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Encyclopedia > Drake University

Drake University

Motto Veritas (Truth)
Established 1881
Type Private coeducational
Endowment $119 million (FY 2005) NACUBO
President Dr. David Maxwell
Staff 362
Undergraduates 3,164
Postgraduates 2,057
Location Des Moines, Iowa, USA
Campus Urban, 150 acres (0.5 km²)
Colors Blue and white
Nickname Bulldogs
Mascot Spike
Website www.drake.edu

Drake University is a private, co-educational university located in the city of Des Moines, Iowa. The institution offers a number of undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as professional programs in law and pharmacy. Today, Drake is one of the twenty-five oldest law schools in the country. Distinguished alumni include Dwight D. Opperman, former CEO of West Publishing Company, after whom Drake's law library was named; Neal Smith, who served in the United States House of Representatives from 1959 until 1995; and Terry Edward Branstad, a former four-term Republican Governor of Iowa, who served from 1983 until 1999. The University approved a new Master building plan on June 25, 2005, calling for extensive renovations of existing facilities and the construction of several large buildings, including a new first year student residence hall, science building, fine arts building, and multi-purpose learning center. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... In Roman mythology, Veritas (meaning truth) was the goddess of truth and a daughter of Saturn. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... David Maxwell is the President of Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the state capital of Iowa. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Drake Bulldogs logo from 1956-2005 The Drake Bulldogs are the athletic teams of the Drake University. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Nickname: Location in Polk County and in the State of Iowa Coordinates: , Country State County Polk County Incorporated September 22, 1851 Government  - Mayor Frank Cownie Area  - City  77. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... Dwight D. Opperman was the CEO of West Publishing Company, now The West Group. ... There is also a former United States Congressman named Neal Smith. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Terry Edward Branstad (b. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... This is a list of Governors of Iowa: See also Iowa Iowa Territory Governors of Iowa Territory Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Iowa ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ...

Contents

History

The institution was founded in 1881, when most of the staff of Oskaloosa College left that college to establish what would become Drake University, founded by Francis Marion Drake, a resident of Centerville, Iowa and Governor of Iowa (18961898). The university's law school, the oldest law school in the country west of the Mississippi River, was established in 1865 by Chester C. Cole[1], who served on the Iowa Supreme Court from 1864 to 1876. In 1969 Drake's basketball team went to the Final Four under coach Maurice John, but were defeated by the UCLA Bruins by three points. Drake did defeat the North Carolina Tarheels by 20 points in the third place game. Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Oskaloosa College was a liberal arts college based out of Oskaloosa, Iowa. ... Francis Marion Drake (December 30, 1830 – November 20, 1903) was an American politician who became Governor of Iowa. ... Appanoose County Courthouse, Centerville Iowa Centerville is a city in Appanoose County, Iowa, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... This is a list of Governors of Iowa: See also Iowa Iowa Territory Governors of Iowa Territory Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Iowa ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... The Iowa Supreme Court is the constitutional head of the judicial branch of the state of Iowa. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... This refers to the athletic teams for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). The name Tar Heel is also often used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. ...


On September 17, 1969 the Drake student newspaper, The Times-Delphic, published what appears to be the first documented account of the famous Paul is dead hoax, written by Tim Harper. No articles published prior to this piece about the supposed death of Paul McCartney are known, although fellow Times-Delphic reporter and musician Dartanyan Brown, one of the sources for the article, recalled hearing about the hoax from other musicians and reading about it in some underground newspapers. Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE (born 18 June 1942) is an English singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who first gained worldwide fame as one of the founding members of The Beatles. ...


From its founding in 1881, Drake University maintained a nominal affiliation with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) although no religious affiliation is officially recognized today. The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), often abbreviated as the Disciples of Christ or Christian Church, is a denomination of Christian Restorationism that grew out of the Restoration Movement founded by Thomas Campbell and Alexander Campbell of Pennsylvania and West Virginia (then Virginia) and Barton W. Stone of Kentucky. ...


