FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Dr. Seuss
Dr.Seuss

At work on a drawing of The Grinch for How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, in 1957.
Born Theodor Seuss Geisel
March 2, 1904(1904-03-02)
Springfield, Massachusetts, United States
Died September 24, 1991 (aged 87)
San Diego, California, United States
Pen name Dr. Seuss, Theo. LeSieg, Rosetta Stone, Theophrastus Seuss
Occupation Writer, cartoonist, animator, roofer
Nationality United States
Genres Children's literature
Notable work(s) The Cat in the Hat
Green Eggs and Ham
How the Grinch Stole Christmas
One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish
Spouse(s) Helen Palmer (1927–1967)
Audrey Stone Dimond (1968–1991)

Theodor Seuss Geisel (pronounced /ˈsɔɪs ˈɡaɪzəl/; March 2, 1904September 24, 1991) was an American writer and cartoonist, better known by his pen name, Dr. Seuss (often pronounced /ˈsuːs/, but he himself said /ˈsɔɪs/[1]). He published over 48 children's books, which were often characterized by his imaginative characters, rhyme, and frequent use of trisyllabic meter. His most notable books include the bestselling classics Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat, and One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish. His work has been adapted numerous times, including eleven television specials, three feature films, and a Broadway musical. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2721x2777, 880 KB) High resolution version http://memory. ... This article is about the character. ... This article is about the Dr. Seuss book. ... -1... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... // Look up Springfield in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... San Diego redirects here. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... This article is about work. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Childrens books redirects here. ... The Cat in the Hat is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss, featuring a tall, anthropomorphic, mischievous cat, wearing a tall, red and white striped hat. ... Green Eggs and Ham is a best-selling and critically acclaimed book by Dr. Seuss, first published in 1960. ... How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is one of the best-known childrens books by Dr. Seuss. ... One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is a 1960 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... American actress and author best known as the wife of famous childrens book writer Dr. Seuss or Theodor Seuss Geisel. ... -1... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Cartoonist Jack Elrod at work. ... Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ... In verse, many meters use a foot as the basic unit in their description of the underlying rhythm of a poem. ... Green Eggs and Ham is a best-selling and critically acclaimed book by Dr. Seuss, first published in 1960. ... The Cat in the Hat is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss, featuring a tall, anthropomorphic, mischievous cat, wearing a tall, red and white striped hat. ... One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is a 1960 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie, which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ... A reel of film, which predates digital cinematography. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ...


Geisel also worked as an illustrator for advertising campaigns, most notably for Flit and Standard Oil, and as a political cartoonist for PM, a New York magazine. During World War II, he joined the Army to work in an animation department of the Air Force, where he wrote Design for Death, a film that later won the 1947 Academy Award for Documentary Feature. An advertising campaign is a series of advertisement messages that share a single idea and theme which make up an integrated marketing communication (IMC). ... Look up flit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Standard Oil was a predominant integrated oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... PM was a leftist daily newspaper in New York City launched in June 1940, bankrolled by eccentric Chicago millionaire Marshall Field III. The paper employed some radical journalists, among them some known members of the Communist Party. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... For a particular Air Force, see List of air forces. ... The Academy Award for Documentary Feature is one of the most prestigious awards for documentary films. ...

Contents

Life and career

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born on March 2, 1904 in Springfield, Massachusetts[2] to Henrietta Seuss and Theodor Robert Geisel, both of German descent[3][4]. He had two sisters, Marnie and Henrietta. Henrietta died of pneumonia at 18 months old. He attended Fremont Intermediate School from age 12 to age 14. His father was a parks superintendent in charge of Forest Park (Springfield), a large park that included a zoo and was located three blocks from a library. Both Geisel's father and grandfather were brewmasters in Springfield, which may have influenced his views on Prohibition. As a freshman member of the Dartmouth College class of 1925, he became a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon. He also joined the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern, eventually rising to the rank of editor-in-chief. (He took over the post from his close friend, author Norman MacLean.) However, after Geisel was caught throwing a drinking party (and thereby violating Prohibition laws), the school insisted that he resign from all extracurricular activities. In order to continue his work on the Jack-O-Lantern without the administration's knowledge, Geisel began signing his work with the pen name "Seuss" (which was both his middle name and his mother's maiden name). His first work signed as "Dr. Seuss" appeared after he graduated, six months into his work for humor magazine The Judge where his weekly feature Birdsies and Beasties appeared.[5]-1... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Domenic J Sarno (D) Area  - City 33. ... Forest Park (735 acres), on the banks of the Connecticut River in Springfield, Massachusetts, is one of the largest municipal parks in the United States. ... The term Prohibition, also known as A Dry Law, refers to a law in a certain country by which the manufacture, transportation, import, export, and sale of alcoholic beverages is restricted or illegal. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... The Dartmouth Jack OLantern (sometimes spelled Jack-O-Lantern) was founded at Dartmouth College in 1908. ... Norman Fitzroy Maclean (23 December 1902 in Clarinda, Iowa — 2 August 1990 in Chicago, Illinois) was an American author and scholar most noted for his books A River Runs Through It and Other Stories (1976) and Young Men and Fire (1992). ...


The Seuss family pronounced their family name as Soice, to rhyme with voice, in line with the German pronunciation of eu (Geisel's maternal grandparents had emigrated from Germany). Alexander Liang, who served with Geisel on the staff of the Jack-O-Lantern and was later a professor at Dartmouth, illustrated this point. However, though Geisel himself has been quoted[citation needed] as saying that Seuss rhymes with voice, the name is often pronounced with an initial "s" sound and rhyming with "juice".[6] Geisel also used the pen name "Theo. LeSieg" (Geisel spelled backwards) for books he wrote but others illustrated.


He entered Lincoln College, Oxford, intending to earn a D.Phil in literature. At Oxford he met his future wife Helen Palmer; he married her in 1927, and returned to the United States without earning the degree. The "Dr." in his pen name is an acknowledgment of his father's unfulfilled hopes that Geisel would earn a doctorate at Oxford. and of the Lincoln College College name Lincoln College Named after Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln Established 1427 Sister college Downing College, Cambridge Rector Prof. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... American actress and author best known as the wife of famous childrens book writer Dr. Seuss or Theodor Seuss Geisel. ...


