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Encyclopedia > Dover
Dover


Aerial view of Dover harbour Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2440x1469, 1124 KB) Samenvatting Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Dover ...


Dover shown within Kent
Population 1(town)
(2001 census)
OS grid reference TR315415
District Dover
Shire county Kent
Region South East
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town DOVER
Postcode district CT15, CT16, CT17
Dial code 01304
Police Kent
Fire Kent
Ambulance South East Coast
UK Parliament Dover
European Parliament South East England
List of places: UKEnglandKent

Coordinates: 51°07′46″N 1°18′32″E / 51.1295, 1.3089 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 565 pixelsFull resolution (856 × 605 pixel, file size: 219 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Dover is a local government district in Kent, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia[1], the Soviet Union and European institutions such as the Council of... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The CT postcode area, also known as the Canterbury postcode area[1], is a group of postal districts around Birchington, Broadstairs, Canterbury, Deal, Dover, Folkestone, Herne Bay, Hythe, Margate, Ramsgate, Sandwich, Westgate-on-Sea and Whitstable in England. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Kent Police is the police force covering Kent in England, including the unitary authority of Medway. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Kent Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the county of Kent covering a geographical area south of London, to the coast and including major shipping routes via the Thames and Medway rivers. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... As of 1st July the NHS Ambulance Services Trusts of Kent, Surrey and Sussex are being joined together to form a new South East Coast Ambulance Service . ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Dover is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... South East England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the ceremonial county of Kent, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Dover is a major channel port in the English county of Kent. At the 2001 census, the town of Dover proper had a population of 28,156 inhabitants, while the population of the whole urban area of Dover, as calculated by the Office for National Statistics, was 39,078 inhabitants.[1] The town is the administrative centre of the Dover district. Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: , the sleeve) is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Office for National Statistics logo The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is the United Kingdom government executive agency charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the United Kingdom at national and local levels. ... Dover is a local government district in Kent, England. ...


Dover is famous for its white cliffs, which are made of chalk. The cliffs gave Britain its nickname of Albion, meaning "white". The town's name derives from the Brythonic Dubrās ("the waters"), via its Latinized form of Dubris. The white cliffs of Dover The location and extent of the white cliffs of Dover. ... The Needles,situated on the Isle Of Wight, are part of the extensive Southern England Chalk Formation. ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ... The white cliffs of Dover. ... Brythonic is one of two major divisions of Insular Celtic languages (the other being Goidelic). ... Roman Dover Dubris or Portus Dubris, Roman name for Roman-founded town of Dover, Kent, England. ...


Its closeness to continental Europe – it is only 34 kilometres (21 miles) from the French port of Calais – makes Dover one of the United Kingdom's busiest cross-Channel ports, with 18 million passengers passing through each year. Regular ferry services operate from Dover to Calais and Dunkerque. A regular catamaran service to Boulogne recommenced in May 2004. Catamaran services provided by Hoverspeed to Ostend were withdrawn in 2003, and to Calais on 7 November 2005. Hoverspeed had previously operated hovercraft services to and from Calais and Boulogne for many years. World map showing the location of Europe. ... Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel (French: , the sleeve) is an arm of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France and joins the North Sea to the Atlantic. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, ca. ... Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Location within France Dunkirk ( French: Dunkerque; Dutch: Duinkerke) is a harbour city and a commune in the northernmost part of France, in the département of Nord, 10 km from the Belgian border. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... Boulogne-sur-Mer is a city and commune in northern France, in the Pas-de-Calais département of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... // Hoverspeed, formed in 1981 by the merger of Seaspeed and Hoverlloyd, was a ferry company that operated on the English Channel from 1981 until 2005. ... The esplanade with the Thermae Palace, the former Royal Residence and the casino For other uses, see Ostend (disambiguation). ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Hovercraft, or Air-Cushion Vehicle (ACV), is an amphibious vehicle or craft, designed to travel over any sufficiently smooth surface - land or water - supported by a cushion of slowly moving, low-pressure air, ejected downwards against the surface close below it. ...


Dover is represented in Parliament by the Labour MP Gwyn Prosser. The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Gwynfor Matthew Prosser (born 27 April 1943, Swansea) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ...


