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Encyclopedia > Dover, New Hampshire
City of Dover
Central Square in c. 1905

Seal
Nickname: The Garrison City
Location within New Hampshire
Coordinates: 43°11′41″N 70°52′30″W / 43.19472, -70.875
Country United States
State New Hampshire
County Strafford
Settled 1623
Incorporated 1623 (town)
Incorporated 1855 (city)
Government
 - City Manager Mike Joyal
 - Mayor Scott Myers
 - City Council Robert Keays
David Scott
Catherine Cheney
Dennis Ciotti
Douglas DeDe
Dean Trefethen
Harvey Turner
Area
 - City  29.0 sq mi (75.2 km²)
 - Land  26.7 sq mi (69.2 km²)
 - Water  2.3 sq mi (6.1 km²)
Elevation  50 ft (15 m)
Population (2003)
 - City 28,216
 - Density 1,006.2/sq mi (388.5/km²)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 - Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website: www.ci.dover.nh.us

Dover is a small city in Strafford County, New Hampshire, in the United States of America. The population was 26,884 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Strafford County. Dover is home to McIntosh College. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... In political geography and international politics, a country is a political division of a geographical entity, a sovereign territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation and government. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... List of New Hampshire counties: New Hampshire counties Belknap County: formed in 1840 from parts of Merrimack County and Strafford County. ... Strafford County is a county located in the state of New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... A Municipal Corporation is a legal defintion for a local governing body, including (but not necessarily limited to) cities, counties, and towns. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The council-manager government is one of 2 main variations of representative municipal government (for contrast, also see Mayor-Council government). ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare orders of magnitude of different geographical regions, we list here areas between 1,000 km² and 10,000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... The metre (American English:meter) is a measure of length. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Metronome, a public art installation showing the time in New York City The Eastern Time Zone (ET) of the Western Hemisphere falls mostly along the east coast of Northern America and the west coast of South America. ... -12 | -11 | -10 | -9:30 | -9 | -8 | -7 | -6 | -5 | -4 | -3:30 | -3 | -2:30 | -2 | -1 | -0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Though DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Eastern Daylight Time or EDT is equal to: In North America, Eastern Standard Time + 1, or UTC − 4 hours. ... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Strafford County is a county located in the state of New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... A county seat is a term for an administrative center for a county, primarily used in the United States. ... McIntosh College is a college in Dover, New Hampshire. ...

Contents

History

According to historian Jeremy Belknap, the area was called Wecohamet by native Abenaki Indians. The first known European to explore the region was Martin Pring from Bristol, England in 1603. Settled in 1623 as Hilton's Point by brothers William and Edward Hilton, Dover is the oldest permanent settlement in New Hampshire, and the seventh oldest in the United States. It is one of the colony's three original townships, and once included Durham, Madbury, Newington and Lee. It also included Somersworth and Rollinsford, together which Indians called Newichawannock after the Newichawannock River, now Salmon Falls River. A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... Jeremy Belknap (June 4, 1744 – June 20, 1798), was an American clergyman and historian. ... The Abenaki (also Wabanuok or Wabanaki) are a tribe of Native Americans/First Nations belonging to the Algonquian peoples of northeastern North America. ... A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ... Abenaki couple Martin Pring (1580-1646) was an English explorer from Bristol, England. ... This article is about the English city of Bristol. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1623 (MDCXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Old mill and dam on the Oyster River, 1908, Durham, NH Durham is a town located in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. As of the 2000 census, the town had a total population of 12,664. ... Seal of Madbury, NH Madbury is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 1,509 at the 2000 census. ... Newington is a town located in Rockingham County, New Hampshire. ... Lee is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 4,145 at the 2000 census. ... Somersworth is a city located in Strafford County, New Hampshire. ... Rollinsford is a town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, USA. The population was 2,648 at the 2000 census. ... The Salmon Falls River is a tributary of the Piscataqua River, in the U.S. states of Maine and New Hampshire. ...


