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Encyclopedia > Dragon Ball (franchise)

Dragon Ball (ドラゴンボール Doragon Bōru?), created by Akira Toriyama in 1984, is an internationally famous media franchise. It consists primarily of one manga series, three different anime, seventeen animated feature films, an unofficial live-action movie, a collectible trading card game, a large number of electronic games, as well as other collectibles like action figures. An official live-action film has been currently in production as of 2002. Image File history File links Merge-arrow. ... Dragon Ball may refer to: Dragon Ball (franchise), a Japanese media franchise Dragon Ball (manga), the original manga series Dragon Ball (anime), an anime adaptation of the first part of the manga Dragon Ball Z, an anime adaptation of the second part of the manga Dragon Ball GT, the anime... In this Japanese name, the family name is Toriyama Akira Toriyama ) born on April 5, 1955, in Kiyosu, Aichi, Japan,[2] is a widely known and acclaimed Japanese manga artist known mostly for his creation of the Dragon Ball manga, as well as the media franchise of the same name... i eat poop alot A media franchise is an intellectual property involving the characters, setting, and trademarks of an original work of media (usually a work of fiction), such as a film, a work of literature, a television program, or a video game. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... Animé redirects here. ... Dragon Ball Z Trading Card Game (originally the Dragon Ball Z Collectible Card Game and the Dragon Ball GT Trading Card Game) is a trading card game based on the anime of Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The game is produced by Score Entertainment and uses screen captures... The following is a list of video games pertaining to the Dragon Ball franchise created by Akira Toriyama. ... A collectible (or collectable) is typically a manufactured item designed for people to collect. ... Zarbon action figure made by Bandai, from the Dragon Ball franchise An action figure is a posable plastic figurine of a character, often from a movie, comic book, video game, or television program. ... Dragonball is a 2009 live action film adaptation of the Dragon Ball franchise. ...


The narrative of the Dragon Ball manga received some of its inspiration and various characters from the Chinese folk novel Journey to the West, though it diverges from the novel very quickly. It follows the adventures of its lead character, Son Goku (based on the Monkey King of the folk legend, Sun Wukong) from his childhood into old age. Dragon Ball originally included action and comedy elements, as well a significant amount of science fiction, though the story became more sci-fi oriented over time. Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1984 – 1995[1] Volumes 42 (16 DB + 26 DBZ) Dragon Ball ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama with an anime adaptation, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The work is influenced by... The four heroes of the story, left to right: SÅ«n Wùkōng, Xuánzàng, ZhÅ« Bājiè, and Shā Wùjìng. ... Goku redirects here. ... The Monkey King redirects here. ... The action genre is a class of creative works characterised by a greater emphasis on exciting action sequences than on character development or story-telling. ... Comedy film is genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. ... A science fiction genre is a division (genre) of science fiction. ...

Contents

History

Before Dragon Ball

Main article: Dragon Boy

Prior to ending a successful six-year run on his humor manga, Dr. Slump, in the Weekly Shonen Jump anthology magazine, Akira Toriyama started toying with the ideas that he would later apply into the Dragon Ball manga. In 1983, he wrote two chapters of Dragon Boy for the Fresh Jump anthology magazine. This story, left unfinished, merged in the comic style of Dr. Slump with an action-oriented plot. It included many elements which would be reused in the later series, including a very different kind of Dragon Ball. In 1983, Toriyama published The Adventures of Tongpoo, a sci-fi comic also featuring a Goku-like character and plot elements (such as "Hoi Poi Capsules") which he would reuse later. Dragon Boy is a brief (two issue) one-shot Japanese manga by Akira Toriyama published initially by Fresh Jump anthology magazine in 1983. ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1980 – 1984 Volumes 18 TV anime: 1st series Director Minoru Okazaki, Shigeyasu Yamauchi Studio Toei Animation Network Fuji TV Original run 8 April 1981 – 19 February 1986 Episodes 243 TV anime: 2nd series Director Shigeyasu Yamauchi Studio Toei Animation Network Fuji TV Original... Weekly Shonen Jump, issue 17 2007 (Japanese version), featuring Luffy of One Piece on the cover JUMP SHOP Osaka Shop. ... In this Japanese name, the family name is Toriyama Akira Toriyama ) born on April 5, 1955, in Kiyosu, Aichi, Japan,[2] is a widely known and acclaimed Japanese manga artist known mostly for his creation of the Dragon Ball manga, as well as the media franchise of the same name... Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1984 – 1995[1] Volumes 42 (16 DB + 26 DBZ) Dragon Ball ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama with an anime adaptation, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The work is influenced by... Dragon Boy is a brief (two issue) one-shot Japanese manga by Akira Toriyama published initially by Fresh Jump anthology magazine in 1983. ... Comics (or, less commonly, sequential art) is a form of visual art consisting of images which are commonly combined with text, often in the form of speech balloons or image captions. ... A Dragon Ball , 龍球 Mandarin lóng-qiú, katakana ronchÅ«) is a fictional artifact from the mangas and animes Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z[1], and Dragon Ball GT. A similar version of them with the same name also appear in the Akira Toriyama manga Dragon Boy (a series of manga... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


