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Encyclopedia > Dragon
Chinese dragon, color engraving on wood, Chinese school, nineteenth century
Chinese dragon, color engraving on wood, Chinese school, nineteenth century

The dragon is a mythical creature of which some interpretation or depiction appears in almost every culture worldwide. The physical description and supposed abilities of the creature vary immensely according to the different cultures in which it appears. However, the unifying feature of almost all interpretations is it being a serpentine or otherwise reptilian monster (or at least possessing a serpentine/reptilian part or trait), and often possessing magical or spiritual qualities. Look up dragon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Download high resolution version (1304x1975, 724 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1304x1975, 724 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Japanese name Hiragana: KyÅ«jitai: Shinjitai: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: The Chinese dragon is a Chinese mythical creature, depicted as a long, scaled, snake-like creature with four claws. ... A legendary creature is a mythical or fantastic creature (often known as fabulous creatures in historical literature). ... For other uses, see Serpentine (disambiguation). ... Orders  Crocodilia - Crocodilians scary crocodiles. ...


The two most familiar interpretations of dragons are either European dragons, derived from various European folk traditions, or unrelated Oriental dragons, derived from the Chinese dragon (lóng). The word "dragon" derives from Greek δράκων (drakōn), "a serpent of huge size, a python, a dragon" and that from the verb δέρκομαι (derkomai) "to see clearly"[1]. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ... Oriental, or asian, dragons are believed to live in the countries of Koerea, Japan and China. ... Japanese name Hiragana: KyÅ«jitai: Shinjitai: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: The Chinese dragon is a Chinese mythical creature, depicted as a long, scaled, snake-like creature with four claws. ...

Contents

Overview

Like most mythological creatures, dragons are perceived in different ways by different cultures. Dragons are sometimes said to breathe and spit fire or poison. They are commonly portrayed as serpentine or reptilian, hatching from eggs and possessing typically feathered or scaly bodies. They are sometimes portrayed as having large yellow or red eyes, a feature that is the origin for the word for dragon in many cultures. They are sometimes portrayed with a row of dorsal spines, keeled scales, or leathery bat-like wings. Winged dragons are usually portrayed only in European dragons while Oriental versions of the dragon resemble large snakes. Dragons can have a variable number of legs: none, two, four, or more when it comes to early European literature. Modern depictions of dragons tend to be larger than their original representations, which were often smaller than humans. For creatures that are wholly fictional creations, see Category:Fictional species. ... In most birds and reptiles, an egg (Latin ovum) is the zygote, resulting from fertilization of the ovum. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ... Oriental, or asian, dragons are believed to live in the countries of Koerea, Japan and China. ...


Although dragons occur in many legends around the world, different cultures have varying stories about monsters that have been grouped together under the dragon label.


Dragons are often held to have major spiritual significance in various religions and cultures around the world. In many East Asian cultures dragons were, and in some cultures still are, revered as representative of the primal forces of nature, religion and the universe. They are associated with wisdom—often said to be wiser than humans—and longevity. They are commonly said to possess some form of magic or other supernatural power, and are often associated with wells, rain, and rivers. In some cultures, they are also said to be capable of human speech. This article is about the geographical region. ... This article is about the physical universe. ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ... For the apocryphal book of the Bible, see Book of Wisdom. ... The Sorceress by John William Waterhouse Magic, sometimes known as sorcery, is a conceptual system that asserts human ability to control the natural world (including events, objects, people, and physical phenomena) through mystical, paranormal or supernatural means. ...


The term dragoon, for infantry that move around by horse yet still fight as foot soldiers, is derived from their early firearm, the "dragon", a wide-bore musket that spat flame when it fired, and was thus named for the mythical creature. For other uses, see Dragoon (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Firearms redirects here. ...