He began submitting humorous articles and illustrations to Judge, The Saturday Evening Post, Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty. One notable "Technocracy Number" made fun of the Technocracy movement and featured satirical rhymes at the expense of Frederick Soddy. He became nationally famous from his advertisements for Flit, a common insecticide at the time. His slogan, "Quick, Henry, the Flit!" became a popular catchphrase. Geisel supported himself and his wife through the Great Depression by drawing advertising for General Electric, NBC, Standard Oil, and many other companies. He also wrote and drew a short-lived comic strip called Hejji in 1935.[5] A cover of the Saturday Evening Post from 1903, illustrated by George Gibbs. ... A cover of Life Magazine from 1911 Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. ... Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles on high-brow culture, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and current affairs. ... Liberty was a general-interest weekly magazine, published in the United States between 1924 and 1950. ... The Technocracy Monad, representing balance, is the official symbol of The Technocracy movement is a social movement that started in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s and advocates a form of society where the welfare of human beings is optimized by means of scientific analysis and widespread use... Frederick Soddy in 1922. ... Look up flit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... GE redirects here. ... This article is about the television network. ... Standard Oil was a predominant integrated oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. ... Hejji was a short-lived 1935 comic strip, the only strip by prominent childrens author Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel). ...


In 1937, while Geisel was returning from an ocean voyage to Europe, the rhythm of the ship's engines inspired the poem that became his first book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. Geisel wrote three more children's books before World War II (see list of works below), two of which are, atypically for him, in prose. AND TO THINK THAT I SAW IT ON MULBERRY STREET by Dr. Seuss. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ...


As World War II began, Geisel turned to political cartoons, drawing over 400 in two years as editorial cartoonist for the left-wing New York City daily newspaper, PM. Geisel's political cartoons, later published in Dr. Seuss Goes to War, opposed the viciousness of Hitler and Mussolini and were highly critical of isolationists, most notably Charles Lindbergh, who opposed American entry into the war. One cartoon[7] depicted all Japanese Americans as latent traitors or fifth-columnists, while at the same time other cartoons deplored the racism at home against Jews and blacks that harmed the war effort. His cartoons were strongly supportive of President Roosevelt's conduct of the war, combining the usual exhortations to ration and contribute to the war effort with frequent attacks on Congress (especially the Republican Party), parts of the press (such as the New York Daily News and Chicago Tribune), and others for criticism of Roosevelt, criticism of aid to the Soviet Union, investigation of suspected Communists, and other offenses that he depicted as leading to disunity and helping the Nazis, intentionally or inadvertently. In 1942, Geisel turned his energies to direct support of the U.S. war effort. First, he worked drawing posters for the Treasury Department and the War Production Board. Then, in 1943, he joined the Army and was commander of the Animation Dept of the First Motion Picture Unit of the United States Army Air Forces, where he wrote films that included Your Job in Germany, a 1945 propaganda film about peace in Europe after World War II, Design for Death, a study of Japanese culture that won the Academy Award for Best Documentary in 1947, and the Private Snafu series of adult army training films. While in the Army, he was awarded the Legion of Merit. Geisel's non-military films from around this time were also well-received; Gerald McBoing-Boing won the Academy Award for Best Short Subject (Animated) in 1950. In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... PM was a leftist daily newspaper in New York City launched in June 1940, bankrolled by eccentric Chicago millionaire Marshall Field III. The paper employed some radical journalists, among them some known members of the Communist Party. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Mussolini redirects here. ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) (nicknamed Lucky Lindy and The Lone Eagle) was an American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and peace activist who, on May 20–21, 1927, rose instantaneously from virtual obscurity to world fame as the result of his piloting of the first solo... Serving from 1999 to 2003, Army General Eric Shinseki of Hawaii became the first Asian American military chief of staff. ... For other uses, see Fifth Column (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ... The U.S. Treasury building today. ... The War Production Board (WPB) was established in 1942 by executive order of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... The First Motion Picture Unit was the first unit of the United States Military to be made entirely of motion picture personnel. ... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as... Japanese culture and language Japans isolation until the arrival of the Black Ships and the Meiji era produced a culture distinctively different from any other, and echoes of this uniqueness persist today. ... The 20th Academy Awards spread awards around, with no film receiving more than 3 awards, the last time this would happen until the 78th Academy Awards. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Storyboard Image Private Snafu is the title character of a series of black-and-white American instructional cartoon shorts produced between 1943 and 1945 during World War II. The character was created by director Frank Capra, chairman of the U.S. Army Air Force First Motion Picture Unit, and some... The Legion of Merit is a military decoration of the United States armed forces that is awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements. ... A scene from UPA/Columbias Gerald McBoing-Boing. ...


Despite his numerous awards, Geisel never won the Caldecott Medal nor the Newbery. Three of his titles were chosen as Caldecott runners-up (now referred to as Caldecott Honor books): McElligot's Pool (1947), Bartholomew and the Oobleck (1949), and If I Ran the Zoo (1950). Caldecott redirects here. ... The John Newbery Medal is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children of the American Library Association (ALA) to the author of the outstanding American book for children. ... McElligots Pool is a 1947 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ...


After the war, Geisel and his wife moved to La Jolla, California. Returning to children's books, he wrote what many consider to be his finest works, including such favorites as If I Ran the Zoo, (1950), Scrambled Eggs Super! (1953), On Beyond Zebra! (1955), If I Ran the Circus (1956), and How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957). Wipeout Beach View from Windansea Beach La Jolla (pronunciation IPA: , i. ... This article is about the Dr. Seuss book. ...


At the same time, an important development occurred that influenced much of Geisel's later work. In May 1954, Life magazine published a report on illiteracy among school children, which concluded that children were not learning to read because their books were boring. Accordingly, Geisel's publisher made up a list of 400 words he felt were important and asked Geisel to cut the list to 250 words and write a book using only those words. Nine months later, Geisel, using 220 of the words given to him, completed The Cat in the Hat. This book was a tour de force—it retained the drawing style, verse rhythms, and all the imaginative power of Geisel's earlier works, but because of its simplified vocabulary could be read by beginning readers. A rumor exists, that in 1960, Bennett Cerf bet Geisel $50 that he couldn't write an entire book using only fifty words. The result was supposedly Green Eggs and Ham. The additional rumor that Cerf never paid Geisel the $50 has never been proven and is most likely untrue. These books achieved significant international success and remain very popular. A cover of Life Magazine from 1911 Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. ... World illiteracy rates by country Literacy is the ability to read and write. ... The Cat in the Hat is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss, featuring a tall, anthropomorphic, mischievous cat, wearing a tall, red and white striped hat. ... Bennett Cerf photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1932 Bennett Alfred Cerf (May 25, 1898 - August 27, 1971) was a publisher and co-founder of Random House, also known for his own compilations of jokes and puns, for regular personal appearances lecturing across the United States, and for his television appearances... Green Eggs and Ham is a best-selling and critically acclaimed book by Dr. Seuss, first published in 1960. ...