Dragon Ball manga

Main article: Dragon Ball (manga)

In late December 1984, the first issue of Dragon Ball appeared in Weekly Shonen Jump, the same anthology magazine where Dr. Slump had previously been published. The series was then published weekly and on a very tight schedule (14 pages per week, plus title page) for nearly eleven years, ending in May 1995. In total, 519 regular chapters and one bonus chapter were published. Unlike American-style comic books, Dragon Ball was largely produced in black-and-white, although a small number of pages in a subset of chapters were colorized for emphasis. During the run of the manga in Japan, it was reprinted in as a tankōbon (Japanese graphic novels). Unlike the original print run of the manga, the previously colorized pages were reprinted only in grayscale. Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1984 – 1995[1] Volumes 42 (16 DB + 26 DBZ) Dragon Ball ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama with an anime adaptation, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The work is influenced by... Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1984 – 1995[1] Volumes 42 (16 DB + 26 DBZ) Dragon Ball ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama with an anime adaptation, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The work is influenced by... Weekly Shonen Jump, issue 17 2007 (Japanese version), featuring Luffy of One Piece on the cover JUMP SHOP Osaka Shop. ... Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1980 – 1984 Volumes 18 TV anime: 1st series Director Minoru Okazaki, Shigeyasu Yamauchi Studio Toei Animation Network Fuji TV Original run 8 April 1981 – 19 February 1986 Episodes 243 TV anime: 2nd series Director Shigeyasu Yamauchi Studio Toei Animation Network Fuji TV Original... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Black-and-white or black and white) can refer to a general term used in photography, film, and other media (see black-and-white). ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... Tankōbon ) is the Japanese term for a compilation volume of a particular series (such as a manga or a novel series, magazine articles, essays, craft patterns, etc. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... A typical grayscale image. ...


A year and a half into the story of Dragon Ball, Akira Toriyama included an extended cameo by some of the characters and locations from his previous creation, Dr. Slump. The Dr. Slump characters never make any further appearances in Dragon Ball. In this Japanese name, the family name is Toriyama Akira Toriyama ) born on April 5, 1955, in Kiyosu, Aichi, Japan,[2] is a widely known and acclaimed Japanese manga artist known mostly for his creation of the Dragon Ball manga, as well as the media franchise of the same name...


Dragon Ball anime

Main article: Dragon Ball (anime)

Within a short amount of time Dragon Ball had reached a level of popularity in Japan that convinced the people of Toei Animation to produce both an anime series and a feature film based on the characters. The anime series premiered in February 1986 on Fuji Television, running weekly and in prime time with new episodes every Wednesday night. Dragon Ball ) is an anime that was produced in the late 1980s, being an adaptation of the first sixteen volumes of the Dragon Ball manga written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama and published in Japan in the Weekly Shonen Jump manga anthology comic. ... Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1984 – 1995[1] Volumes 42 (16 DB + 26 DBZ) Dragon Ball ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama with an anime adaptation, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The work is influenced by... Toei Animation Company, Limited ) (JASDAQ: 4816) is a Japanese animation studio owned by the Toei Company. ... Fuji Television Network, Inc. ... Prime time is the block of programming on television during the middle of the evening. ...


