North America and South America, mainly in Brazil, essentially a mini-Genesis console, based on the Japanese Mega Jet and featuring a built-in color screen. ... This article is about the machine. ... Sega SC-3000 and joystick The SC-3000 was the computer equivalent of the SG-1000 cartridge-based gaming console manufactured by Sega. ... Edutainment (also educational entertainment or entertainment-education) is a form of entertainment designed to educate as well as to amuse. ... The Sega Pico The Sega Pico, also known as Kids Computer Pico ), was an electronic toy by Sega. ... The Advanced Pico Beena, also known as Beena is an educational console system targeted at young children sold by Sega Toys, successor of the Pico. ... The Multi-Mega or CDX was a 16-bit video game console released in 1994, combining the Sega Mega Drive (Sega Genesis in North America) and one of its add-ons, the Sega Mega-CD (Sega CD in North America), into a single compact unit as a final attempt by... During its lifespan, the Sega Mega Drive and Genesis quite possibly received more officially licensed variations than any other console. ... The TeraDrive was a 16-bit PC with an integrated Mega Drive, manufactured by IBM for Sega. ... The Mega PC was manufactured and released by Amstrad in 1993 under licence from Sega, which was a similar, but unrelated system to the Sega TeraDrive. ... Sega Channel logo and mascot Sega Pat Sega Channel was a project developed by Sega for the 16-bit Sega Genesis console. ... Megamodem attached to a Mega Drive The Sega Meganet was a network service in Japan for people using the Sega Mega Drive. ... SegaNet was a short-lived internet service operated by Sega, geared for dial-up based online gaming on their Dreamcast game console. ... NetLink (or Seganet in Japan) is a 28. ... The Dreamarena was an online gaming service provided with all Sega Dreamcast consoles in Europe. ... A video game accessory is a separate piece of hardware that is required to use a video game console, or one that enriches the video games play experience. ... The Sega Light Phaser The Light Phaser was a light gun created for the Sega Master System, modeled after the Zillion gun from the Japanese anime series of the same name. ... Image:Menacer. ... The Sega Activator was an octagonal game controller for the Sega Genesis that used infrared beams to interpret movements. ... AX-1E Analogue Pad was an analog controller for Sega Megadrive videogame console that was only released in Japan. ... In 1994, following the Super Nintendo Mouse, Sega had released a mouse for their own 16-bit console, Sega Mega Drive (aka Sega Genesis). ... The Sega Mega Anser was an accessory for the Sega Mega Drive. ... Originally known at VR-SHOOTER, the Sega Lock-On was a little known laser tag game developed by Sega and released in 1992. ... Sega VR Prototype Sega, flush with funds from the Sega Megadrive in Europe and the Sega Genesis in North America, announced the Sega VR add-on in 1991. ... Directlink is a high voltage direct current transmission line between Mullumbimby and Bungalora in Australia. ... The Dreameye was a digital camera released for the Dreamcast home video console by Sega, The Dreameye was a digital camera which came with Visual Park software. ... The American version comes in this box The Dreamcast Broadband Adapter (Also know has BBA) was an accessory released for the Sega Dreamcast, the console originally came equiped with a 56K modem however a Broadband adapter was released on January 10, 2001. ... A first and third party peripheral for the Sega Dreamcast, the VGA adapter allowed the Dreamcast to be connected to a computer monitor. ... Sega Dreamcast VMU The VMU, initialism of Visual Memory Unit (called VMS, Visual Memory System in Japan or Virtual Memory Unit), is a memory card peripheral for the Sega Dreamcast. ... GD-ROM is the proprietary optical disc format used by the Sega Dreamcast. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Sega G80 was an Arcade system board released by Sega in 1981. ... The Sega System 16 is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1985. ... The Sega X Board is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1987. ... The Sega Y Board is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1988. ... The Sega Mega-Tech was an arcade system developed by Sega Europe in 1989. ... The Sega System 18 is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1989. ... The Sega System 24 was an arcade platform released by Sega in the late 1980s. ... The System 32 was an arcade platform released by Sega in the early 1990s. ... The Sega Model 1 is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1992. ... The Sega Model 2 is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1993. ... The Sega Model 3 is an arcade system board released by Sega in 1996. ... The Sega Titan Video or ST-V was an arcade system board released by Sega in 1994. ... The Sega NAOMI (New Arcade Operation Machine Idea) is a development of the Sega Dreamcast technology as a basis for an arcade system board. ... In 2000, Sega debuted the NOAMI 2 arcade system board at JAMMA. NOAMI 2 offered improved graphics performance; by substituting the graphics-assembly of the previous NAOMI board with a new assembly composed of two PowerVR CLX2 GPUs and a VideoLogic Elan chip (for geometry transformation and lighting effects). ... The Sega Chihiro system is a Sega arcade system board based on the architecture of the Microsoft Xbox. ... The Triforce is an arcade system board developed jointly by Nintendo, Namco, and Sega, with the first games appearing in 2002. ... The Lindbergh as shown at AM Show 2005 The Sega Lindbergh is an arcade system board developed by Sega. ... This is a list of video game consoles by the era they appeared in. ... The first