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Encyclopedia > Downfall of Númenor

Akallabêth is the fourth part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. It is relatively short, consisting of about thirty pages. This is a work of fiction. The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher, with the assistance of fantasy fiction writer Guy Gavriel Kay. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... The Three Graces, here in a painting by Sandro Botticelli, were the goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility in Greek mythology. ...

Contents

Synopsis

Akallabêth (The Downfallen in Adûnaic; Quenya is Atalantë) is the story of the destruction of the Kingdom of Númenor. At the end of the First Age (described in detail in the Quenta Silmarillion), those of Men who had been helping Elves in their fight against Melkor were given a new small continent of their own, free from the evil and sadness of Middle-earth. It was located in the middle of the Great Ocean, between the western shores of Middle-earth, and the eastern shores of Aman, where the Valar dwelt. In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Adûnaic (language of the west) was the language of the men of Númenor during the Second Age. ... Quenya is one of the languages spoken by the Elves in J. R. R. Tolkiens work. ... Númenor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth and is intended to be his version of Atlantis. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the First Age began with the rise of the Sun and the arrival of the Ñoldor in the land Beleriand in Middle-earth, and ended with the overthrow of Morgoth. ... Quenta Silmarillion is the third part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The race of Men in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth books, such as The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, refers to humanity and does not denote gender. ... The Elves (always pluralized as such, never Elfs) are one of the races that appear in the work of J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Morgoth Bauglir (Morgoth means The Dark Enemy, Bauglir is The Constrainer), originally named Melkor (He Who Arises in Might), is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Dymaxion map by Buckminster Fuller shows land mass with minimal distortion as only one continuous continent A continent (Latin continere, to hold together) is a large continuous mass of land on the planet Earth. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... AMAN (A.M.A.N.) is a television comedy series aired by ANT1 in Greece. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, the Valar are the Powers of Arda who live on the Western continent of Aman. ...


As they entered Númenor, the Men were forbidden to set sail towards Aman. They gladly agreed to this, because they regarded mortality as a gift, and did not envy the Valar and Elves who could not die. For two and a half thousand years Númenor grew in might. Númenórian ships sailed the seas and established remote colonies, some of them in Middle-earth. During that time, the Elves of Middle-earth were engaged in a bitter fight with Morgoth's former servant Sauron, who had turned into a Dark Lord himself. The Elves asked for the help of the Númenórians, and they agreed. But as time went on, it became evil and rebelled against the Valar and the Elves, over the course of one thousand and a half years, desiring immortality. There was one king, the second-last, who tried to amend the evil, but it was too late. During this time, Númenor still grew more powerful. A ship is a large, usually decked watercraft. ... Morgoth Bauglir (Morgoth means The Dark Enemy, Bauglir is The Constrainer), originally named Melkor (He Who Arises in Might), is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... The main part of this article relates to the last versions of Middle-earths history, and as such may controvert parts of The Silmarillion. ... Dark Lord (also known as an Evil Overlord) is a name often used in fiction to talk about a villain with evil henchmen, especially when the real name is thought to bring bad luck. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe, Middle-earth, the Valar are the Powers of Arda who live on the Western continent of Aman. ...