The anime series that was produced closely matched the manga that it was based on (as opposed to Sailor Moon, for example, which the manga and anime diverged significantly), but this had the major drawback that the anime would often catch up to the current point in the manga and the animators were left to create additional episodes and situations to allow them time for more source material to be written. Such material in the series (known by fans as filler) was often of a lower quality than the original manga and occasionally would directly contradict information that would be provided in the source material later. This is perhaps unsurprising due to the difficulty of producing 20 minutes of animation each week, with only 14 pages of manga to work from. For the title character, see Sailor Moon (character) and for the first story arc, see Dark Kingdom arc. ... For more information on fans of football (soccer), see Football (soccer) culture. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In December 1986, the first theatrical film version of the anime was produced. Simply titled "Dragon Ball" (When released on VHS, the subtitle "The Legend of Shenlong" was added), it retold the events of the first several episodes of the anime series. The movie was followed by additional movies in July 1987 ("The Sleeping Princess in the Devil's Castle") and July 1988 ("Mystical Great Adventure").


Because of the popularity of the title in Japan, three video games (all for the Nintendo Family Computer) were produced. The first, released in 1986 as "The Mystery of Shenlong", was the only action game of the three. The other two (released in 1988 and 1989) were card game/board game hybrids. “NES” redirects here. ...


The anime series ended in April 1989 after 153 episodes (and Goku's transition to adulthood). Although the animated series ended, fans did not have to wait long for the continuation of the story. The sequel anime, Dragon Ball Z debuted the following week.


Dragon Ball Z

Main article: Dragon Ball Z

Picking up exactly where the previous series left off, Dragon Ball Z (often abriviated as DBZ) began airing in Japan a week after the Dragon Ball anime ended, and in the same time slot. A new series name was chosen by the producers to differentiate the current series, with its reduced emphasis on comedy and its new science fiction themes, from the previous one -- even though both were still based on the same Dragon Ball manga. The new show also featured improved production values and animation quality. This transition point was attractive because not only did it follow a several year gap in the plot (one of several such gaps in the series), but it also featured revised origin stories for several lead characters and the introduction of several new characters. This made it a good jumping point for new fans of the series. DBZ redirects here. ...


Three months after the premier of DBZ, in July 1989, the first movie of the series (entitled Dead Zone in the US) premiered in theaters. In total, thirteen DBZ movies were produced. In addition to the feature films, two movie-length television specials were also produced for the series. An OVA based on a NES videogame was also made, but it only aired in Japan, and it is unknown if or when an English version will be released. Dragon Ball Z: Return my Gohan!! ) is the first movie in the Dragon Ball Z franchise. ... A human ovum An ovum (loosely, egg or egg cell) is a female sex cell or gamete. ...


Like the original Dragon Ball anime, DBZ suffered from the same manga-to-anime pacing problems which resulted in the excess of filler material in the previous anime. In some ways, the problem was more pronounced during the production of DBZ as the increased focus on action resulted in many issues of the manga devoted entirely to action sequences. These combat-oriented issues were more difficult to "stretch" into episodes than more diverse action and this resulted in pacing problems throughout some sections of the series.


In May 1995, the long running Dragon Ball manga finally ended its run in Shonen Jump as creator Akira Toriyama had grown exhausted and his editors allowed him to end the series. Without additional issues of the manga to translate onto the small screen, DBZ ended in January 1996 after 291 episodes. Once again however, Japanese fans would not have to wait more than a week for the continuation of the story, in Dragon Ball GT. 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


During the production of DBZ in Japan, popularity for the franchise was at its peak. Production of video games--first for the Nintendo Family Computer (Famicom), then later for Super Famicom, PlayStation, Game Boy, and Sega Saturn-- reached its peak during this period. Ironically, despite tremendous success in Japan and tons of marketable goods, the series had yet to take off in the US. “NES” redirects here. ... The Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Super NES (also called SNES and Super Nintendo) was a 16-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Europe, Australasia, and Brazil between 1990 and 1993. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ...


Dragon Ball GT

Main article: Dragon Ball GT

The third and final Dragon Ball series quickly followed the completion of Dragon Ball Z in February. Unlike the two previous series, Dragon Ball GT was not based on the Dragon Ball manga by Akira Toriyama. Instead, it was completely new material. Original run February 7, 1996 – November 19, 1997 Episodes 64 Sagas Black Star Dragon Ball Saga Baby Saga Super 17 Saga Shadow Dragon Saga TV Special A Heros Legacy Dragon Ball GT ) is a Japanese anime-only sub-series of the Dragon Ball franchise created by Akira Toriyama. ...