The Hiltons' name survives today at Hilton Park on Dover Point, located where they landed near the confluence of the Cochecho and Bellamy rivers with the Piscataqua. They had been sent from London by The Company of Laconia, which intended to establish a colony and fishery around the Piscataqua. In 1631, however, it contained only three houses. Dam on the Cochecho River, Dover, NH The Cochecho River is a tributary of the Piscataqua River, 30 miles (48 kilometres) long, in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Bellamy River, Dover, NH The Bellamy River, in Strafford County, southeastern New Hampshire, is a tributary of the Piscataqua River about 15 miles (24 kilometres) long. ... The Piscataqua River seen from downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire The Piscataqua River, in the northeastern United States, is a 12 mi (19 km) long tidal estuary formed by the confluence of the Salmon Falls and Cocheco rivers. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A lobster boat unloading its catch in Ilfracombe harbour, North Devon, England. ... // Events February 5 - Roger Williams emigrates to Boston. ...


In 1633, the Plantation of Cochecho was bought by a group of English Puritans who planned to settle in New England, including Viscount Saye and Sele, Baron Brooke and John Pym. They promoted colonization in America, and that year Hilton's Point would receive an infusion of pioneers, many from Bristol. It would also receive another name. While Captain Thomas Wiggin was agent for the proprietors, granting small lots to keep the settlement compact, it was called Bristol. Atop the nearby hill, the settlers built a meetinghouse, surrounded by an entrenchment. To the east of it, they built a jail. Events February 13 - Galileo Galilei arrives in Rome for his trial before the Inquisition. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... William Fiennes, 1st Viscount Saye and Sele (May 28, 1582–April 14, 1662), was the only son of Richard Fiennes, 7th Baron Saye and Sele, and was descended from James Fiennes, Lord Saye and Sele, who was lord chamberlain and lord treasurer under Henry VI and was beheaded by the... Robert Greville, 2nd Baron Brooke (1608–1643) English Civil War Roundhead General. ... John Pym (1584 – December 8, 1643) was an English parliamentarian, leader of the Long Parliament and a prominent critic of James I and then Charles I. Pym was born in Brymore, Somerset, into minor nobility. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ... Captain Thomas Wiggin (1592-1667), often known as Governor Thomas Wiggin, was one of the first governors of the province of New Hampshire. ... -1...


The town would be called Dover in 1637 by the new governor, Reverend George Burdett. With the arrival of Thomas Larkham in 1639, it would be renamed Northam, after Northam, England, where he had been preacher. But Lord Saye and Sele's group lost interest in their settlements, both here and at Saybrook, Connecticut, when their intention to establish a hereditary aristocracy in the colonies met with disfavor in New England. Consequently, in 1641, the plantation was sold to Massachusetts and again named Dover, in honor of Robert Dover, an English lawyer who resisted Puritanism. Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Preacher is a term the for someone who preaches sermons or gives homilies. ... Old Saybrook is a town located in Middlesex County, Connecticut. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is held by a small number of individuals from an elite or from noble families. ... Events The Long Parliament passes a series of legislation designed to contain Charles Is absolutist tendencies. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Robert Dover - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A lawyer, according to Blacks Law Dictionary, is a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ...


Settlers felled the abundant trees to build log-houses called garrisons. The town's population and business center would shift from Dover Point to Cochecho at the falls, where the river's drop of 34 feet provided water power for industry. Indeed, Cochecho means "the rapid foaming water." Major Richard Waldron settled here and built a sawmill and gristmill. On September 7, 1676, Waldron invited about 400 Indians to participate in a mock battle against the militia. It was a trick; instead, he took them prisoner. He would free about 200 of them, but sent the remainder, which he considered in some regard a threat, to Boston, where 7 or 8 were executed. The rest were sold into slavery in "foreign parts." Richard Waldron would be appointed Chief Justice for New Hampshire in 1683. For people named Garrison, see Garrison (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of fall, see fall (disambiguation) The word falling describes movement due to gravity. ... Hydropower (or waterpower) harnesses the energy of moving or falling water. ... A sawmill is a facility where logs are cut into boards. ... Gristmill with water wheel, Skyline Drive, VA, 1938 A gristmill is a building where grain is ground into flour. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 29 - Feodor III becomes Tsar of Russia First measurement of the speed of light, by Ole Rømer Bacons Rebellion Russo-Turkish Wars commence. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia A Militia is an organization of citizens to provide defense, emergency or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... Slave redirects here. ... The Chief Justice in many countries is the name for the presiding member of a Supreme Court in Commonwealth- or other countries with an Anglosaxon type of justice, such as the Supreme Court of the United States, the Supreme Court of Canada, the Supreme Court of New Zealand, the Supreme... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ...