Jewish

In Jewish religious texts, the first mention of a dragon-like creature is in the Biblical works of Job (26:13), and Isaiah (27:1) where it is called Nachash Bare'ach, or a "Pole Serpent".[2] This is identified in the Midrash Rabba to Genesis 1:21 as Leviathan from the word Taninim For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... This article is about the biblical creature. ...

and God created the great sea-monsters.[3]

In Jewish astronomy this is also identified with the North Pole, the star Thuban which, around 4,500 years ago, was the star in the Draco constellation's "tail".[2] However this can also have been either the celestial pole or the ecliptic pole. The ancient observers noted that Draco was at the top of the celestial pole, giving the appearance that stars were "hanging" from it, and in Hebrew it is referred to as Teli, from talah (תלה) - to hang.[4] Hebrew writers from Arabic-speaking locations identified the Teli as Al Jaz'har, which is a Persian word for a "knot" or a "node" because of the intersection of the inclination of the orbit of a planet from the elliptic that forms two such nodes. In modern astronomy these are called the ascending node and the descending node, but in the medieval astronomy they were referred to as "dragon's head" and "dragon's tail".[5] For other uses, see North Pole (disambiguation). ... Thuban (α Dra / α Draconis / Alpha Draconis) is a star (or star system) in the constellation of Draco. ... Draco (IPA: , Latin: ) is a far northern constellation that is circumpolar for many northern hemisphere observers. ... The two celestial poles are the imaginary points where the Earths spin axis intersects the imaginary rotating sphere of gigantic radius, called the celestial sphere. ... The ascending node is one of the orbital nodes, a point in the orbit of an object where it crosses the plane of the ecliptic from the south celestial hemisphere to the north celestial hemisphere in the direction of motion. ... The descending node is the point in the orbit of an object where it crosses the plane of the ecliptic from the north celestial hemisphere to the south celestial hemisphere in the direction of motion. ... Astronomy is the oldest of the natural sciences, dating back to antiquity, with its origins in the religious, mythological, and astrological practices of pre-history: vestiges of these are still found in astrology, a discipline long interwoven with public and governmental astronomy, and not completely disentangled from it until a...


Greek

In Ancient Greece the first mention of a dragon is derived from the Iliad where Agamemnon is described as having a blue dragon motif on his sword belt and a three-headed dragon emblem on his breast plate. [6] The term ancient Greece refers to the periods of Greek history in Classical Antiquity, lasting ca. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ...


Christian

In the biblical book the Revelation of John, Satan is portrayed as a dragon that can emit a flood of water from its mouth.Revelation 12:16. Dragons are also commonly a part of the legends of several early Christian Saints, most famously Saint George. The Revelation of St. ... This article is about the concept of Satan. ... General definition of saint In general, the term Saint refers to someone who is exceptionally virtuous and holy. ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ...


Chinese

Chinese dragons (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: lóng), and Oriental dragons generally, are usually seen as benevolent, whereas European dragons are usually malevolent though there are exceptions (one exception being Y Ddraig Goch, The Red Dragon of Wales). Malevolent dragons also occur in the mythology of Persia (see Azhi Dahaka) and Russia, among other places. Japanese name Hiragana: KyÅ«jitai: Shinjitai: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: The Chinese dragon is a Chinese mythical creature, depicted as a long, scaled, snake-like creature with four claws. ... Simplified Chinese character (Simplified Chinese: or ; traditional Chinese: or ; pinyin: or ) is one of two standard sets of Chinese characters of the contemporary Chinese written language. ... Traditional Chinese characters refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Y Ddraig Goch on the Flag of Wales Y Ddraig Goch (IPA: ) (Welsh for the red dragon) appears on the national Flag of Wales (the flag itself is also called Y Ddraig Goch), and is the most famous dragon in Britain. ... The beliefs and practices of the culturally and linguistically related group of ancient peoples who inhabited the Iranian Plateau and its borderlands, as well as areas of Central Asia from the Black Sea to Khotan (modern Ho-tien, China), form Persian mythology. ... Zahak, Zahhak, Zahak-e Tāzi or (Arab Zahak) also knwon as Bivar-Asp, which means [he who has] 10,000 horses in the Pahlavi (middle Persian) language, and Avestan Āži-Dahāk) is a mythical figure of ancient Persia (Iran). ...