From the beginning however, there were problems with the series. Dragon Ball fandom in Japan was waning. To help renew interest in the series and bring it back to its roots, a decision was made to return the series to the style of the original comedy Dragon Ball anime, rather than the more action-oriented Dragon Ball Z. This decision led to the reintroduction of several villains not present since the original series, a return to the "Dragon Ball quest"-style plot of that series, and even the mystical de-aging of Goku, back to roughly the age he was when the first series began. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this creative change did not improve ratings and the series focus was changed again after the completion of only sixteen episodes. The remaining episodes of the series returned to the more action-oriented style of the latter series. As a result of declining interest, the series had ended in November 1997 after only 64 episodes. There was no sequel the following week.


DBGT was also less successful in its tie-ins than the previous series had been. Unlike the previous series, DBGT did not spawn any theatrical films on its own. In March 1996, just one month after the introduction of the series, the Dragon Ball 10th Anniversary Special (called The Path to Power in the US) was released. Although produced in the artistic style of DBGT, the plot was a modified retelling of the very beginning of the original Dragon Ball anime. This was the last Dragon Ball animated movie to be released to date. Other than that film, the final series was limited to a single television special, released in March 1997. In other product areas, such as video games and merchandise, DBGT was also less successful than its predecessors. The Path to Power is the fourth Dragon Ball movie. ...


First US release

In the first years after the Dragon Ball manga and anime became successful in Japan, an initial attempt was made to export the show to an American audience. These initial attempts to gain a foothold in the large American market were unsuccessful and short lived.


In 1986, as the Dragon Ball anime was kicking off in Japan, a Dragon Ball video game for the Nintendo Entertainment System was produced by Bandai and exported to the US. Titled "Dragon Power" , it was a martial arts action game which loosely followed the plot of the first thirteen chapters of the manga. “NES” redirects here. ... This article is about the Japanese toy manufacturer. ... Dragon Power, known in Japan as Dragon Ball: Shenron no Nazo , lit. ...


In 1989, a first attempt was made to release the Dragon Ball anime in the US in the form of a limited number of episodes (and an edited form of the first and third movie) produced and dubbed by Harmony Gold. After being test marketed in several cities (with some resulting controversy over the subject matter of the early episodes-- something that would strike again in later attempts), this version (now called the "Lost Dub") was withdrawn from the marketplace without a full season produced. Harmony Gold is the creator and main distributor of Robotech. ...


Second US release

In 1996, the company FUNimation Production Inc. (now known as FUNimation Entertainment) bought the rights to all the U.S. releases of the Dragon Ball series. But the company was too poor to handle a show by itself, so they teamed up with KidMark Entertainment for the show in the U.S. They also hired voice actors of the Ocean Group to handle the dubbing. However, the show had poor ratings and was canceled after 13 of the 28 episode first season was aired. They also dubbed and released the first Dragon Ball movie. FUNimation Entertainment (previously known as FUNimation Productions, and usually referred to as FUNimation or FUNi for short) is an American entertainment company. ... Ocean Group is an organization located in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada that purchases anime for English dubbing. ...


After the two failed launches of the Dragon Ball anime in the US, FUNimation switched distribution companies to Saban (at that time riding on the popularity of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, another Japanese import) and created a dub of Dragon Ball Z that debuted in syndication in September 1996, using voice actors of the Ocean Group again. The intended audience of the series (young children) did not work well with the more violent and adult nature of DBZ. This resulted in extensive editing of the series (cutting out the equivalent of 14 of the first 67 episodes-- almost 21%), including the complete removal of blood, language, nudity and references to character death ("sent to another dimension"). To many fans of the series however, these edits made the series worse as violence was always shown without consequence. Also, they made many changes to the original dialogue and musical score, and also created many name changes (i.e. Kuririn to Krillin, Yamucha to Yamcha, Tenshinhan to Tien, Chaozu to Chiaotzu, etc.) as well as rough translations to some of the characters' special techniques (i.e. Genki-Dama to Spirit Bomb). The Saban Saturn logo from 1984 to 1988. ... Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (MMPR) is an American live-action television series, created for the American market, based on the sixteenth installment of the Japanese Super Sentai franchise, Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger. ... 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


In addition to the anime series, Saban also edited the third DBZ movie (The Tree of Might in the US) and released it as a two-part episode in the production run of the series. Two more movies (#1 and #2) were subsequently released by Pioneer Entertainment direct to video and the third was released to video as well, though with dialogue changes more accurate to the original script. Super Deciding Battle for the Entire Planet Earth ) is the third Dragon Ball Z movie. ... Geneon, formerly known as Pioneer Entertainment (or Pioneer LDC) and also a former subsidiary of Pioneer Corporation, is a home entertainment production and distribution company. ...