Colleges

The University is made up of the following colleges:


College of Arts & Sciences

Majors offered: Biology, Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology (BCMB), Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, English, Environmental Policy, Environmental Science, Ethics, Fine Art, Graphic Design, History, International Relations, Law, Politics, and Society (LPS), Mathematics, Mathematics Education (Secondary), Neuroscience, Physics,Politics, Astronomy, Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Philosophy, Rhetoric, Writing and Religion. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Fine art refers to arts that are concerned with beauty or which appealed to taste (SOED 1991). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The title page to The Historians History of the World. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... This is a discussion of a present category of science. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy (also frequently referred to as astrophysics) is the scientific study of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as the cosmic background radiation). ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge) is an academic and applied discipline that studies society and human social interaction. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of spoken language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


College of Business & Public Administration (CBPA)

Majors offered: Accounting, Actuarial Science, Economics, Entrepreneurial Management, Finance, General Business, Information Systems, International Business, Marketing, Management, Quantitative Economics
Graduate programs: Master of Accountancy, MBA, MPA The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of Scotts site can be found at Degree programmes delivered by Management Schools. ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... 2003 US mortality (life) table, Table 1, Page 1 Actuarial science applies mathematical and statistical methods to finance and insurance, particularly to the assessment of risk. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Information System (example) An Information System (IS) is the system of persons, data records and activities that process the data and information in a given organization, including manual processes or automated processes. ... This article or section may contain external links added only to promote a website, product, or service – otherwise known as spam. ... “Next big thing” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Management system be merged into this article or section. ... Master of Accountancy (MAcc, MAc, or MAcy), alternatively Master of Professional Accounting (MPAcc) or Master Science in Accounting (MSAcc), is typically a one-year, non-thesis graduate program designed to prepare graduates for public accounting and to provide them with the 150 credit hours required by most states before taking... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... MPA is a TLA (three-letter acronym) that may mean: Macedonian Press Agency Marine Protected Area Maritime Patrol Aircraft Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad (AAR reporting mark MPA) Master of Public Administration Master of Public Affairs Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics Metropolitan Police Authority Mid-atlantic Pagan Alliance Motion Picture Association...

Distinguished Faculty:

The Society of Actuaries is a professional society of actuaries in the United States. ... Principal Financial Group in Hong Kong Principal Financial Group NYSE: PFG is a publicly traded corporation based in Des Moines, Iowa, USA. The Principal Financial Group (The Principal) is a leading global financial institututional clients a wide range of financial products and services. ... 2003 US mortality (life) table, Table 1, Page 1 Actuarial science applies mathematical and statistical methods to finance and insurance, particularly to the assessment of risk. ... Insurance, in law and economics, is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent loss. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ...

School of Education

Majors offered: Special education, Secondary education, Elementary education Special education is instruction that is modified or particularized for those students with special needs, such as learning differences, mental health problems, specific disabilities (physical or developmental) [1] , and giftedness [2]. // Children with special needs have always been part of society. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Primary or elementary education consist of the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ...


School of Journalism & Mass Communication (SJMC)

Majors offered: Advertising, Electronic Media, Magazines, News-Internet, Public Relations, JMC/Law 3+3, Broadcast News Advertising is nothing but just waste of money. ... A screenshot of a web page. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The School of Journalism and Mass Communication is also home to 94.1 The Dog, which operates under the call letters KDRA-LP FM. The station launched in August 2006 after having existed as an internet station, KDCS Bulldog Radio. 94.1 The Dog is broadcast at 80 watts from a tower atop Meredith Hall, the home of Drake's SJMC. An agreement with the FCC allows Drake to utilize the frequency from 4 p.m. to 4 a.m. weekdays and all day Saturday, while Grand View College controls the frequency the rest of the week under the call letters KGVC-LP. Drake students schedule 24 hours of programming under "The Dog," broadcasting online and on channel 12 on closed-circuit television on campus even when not broadcasting on the frequency. The abbreviation FCC can refer to: Face-centered cubic (usually fcc), a crystallographic structure Federal Communications Commission, a US government organization Farm Credit Corporation/Farm Credit Canada, a Canadian government organization Families with Children from China, an adoption support organization Florida Christian College, a college in central Florida Fresno City... The Humphrey Center is the oldest building at Grand View College and houses the colleges administration. ...