Geisel went on to write many other children's books, both in his new simplified-vocabulary manner (sold as "Beginner Books") and in his older, more elaborate style. In 1982 Geisel wrote "Hunches in Bunches". The Beginner Books were not easy for Geisel, and reportedly he labored for months crafting them. Beginner Books is the Random House imprint for young children, co-founded by Phyllis Cerf with Ted Geisel, more often known as Dr. Seuss and his wife Helen Palmer Geisel. ... Hunches in Bunches (ISBN 0394855027) is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss intended for readers between ages 4 and 8. ...


At various times Geisel also wrote books for adults that used the same style of verse and pictures: The Seven Lady Godivas; Oh, The Places You'll Go!; and You're Only Old Once. The Seven Lady Godivas is a 1939 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... Oh, the Places Youll Go! (ISBN 0-8335-5129-9) is the last book written and illustrated by childrens author Dr. Seuss. ...


On October 23, 1967, during a very difficult illness, Geisel's wife, Helen Palmer Geisel, committed suicide. Geisel married Audrey Stone Dimond on June 21, 1968. Geisel himself died, following several years of illness, in La Jolla, California on September 24, 1991. is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wipeout Beach View from Windansea Beach La Jolla (pronunciation IPA: , i. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ...


On December 1, 1995 UCSD's University Library Building was renamed Geisel Library in honor of Geisel and Audrey for the generous contributions they have made to the library and their devotion to improving literacy.[8] is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a highly selective, research-oriented[1] public university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... UCSDs distinctive Geisel Library, named for Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss) and featured in UCSDs logo. ...


Geisel was frequently confused, by the US Postal Service among others, with Dr. Suess (Hans Suess), his contemporary living in the same locality, La Jolla. Their names have been linked together posthumously: the personal papers of Hans Suess are housed in the Geisel Library at UC San Diego.[6] Hans Eduard Suess (December 16, 1909 in Vienna - September 20, 1993) was an Austrian physical chemist and nuclear physicist. ... Wipeout Beach View from Windansea Beach La Jolla (pronunciation IPA: , i. ... UCSDs distinctive Geisel Library, named for Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss) and featured in UCSDs logo. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD) is a public, coeducational university located in La Jolla, California. ...


In 2002, the Dr. Seuss National Memorial Sculpture Garden opened in his birthplace of Springfield, Massachusetts; it features sculptures of Geisel and of many of his characters. The Dr. Seuss National Memorial is a sculpture garden located at The Quadrangle in Springfield, Massachusetts, honoring the American childrens author Dr. Seuss. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Domenic J Sarno (D) Area  - City 33. ...


California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and First Lady Maria Shriver announced on May 28, 2008 that Geisel will be inducted into the California Hall of Fame, located at The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts. The induction ceremony will take place December 10th and his widow, Audrey will accept the honor in his place. Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German IPA: ; born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, Golden Globe-winning actor, businessman and politician currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ... Maria Owings Shriver (pronounced: ; born November 6, 1955)[1] is an award-winning American journalist from the Kennedy Family, a prolific author and First Lady of California. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Conceived by First Lady Maria Shriver, the California Hall of Fame was established with The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts to honor legendary individuals and families who embody California’s innovative spirit and have made their mark on history. ... The California Museum for History, Women and the Arts – home of the California Hall of Fame – is housed in the State Archives Building in Sacramento, one block from the State Capitol. ...


Though he devoted most of his life to writing children's books, he never had any children himself.


Political views

Geisel's early political cartoons show a passionate opposition to fascism, and he urged Americans to oppose it, both before and after the entry of the United States into World War II. In contrast, his cartoons tended to regard the fear of communism as overstated, finding the greater threat in the Dies Committee and those who threatened to cut America's "life line" to Stalin and Soviet Russia, the ones carrying "our war load".) Fascism is a term used to describe authoritarian nationalist political ideologies or mass movements that are concerned with notions of cultural decline or decadence. ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... HUAC hearings House Committee on Un-American Activities (HUAC or HCUA) (1938–1975) was an investigative committee of the United States House of Representatives. ...


Geisel's cartoons also called attention to the early stages of the Holocaust and denounced discrimination in America against black people and Jews, but he supported the Japanese American internment during World War II. Geisel himself experienced anti-semitism: in his college days, he was refused entry into certain circles because of a misperception that he was Jewish. Geisel's racist treatment of the Japanese and of Japanese Americans, whom he often failed to differentiate between, has struck many readers as a moral blind spot.[9] On the issue of the Japanese he is quoted as saying: “Shoah” redirects here. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Residents of Japanese ancestry waiting in line for the bus that will transport them to an internment camp. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...

But right now, when the Japs are planting their hatchets in our skulls, it seems like a hell of a time for us to smile and warble: "Brothers!" It is a rather flabby battle cry. If we want to win, we’ve got to kill Japs?, whether it depresses John Haynes Holmes or not. We can get palsy-walsy afterward with those that are left.

Theodor Geisel, quoted in Dr. Seuss Went to War, by Dr. Richard H. Minear

After the war, though, Seuss was able to end his feelings of animosity, using his book Horton Hears a Who as a parable for the American post-war occupation of Japan, as well as dedicating the book to a Japanese friend.[10] Horton Hears a Who! (1954) is a rhyming story by Dr. Seuss. ... // For a comparison of parable with other kinds of stories, see Myth, legend, fairy tale, and fable. ... Capital Tokyo Language(s) Japanese Political structure Military occupation Military Governor  - 1945-1951 Douglas MacArthur  - 1951-1952 Matthew Ridgway Emperor  - 1926-1989 Hirohito Historical era Post-WWII  - Surrender of Japan August 15, 1945  - San Francisco Treaty April 28, 1952 At the end of the Second World War, Japan was occupied...