However, it was only a modest success and was cancelled in May 1998 due to low ratings. No new episodes of the Ocean Group dub aired after the first 53.


Third US release

In August 1998, after its modest success in syndication, the Ocean Group of Dragon Ball Z was brought to Cartoon Network's action-animation block Toonami. The block gave the series new life and, combined with the DiC dub of Sailor Moon, exposed the series to a much wider audience. In 1999, FUNimation decided to cut their partnership with Saban and, continuing from where the original version left off, dubbed the show themselves with their own in-house voice actors and a newly commissioned musical score. They also cut some of their previous restrictions such as small inclusions of blood, though still kept the name changes used in the previous dub and edited some of the violence, in order to make it suitable for viewers of all ages. The FUNimation dub became immensely popular and it also greatly helped expand the anime market in the US. For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... For the former television channel in the United Kingdom of the same name, see Toonami (UK). ... The DIC Incredible World logo used from the late 2001-present. ... The Sailor Moon anime series , Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon) was co-produced by TV Asahi, Toei Agency and Toei Animation. ...


Around 1999-2000, merchandising of the series started, beginning with action figures of the characters. Burger King started a promotional campaign which encompassed releasing figurines of the DBZ characters with a special trading card, which were in Kids Meals. Burger King also had a promotional event which offered an originally exclusive VHS tape that was not released as part of the main production line, entitled "Z Warriors Prepare", and designed to look like the recognizable FUNimation DBZ VHS production line. In May 2002, the first DBZ video game in the US (The Legacy of Goku), was released for the Game Boy Advance and was a great financial success, opening the gate for the release of many other DBZ video games of different platforms. In September 2002, DBZ was Number One on all cable TV (#1 program of the week on all cable television for boys 9-14 and men 12-24). The series finally ended its first run in April 2003 and from 2001 to 2006, movies 4-13 were all dubbed by the FUNimation voice cast and released in the US. “GBA” redirects here. ...


The success of DBZ on Cartoon Network allowed FUNimation to go back and do a new dub of Dragon Ball as well, starting from the beginning and airing on the Toonami block as well, running from August 2001 to December 2002. However, there were marked changes in the dubbing between this and its sequel series, most pronounced in the usage of the original Japanese background music, though this was met with delight by fans of the series. FUNimation also released Dragon Ball to DVD, but with a slight snag: since KidMark remained the distributor of the earlier Dragon Ball dub, they could not release the first thirteen episodes of the new dub until their license expired, which continues to be renewed to this day. The two remaining Dragon Ball movies were also released by this time, having been dubbed by the FUNimation voice cast even before they started on DBZ.


By 2003, with the completion of Dragon Ball and DBZ, FUNimation began the process of dubbing Dragon Ball GT, which was released on both Toonami and in the DVD line. However, they were afraid they would experience the same drop off witnessed in Japan by starting with the lighter episodes at the beginning. In a controversial decision, FUNimation decided to start from the first action-intensive arc, connected with the first major villain of the series. Furthermore, a special episode was created for the beginning of this series that would fill in the material prior to the start of this arc (such as how Goku became a child again and went into space). Similarly, DBGT would feature a new musical composer, pushing music with a harder sound and even creating a hip-hop-style opening to appeal with the demographic that originally lived through the third, and most successful, US release, as they were starting to 'grow up'. Eventually after the completion of the series in 2005, the earlier episodes prior to the starting point were released and aired as "The Lost Episodes". Breakdance, an early form of hip hop dance, often involves battles, showing off skills without any physical contact with the adversaries. ...


Release of the Dragon Ball manga in the US occurred from 2003 to 2006 through Shonen Jump and Viz Media, though volumes 17-42 were titled Dragon Ball Z, in order to avoid confusion with fans of the US, and numbered 1-26. Viz Media, LLC, headquartered in San Francisco, California, is a major American anime, manga and Japanese entertainment company formed by the merger of Viz, LLC, and ShoPro Entertainment. ...