Thirteen years passed, and it was assumed that the incident had been forgotten. But then squaws began dropping ambiguous hints that something was astir. When citizens spoke their concern to Waldron, he told them to "go and plant your pumpkins, and he would take care of the Indians." On June 27, 1689, two squaws appeared at each of 5 garrison houses, asking permission to sleep by the fire. All but one house accepted. In the dark early hours of the next day, the squaws unfastened the doors, and in rushed braves that had concealed themselves about the town. Waldron resisted but was stunned with a hatchet, then placed on his table. After dining, the Indians cut him across the belly with knives, each saying "I cross out my account." Major Waldron was slain with his own sword. Five or six dwelling houses were burned, along with the mills. Fifty-two colonists, a full quarter of the entire population, were captured or slain in the Cochecho Massacre of June 28, 1689. The perpetrators were never caught. Squaw (from Pidgin Massachusett (a Pidginized version of a language belonging to the Algonquian family) squa, meaning young woman) is an English loan-word whose present meaning is (an) American Indian woman, regardless of tribe, and often with a derisive connotation. ... Pumpkins A pumpkin is a gourd (Cucurbitaceae), most commonly orange in colour when ripe, that grows from a trailing vine. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... An independent origin and development of writing is counted among the many achievements and innovations of pre-Columbian American cultures. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ...

Cochecho Falls in c. 1910

Located at the head of navigation, the falls of the Cochecho River helped bring the Industrial Revolution to 19th century Dover in a big way. The Dover Cotton Factory was incorporated in 1812, then enlarged in 1823 to become the Dover Manufacturing Company. In 1827, the Cocheco Manufacturing Company was founded (the misspelling a clerical error at incorporation), and in 1829 purchased the Dover Manufacturing Company. Expansive brick mill buildings, linked by railroad, were constructed downtown. Incorporated as a city in 1855, Dover was for a time a national leader in textiles. The mills were purchased in 1909 by the Pacific Mills of Lawrence, Massachusetts, which closed the printery in 1913 but continued spinning and weaving. During the Great Depression, however, textile mills no longer dependent on New England water power began moving to southern states in search of cheaper operating conditions, or simply went out of business. Dover's millyard shut down in 1937, and was bought at auction in 1940 by the city itself for $54,000. There were no other bids. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Table of geography, hydrography, and navigation, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... The Industrial Revolution was a major shift of technological, socioeconomic, and cultural conditions that occurred in the late 18th century and early 19th century in some Western countries. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the type of fabric. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A hand-turned spinning wheel in action Cones of yarn for industrial use Spinning is the process of creating yarn (or thread, rope, cable) from various raw fiber materials. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn made of fiber called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ... The Great Depression was the result of the economic downturn that started with the Stock Market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ... The U.S. Southern states or The South, known during the American Civil War era as Dixie, is a distinctive region of the United States with its own unique historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Now the old mills have become fashionable, and redeveloped into waterfront offices, restaurants and other modern uses. As part of the mill town's commercial and cultural rebirth, the Cochecho River is scheduled to be dredged, which will allow increased boat traffic between the falls and Piscataqua River. Walking trails will line the water's edge. Another walking trail will be created from the rail bed of the defunct Portsmouth & Dover Railroad, established in 1866. The city currently schedules community events and entertainments, some staged in the new Rotary Arts Pavilion, a band shell at Henry Law Park. Amoskeag Canal, 1948, by Charles Sheeler A mill town is a community that grew up around one or more mills or factories, usually on a river that was used as a source of power in the days before electricity. ... Rebirth may refer the following spiritual/religious concepts: Reincarnation Buddhist Rebirth The experience of being born again in Christianity Rebirth may also refer to: Rebirth, an album by Pain Rebirth, an album by Jennifer Lopez Rebirth, an album by Gackt Rebirth, an album by Angra ReBirth RB-338, software synthesizer... // For other uses, see Dredge (disambiguation). ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...