generation of video game consoles lasted from 1972 until 1977. ... The Magnavox Odyssey was the worlds first commercially sold video game console. ... Philips Videopac G7000 shown playing Pickaxe Pete The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, and also by many other names, was a video game console released in 1978. ... For other uses, see Pong (disambiguation). ... The Telstar is a video game console produced by Coleco which first went on sale in 1976. ... The second generation of video game consoles lasted from 1976 until 1984. ... The Fairchild Channel F is the worlds second cartridge-based video game console, after the Magnavox Odyssey. ... The Atari 2600, released in October 1977, is the video game console credited with popularizing the use of microprocessor based hardware and cartridges containing game code, instead of having non-microprocessor dedicated hardware with all games built in. ... The VC 4000 is an early 8-bit cartridge-based game console released in Germany in 1978 by Interton. ... Magnavox Odyssey² video game console The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, in the United States as the Magnavox Odyssey² and the Philips Odyssey², and also by many other names, is a video game console released in 1978. ... The Intellivision is a video game console released by Mattel in 1979. ... Emerson Arcadia 2001, intended as a portable game console, the Arcadia 2001 was released by Emerson Radio Corp in mid-1982. ... The Atari 5200 SuperSystem, or simply Atari 5200, is a video game console that was introduced in 1982 by Atari as a replacement for the famous Atari 2600. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Vectrex is an 8-bit video game console developed by General Consumer Electric (GCE) and later bought by Milton Bradley Company. ... The SG-1000 ), which stands for Sega Game 1000, is a cartridge-based video game console manufactured by Sega. ... In the history of video games, the 8-bit era was the third generation of video game consoles, but the first after the video game crash of 1983 and considered by some to be the first modern era of console gaming. ... “NES” redirects here. ... The Sega Master System ) or SMS for short (1986 - 2000), is an 8-bit cartridge-based video game console that was manufactured by Sega. ... The Atari 7800 is a video game console released by Atari in June 1986 (a test market release occurred two years earlier). ... In the history of video games, the 16-bit era was the fourth generation of video game consoles. ... For information on the Japanese version of this console, see PC Engine The TurboGrafx 16 is a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... CD-i or Compact Disc Interactive is the name of an interactive multimedia CD player developed and marketed by Royal Philips Electronics N.V. CD-i also refers to the multimedia Compact Disc standard utilized by the CD-i console, also known as Green Book, which was co-developed by... Neo-Geo is the name of a cartridge-based arcade and home video game system released in 1990 by Japanese game company SNK. The system offered comparatively colorful 2D graphics and high-quality sound. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... In the history of computer and video games, the 32-bit / 64-bit /3D era was the fifth generation of video game consoles. ... For other uses, see 3DO. Crash n Burn on the 3DO, the systems first bundled title. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Atari Jaguar is a video game console that was released in November 1993 to rival the Mega Drive/Genesis and the Super Nintendo Entertainment System as a powerful next generation platform. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... PlayStation redirects here. ... The PC-FX console The PC-FX was NECs 32-bit sequel to its PC Engine (US:TurboGrafx 16). ... The Nintendo 64 ), often abbreviated as N64, is Nintendos third home video game console for the international market. ... The sixth-generation era (sometimes referred to as the 128-bit era; see Number of bits below) refers to the computer and video games, video game consoles, and video game handhelds available at the turn of the 21st century. ... PS2 redirects here. ... The Xbox is a sixth generation era video game console produced by Microsoft Corporation. ... The Nintendo GameCube (GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the sixth generation era. ... In the history of computer and video games, the seventh generation began on November 21, 2004 with the North American release of the Nintendo DS, followed by the PlayStation Portable on December 12, 2004. ... The PlayStation 3 , trademarked PLAYSTATION®3,[3] commonly abbreviated PS3) is the third home video game console produced by Sony Computer Entertainment; successor to the PlayStation 2. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... It has been suggested that Xbox 360 Elite be merged into this article or section. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sega Dreamcast: Information from Answers.com (6047 words)
The Dreamcast was released on November 27, 1998 in Japan, on September 9, 1999 in North America (the date 9/9/99 featured heavily in US promotion) and on October 14, 1999 in Europe.
In fact, although the Dreamcast was officially discontinued in January 2001, Sega continued to produce the console for a short time afterwards due to rising demand, especially among collectors and hardcore fans.
Dreamcast mouse and keyboard The Dreamcast supported a mouse as well as a keyboard, which were useful when using the included web browser, and also supported by certain games such as The Typing of the Dead, Quake 3, Phantasy Star Online and Railroad Tycoon 2.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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