Fourth US release

Shortly after completing the FUNimation dubs of Dragon Ball, DBZ and DBGT, the company chose to re-dub the first 53 episodes and 3 movies of DBZ that were heavily edited by the original dub, and they released these uncut versions voiced by the FUNimation voice cast, under the title Ultimate Uncut Special Edition.


Cartoon Network aired the uncut version of the original 67 episodes in 2005, from June to September. This version used the original Japanese footage, with the exception of the Japanese opening and closing themes, and had an entirely new score of music. The uncut version also featured many scenes with large amounts of blood, as well as mild language, profanity, sexual humor and nudity. Generally, while some lines were maintained from the original dub, several mistranslations were also corrected. The remastered movie 1 was also released in 2005 and later re-released in a boxset, also containing the remastered movies 2 and 3, in 2006. For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... UNCUT magazine is a popular monthly publication based in London, which is available across the English speaking world, and focuses on films, music and books. ...


As of this, every Dragon Ball, DBZ, or DBGT episode, movie, and special has been dubbed by the FUNimation voice cast, with the exception of the first Dragon Ball movie (due to licensing issues with Lionsgate).


International release

Until 2001, other English speaking countries including the UK, Canada, Australia and Republic of Ireland received the American version of Dragon Ball Z, both the Ocean Group and FUNimation dubs. This changed when Episode 108 aired in the UK (also in The Netherlands); the English Dub switched to a version produced by the Blue Water studios. This version regained the original voice actors of the Ocean Group dub instead of the FUNimation voice cast. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...


This version began airing in Canada in the autumn of 2001 from Episode 168, and ran through to the end of the series. It used FUNimation's own videotracks and its scripts, albeit with some changes. This version used music recycled from the Mega Man and Monster Rancher cartoons, as well as a few original pieces for the series by Jon Mitchell, Tom Keenlyside and David Iris. This version suffered from low production values and a rushed schedule. Many voice actors did not stay consistent through the series, and by the end few remained from the original cast. Mega Man firing his weapon while in Shadow Mans stage from Mega Man 3 (NES). ... This article is about the Monster Rancher series. ...


Blue Water also created a dub of Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball GT, though both dubs featured a completely different voice cast, including no one from the Ocean Group dub.


Season boxsets

In 2006, FUNimation cancelled the Ultimate Uncut DVD releases and moved to remaster all 291 episodes of Dragon Ball Z on DVD season boxsets. These contain remastered footage in widescreen format and also the choice between the English dialogue with either the American BGM or the original Japanese BGM. Also some of the FUNimation voice cast re-dubbed themselves in the episodes that they originally started from in order to keep consistency with the new dub. Some of the current voice actors, who were not present during the dubbing of these early episodes, have also re-dubbed themseleves over the old voices. In 2007, Season 1 (39 episodes) was released on February 6, Season 2 (35 episodes) was released on May 25, and Season 3 (33 episodes) was released on September 18. In 2008, Season 4 (32 episodes) was released on February 19, as well as the two DBZ specials in a remastered form, Season 5 (26 episodes) was released on May 27, as well as the first two DBZ movies in a remastered form, and Season 6 and the third and fourth movies are expected to be release in late August or early September. is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


FUNimation has also expressed interest in remastering Dragon Ball and Dragon Ball GT and releasing them as season boxsets, along with their movies.


Remastered collection

Season box sets
Season Release Date Episode Number Sagas
One February 6, 2007 39, (1-39) Vegeta Saga
Two May 22, 2007 35, (40-74) Namek and Captain Ginyu sagas
Three September 18, 2007 33, (75-107) Frieza Saga
Four February 19, 2008 32, (108-139) Garlic Junior, Trunks, and Android sagas
Five May 27, 2008 26, (140-165) Imperfect Cell and Perfect Cell sagas
Six September 16, 2008 28, (166-193) Cell Games Saga
Seven TBA TBA (194-) TBA

is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

Double feature releases
Specials/Movies Release Date
History of Trunks, Bardock: The Father of Goku February 19, 2008
The Dead Zone, The World's Strongest May 27, 2008
Tree of Might, Lord Slug September 16, 2008

Dragon Ball Z: The History of Trunks, known in Japan as Dragon Ball Z: Zetsubō e no Hankō!! Nokosareta Chō-Senshi Gohan to Trunks , lit. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dead Zone may refer to: The Dead Zone (novel) - A 1979 novel by Stephen King. ... Dragon Ball Z: The Worlds Strongest Guy ) is the second movie in the Dragon Ball Z franchise. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Super Deciding Battle for the Entire Planet Earth ) is the third Dragon Ball Z movie. ... In the popular anime series Dragon Ball Z, Lord Slug was one of the Ancient Namek s who discovered the key to unlocking a higher consciousness within. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