School of Law

Drake's law school is one of the twenty-five oldest law schools in the nation, tracing its history to 1865. It is a charter member of the American Association of Law Schools, has been accredited since 1923 when accreditation first began, and is one of only seventy-five ABA-approved law schools to have a Chapter of Order of the Coif. Drake University Law School is home to the American Judicature Society, the archives of the National Bar Association, the nation's oldest and largest national association of predominately African-American lawyers and judges, and the Drake Constitutional Law Center, which is one of only four constitutional law programs established by the U.S. Congress and funded by the federal government. The Center's mission is to foster in-depth study of the United States Constitution. A significant aspect of the Center's activities is the Dwight D. Opperman Lecture series, an annual event of national importance in constitutional law. The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America. ...


Several Supreme Court Justices have visited campus to deliver lectures on American juris prudence. Numerous current and former United States Supreme Court Justices have delivered the Opperman Lecture, including Justice Clarence Thomas, Justice Antonin Scalia, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Justice Stephen Breyer, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, and late Justices Harry A. Blackmun, Lewis F. Powell and William H. Rehnquist. The 2007 graduate schools edition of U.S. News ranks the law school as Tier 3. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Sandra Day OConnor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who served as the first female Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1981 to 2006. ... Justice Anthony Kennedy Anthony McLeod Kennedy (born July 23, 1936) has been a US Supreme Court Associate Justice since 1988. ... Harold Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 - March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 to 1994. ... Lewis Franklin Powell, Jr. ... William H. Rehnquist has served as the Chief Justice of the United States since 1986. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

The 2007 edition of U.S. News best graduate programs ranks Drake's College of Pharmacy the #46 out of 57 pharmacy schools in the United States. Alumni donations run deep at this Midwestern private institution. In 2005, Former Walgreen's Chairman and CEO Dan Jorndt, donated $10 million to his alma mater.
Majors offered: Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD.) and Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (BSPS) Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... // In the United States the Pharm. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Housing

The University provides the following on-campus living accommodations for undergraduate students:

  • Stalnaker Hall (Freshmen only)
  • Carpenter Hall (Freshmen only)
  • Herriott Hall (Freshmen only)
  • Crawford Hall (Freshmen only)
  • Morehouse
  • Jewett Hall
  • Goodwin-Kirk Hall
  • Ross Hall

Drake University and Hubbell Realty leaders announced plans on July 20, 2006 for a $34-million housing and retail development at 30th Street and Carpenter Avenue. is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The development will create 7,000 feet of retail space for street-level neighborhood businesses and upper floors for state-of-the-art student suites. The buildings will house up to 500 students.


Current design calls for a mix of one-, two- and four-bedroom units, where each student has a private bedroom and shares a common living and kitchen space. The housing will be targeted primarily at junior and senior undergraduate students and graduate students in the pharmacy program or the Drake Law School. The housing should be available for students in Fall of 2008. 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Student organizations

Drake features over 100 student organizations in which to participate, which include:

Academic

Cultural/social

  • Coalition of Black Students (CBS)
  • Hillel
  • College Democrats
  • International Students Association (ISA)
  • La Fuerza Latina (LFL)
  • Rainbow Union (RU)
  • Residence Hall Association (RHA)
  • Student Activities Board (SAB)
  • Student Senate

Religious

It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... A Model United Nations Conference in Stuttgart, Germany in action. ... Quizbowl (or Quiz-bowl or quiz bowl) is a family of games of questions and answers on all topics of human knowledge, commonly played in high school and college. ... The Society of Physics Students (SPS), a division of the American Institute of Physics (AIP), is an organization of undergraduate students in physics and related fields. ... Students in Free Enterprise or SIFE is a global, non-profit organization that promotes free enterprise education on more than 1800 university campuses in more than 40 countries. ... Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life (Hillel International) is the largest Jewish campus organization in the world. ... This logo represents an example of a Residence Hall Association logo. ... // Each March, U.S. college students spend Spring Break participating in “Big Break,” a Campus Crusade outreach to Panama City Beach vacationers. ... InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, commonly referred to as InterVarsity, IVCF or simply IV, is an interdenominational, evangelical Christian ministry for college students. ...