Dragons are particularly popular in China and the 5-clawed dragon was a symbol of the Chinese emperors, with the phoenix or fenghuang the symbol of the Chinese empress. Dragon costumes manipulated by several people are a common sight at Chinese festivals. For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... Fenghuang sculpture, Nanning city, Guangxi, China. ...


Persian

Aži Dahāka is the source of the modern Persian word azhdahā or ezhdehā اژدها (Middle Persian azdahāg) meaning "dragon", often used of a dragon depicted upon a banner of war.


Modern Literature

There are numerous examples of dragons in modern literature, especially the fantasy genre.


In the 1937 fantasy novel The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien, the major antagonist is a dragon named Smaug. Smaug hordes a great treasure but is ultimately defeated by a band of dwarves, the "men of the lake" and a hobbit named Bilbo Baggins. For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation) and There and Back Again (disambiguation). ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... For other uses, see Antagonist (disambiguation). ... Smaug in his lair: an illustration for the fantasy The Hobbit Smaug is a fictional character in The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation). ... Bilbo Baggins (2890 Third Age - ? Fourth Age) is an important character in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ...


Dragons play an important role in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. In the first book of the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Hagrid, the Hogwarts grounds-keeper, owns a baby dragon of a species called "Norwegian Ridgeback". In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire one of the three events the contestants for the tri-wizard tournament involves successfully taking a Golden egg from a Dragon, in Harry's case "a Hungarian Horntail". In the final book of the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Harry has to overcome a blind dragon guarding the treasure in the vaults of the wizarding bank, Gringots. This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... HPSS and HP1 redirect here. ... HP4 redirects here. ... HP7 redirects here. ...


Dragonriders of Pern is an extensive fantasy/science fiction series of novels and short stories primarily written by Anne McCaffrey. Since 2004, McCaffrey's son Todd McCaffrey has also published Pern novels, both in collaboration with Anne and on his own. The Pernese use intelligent firebreathing dragons who have a telepathic bond with their riders, formed by mental impressions the dragons receive at the time they hatch from their eggs. The Dragonriders of Pern is an extensive fantasy/science fiction series of novels and short stories primarily written by Anne McCaffrey. ... Anne Inez McCaffrey (born April 1, 1926) is an American science fiction author best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series. ...


The concept of a dragon bonding at birth with its rider was explored more recently in the 2003 fantasy novel and subsequent motion picture, Eragon, which features a teen-aged boy by that name and a young dragon named Saphira. Eragon becomes a Dragon Rider, a magical dragon riding hero, who helps to overthrow an evil and despotic king. This article is about the novel written by Christopher Paolini. ... Saphira Bjartskular (which means Saphira Brightscales) is a female sapphire-blue dragon from Christopher Paolinis Inheritance Trilogy and also happens to be Christopher Paolinis favorite character. ...


Speculation on the origin of dragons

Dragons may be mental representations of natural human fears of snakes, wildcats, birds of prey, as well as teeth, claws, size, and even venom blending with fear of wildfire.[7]


Others believe that the dragon may have had a real counterpart from which the various legends arose — typically dinosaurs or other archosaurs are mentioned as a possibility — but there is no physical evidence to support this claim, only alleged sightings collected by cryptozoologists. Loren Coleman argues that monitor lizards were the basis of some dragon tales and that the breath of the dragon is the fantastic imagery of the steam from the warm Montane Valley monitors emerging from a body of water into the cold air of some Asian locations. Orders Saurischia    Sauropodomorpha    Theropoda Ornithischia Dinosaurs are giant reptiles that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for most of their 165-million year existence. ... Groups Pterosauria Crocodylia (crocodiles) Dinosauria    Aves (birds) Archosaurs (Greek for ruling reptiles) are a group of diapsid reptiles that first appeared during the late Permian (roughly 250 million years ago). ... Cryptozoology (from Greek: κρυπτός, kryptós, hidden; ζῷον, zôon, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge or study – zoology) is the search for animals hypothesized to exist, but for which conclusive proof is missing. ... Loren Coleman in a photograph featured in his profile on Cryptomundo. ... Species Many, see text. ...