In 1948, after living and working in Hollywood for years, Geisel moved to La Jolla, California. It is said that when he went to register to vote in La Jolla, some Republican friends called him over to where they were registering voters, but Geisel said, "You my friends are over there, but I am going over here [to the Democratic registration]." Geisel had since been a lifelong Democrat.[clarify] GOP redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Many of Geisel's books express his views on a myriad of social and political issues:

  • The Lorax (1971) strikes many readers as fundamentally an environmentalist tract. It is the tale of a ruthless and greedy industrialist (the "Once-ler") who so thoroughly destroys the local environment that he ultimately puts his own company out of business. The book is striking for being told from the viewpoint (generally bitter, self-hating, and remorseful) of the Once-ler himself. In 1989, an effort was made by lumbering interests in Laytonville, California, to have the book banned from local school libraries, on the grounds that it was unfair to the lumber industry.[citation needed]
  • The Sneetches (1961) is commonly seen as a satire of racial discrimination.[citation needed]
  • The Butter Battle Book (1984) written in Geisel's old age, is both a parody and denunciation of the nuclear arms race. It was attacked by conservatives as endorsing moral relativism by implying that the difference between the sides in the Cold War were no more than the choice between how to butter one's bread.[11]
  • The Zax can be seen as a parody of all political hardliners.[citation needed]
  • Yertle the Turtle (1958) is often interpreted as an allegory of tyranny. It also encourages political activism, suggesting that a single act of resistance by an individual can topple a corrupt system.[citation needed]
  • Geisel's values also are apparent in the much earlier How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1957), which can be taken (partly) as a polemic against materialism.[citation needed] The Grinch, thinking he can steal Christmas from the Whos by stealing all the Christmas gifts and decorations, attains a kind of enlightenment (as indicated by his heart growing three sizes) when the Whos prove him wrong.
  • Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose (1948) is often considered to be making a statement about hunting.[citation needed]
  • Horton Hears a Who! (1954) is said to be an allegory for supporting democracy in post-WWII Japan[citation needed]. Also, one of its lines, "A person is a person, no matter how small," has been used as rhetoric by pro-life groups. However, Seuss threatened to sue an anti-abortion group for their use of the phrase, and his widow, also strongly pro-choice, has reiterated these criticisms; in 2001, a lawsuit was filed in Canada on the issue.[citation needed]

Cover of The Lorax This article is about the Dr. Seuss childrens story. ... The historic Blue Marble photograph, which helped bring environmentalism to the public eye. ... The Once-ler is a fictional character created by Dr. Seuss in the childrens story The Lorax. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill roni Lumber or timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use — from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use — as structural material for... Laytonville is a census-designated place located in Mendocino County, California. ... The Sneetches and Other Stories is a collection of stories by Dr. Seuss. ... The books cover The Butter Battle Book is a rhyming story written by Dr. Seuss. ... U.S. and USSR/Russian nuclear weapons stockpiles, 1945-2006. ... In philosophy, moral relativism is the position that moral or ethical propositions do not reflect objective and/or universal moral truths, but instead make claims relative to social, cultural, historical or personal circumstances. ... The Sneetches and Other Stories is a collection of stories by Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel). ... Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories is a book containing three stories written by famous childrens author Dr. Seuss. ... Watergate redirects here. ... Look up Polemic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A Columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. ... Arthur Buchwald (October 20, 1925 – January 17, 2007) was an American humorist best known for his long-running column that he wrote in The Washington Post, which in turn was carried as a syndicated column in many other newspapers. ... This article is about the Dr. Seuss book. ... In philosophy, materialism is that form of physicalism which holds that the only thing that can truly be said to exist is matter; that fundamentally, all things are composed of material and all phenomena are the result of material interactions; that matter is the only substance. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Thidwick, the Big-hearted Moose book cover. ... This article is about the hunting of prey by human society. ... Horton Hears a Who! book cover Horton Hears a Who! is a 1954 story by Dr. Seuss. ...

Poetic meters

Geisel wrote most of his books in anapestic tetrameter, a poetic meter also employed by many poets of the English literary canon. This characteristic style of writing, which draws and pulls the reader into the text, is often suggested as one of the reasons that Geisel's writing was so well-received.[12][13] Anapestic tetrameter is a poetic meter that has four anapestic metrical feet per line. ... In poetry, the meter or metre is the basic rhythmic structure of a verse. ...


Anapestic tetrameter consists of four rhythmic units, anapests, each composed of two weak beats followed by one strong beat; often, the first weak syllable is omitted, or an additional weak syllable is added at the end. An example of this meter can be found in Geisel's "Yertle the Turtle", from Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories: An anapaest is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. ... In linguistics, syllable weight is the concept that syllables pattern together according to the number and/or duration of segments in the rime. ... Yertle the Turtle is a book written by famous childrens author Dr. Seuss. ...

"And today the Great Yertle, that Marvelous he
Is King of the Mud. That is all he can see."[14]

Geisel generally maintained this meter quite strictly, until late in his career, when he no longer maintained strict rhythm in all lines. The consistency of his meter was one of his hallmarks; the many imitators and parodists of Geisel are often unable to write in strict anapestic tetrameter, or are unaware that they should, and thus sound clumsy in comparison. Imitation is an advanced animal behaviour whereby an individual observes anothers behaviour and replicates it itself. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ...


Some books by Geisel that are written mainly in anapestic tetrameter also contain many lines written in amphibrachic tetrameter, such as these from If I Ran the Circus: An amphibrac is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. ...

"All ready to put up the tents for my circus.
I think I will call it the Circus McGurkus.
"And NOW comes an act of Enormous Enormance!
No former performer's performed this performance!"

Geisel also wrote verse in trochaic tetrameter, an arrangement of four units of a strong followed by a weak beat (for example, the title of One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish. The formula for trochaic meter permits the final weak position in the line to be omitted, which facilitates the construction of rhymes. Trochaic tetrameter is a meter in poetry. ... One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is a 1960 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ...


Geisel generally maintained trochaic meter only for brief passages, and for longer stretches typically mixed it with iambic tetrameter, which consists of a weak beat followed by a strong, and is generally considered easier to write. Thus, for example, the magicians in Bartholomew and the Oobleck make their first appearance chanting in trochees (thus resembling the witches of Shakespeare's Macbeth): Iambic tetrameter is a meter in poetry. ... Bartholomew and the Oobleck book cover. ... A trochee or choree, choreus, is a metrical foot used in formal poetry. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about Shakespeares play. ...

"Shuffle, duffle, muzzle, muff"

then switch to iambs for the oobleck spell: An iamb or iambus is a metrical foot used in various types of poetry. ...

"Go make the Oobleck tumble down
On every street, in every town!"[15]

Artwork

Geisel's earlier artwork often employed the shaded texture of pencil drawings or watercolors, but in children's books of the postwar period he generally employed the starker medium of pen and ink, normally using just black, white, and one or two colors. Later books such as The Lorax used more colors. Cover of The Lorax This article is about the Dr. Seuss childrens story. ...