Greek life

Social fraternities/sororities

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated

Honorary/professional/service fraternities

Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ... Theta Chi (ΘΧ) is an international college fraternity for men. ... ΑΚΨ (Alpha Kappa Psi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ... BAΨ (Beta Alpha Psi) is an honorary organization for accounting, finance and information systems students and professionals. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Coat-of-Arms of Kappa Psi Kappa Psi (ΚΨ) is the largest and oldest professional pharmaceutical college fraternity in the world. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Phi Delta Chi (ΦΔΧ) Pharmacy Fraternity was founded on 2 November 1883 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor by 11 men, led by Dean Albert B. Prescott. ... Phi Mu Alpha (ΦΜΑ) Sinfonia is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ...

Athletics

The Knapp Center
The Knapp Center

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 263 KB) Summary The Knapp Center at Drake University (Photograph taken by Kevin Satoh in 2006) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 263 KB) Summary The Knapp Center at Drake University (Photograph taken by Kevin Satoh in 2006) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

NCAA sports

Main article: Drake Bulldogs

Drake student-athletes compete in NCAA Division I in the Missouri Valley Conference in all sports except football. In football, Drake competes in the Division I-AA Pioneer Football League. Drake Bulldogs logo from 1956-2005 The Drake Bulldogs are the athletic teams of the Drake University. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Former Missouri Valley Conference logo The Missouri Valley Conference (also called MVC or simply The Valley) is a college athletic conference whose members are located in the midwestern United States. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Pioneer Football League is a college athletic conference which operates literally from coast to coast in the United States It has member schools that range from North Carolina and Florida in the east to California in the west. ...

A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... US Armed Forces cross country meet Cross-country running is a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain before other teams. ... College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the sport. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ...

Drake Relays

Main article: Drake Relays

Drake University also hosts the Drake Relays during April. This track and field event has been held since 1910, and is the second-largest collegiate track and field event in the United States. Participants come from all over the world to compete in this three-day event, which also helps to draw large crowds of spectators to Des Moines. Many Olympic athletes can be found participating in these events, which commonly break national and world records. The Drake Relays is an annual outdoor track and field event held in Des Moines, Iowa, United States, on the campus of Drake University. ... The Drake Relays is an annual outdoor track and field event held in Des Moines, Iowa, United States, on the campus of Drake University. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ...


Students kick-off the Relays in the annual tradition of Street Painting, in which student organizations colorfully decorate areas of Carpenter Avenue near the center of campus under a common theme. Des Moines police officers are often present to pretend to "strictly enforce the law". The theme in 2007 was "The Legacy Lives On"—referencing the $15 million renovation of Drake Stadium. Streaking the street painting was an annual occurrence for a period in the mid-1990s and has occasionally occurred in a few years following. A participant of the Bay to Breakers. ...


Rankings

Drake University advanced to seventh in the "Great Schools, Great Prices" rankings and gained sole possession of fourth place in the overall rankings of 142 Midwest Universities - Master's category published by U.S. News and World Report magazine in the 2007 edition of "America's Best Colleges."


Last year Drake ranked eighth in the "Great Schools, Great Prices" category. The rankings are based on a formula that relates a school's academic quality, as indicated by its U.S. News ranking, to the net cost of attendance for a student who receives the average level of need-based financial aid. "The higher the quality of the program and the lower the cost, the better the deal," according to the magazine.


Drake continues to be ranked No. 2 in reputation for academic quality (peer assessment). It has the highest ranking in its category of any Iowa college or university. Drake improved in several areas this year, including student/faculty ratio, average freshmen retention rate and freshmen in the top 25 percent of their high school class.[1]