Dinosaur and mammalian fossils were occasionally mistaken for the bones of dragons and other mythological creatures — for example, a discovery in 300 BC in Wucheng, Sichuan, China, was labeled as such by Chang Qu.[8] A town located in Jiangxi, China, where the Xiushui River enters Lake Poyang. ... This article is about the Chinese province. ... Chang Qu (c. ...


Dragons in world mythology

Asian dragons
Indonesian dragon Naga or Nogo Naga is a mythical animal from Indonesian mythology, and the myth encompasses almost all of the islands of Indonesia, especially those who were influenced heavily by Hindu culture (including Malaya. in fact, the word 'Naga' is a common noun for dragon in Malay). Like its Indian counterpart, it is considered as divine in nature, benevolent, and often associated with sacred mountains, forests, or certain parts of the sea.
Khmer Dragon Neak
The Khmer dragon, or Neak is derived from the Indian Naga. Like its Indian counterpart, the Neak is often depicted with cobra like characteristics such as a hood. The number of heads can be as high as nine, the higher the number signifies rank. Odd headed dragons are symbolic of male energy while even headed dragons symbolize female energy. Traditionally, a Neak is distinguished from the often serpentine Makar and Tao, the former possessing crocodilian traits and the latter possessing feline traits. A dragon princess is the heroine of the creation myth of Cambodia.
Chinese dragon Lóng (or Loong. "Lung" being an inaccurate, but commonly used, romanization.)
The Chinese dragon, is a mythical Chinese creature that also appears in other East Asian cultures, and is also sometimes called the Oriental (or Eastern) dragon. Depicted as a long, snake-like creature with four claws, it has long been a potent symbol of auspicious power in Chinese folklore and art.
Japanese dragon Ryū Similar to Chinese dragons, with three claws instead of four. They are benevolent (with exceptions), associated with water, and may grant wishes.
Philippine Dragon Bakunawa
The Bakunawa appears as a gigantic serpent that lives in the sea.

Ancient natives believed that the Bakunawa caused the moon or the sun to disappear during an eclipse. Japanese name Hiragana: KyÅ«jitai: Shinjitai: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: The Chinese dragon is a Chinese mythical creature, depicted as a long, scaled, snake-like creature with four claws. ... This article is about a system of myths. ... Khmer can refer to, the: Khmer people, the ethnic group to which the great majority of Cambodians belong to Khmer language Khmer script Khmer Empire, which ruled much of Indochina from the 9th to the 13th centuries. ... The word Naga can refer to several different things. ... Japanese name Hiragana: KyÅ«jitai: Shinjitai: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: The Chinese dragon is a Chinese mythical creature, depicted as a long, scaled, snake-like creature with four claws. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... This article is about the geographical region. ... Chinese folktales have a long history, going back several thousand years. ... Chinese Jade ornament with flower design, Jin Dynasty (1115-1234 AD), Shanghai Museum. ... Japanese Dragon water fountain in Fujiyoshida. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (602x800, 118 KB) Dragon by Maruyama ÅŒkyo. ... Japanese name Hiragana: KyÅ«jitai: Shinjitai: Korean name Hangul: Hanja: Thai name Thai: Vietnamese name Quốc ngữ: Hán tá»±: The Chinese dragon is a Chinese mythical creature, depicted as a long, scaled, snake-like creature with four claws. ... Title: Bakunawa Description: Moon eater Gender: Male/female Region: Philippines Equivalent: Sea serpent The Bakunawa, also known as Bakonawa, Baconaua, or Bakonaua, is a deity in Philippine mythology that is often represented as a gigantic sea serpent. ...


It is said that during certain times of the year, the bakunawa arises from the ocean and proceeds to swallow the moon whole. To keep the Bakunawa from completely eating the moon, the natives would go out of their houses with pans and pots in hand and make a noise barrage in order to scare the Bakunawa into spitting out the moon back into the sky.