Geisel's figures are often rounded and somewhat droopy. This is true, for instance, of the faces of the Grinch and of the Cat in the Hat. It is also true of virtually all buildings and machinery that Geisel drew: although these objects abound in straight lines in real life, for buildings, this could be accomplished in part through choice of architecture. For machines, for example, If I Ran the Circus includes a droopy hoisting crane and a droopy steam calliope. The Cat in the Hat is a fictional cat created by Dr. Seuss. ...


Geisel evidently enjoyed drawing architecturally elaborate objects. His endlessly varied (but never rectilinear) palaces, ramps, platforms, and free-standing stairways are among his most evocative creations. Geisel also drew elaborate imaginary machines, of which the Audio-Telly-O-Tally-O-Count, from Dr. Seuss's Sleep Book, is one example. Geisel also liked drawing outlandish arrangements of feathers or fur, for example, the 500th hat of Bartholomew Cubbins, the tail of Gertrude McFuzz, and the pet for girls who like to brush and comb, in One Fish Two Fish. Dr. Seusss Sleep Book is a 1962 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is a 1960 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ...


Geisel's images often convey motion vividly. He was fond of a sort of "voilà" gesture, in which the hand flips outward, spreading the fingers slightly backward with the thumb up; this is done by Ish, for instance, in One Fish Two Fish when he creates fish (who perform the gesture themselves with their fins), in the introduction of the various acts of If I Ran the Circus, and in the introduction of the Little Cats in The Cat in the Hat Comes Back. He was also fond of drawing hands with interlocked fingers, which looked as though the character was twiddling their thumbs. One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is a 1960 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... The Cat in the Hat is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss, featuring a tall, anthropomorphic, mischievous cat, wearing a tall, red and white striped hat. ...


Geisel also follows the cartoon tradition of showing motion with lines, for instance in the sweeping lines that accompany Sneelock's final dive in If I Ran the Circus. Cartoonist's lines are also used to illustrate the action of the senses (sight, smell, and hearing) in The Big Brag and even of thought, as in the moment when the Grinch conceives his awful idea.


Recurring images

Geisel's early work in advertising and editorial cartooning produced sketches that received more perfect realization later in the children's books. Often, the expressive use to which Geisel put an image later on was quite different from the original.[16]

  • An editorial cartoon of July 16, 1941[17] depicts a whale resting on the top of a mountain, as a parody of American isolationists, especially Charles Lindbergh. This was later rendered (with no apparent political content) as the Wumbus of On Beyond Zebra (1955). Seussian whales (cheerful and balloon-shaped, with long eyelashes) also occur in McElligot's Pool, If I Ran the Circus, and other books.
  • Another editorial cartoon from 1941[18] shows a long cow with many legs and udders, representing the conquered nations of Europe being milked by Adolf Hitler. This later became the Umbus of On Beyond Zebra.
  • The tower of turtles in a 1942 editorial cartoon[19] prefigures a similar tower in Yertle the Turtle. This theme also appeared in a Judge cartoon as one letter of a hieroglypic message, and in Geisel's short-lived comic strip Hejji. Geisel once stated that Yertle the Turtle was Adolf Hitler.[20]
  • Little cats A B and C (as well as the rest of the alphabet) who spring from each other's hats appeared in a Ford ad.
  • The connected beards in Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? appear frequently in Geisel's work, most notably in Hejji, which featured two goats joined at the beard, The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T, which featured two roller-skating guards joined at the beard, and a political cartoon in which Nazism and the America First movement are portrayed as "the men with the Siamese Beard."
  • Geisel's earliest elephants were for advertising and had somewhat wrinkly ears, much as real elephants do.[21] With And to Think that I Saw it on Mulberry Street (1937) and Horton Hatches the Egg (1940), the ears became more stylized, somewhat like angel wings and thus appropriate to the saintly Horton. During World War II, the elephant image appeared as an emblem for India in four editorial cartoons.[22] Horton and similar elephants appear frequently in the postwar children's books.
  • While drawing advertisements for Flit, Geisel became adept at drawing insects with huge stingers,[23] shaped like a gentle S-curve and with a sharp end that included a rearward-pointing barb on its lower side. Their facial expressions depict gleeful malevolence. These insects were later rendered in an editorial cartoon as a swarm of Allied aircraft[24] (1942), and again as the Sneedle of On Beyond Zebra, and yet again as the Skritz in I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew.

is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... This article is about the animal. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... For the electronic album, see Isolationism (album). ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) (nicknamed Lucky Lindy and The Lone Eagle) was an American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and peace activist who, on May 20–21, 1927, rose instantaneously from virtual obscurity to world fame as the result of his piloting of the first solo... Hitler redirects here. ... Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories is a book containing three stories written by famous childrens author Dr. Seuss. ... Hejji was a short-lived 1935 comic strip, the only strip by prominent childrens author Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel). ... Ford may mean a number of things: A ford is a river crossing. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ... The America First Committee was the foremost pressure group against American entry into the Second World War. ... Genera and Species Loxodonta Loxodonta cyclotis Loxodonta africana Elephas Elephas maximus Elephas antiquus † Elephas beyeri † Elephas celebensis † Elephas cypriotes † Elephas ekorensis † Elephas falconeri † Elephas iolensis † Elephas planifrons † Elephas platycephalus † Elephas recki † Stegodon † Mammuthus † Elephantidae (the elephants) is a family of pachyderm, and the only remaining family in the order Proboscidea... Horton Hatches the Egg book cover. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... Look up flit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew is a 1965 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ...

Publications

Over the course of his long career, Geisel wrote over forty books; though most were published under his well-known pseudonym, Dr. Seuss, he also wrote over a dozen books as Theo. LeSieg, and one as Rosetta Stone. As one of the most popular children's authors of all time, Geisel's books have topped many bestseller lists, sold over 222 million copies, and been translated into more than 15 languages.[25] In 2000, Publishers Weekly compiled a list of the best-selling children's books of all time; of the top 100 hardcover books, 16 were written by Geisel, including Green Eggs and Ham, at number 4, The Cat in the Hat, at number 9, and One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, at number 13.[26] In various years after his death in 1991, several additional books were published based on his sketches and notes; these included Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! and Daisy-Head Mayzie. Though they were all published under the name Dr. Seuss, only My Many Colored Days, originally written in 1973, was entirely by Geisel. // This list was originally compiled in 1997, and has been updated using the sources shown. ... Green Eggs and Ham is a best-selling and critically acclaimed book by Dr. Seuss, first published in 1960. ... The Cat in the Hat is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss, featuring a tall, anthropomorphic, mischievous cat, wearing a tall, red and white striped hat. ... One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is a 1960 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! (ISBN 0679890084) is a childrens book credited to Dr. Seuss with some help by Jack Prelutsky and Lane Smith. The book is based on verses and sketches created by Seuss before his death in 1991, and was expanded to book length and completed by writer... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... My Many Colored Days (ISBN 067989344X) is a childrens book written by Dr. Seuss. ...