Notable inhabitants

Jeremy Belknap (June 4, 1744 – June 20, 1798), was an American clergyman and historian. ... Lisa Crystal Carvers (AKA Lisa Suckdog) writing in Rollerderby, made her one of the most well known writers of the zine boom in the early 90s, along with scribes like Pagan Kennedy. ... John Parker Hale (March 31, 1806 - November 19, 1873) was an American politician. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Tommy Makem (November 4, 1932 – August 1, 2007) was an internationally celebrated folk musician, artist, poet and storyteller from Ireland, most known as a member of The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem. ... Hercules Mooney (1715-1800) was born in Ireland to a family a family of Irish Protestants. ... Combatants United States France Spanish Empire Dutch Republic Oneida Tuscarora Polish volunteers Quebec volunteers Prussian volunteers Kingdom of Great Britain Iroquois Confederacy Hessian mercenaries Loyalists Commanders George Washington Nathanael Greene Gilbert de La Fayette Comte de Rochambeau Bernardo de Gálvez Tadeusz KoÅ›ciuszko Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben King George... Andrea Christine Ross (born April 8, 1991) is an American singer and actress. ... Jennifer Thompson (born February 26, 1973), a swimmer, is one of the most decorated Olympians in history, winning twelve medals, including eight golds, while representing the United States of America in the 1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004 Summer Olympics. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Lawrence Delano Dike Varney (August 9, 1880 - April 23, 1950) was a Major League Baseball pitcher during part of the 1902 season. ... The Cleveland Indians are a Major League Baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. ...

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 75.2 km² (29.0 mi²). 69.2 km² (26.7 mi²) of it is land and 6.1 km² (2.3 mi²) of it is water, comprising 8.06% of the town. Dover is drained by the Cochecho and Bellamy rivers. Long Hill, elevation 300 feet (91 meters) above sea level and located 3 miles northwest of the city center, is the highest point in Dover. Garrison Hill, elevation 284 feet (86.5 meters), is a prominent hill rising directly above the center city, with a park and lookout tower on top. Dover lies fully within the Piscataqua River (Coastal) watershed.[1] The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census as defined in Title ) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Dam on the Cochecho River, Dover, NH The Cochecho River is a tributary of the Piscataqua River, 30 miles (48 kilometres) long, in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Bellamy River, Dover, NH The Bellamy River, in Strafford County, southeastern New Hampshire, is a tributary of the Piscataqua River about 15 miles (24 kilometres) long. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ... For considerations of sea level change, in particular rise associated with possible global warming, see sea level rise. ... The Piscataqua River seen from downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire The Piscataqua River, in the northeastern United States, is a 12 mi (19 km) long tidal estuary formed by the confluence of the Salmon Falls and Cocheco rivers. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Demographics

Brick Schoolhouse in c. 1910

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 26,884 people, 11,573 households, and 6,492 families residing in the city. The population density was 388.5/km² (1,006.2/mi²). There were 11,924 housing units at an average density of 172.3/km² (446.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.47% White, 1.12% African American, 0.20% Native American, 2.36% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 1.45% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.14% of the population. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... 1870 US Census for New York City A census is the process of obtaining information about every member of a population (not necessarily a human population). ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... It has been suggested that Ethnicity (United States Census) be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ...


There were 11,573 households out of which 26.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.5% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.9% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.87. For the record label, see Marriage Records. ...

Whitcher's Falls in c. 1910

In the city the population was spread out with 20.8% under the age of 18, 11.2% from 18 to 24, 34.0% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


The median income for a household in the city was $43,873, and the median income for a family was $57,050. Males had a median income of $37,876 versus $27,329 for females. The per capita income for the city was $23,459. About 4.8% of families and 8.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.4% of those under age 18 and 5.7% of those age 65 or over. The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...


Education

The Dover School District consists of approximately 3600 pupils, attending Horne Street Elementary, Garrison Elementary, Woodman Park Elementary, Dover Middle School and Dover High School, as of 2005. Dover High's athletic teams are known as The Green Wave, and the middle school's teams are The Little Green.