Since 1836 the town of Dover (originally being the two parishes of Dover St. Mary's and Dover St. James) has incorporated the ancient villages and parishes of Buckland and Charlton. These are now suburbs of the town.


Most of the western half of the town is in Hougham parish and a small part of the eastern section and Dover Castle are in Guston parish Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ...


Maxton was once a hamlet of Hougham parish to the west of Dover, and the terminus of the tramway system serving the town until its closure in 1936. It is now a suburb of the town. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Contents

History

As the closest point in Britain to France, Dover has been strategically important, vulnerable to invasion and an important port for millennia. Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ...


Bronze Age

Main article: Bronze Age#Bronze Age boats

In 1992, a waterlogged boat was discovered in a depth of 6 m that dates to the Bronze Age and is one of the oldest seagoing vessels ever recovered. It has been dated by the radiocarbon method to ca. 1550 BC. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Radiocarbon dating is a radiometric dating method that uses the naturally occurring isotope carbon-14 (14C) to determine the age of carbonaceous materials up to about 60,000 years[1]. Raw, i. ...


The Langdon Bay hoard, discovered in 1974 off the Dover coast, contains bronze axes of a French type and may represent the cargo of a sunken vessel, thus demonstrating cross-channel trade already for the Bronze Age, if not earlier. Both this hoard and the boat are on display in a new purpose-built gallery of the Dover Museum in Market Square. For the software, see hoard memory allocator. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dover Museum is a museum in Dover, Kent, in south-east England. ...


Roman

Main article: Dubris

In Roman times it became an important fortified port, named Portus Dubris. Dover was the starting point of the Watling Street Roman road, and was an important harbour of the Classis Britannica. Roman Dover Dubris or Portus Dubris, Roman name for Roman-founded town of Dover, Kent, England. ... Motto Senatus Populusque Romanus (SPQR) The Roman Empire at its greatest extent. ... Building the fort - a tableau at Dover Museum. ... The modern Watling Street crossing the Medway at Rochester near the Roman and Celt crossings Watling Street is the name given to an ancient trackway in England and Wales that was first used by the Celts mainly between the modern cities of Canterbury and St Albans. ... Roman trireme, a warship, 31 BC. Note the bank of oars (two on the hidden side), the square-rigged sails, the steering oars, the tower on deck, the ram at the prow, the ballistae and the Greek fire. ...


In around AD 50 the Romans built two lighthouses, one on either side of the then-river-estuary (now silted-up, one on the Western Heights whose few remains are now within the Drop Redoubt, and the other which still stands to its full height in the grounds of Dover Castle, making it one of the oldest buildings in Britain. The "Painted House" is a Roman mansio from about AD 200 and one of the best preserved Roman houses in Britain. On the same site and nearby there is also a Classis Britannica fort and the Saxon Shore Fort which was built over them both. This article is about the year 50. ... Rio de la Plata estuary Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Estuaries An estuary is a semi-enclosed coastal body of water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea. ... Silt is soil or rock derived granular material of a specific grain size. ... First given earthworks during the American Civil War, the high ground west of Dover, now called Dover Western Heights, was properly fortified in 1804 when Lieutenant-Colonel William Twiss built the Citadel at the western end, North Centre Bastion to the north, and Drop Redoubt overlooking the town, with the... Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ... Roman Dover Dubris or Portus Dubris, Roman name for Roman-founded town of Dover, Kent, England. ... In the Roman Empire, a mansio (from the Latin word mansus the perfect passive participle of manere to remain or to stay) was an official stopping place on a Roman road, or via, maintained by the central government for the use of officials and those on official business whilst travelling. ... For other uses, see number 200. ... Roman trireme, a warship, 31 BC. Note the bank of oars (two on the hidden side), the square-rigged sails, the steering oars, the tower on deck, the ram at the prow, the ballistae and the Greek fire. ... The Saxon Shore is the collective name given to a series of fortifications built along the south-east coast of what is now England, during the latter years of the Roman occupation of Britain. ...


Anglo-Saxon and Norman, to 1200

Dover seafront, with the castle overlooking the beach.
Dover seafront, with the castle overlooking the beach.
The English Channel as seen from Dover Castle.