As Dr. Seuss

  • I Can Lick 30 Tigers Today! and Other Stories (1969)
  • My Book about ME (Illustrated by Roy McKie, 1970)
  • I Can Draw It Myself (1970)
  • Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You?: Dr. Seuss's Book of Wonderful Noises! (1970)
  • The Lorax (1971)
  • Marvin K. Mooney Will You Please Go Now! (1972)
  • Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? (1973)
  • The Shape of Me and Other Stuff (1973)
  • There's a Wocket in My Pocket! (1974)
  • Great Day for Up! (Illustrated by Quentin Blake, 1974)
  • Oh, the Thinks You Can Think! (1975)
  • The Cat's Quizzer (1976)
  • I Can Read with My Eyes Shut! (1978)
  • Oh Say Can You Say? (1979)
  • Hunches in Bunches (1982)
  • The Butter Battle Book (1984)
  • You're Only Old Once! : A Book for Obsolete Children (1986)
  • I Am NOT Going to Get Up Today! (Illustrated by James Stevenson, 1987)
  • Oh, the Places You'll Go! (1990)
  • Daisy-Head Mayzie (Posthumous, 1995)
  • My Many Colored Days (Posthumous, illustrated by Steve Johnson with Lou Fancher, 1996)
  • Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! (Posthumous, from notes, with Jack Prelutsky and Lane Smith, 1998)
  • Gerald McBoing-Boing (Posthumous, based on story and film, 2000)

AND TO THINK THAT I SAW IT ON MULBERRY STREET by Dr. Seuss. ... The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... The Seven Lady Godivas is a 1939 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... Horton Hatches the Egg book cover. ... Thidwick, the Big-hearted Moose book cover. ... Bartholomew and the Oobleck book cover. ... The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children published that year. ... If I Ran the Circus [[Category:Books by D Category: ... Horton Hears a Who! book cover Horton Hears a Who! is a 1954 story by Dr. Seuss. ... On Beyond Zebra! book cover On Beyond Zebra! is a classic illustrated childrens book by Theodore Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. ... If I Ran the Circus is a 1956 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... This article is about the Dr. Seuss book. ... The Cat in the Hat is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss, featuring a tall, anthropomorphic, mischievous cat, wearing a tall, red and white striped hat. ... The Cat in the Hat is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss, featuring a tall, anthropomorphic, mischievous cat, wearing a tall, red and white striped hat. ... Yertle the Turtle is a book written by famous childrens author Dr. Seuss. ... Green Eggs and Ham is a best-selling and critically acclaimed book by Dr. Seuss, first published in 1960. ... One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish is a 1960 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... The cover of The Sneetches and Other Stories The Sneetches and Other Stories is a collection of stories by Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel). ... Fox in Socks is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew is a 1965 childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... The Foot Book: Dr. Seusss Wacky Book of Opposites (ISBN 0394809378) is a childrens book written by Dr. Seuss and first published in 1968. ... Roy McKie was an illustrator of childrens books, most notably under the Dr. Seuss imprint. ... Cover of The Lorax This article is about the Dr. Seuss childrens story. ... book cover Marvin K. Mooney Will You Please Go Now! (ISBN 0-394-82490-3) is a childrens book by Dr. Seuss. ... Professor Quentin Saxby Blake, CBE (born December 16, 1932) is a British cartoonist and author. ... The books cover The Butter Battle Book is a rhyming story written by Dr. Seuss. ... Oh, the Places Youll Go! (ISBN 0-8335-5129-9) is the last book written and illustrated by childrens author Dr. Seuss. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... My Many Colored Days (ISBN 067989344X) is a childrens book written by Dr. Seuss. ... Hooray for Diffendoofer Day! (ISBN 0679890084) is a childrens book credited to Dr. Seuss with some help by Jack Prelutsky and Lane Smith. The book is based on verses and sketches created by Seuss before his death in 1991, and was expanded to book length and completed by writer... Jack Prelutsky (born September 8, 1940 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American poet noted for his childrens poems. ... Lane Smith (Born August 25, 1959) is an American childrens book author and illustrator. ... A scene from UPA/Columbias Gerald McBoing-Boing. ...

As Theo. LeSieg

  • Ten Apples Up on Top! (Illustrated by Roy McKie, 1961)
  • I Wish That I Had Duck Feet (Illustrated by B Tobey, 1965)
  • Come over to My House (Illustrated by Richard Erdoes, 1966)
  • The Eye Book (Illustrated by Joe Mathieu/Roy McKie, 1968)
  • I Can Write (Illustrated by Roy McKie, 1971)
  • In a People House (Illustrated by Roy McKie, 1972)
  • Wacky Wednesday (Illustrated by George Booth, 1974)
  • The Many Mice of Mr. Brice (Illustrated by Roy McKie, 1974)
  • Would You Rather Be a Bullfrog? (Illustrated by Roy McKie, 1975)
  • Hooper Humperdink...? Not Him! (Illustrated by Charles E. Martin, 1976)
  • Please Try to Remember the First of Octember! (Illustrated by Art Cummings, 1977)
  • Maybe You Should Fly a Jet! Maybe You Should Be a Vet! (Illustrated by Michael J. Smollin, 1981)
  • The Tooth Book (Illustrated by Joe Mathieu/Roy McKie, 1989)

Roy McKie was an illustrator of childrens books, most notably under the Dr. Seuss imprint. ... cover Come over to My House is a book written by Theo. ...

As Rosetta Stone

  • Because a Little Bug Went Ka-choo (Illustrated by Michael Frith, 1975)

Adaptations

Seuss Landing at Islands of Adventure in Orlando.
Seuss Landing at Islands of Adventure in Orlando.