Korean dragon Yong (Mireu) A sky dragon, essentially the same as the Chinese lóng. Like the lóng, yong and the other Korean dragons are associated with water and weather. In pure Korean, it is also known as 'mireu'.
Imoogi A hornless ocean dragon, sometimes equated with a sea serpent.
Gyo A mountain dragon. In fact, the Chinese character for this word is also used for the imoogi.
Vietnamese dragon Rồng or Long

(Ly dynasty, Daiviet X) To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is about sea serpents in mythology and cryptozoology. ... Vietnamese dragon, Ly dynasty In Vietnam, the dragon (Vietnamese: rồng or long) is the most important and sacred symbol. ...

These dragons' bodies curve lithely, in sine shape, with 12 sections, symbolising 12 months in the year. They are able to change the weather, and are responsible for crops. On the dragon's back are little, uninterrupted, regular fins. The head has a long mane, beard, prominent eyes, crest on nose, but no horns. The jaw is large and opened, with a long, thin tongue; they always keep a châu (gem/jewel) in their mouths (a symbol of humanity, nobility and knowledge).
Cham dragon makara
A mythical sea monster with the body of a serpent, the trunk of an elephant, and a head that can have features reminiscent of a lion, a crocodile, or a dragon.
Siberian dragon Yilbegan Related to European Turkic and Slavic dragons
European dragons
Catalan dragon drac Catalan dragons are serpent-like creatures with two legs (rarely four) and, sometimes, a pair of wings. Their faces can resemble that of other animals, like lions or cattle. They have a burning breath. Their breath is also poisonous, the reason by which dracs are able to rot everything with their stench. A víbria is a female dragon.
French dragons Dragon
The French representation of dragons spans much of European history, and has even given its name to the dragoons, a type of cavalry.
Sardinian dragon scultone The dragon named "scultone" or "ascultone" was a legend in Sardinia, Italy for many a millennium. It had the power to kill human beings with its gaze. It was a sort of basilisk, lived in the bush and was immortal.
Scandinavian & Germanic dragons Lindworm
(early Vandal)
Lindworms are serpent-like dragons with either two or no legs. In Nordic and Germanic heraldry, the lindworm looks the same as a wyvern. The dragon Fafnir was a lindworm.
English dragons Wyvern
Wyverns are a heraldic device in shape of a dragon with expanded wings, with only two legs and the pointed tail of a scorpion. Sometimes they are depicted as dragons with serpentine or lizard-like bodies, four legs and bat-like wings, and usually have horns and can breathe fire. They are generally evil, and hoard treasure captured from raids on castles. The dragon that Beowulf fought has been depicted as a wyvern. In modern fantasy, Smaug, the dragon from J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit, was a wyvern.
Welsh dragons y ddraig goch
In Welsh mythology, after a long battle (which the Welsh King Vortigern witnesses) a red dragon defeats a white dragon; Merlin explains to the Vortigern that the red dragon symbolizes the Welsh, and the white dragon symbolizes the Saxons - thus foretelling the ultimate defeat of the English by the Welsh.
Hungarian dragons (Sárkányok) zomok A great snake living in a swamp, which regularly kills pigs or sheep. A group of shepherds can easily kill them.
sárkánykígyó A giant winged snake, which is in fact a full-grown zomok. It often serves as flying mount of the garabonciás (a kind of magician). The sárkánykígyó rules over storms and bad weather.
sárkány A dragon in human form. Most of them are giants with multiple heads. Their strength is held in their heads. They become gradually weaker as they lose their heads.