The last king wanted control of Middle-Earth, and so he attacked Sauron. Sauron's armies became afraid of the might of Númenor, and so he was captured and brought imprisoned to the Númenórian king. However Sauron exploited his power to corrupt the Númenorian king to his will. Soon he became his advisor, and much of Númenor obeyed his will and worshiped Morgoth. Sauron convinced the king to try and assail Aman for immortality, desiring to destroy Númenor with the wrath of the Valar. However as this was done, the Valar appealed to Eru Ilúvatar. Eru destroyed the Númenórian host, by crushing it under stones; however he also caused the whole of Númenor to sink under the Great Ocean. Just a few men of Númenórian royal blood, uncorrupted by Sauron who came from a long line called the Faithful, had fled Númenor by ships earlier with some gifts that Men received from the Valar and the Elves in times of peace. They were led by Elendil the Tall, and his two sons: Isildur and Anárion. The main part of this article relates to the last versions of Middle-earths history, and as such may controvert parts of The Silmarillion. ... Morgoth Bauglir (Morgoth means The Dark Enemy, Bauglir is The Constrainer), originally named Melkor (He Who Arises in Might), is a fictional character of Middle-earth, created by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Eru (the One), also called Ilúvatar (the Father of All), is the name in the legendarium of J.R.R. Tolkien for the supreme God, the creator of the angels (Ainur) and the universe (Eä). ... In Middle-earth, the fantasy universe of J. R. R. Tolkien, Elendil was a heroic figure. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy universe of Middle-earth, Isildur was a Dúnadan of Númenor, elder son of Elendil. ... Anárion is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, born S.A. 3219 and slain S.A. 3440 (lived 221 years). ...


They set sail to Middle-earth, where the followers of Elendil established two kingdoms which were managed as Númenórian provinces: Gondor in the south, and Arnor in the North. Some of the King's Men, enemies of Elendil, established other realms in exile to the south; of these Umbar was the chief. The culture of Númenor became the dominant culture of Middle-earth (thus, Westron, a descendant of the Adûnaic language of Númenor became the lingua franca). The sadness and the shock from the loss of a whole continent lived ever in the hearts of kings of Númenórian descent. Arda was made spherical, and Aman was put beyond it, out of the reach of mortal men. Sauron, although greatly diminished and bereft of shape, escaped Númenor and return to Middle-earth once more. Gondor is a fictional location from J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth. ... In the fiction of J.R.R. Tolkien, Arnor, or the Northern Kingdom, was a kingdom of the Dúnedain in the land of Eriador in Middle-earth. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens universe of Middle-earth, a great haven to the far south of Gondor. ... In J. R. R. Tolkiens fantasy world of Middle-earth, the Westron or Common Speech is the closest thing to a universal language, at least at the time during which The Lord of the Rings is set. ... In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, Adûnaic (language of the west) was the language of the men of Númenor during the Second Age. ... Lingua franca, literally Frankish language in Italian, was originally a mixed language consisting largely of Italian plus a vocabulary drawn from Turkish, Persian, French, Greek and Arabic and used for communication throughout the Middle East. ... A map of Arda before the end of the First Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda In the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, Arda is the world in which all of the events occur, including the continents of Middle-earth and Aman. ...


Textual history

The story originated with The Lost Road, an abandoned time-travel novel. It was later adapted into back-story for The Lord of the Rings. The Lost Road and Other Writings is the fifth volume of The History of Middle-earth, a series of compilations of drafts and essays written by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... In narratology, a back-story (also back story or backstory) is the history behind the situation extant at the start of the main story. ... Dust jacket of the 1968 UK edition The one ring of power The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy story by J. R. R. Tolkien, a sequel to his earlier work, The Hobbit. ...


Interpretation

As the Quenya name makes obvious, this is a retelling of the story of Atlantis in the Middle-Earth cadre. An artistic rendition of an imaginary Atlantis Atlantis was a legendary ancient culture and island, whose existence and location have never been confirmed. ...


External links


J. R. R. Tolkien's - The Silmarillion

Ainulindalë | Valaquenta | Quenta Silmarillion | Akallabêth | Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... The Silmarillion is a collection of J. R. R. Tolkiens works, edited and published posthumously by his son Christopher, with the assistance of fantasy fiction writer Guy Gavriel Kay. ... The Ainulindalë is the title of the first part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Valaquenta is the second part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Quenta Silmarillion is the third part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ... Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age is the fifth and last part of The Silmarillion by J. R. R. Tolkien. ...

The History of Middle-earth
(earlier versions of the story of The Silmarillion) The History of Middle-earth is a 12-volume series of books that collect and analyse material relating to the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, compiled and edited by his son, Christopher Tolkien. ...


 
 

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