For most of his career, Geisel was reluctant to have his characters marketed in contexts outside of his own books. However, he did allow for the creation of several animated cartoons, an art form in which he himself had gained experience during the second World War, and gradually relaxed his policy as he aged. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 2001 KB) Summary Suess Landing at Universal Studios Islands of Adventure theme park, Orlando, Florida. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1200, 2001 KB) Summary Suess Landing at Universal Studios Islands of Adventure theme park, Orlando, Florida. ... Universals Islands of Adventure is a theme park located in Orlando, Florida. ... Universals Islands of Adventure is a theme park located in Orlando, Florida. ... Orlando redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


The first adaptation of one of Geisel's works was a cartoon version of Horton Hatches the Egg, animated at Warner Brothers in 1942. Directed by Robert Clampett, it was presented as part of the Looney Tunes series, and included a number of gags not present in the original narrative, including a fish committing suicide and an affinity by Lazy Mayzie for Katharine Hepburn. Horton Hatches the Egg book cover. ... Robert Bob Clampett (May 8, 1913–May 4, 1984) was an animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes series of cartoons from Warner Bros. ... Looney Tunes opening title from mid-1950s Looney Tunes is a Warner Bros. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ...


In 1966, Geisel authorized the eminent cartoon artist Chuck Jones, his friend and former colleague from the war, to make a cartoon version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas!; Geisel was credited as a co-producer, along with Jones, under his real name, "Ted Geisel". The cartoon was very faithful to the original book, and is considered a classic by many to this day; it is often broadcast as an annual Christmas television special. In 1970, an adaptation of Horton Hears a Who! was directed by Chuck Jones for MGM. For other persons named Charles Jones, see Charles Jones (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Dr. Seuss book. ... In American television, a Christmas television special is typically a one-time, half-hour program aired during the Christmas season. ... Horton Hears a Who! book cover Horton Hears a Who! is a 1954 story by Dr. Seuss. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ...


From 1971 to 1982, Geisel wrote seven television specials, which were produced by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises and aired on CBS: The Cat in the Hat (1971), The Lorax (1972), Dr. Seuss on the Loose (1973), The Hoober-Bloob Highway (1975), Halloween is Grinch Night (1977), Pontoffel Pock, Where Are You? (1980), and The Grinch Grinches the Cat in the Hat (1982). Several of the specials were nominated for and won multiple Emmy Awards. DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (sometimes abbreviated to DFE) was a Hollywood-based animation production company, active from 1963 to 1981. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... You will note, I am neat; wiped my feet on the mat. ... Cover of The Lorax This article is about the Dr. Seuss childrens story. ... Dr. Seuss on the Loose is a 1973 animated television special, hosted by The Cat in the Hat, who appears in bridging sequences where he introduced animated adaptations of three Dr. Seuss childrens books The Sneetches, The Zax, and Green Eggs and Ham. ... Halloween is Grinch Night is a 1977 cartoon narrated by Hans Conried Staring The Grinch. ... This was a Dr. Seuss animated television special from 1980 and nominated for an Emmy[1]. It was directed by Gerard Baldwin for DePatie-Freleng Enterprises. ... The Grinch Grinches the Cat in the Hat is an animated television crossover produced by Marvel Productions in association with DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (in name only) that starred two of Dr. Seuss famed characters The Grinch and The Cat in the Hat. ... An Emmy Award. ...


A Soviet paint-on-glass-animated short film called Welcome (an adaptation of Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose) was made in 1986. The last adaptation of Geisel's works before he died was The Butter Battle Book, a television special based on the book of the same name, directed by adult animation legend Ralph Bakshi. Geisel himself called the special "the most faithful adaptation of his work."[citation needed] Soviet redirects here. ... Aleksandr Petrovs 1999 The Old Man and the Sea (Academy Award for Animated Short Film) Paint-on-glass animation is a technique for making animated films by manipulating slow-drying oil paints on sheets of glass. ... Thidwick, the Big-hearted Moose book cover. ... The books cover The Butter Battle Book is a rhyming story written by Dr. Seuss. ... Ralph Bakshi (October 29, 1938) is an American director of animated and occasionally live-action films. ...


After Geisel died of cancer at the age of 87 in 1991, his widow Audrey Geisel was placed in charge of all licensing matters. She approved a live-action feature film version of How the Grinch Stole Christmas! starring Jim Carrey, as well as a Seuss-themed Broadway musical called Seussical, and both premiered in 2000. The Grinch has had limited engagement runs on Broadway during the Christmas season, after premiering in 1998 (under the title How the Grinch Stole Christmas!) at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, where it has become a Christmas tradition. In 2003, another live-action film was released, this time an adaptation of The Cat in the Hat that featured Mike Myers as the title character. Audrey Geisel was vocal in her dislike of the film, especially the casting of Myers as the Cat in the Hat, and stated that there would be no further live-action adaptations of Geisel's books.[27] However, an animated CGI feature film adaptation of Horton Hears a Who! was approved, and was eventually released on March 14, 2008, to critical acclaim. Dr. Seuss How the Grinch Stole Christmas! is a 2000 live-action film, based on the 1957 book by Dr. Seuss. ... James Eugene Carrey (born January 17, 1962) is a two-time Golden Globe Award-winning Canadian-American A-list film actor and comedian. ... Note on spelling: While most Americans use er (as per American spelling conventions), the majority of venues, performers and trade groups for live theatre use re. ... Seussical The Musical is a musical based on the books of Dr. Seuss that debuted on Broadway in 2000. ... aundrea loves chauncey ... Dr. Seuss The Cat in the Hat is a 2003 live-action film, based on the 1957 book, produced by Universal Studios, DreamWorks Pictures, and Imagine Entertainment. ... For other persons of the same name, see Michael Myers. ... Computer-generated imagery[1] (also known as CGI) is the application of the field of computer graphics or, more specifically, 3D computer graphics to special effects in films, television programs, commercials, simulators and simulation generally, and printed media. ... Horton Hears a Who! (also known as Dr. Seusss Horton Hears a Who!) is a 2008 computer-generated imagery animated film based on the book of the same name and the fourth feature film from Blue Sky Studios. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...


Two television programs have been adapted from Geisel's work. The first, The Wubbulous World of Dr. Seuss, was a mix of live-action and puppetry by Jim Henson Television, the producers of The Muppets. It aired for one season on Nickelodeon in the USA, from 1996 to 1997. The second, Gerald McBoing-Boing, is an animated television adaptation of Geisel's 1951 cartoon of the same name.[28] Produced in Canada by Cookie Jar Entertainment, it ran from 2005 to 2007. The Wubbulous World of Dr. Seuss was a live-action/puppet television series based on characters created by Dr. Seuss, produced by Jim Henson Television, which aired for two seasons (1996–1998) on Nickelodeon. ... Jim Henson Television is the television production arm of The Jim Henson Company. ... For the slang term, see Muppet (slang). ... This article is about the TV channel. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Gerald McBoing-Boing is an animated childrens television series based on the original cartoon. ... A scene from UPA/Columbias Gerald McBoing-Boing. ... The Cookie Jar Company (formerly Cinar Inc. ...