Notable alumni

Stephen Valentine Patrick William Allen (December 26, 1921 – October 30, 2000) was an American musician, comedian and writer instrumental in innovating the concept of the television talk show. ... John August (born August 4, 1970 in Boulder, Colorado) is an American screenwriter and film director. ... Terry Edward Branstad (b. ... Johnny D. Bright (born June 11, 1930, Fort Wayne, Indiana; died December 14, 1983, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) was a professional football player with the Canadian Football League (primarily with the Edmonton Eskimos) and an outstanding college football player at Drake University. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... The Canadian Football Hall of Fame officially opened as a museum to dedicate football in Canada on November 28, 1972. ... William Bill McGuire Bryson, OBE, (born December 8, 1951) is a best-selling American-born author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects. ... George A. Cohon, O.C., O.Ont. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Chester John Chet Culver (born January 25, 1966) is the current Governor of the U.S. state of Iowa, having recently won the 2006 election. ... Billy Cundiff (born March 30, 1980 in Valley Center, California) is a National Football League placekicker currently playing for the New Orleans Saints as a kickoff specialist. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... An amateur place kicker attempts to kick a field goal Placekicker, or simply Kicker, is the title of the player in American and Canadian football who is responsible for the kicking duties of field goals, extra points, and, in many cases, kickoffs. ... Laurie Wasserman Dann (c. ... Mark Doty (born 1953 in Maryville, Tennessee) is an American poet. ... Michael Emerson (b. ... Benjamin Linus, better known as Ben, is a fictional character on the ABC television series Lost played by Michael Emerson. ... Lost is an Emmy Award and Golden Globe-winning American serial drama television series that follows the lives of plane crash survivors on a mysterious tropical island, after a passenger jet flying between Australia and the United States crashes somewhere in the South Pacific. ... Bridget Christine Flanery (born March 24, 1970 in Guthrie Center, Iowa) is an American actress. ... Zach Johnson (born February 24, 1976 in Iowa City, Iowa) is an American golfer. ... Founded in 1916, the Professional Golfers Association of America is headquartered in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, United States and claims to be the largest working sports organization in the world with more than 27,000 members. ... Emma Verona (Calhoun) Johnston (August 6, 1890-December 1, 2004), recognized as the oldest living American from May 2004 until her passing, was born in Indianola, Iowa as one of a large family. ... Al McCoy, The Voice Of The Suns, has been the radio broadcast announcer of Phoenix Suns NBA basketball games since 1972, nearly the entire length of the teams existence. ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Clark R Mollenhoff (April 16, 1921-1991) was a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, lawyer, and columnist for the Des Moines Register. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Dwight D. Opperman was the CEO of West Publishing Company, now The West Group. ... Jeremy Samuel Piven (born July 26, 1965)[1] is an Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... Entourage is an Emmy Award-winning HBO original series created by Doug Ellin that chronicles the rise of Vincent Chase — a young A-list movie star — and his childhood friends from Queens, New York City as they navigate the unfamiliar terrain of Hollywood, California. ... Robert D. Ray (Born September 26, 1928 in Des Moines, Iowa) was the Republican governor of Iowa, from 1969-83. ... Sara Marie Taylor (born September 15, 1974) was Deputy Assistant to the President and Director of Political Affairs at the White House, making her one of George W. Bushs top political aides. ... Fred L. Turner was one of the first employees of McDonalds in 1956. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Sam Wanamaker (born Samuel Watenmaker) (June 14, 1919, Chicago – December 18, 1993, London, England) was an American actor and director. ... Brian Wansink Brian Wansink (born 1960, Sioux City, Iowa) is an American professor of marketing and nutritional science. ... Roger Williams (born October 1, 1924) is one of the most popular pianists in American popular music history. ... One of the most successful and influential producers in the entertainment industry-responsible for classics such as Roots (TV miniseries), The Thorn Birds, L.A. CONFIDENTIAL, and Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. ... Felix Carl Wright (born June 22, 1959 in Carthage, Missouri), is an American former professional football player who played safety from 1985-1992 for the Cleveland Browns and Minnesota Vikings. ... NFL redirects here. ... In American football and Canadian football, the termsafety can refer to: two positions in the most-common defensive backfield setup, the strong safety and the free safety, or a type of score, worth one or two points. ...

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Drake University (299 words)
Drake University's Anderson Gallery will present a collection of new work by two artists from Richmond, Va., in "Evidence," an exhibition of paintings by Cindy Neuschwander and Janet DeCover.
Drake's mission is to provide an exceptional learning environment that prepares students for meaningful personal lives, professional accomplishments, and responsible global citizenship.
The Drake experience is distinguished by collaborative learning among students, faculty, and staff and by the integration of the liberal arts and sciences with professional preparation.
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