In contemporary Hungarian the word sárkány is used to mean all kinds of dragons. In mathematics, the trigonometric functions are functions of an angle, important when studying triangles and modeling periodic phenomena. ... The word Makara can refer to several different things. ... Yilbegän ([jilbe`gæn];Йилбегән; Yelbegän, Kazan Tatar language: Cilbegän/Җилбегән) is a multi-headed wigned anthropophag monster in the mythology of Turkic peoples of Siberia, as well as Siberian Tatars. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Dragon. ... For other uses, see Dragoon (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... Sardinia (pronounced ; Italian: ; Sardinian: or ) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). ... For other uses, see Basilisk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bush. ... The Fountain of Eternal Life in Cleveland, Ohio Immortality (or eternal life) is the concept of living in physical or spiritual form for an infinite length of time, or in a state of timelessness. ... Lindworm (wingless bipedal dragon) in British heraldry Lindorm (seaserpent) in Scandinavian heraldry Lindworm or lindorm (cognate with Old Norse linnormr snake, Scandinavian languages lindorm seaserpent, German Lindwurm dragon, from two Germanic roots meaning roughly constrictor snake), in British heraldry, is a technical term for a wingless bipedal dragon. ... Vandal and Vandali redirect here. ... For other uses, see Wyvern (disambiguation). ... Fáfnir guards the gold hoard in this illustration by Arthur Rackham to Richard Wagners Siegfried. ... For other uses, see Wyvern (disambiguation). ... This article is about the epic poem. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... For other uses, see Hobbit (disambiguation) and There and Back Again (disambiguation). ... Y Ddraig Goch on the Flag of Wales Y Ddraig Goch (IPA: ) (Welsh for the red dragon) appears on the national Flag of Wales (the flag itself is also called Y Ddraig Goch), and is the most famous dragon in Britain. ... Welsh mythology, the remnants of the mythology of the pre-Christian Britons, has come down to us in much altered form in medieval Welsh manuscripts such as the Red Book of Hergest, the White Book of Rhydderch, the Book of Aneirin and the Book of Taliesin. ... Merlin dictating his poems, as illustrated in a French book from the 13th century For other uses, see Merlin (disambiguation). ... Look up Saxon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Pig (disambiguation). ... Species See text. ...

Slavic dragons zmey, zmiy, żmij, змей, or zmaj, or drak, or smok
Similar to the conventional European dragon, but multi-headed. They breathe fire and/or leave fiery wakes as they fly. In Slavic and related tradition, dragons symbolize evil. Specific dragons are often given Turkic names (see Zilant, below), symbolizing the long-standing conflict between the Slavs and Turks. However, in Serbian and Bulgarian folklore, dragons are defenders of the crops in their home regions, fighting against a destructive demon Ala, whom they shoot with lightning.[9][10]
Romanian dragons Balaur Balaur are very similar to the Slavic zmey: very large, with fins and multiple heads.
Chuvash dragons Vere Celen Chuvash dragons represent the pre-Islamic mythology of the same region.
Asturian dragons Cuélebre In Asturian mythology the Cuélebres are giant winged serpents, which live in caves where they guard treasures and kidnapped xanas. They can live for centuries and, when they grow really old, they use their wings to fly. Their breath is poisonous and they often kill cattle to eat. Asturian term Cuelebre comes from Latin colŭbra, i.e. snake.
Portuguese dragons Coca In Portuguese mythology coca is a female dragon that fights with Saint George. She loses her strength when Saint George cuts off one of her ears.
Greek dragons Drakōn - δράκων
Cadmus fighting the dragon is a legendary story from the Greek lore dating to before ca. 560–550 BC.
Tatar dragons Zilant
Really closer to a wyvern, the Zilant is the symbol of Kazan. Zilant itself is a Russian rendering of Tatar yılan, i.e. snake.
Turkish dragons Ejderha or Evren The Turkish dragon secretes flames from its tail, and there is no mention in any legends of its having wings, or even legs. In fact, most Turkish (and later, Islamic) sources describe dragons as gigantic snakes.