Geisel's books and characters also feature in Seuss Landing, an "island" at the Islands of Adventure theme park in Orlando, Florida. In an attempt to match Geisel's visual style, there are reportedly "no straight lines in Seuss Landing".[29] Universals Islands of Adventure is a theme park located in Orlando, Florida. ... Universals Islands of Adventure is a theme park located in Orlando, Florida. ... Theme Park is a simulation computer game designed by Bullfrog Productions, released in 1994, in which the player designs and operates an amusement park. ... Orlando redirects here. ...


References

  1. ^ A Seuss Shocker
  2. ^ Register of Dr. Seuss Collection - MSS 0230
  3. ^ About the USA > Germans in America
  4. ^ Ancestry of Theodor Geisel
  5. ^ a b Lambiek Comiclopedia. Dr. Seuss.
  6. ^ Pronouncing German Words in English 2
  7. ^ Dr. Seuss. "Waiting for the Signal from Home",[1] PMFebruary 13 1942: p.nn.
  8. ^ UCSD Libraries: Geisel Library
  9. ^ The Political Dr. Seuss Springfield Library and Museums Association
  10. ^ On the World War II political cartoons: did Geisel come to regret some of the racism displayed in those pieces? Interview with filmmaker Ron Lamothe about The Political Dr. Seuss
  11. ^ The Butter Battle Book. - Free Online Library
  12. ^ Mensch, Betty; Alan Freeman (1987). Getting to Solla Sollew: The existentialist politics of Dr. Seuss. “In opposition to the conventional—indeed, hegemonic—iambic voice, his metric triplets offer the power of a more primal chant which quickly draws the reader in with its relentless repetition. 
  13. ^ Fensch, Thomas (ed.) (1997). Of Sneetches and Whos and the Good Dr. Seuss. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. ISBN 0786403888. OCLC 37418407. 
  14. ^ Dr. Seuss (1958). Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories. Random House. OCLC 18181636. 
  15. ^ Dr. Seuss (1949). Bartholomew and the Oobleck. Random House. OCLC 391115. 
  16. ^ UCSD. Mandeville Special Collections Library, UC San Diego.
  17. ^ Dr. Seuss. "The Isolationist",[2] PMJuly 16 1941: p.nn.
  18. ^ Dr. Seuss. "The head eats.. the rest gets milked",[3] PMMay 19 1941: p.nn.
  19. ^ Dr. Seuss. "You can't build a substantial V out of turtles!",[4] PMMarch 21 1942: p.nn.
  20. ^ CNN.com (October 17, 1999). Serious Seuss: Children's author as political cartoonist.
  21. ^ Geisel, Theodor. You can't kill an elephant with a pop gun!. L.P.C.Co.
  22. ^ Theodor Geisel. India List.
  23. ^ Theodor Geisel. Flit kills!.
  24. ^ Theodor Geisel. "Try and pull the wings off these butterflies, Benito!",[5] PMNovember 11 1942: p.nn.
  25. ^ Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P. "Seussville: Biography". Seussville.com. Accessed April 23, 2008.
  26. ^ Debbie Hochman Turvey (2001-12-17). All-Time Bestselling Children's Books. Publishers Weekly. Retrieved on 2008-04-23.
  27. ^ Associated Press (February 26, 2004). Seussentenial: 100 years of Dr. Seuss. msnbc.com. Retrieved on April 6, 2008.
  28. ^ Abby Ellin (2005-10-02). The Return of . . . Gerald McBoing Boing?. nytimes.com. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2008-04-07.
  29. ^ Universal Orlando.com. The Cat in the Hat ride. Retrieved on April 6, 2008.

is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ron Lamothe (b. ... Jefferson is a town located in Ashe County, North Carolina. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... MSNBC logo MSNBC (Microsoft & National Broadcasting Company) is a 24-hour news channel in the United States. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Theodor Seuss Geisel: The Early Works, Volume 1 (Checker Book Publishing, 2005; ISBN 1-933160-01-2), Early Works Volume 1 is the first of a series collecting various political cartoons, advertisements, and various images drawn by Geisel long before he had written any of his world-famous books.
  • Dr. Seuss From Then to Now (New York: Random House, 1987; ISBN 0-394-89268-2) is a biographical retrospective published for the exhibit of the same title at the San Diego Museum of Art
  • Dr. Seuss & Mr. Geisel,a biography by close friends Judith and Neil Morgan (1995, Random House)
  • The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss by Audrey Geisel (New York: Random House, 1995; ISBN 0-679-43448-8) contains many full-color reproductions of Geisel's private, previously unpublished artwork.
  • Dr. Seuss Goes to War: The World War II Editorial Cartoons of Theodor Seuss Geisel, a selection with commentary by Richard Minnear (New Press, 2001; ISBN 1-56584-704-0).
  • Oh, the Places He Went, a story about Dr. Seuss by Maryann Weidt (Carolrhoda Books, 1995; ISBN 0-87614-627-2)
  • The Seuss, the Whole Seuss and Nothing But the Seuss: A Visual Biography of Theodor Seuss Geisel by Charles Cohen (Random House Books for Young Readers, 2004; ISBN 0-375-82248-8).
  • Dr. Seuss: American Icon by Philip Nel (Continuum Publishing, 2004; ISBN 0-8264-1434-6)
  • The Annotated Cat: Under the Hats of Seuss and His Cats by Philip Nel (Random House, 2007; ISBN 978-0-375-83369-4)
  • The Tough Coughs as he Ploughs the Dough: Early Writings and Cartoons by Dr. Seuss, edited and with an introduction by Richard Marschall (also includes autobiographical material); ISBN 0-688-06548-1
  • The Boy on Fairfield Street by Kathleen Krull. It tells about the childhood of Dr. Seuss and shows the sources of many of his inspirations.

The San Diego Museum of Art opened as the Museum of Fine Arts on February 28, 1926. ... The cover for The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss (ISBN 0679434488) is a collection of visual art created by Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
This article has been illustrated as part of WikiProject WikiWorld.

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (516x612, 87 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dr. Seuss User:Greg Williams User:EReference/ Dr. Seuss ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (516x612, 87 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dr. Seuss User:Greg Williams User:EReference/ Dr. Seuss ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (516x612, 87 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dr. Seuss User:Greg Williams User:EReference/ Dr. Seuss ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ...


 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m