Neko Majin Z

Main article: Neko Majin

Originally a one-shot bearing little relation to Akira Toriyama's other series, the first chapter of Neko Majin appeared in Weekly Shonen Jump in April 1999 (WJ #22-23). Though there were some similarities, it didn't become a self-parody of the Dragon Ball manga, until Neko Majin Z, which had cameos of characters from the author's magnum opus. As of 2005, the series was completed with eight total chapters (five of which are Dragon Ball parodies). These chapters were compiled into a "kanzenban"-style package for release in Japan on 4 April 2005. However because the manga is intended as a parody of Dragon Ball, most fans do not consider it a sequel and do not consider the events canonical. Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump, Monthly Shonen Jump, Shonen Jump Original run April 1999 – February 2005 No. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Cross Epoch

Cross Epoch is a Japanese manga by Akira Toriyama and Eiichiro Oda. It was created as a crossover between Dragon Ball and One Piece. In this Japanese name, the family name is Toriyama Akira Toriyama ) born on April 5, 1955, in Kiyosu, Aichi, Japan,[2] is a widely known and acclaimed Japanese manga artist known mostly for his creation of the Dragon Ball manga, as well as the media franchise of the same name... Eiichiro Oda , born January 1, 1975 in Kumamoto, Kumamoto) is a Japanese manga artist, best known as the creator of the manga and anime One Piece. ... Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1984 – 1995[1] Volumes 42 (16 DB + 26 DBZ) Dragon Ball ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama with an anime adaptation, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The work is influenced by... One piece redirects here. ...


Released on 25 December 2006, in the Weekly Shonen Jump. is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Weekly Shonen Jump, issue 17 2007 (Japanese version), featuring Luffy of One Piece on the cover JUMP SHOP Osaka Shop. ...


There are currently no plans for Cross Epoch to be released as a tankōbon or for it to be released in English. Tankōbon ) is the Japanese term for a compilation volume of a particular series (such as a manga or a novel series, magazine articles, essays, craft patterns, etc. ...


Video games

The Dragon Ball franchise, in being very successful spawned off several video games in all genres: fighting, platforming, role-playing, and card battling. The following is a list of video games pertaining to the Dragon Ball franchise created by Akira Toriyama. ...


Soundtracks

Main article: Dragon Ball Soundtracks

Many Soundtracks were released to the Anime, movies and the games. This list contains known titles from both Japanese and American soundtracks from all three series. ...


Live action film

Main article: Dragonball (film)

Dragonball is a 2009 live action film adaptation of the Dragon Ball franchise. ...