Dobrynya Nikitich slaying Zmey Gorynych, by Ivan Bilibin Dobrynya Nikitch rescues Princess Zabava from Zmey Gorynych, by Ivan Bilibin In Slavic mythology, European dragons have their peculiarities. ... The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean to Siberia and Western China, and are traditionally considered to be part of the proposed Altaic language family. ... For other uses, see crop (disambiguation). ... Ala or hala (plural Bulgarian: (hali); Serbian: ) is a mythological creature recorded in folklore and beliefs of Serbs, Bulgarians and Macedonians. ... In Romanian folkore a balaur is a creature similar to a dragon, although distinct: dragons as such also exist in Romanian folklore. ... Chuvash dragons differ from their Turkic counterparts (such as Zilant), as they are supposed to reflect the pre-Islamic mythology of Volga Bulgaria. ... Chuvash dragons differ from their Turkic counterparts (such as Zilant), as they are supposed to reflect the pre-Islamic mythology of Volga Bulgaria. ... Asturian, Astur-Leonese or Bable (Asturianu in Asturian) is a Romance language spoken in some parts of the provinces of Asturias and León in Spain, and in the area of Miranda de Douro in Portugal (where it is officially recognized as Mirandese). ... Cuélebre is a giant winged serpent (a dragon) of the Asturian mythology which lives in caves and guards treasures while keeping xanas as prisoners. ... Anthem: Asturias, patria querida Capital Oviedo Official language(s) Spanish; Asturian has special status Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 10th  10,604 km²  2. ... Cuélebre is a giant winged serpent (a dragon) of the Asturian mythology which lives in caves and guards treasures while keeping xanas as prisoners. ... XANA (also spelled or Xana) is the digital entity antagonist in the French animated television series Code: LYOKO. // Description The Eye of XANA. For some unknown reason, XANA hates humans, most significantly the ones who constantly foil its plans: Aelita, Jeremie, Odd, Ulrich, and Yumi. ... Asturian, Astur-Leonese or Bable (Asturianu in Asturian) is a Romance language spoken in some parts of the provinces of Asturias and León in Spain, and in the area of Miranda de Douro in Portugal (where it is officially recognized as Mirandese). ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... Coat of arms of Kazan Zilant is a legendary creature, something between a dragon and a wyvern. ... For other uses, see Wyvern (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital city of Tatarstan. ...

References

  1. ^ Drakon, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, at Perseus
  2. ^ a b p.233, Kaplan
  3. ^ p.51,Freedman
  4. ^ p.1670, Jastrow ref to Genesis 38:14, Y.Sot.I 16d (bot.)
  5. ^ p.235, Kaplan
  6. ^ p.79, Drury, Nevill, The Dictionary of the Esoteric [1]
  7. ^ Jones, David E. [2002-06-21]. An Instinct for Dragons (in English). Routledge. ISBN 0415937299. 
  8. ^ Great Moments in Science - Dinosaurs And Cave People
  9. ^ Зечевић, Слободан (1981). Митска бића српских предања. Belgrade: "Вук Караџић" : Етнографски музеј.  (A book in Serbian about mythical creatures of Serbian traditions)
  10. ^ Беновска-Събкова, Милена. Змей. Родово Наследство. Retrieved on 2007-08-13. (An extract from the book Змеят в българския фолклор (The Dragon in Bulgarian Folklore), in Bulgarian)

An Instinct for Dragons is a book by University of Central Florida anthropologist David E. Jones, which seeks to explain the alleged universality of dragon images in the folklore of human societies. ... Routledge is an imprint for books in the humanities part of the Taylor & Francis Group, which also has Brunner-Routledge, RoutledgeCurzon and RoutledgeFalmer divisions. ... For other uses, see Belgrade (disambiguation). ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources

  • Rosanna M. Giammanco Frongia; Giorgi, Rosa; Giammanco Frongia, Rosanna M.; Zuffi, Stefano (2005). Angels and demons in art. Los Angeles: J. Paul Getty Museum. ISBN 0892368306. 
  • Littleton, C. Scott. Mythology: The Illustrated Anthology of World Myth and Storytelling. Thunder Bay Press (CA). ISBN 1571458271. 
  • Drury, Nevill, The Dictionary of the Esoteric, Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 2003 ISBN 8120819896
  • Freedman, Rabbi Dr. H. (translation), Simon M., editor, Midrash Rabbah: Genesis, Volume one, The Soncino Press, London, 1983

Further reading

  • Knight, Peter. "Sacred Dorset - On the Path of the Dragon", 1998.
  • Shuker, Karl (1995). Dragons: a natural history. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0684814439. 
  • Manning-Sanders, Ruth (1977). A Book of Dragons. London: Methuen. ISBN 0416581102. 

Dr. Karl P. N. Shuker (born 1959) is a British zoologist, specialising in cryptozoology. ... Ruth Manning-Sanders (born 1895 in Swansea, Wales; died October 12, 1988, in Penzance, England) was a poet and author who was perhaps best known for her series of childrens books in which she collected and retold fairy tales from all over the world. ... A Book of Dragons is a 1965 anthology of 14 fairy tales from around the world that have been collected and retold by Ruth Manning-Sanders. ...