After the Battle of Hastings in October 1066, William the conqueror (or William the Bastard as he is known in Kent) and his forces marched to Westminster Abbey for his coronation. They took a roundabout route, via Romney, Dover, Canterbury, Surrey and Berkshire. From the Cinque Ports's foundation in 1050, Dover has always been a chief member - it may also have been this that first attracted William's attention, and got Kent the motto of Invicta. In the words of William of Poitiers: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 823 KB) Summary Taken by James Armitage, Sunday 28th August 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 823 KB) Summary Taken by James Armitage, Sunday 28th August 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1588x1028, 762 KB) The English Channel as seen from Dover Castle (picture by Marco Sinibaldi, August 2005) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1588x1028, 762 KB) The English Channel as seen from Dover Castle (picture by Marco Sinibaldi, August 2005) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Combatants Normans supported by: Bretons (one third of total), Aquitanians, Flemings Anglo-Saxons Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson † Strength 7,000-8,000 7,000-8,000 Casualties Unknown, thought to be around 2,000 killed and wounded Unknown, but significantly higher than the Normans The... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... New Romney is a small seaside town in Kent, England. ... Flag of the Cinque Ports Formally, in Kent and Sussex there are five Head Ports making up the Confederation of the Cinque Ports, often pronounced as the anglicised sink ports, and meaning five ports (cinque in French means five and ports is to be connected to the Italian word porto... Invicta (meaning undefeated) is the motto of the county of Kent, England. ... William of Pointers (c. ...

Then he marched to Dover, which had been reported impregnable and held by a large force. The English, stricken with fear at his approach had confidence neither in their ramparts nor in the numbers of their troops ... While the inhabitants were preparing to surrender unconditionally, [the Normans], greedy for booty, set fire to the castle and the great part of it was soon enveloped in flames...[William then paid for the repair and] having taken possession of the castle, the Duke spent eight days adding new fortifications to it'.

Quote taken from "The Kent Invicta Horse" webpage (Invicta Horse)

"The "Invicta" motto is associated with the story of the Treaty of Swanscombe in 1067: according to local legend, William the Bastard, having seized the English throne, was travelling to Dover when he was met by the Cantware (the People of Kent). They demanded from him their ancient laws and rights, in which case he would have their loyalty, or else "battle most deadly". William granted the request, and Kent acceded to his reign by treaty, hence getting the motto "Invicta" (unconquered). I have lived in Kent all my life, and can vouch for the fact that William is never styled "Conqueror" by anyone native to the County. Karl Wittwer, 24 July 2004"

Archaeological evidence suggests that a new castle was constructed near the Saxon church of St. Mary in Castro in what is now Dover Castle, rather than or as well as repairing the old burgh. Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ...


The Domesday Book of only 20 years later states that before the conquest Dover's value had been £18 but was now £40. Clearly Dover had quickly been rebuilt. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ...


The Normans also built the churches of St Mary the Virgin, Dover (on the foundations of a Roman structure - it still stands) and of St. James the Apostle (as an aisleless nave with a short tower - perhaps on the site of a Saxon church partly destroyed in 1066 - destroyed in World War Two, ruins visible) and reconstituted the Saxon monastic church of St Martin le Grand, as well as founding a new Dover Priory on another site, also dedicated to St. Martin. Several surviving buildings and various ruins of Dover Priory have been incorporated in to Dover College The Priory of St. ...


Medieval

Dover Harbour viewed from the Castle
Dover Harbour viewed from the Castle

St Martin le Grand dominated Market Square, being over 150 feet long. It housed the altars of three parish churches; St. Mary, St. Nicholas and St. John the Baptist and had the churches of St. Peter and St. James subordinate to it. The church was finally dismantled around 1540 although the remains of some of the walls survived into the 19th century. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 677 KB) Summary Chris Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 677 KB) Summary Chris Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ...


In 1216, Dover was attacked by the French and successfully defended from Dover Castle by Hubert de Burgh - it was less lucky in 1295 when 10,000 French burnt most of Dover to the ground. It nevertheless flourished as the closest port to the continent. The First Barons War (1215–1217) was a civil war in England between the forces of a number of rebellious barons and King John. ... Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ... Hubert de Burgh (~1165 - May 12, 1243) was Earl of Kent, Justiciar of England and Ireland, and one of the most influential men in England during the reigns of John and Henry III. De Burgh came from a minor gentry family about which little is known. ...