References

External links

  • Dragon Ball Wiki (dragonball.wikia.com) on Wikia
Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... Dragon Ball ) is an anime that was produced in the late 1980s, being an adaptation of the first sixteen volumes of the Dragon Ball manga written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama and published in Japan in the Weekly Shonen Jump manga anthology comic. ... The following is a list of FUNimation dubbed episodes for Dragon Ball. ... For a list of Dragon Ball Z episodes, see List of Japanese Dragon Ball Z Episodes. ... DBZ redirects here. ... This is a list of the dubbed episodes and movies for Dragon Ball Z. For the Dragon Ball episode list, see List of Dragon Ball episodes. ... This is a list of the dubbed episodes for Dragon Ball Z and movies. ... Original run February 7, 1996 – November 19, 1997 Episodes 64 Sagas Black Star Dragon Ball Saga Baby Saga Super 17 Saga Shadow Dragon Saga TV Special A Heros Legacy Dragon Ball GT ) is a Japanese anime-only sub-series of the Dragon Ball franchise created by Akira Toriyama. ... Demographic Shōnen Serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump Original run 1984 – 1995[1] Volumes 42 (16 DB + 26 DBZ) Dragon Ball ) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Akira Toriyama with an anime adaptation, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. The work is influenced by... For lists of the original Japanese episodes, see: List of Japanese Dragon Ball episodes List of Japanese Dragon Ball Z Episodes List of Japanese Dragon Ball GT Episodes For lists of the dubbed FUNimation episodes, see: List of Dragon Ball dubbed episodes List of Dragon Ball Z dubbed episodes List... This list contains known titles from both Japanese and American soundtracks from all three series. ... The Dragon Ball films are animated films made based on the Dragon Ball manga and its three animated TV series, Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. All Dragon Ball movies were originally released in Japan. ... The following is a list of video games pertaining to the Dragon Ball franchise created by Akira Toriyama. ... Dragonball is a 2009 live action film adaptation of the Dragon Ball franchise. ... Goku redirects here. ... Gohan redirects here. ... This article is about the Dragon Ball character. ... For the same Dragon Ball character from an alternate timeline, see Trunks (Dragon Ball). ... Son Goten ) is a fictional character who first appears in the Dragon Ball manga created by manga artist Akira Toriyama, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. Goten is the second and final child of Son Goku, the series protagonist. ... For the same Dragon Ball character from an alternate timeline, see Future Trunks. ... Pan (パン), or more properly Son Pan, is a fictional character in the manga and anime series Dragon Ball Z, as well as Dragon Ball GT. She is a Human-Saiyan quarter breed. ... Bulma ) is a fictional character who first appears in the Dragon Ball manga created by Akira Toriyama, followed by an identical anime, including Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. She was originally portrayed as a secondary main character, but her role was quickly downplayed as the series continued, even... Muten Roshi ) (in English, Old Master Martial Sky) is a fictional character and supercentenarian in the Dragon Ball metaseries by Akira Toriyama. ... Yamcha ), the notorious desert bandit, is a fictional character from the manga Dragon Ball and the anime Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. He is a human who has started out as an antagonist of Goku but quickly reformed and became his friend. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Tenshinhan ) is a fictional character who first appears in the Dragon Ball manga created by Akira Toriyama, followed by an equivalent anime, including Dragon Ball Z. Tenshinhan also makes cameo appearances in Dragon Ball GT.[3] Initially trained by Muten Roshis rival, Tsuru-Sennin, he is introduced as... Piccolo ) is a fictional character from the Dragon Ball manga, authored by mangaka Akira Toriyama. ... Freeza ) is a graphic novel supervillain who first appears in the Dragon Ball manga created by Akira Toriyama, followed by Dragon Ball Z. Freeza also appears in the television special Bardock: The Father of Goku; a few Dragon Ball Z movies and in Dragon Ball GT. He is a powerful... Cell ) is a fictional graphic novel supervillain who first appears in the Dragon Ball manga created by Akira Toriyama, followed by Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT. He is the ultimate creation of the scientist Dr. Gero, cloned from the cells of several characters from the series. ... Majin Buu ) is a fictional graphic novel supervillain who first appears in the Dragon Ball manga created by Akira Toriyama. ... Baby ) is a fictional parasitic extraterrestrial supervillain in Dragon Ball GT, based on the Dragon Ball manga created by Akira Toriyama. ... This is a list of Saiyans who appear in the manga and anime universe of the Dragon Ball metaseries, including the Dragon Ball films. ... // The Announcer ) is active for every Tenkaichi Budokai from the beginning of Dragon Ball to the end of Dragon Ball Z. He announces the fights, decisions by the judges, and provides commentary. ... This is a list of fictional extraterrestrials (excluding the Saiyan race) who first appeared in Akira Toriyamas Dragon Ball manga, followed by the anime series, including the Dragon Ball films. ... This is a list of deities, legendary creatures, and other beings of unexplained origin who appear in the manga and anime universe of the Dragon Ball metaseries, including the Dragon Ball films. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Official Dragon Ball Z Website (382 words)
The Dragon Ball franchise consists of Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT and is one of the most successful anime trilogies.
Dragon Ball Z follows the adventures of Goku, who along with the Z Warriors, defends the Earth against evil.
Dragon Ball GT is the third and final installment in the series and consists of 64 episodes.
Dragon Ball (franchise) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2902 words)
Among fans, the Dragon Ball manga is considered the "authoritative" source of the events in the Dragon Ball universe (called Dragon World by the author).
Called simply "Dragon Ball" (in Japan, the movie's eventual English title is "Curse of the Blood Rubies"), it retold the events of the first several episodes of the anime series.
In 1989, a first attempt was made to release the Dragon Ball anime in the US in the form of a limited number of episodes (and an edited form of the first and third movies) produced and dubbed by Harmony Gold.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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