External links

Look up dragon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 151 languages. ... In heraldry, a charge is an image occupying the field on an escutcheon (or shield). ... For other uses, see Bear (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The wild boar (Sus scrofa) is the wild ancestor of the domestic pig. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Range map The giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is an African even-toed ungulate mammal, the tallest of all land-living animal species. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... The winged lion of Mark the Evangelist for centuries has been the national emblem and landmark of Venice (detail from a painting by Vittore Carpaccio, 1516) The lion is a common charge in heraldry. ... For general information about the genus, including other species of cattle, see Bos. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ... For other uses, see Tiger (disambiguation). ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Rooster (disambiguation). ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Dove redirects here. ... The Polish coat of arms has an eagle as the main subject. ... For other uses, see Pelican (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rook. ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Basilisk (disambiguation). ... The biscione as a symbol of Milan, seen here at the Central Station The biscione, together with the Imperial eagle, on the coat of arms of the Duchy of Milan The Biscione (‘large grass snake’), also known as the Vipera (‘viper’ or in Milanese as the Bissa), is a heraldic... Cockatrice A cockatrice is a legendary creature, an ornament in the drama and poetry of the Elizabethans (Breiner). ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... Roman griffon, Turkey The griffin (also spelled gryphon, griffon or gryphin) is a legendary creature with the body of a lion, the head of an eagle and the ears of a horse or a donkey. ... Manticore illustration from The History of Four-footed Beasts (1607) For other uses, see Manticore (disambiguation). ... A martlet is a type of heraldic bird similar to the swallow, but having no feet. ... For other uses, see Griffin (disambiguation). ... For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... A 16th-century image of a salamander from M. M. Pattison Muirs The Story of Alchemy and the Beginnings of Chemistry The salamander an amphibian of the order Urodela. ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Wyvern (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Coryphaena hippurus Linnaeus, 1758 The Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), also known as dolphin fish or dorado, are a species of surface-dwelling fish found in tropical and subtropical waters. ... Species  E. americanus –       grass and redfin pickerels  E. lucius – northern pike  E. masquinongy – muskellunge  E. niger – chain pickerel   – Amur pike Esox Linnaeus, 1758, is a genus of freshwater fish, the only member of the pike family (family Esocidae) of order Esociformes. ... Species  E. americanus –       grass and redfin pickerels  E. lucius – northern pike  E. masquinongy – muskellunge  E. niger – chain pickerel   – Amur pike Esox Linnaeus, 1758, is a genus of freshwater fish, the only member of the pike family (family Esocidae) of order Esociformes. ... Genera See text. ... For other uses, see Western honey bee and Bee (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Toad (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ant (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Serpent (disambiguation). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
European dragon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2059 words)
Though a winged creature, the dragon is generally to be found in its underground lair, a cave that identifies it as an ancient creature of earth, like the mythic serpent, that was a source of knowledge even in Eden: knowledge is the temptation.
The dragon of the modern period is typically depicted as a huge fire-breathing, scaly and horned dinosaur-like creature, with leathery wings, with four legs and a long muscular tail.
The female dragon represents harsh weather and is the destroyer of crops, the hater of mankind, and is locked in a never ending battle with her brother.
Dragon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2687 words)
The various figures now called dragons probably have no single origin, but were spontaneously envisioned in nearly every different culture around the world, based loosely on the appearance of a snake and/or large bird of prey and possibly fossilized dinosaur and Tertiary mammal megafauna remains.
Some believe that the dragon may have had a real-life counterpart from which the legends around the world arose — typically dinosaurs are mentioned as a possibility — but there is no physical evidence to support this claim, only sightings collected by cryptozoologists.
Dragons are common (especially as non-player characters) in Dungeons and Dragons and in some computer fantasy role-playing games, such as the MMORPG RuneScape, the Final Fantasy series, Breath of Fire series, Fire Emblem series, and is also a type in the Pokemon games.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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