Saint Mary Academy, a Catholic school, has been in downtown Dover since 1912, currently serving 400 students from pre-kindergarten to 8th grade.


Sites of interest

The Woodman Institute

Woodman Institute in c. 1920

Dover features the Woodman Institute, a museum created in 1915 with a bequest of $100,000 from philanthropist Annie Woodman to encourage her city's education in history, science and the arts. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... The title page to The Historians History of the World. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ...


The museum's campus now includes three brick houses of Federal style architecture, one of which is the former home of noted abolitionist, Senator John P. Hale. Inside are exhibits of local history and natural history (encompassing the largest American rock and mineral collection north of Boston), in addition to art and antiques. One famous item is the saddle in which President Abraham Lincoln rode to review troops shortly before his assassination. A generous collection of artifacts showcases the nation's past, with a special emphasis on Dover's history. Federal style architecture occurred in the United States between 1780 and 1830, particularly from 1785 to 1815. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... The title page to The Historians History of the World. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926). ... For the province in the Philippines, see Antique (province) and for the band, see Antique (duo). ... A saddle is a seat for a rider fastened to an animals back. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Selective assassination be merged into this article or section. ... In archaeology, an artifact or artefact is any object made or modified by a human culture, and often one later recovered by some archaeological endeavor. ...


Visitors can see the set of Samurai armor a Japanese delegate to the 1905 Portsmouth Peace Conference (Treaty of Portsmouth) gave to a waiter at the Wentworth Hotel, examples of Dover's textile output, relics from every war the United States has fought, an old 13 star American flag, a 10 foot stuffed polar bear from the Arctic, an old piano made with genuine ivory keys, and an impressive collection of stuffed birds, fish and mammals. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Armor or armour (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Russian and Japanese delegates around the negotiating table at the Portsmouth Navy Yard St The Treaty of Portsmouth formally ended the 1904-1905 Russo-Japanese War. ... Binomial name Phipps, 1774 Polar bear range Synonyms Ursus eogroenlandicus Ursus groenlandicus Ursus jenaensis Ursus labradorensis Ursus marinus Ursus polaris Ursus spitzbergensis Ursus ungavensis Thalarctos maritimus The polar bear (Ursus maritimus), a bear native to the Arctic, is the apex predator within its range. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... A short grand piano, with the top up. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


On the museum's grounds is the 1675 William Damm Garrison, the oldest intact garrison in the state, as well as the oldest house in Dover. It survived the Cochecho Massacre, and was later moved across town for preservation under a permanent shelter. Also within the shelter, visitors may see a Napoleon brass cannon used in the Civil War, one of only seven left in existence. For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Brass (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Canon. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


See also

Other information Code DOV Traffic Passengers (2006) 39,080 36% Dover is a train station in Dover, New Hampshire served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system. ...

References

  1. ^ Foster, Debra H.; Batorfalvy, Tatianna N.; and Medalie, Laura (1995). Water Use in New Hampshire: An Activities Guide for Teachers. U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Geological Survey. 

External links

  • Maps and aerial photos for 43°11′28″N 70°52′43″W / 43.190984, -70.878533Coordinates: 43°11′28″N 70°52′43″W / 43.190984, -70.878533

  Results from FactBites:
 
Dover: Weather and Much More from Answers.com (1842 words)
Settled in 1623 as "Hilton's Point" by brothers William and Edward Hilton, Dover is the oldest permanent settlement in New Hampshire, and the seventh oldest in the United States.
Dover is drained by the Cochecho and Bellamy rivers.
Dover features the Woodman Institute, a museum created in 1915 with a bequest of $100,000 from philanthropist Annie Woodman to encourage her city's education in history, science and the arts.
Dover, New Hampshire, NH, real estate (963 words)
Dover New Hampshire, is nestled between the mountains and the ocean, Dover is also close to the University of New Hampshire, Pease International Tradeport and harbors a local airport.
Climate: New Hampshire’s weather is as varied as its terrain, boasting the beauty of four very different seasons.
Government: New Hampshire’s state capitol is Concord, situated along the Merrimack River in the south central region of the state.
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