Medieval buildings:

The Hospital of St Mary, Domus Dei, or Maison Dieu (Latin/Norman French - house of God), is a medieval building in Dover, England which forms part of the Old Town Hall buildings. ...

Tudors

Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, both threatened by continental invasion,also made improvements to Dover's defences, both the castle and Moat Bulwark (making a personal visit to the castle to do so).


Stuarts

During the Civil War Dover declared for the king but was captured by the Parliamentarians without a siege. Charles II landed here in 1660 at the restoration, deputizing Bernard de Gomme to make extensive repairs to the pier. On May 26, 1670, Charles II signed a secret treaty here ending the hostilities with Louis XIV of France. Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... King Charles II, the first monarch to rule after the English Restoration. ... Sir Bernard de Gomme (1620 – 23 November 1685) was a military engineer. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ... “Sun King” redirects here. ...


Napoleonic Wars

Main article: Dover Western Heights

Dover became a garrison town heavily defended against the threat of French invasion. Napoleon's troops, gathered at Boulogne, could be seen from Dover on a clear day. First given earthworks during the American Civil War, the high ground west of Dover, now called Dover Western Heights, was properly fortified in 1804 when Lieutenant-Colonel William Twiss built the Citadel at the western end, North Centre Bastion to the north, and Drop Redoubt overlooking the town, with the...


At first earthen batteries were built along the seafront and across the Western Heights (to supplement the medieval castle, which had been superseded by developments in military technology and artillery). These were later improved in 1804 with a massive building programme in stone and brick on the Western Heights, creating two cutting-edge forts, deep brick-lined ditches, and the Grand Shaft, a unique 140 ft triple staircase, linking the town to the forts and enabling troops from the hilltop barracks to be rapidly deployed at the seafront. First given earthworks during the American Civil War, the high ground west of Dover, now called Dover Western Heights, was properly fortified in 1804 when Lieutenant-Colonel William Twiss built the Citadel at the western end, North Centre Bastion to the north, and Drop Redoubt overlooking the town, with the...


19th century

Between 1801 and 1901 the population increased by 600 percent. The harbour was finally rebuilt as a set of artificial moles, and the town tried to become a seaside resort by building a pleasure pier, ice rink, bathing machines and impressive seafront crescents of hotels and apartments. The South Eastern Railway arrived in 1844 and cross-channel traffic boomed - the town were even combined with boat trains and the Golden Arrow service. The London and Greenwich Railway (LGR) and the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway (CWR) in East Kent were the earliest railways to serve the then county of Kent: eventually both became parts of the South Eastern Railway (SER). ... The Golden Arrow was a luxury train of the Southern Railway and later British Railways that linked London with Dover, where passengers took the ferry to Calais to join the Flèche d’Or that took them onto Paris. ...


20th century

The white cliffs of Dover
The white cliffs of Dover
A Map of Dover from 1945
A Map of Dover from 1945
Dover Quad type pillbox on the Western Heights
Dover Quad type pillbox on the Western Heights

In the 20th century Dover became the centre of English Channel defence during World War I, as the base for the Dover Patrol. File links The following pages link to this file: Albion White cliffs of Dover Categories: Cliffs ... File links The following pages link to this file: Albion White cliffs of Dover Categories: Cliffs ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (879x706, 501 KB)from the 1945 OS map of east kent 1 inch to the mile File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (879x706, 501 KB)from the 1945 OS map of east kent 1 inch to the mile File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 669 KB) Pillbox - Type Dover Quad, Western Heights, Dover, OS reference TR292400 Easy access. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 669 KB) Pillbox - Type Dover Quad, Western Heights, Dover, OS reference TR292400 Easy access. ... First given earthworks during the American Civil War, the high ground west of Dover, now called Dover Western Heights, was properly fortified in 1804 when Lieutenant-Colonel William Twiss built the Citadel at the western end, North Centre Bastion to the north, and Drop Redoubt overlooking the town, with the... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Dover Patrol was a very important Royal Navy command of the First World War. ...


In World War I it was, with Folkestone, one of the main troop embarkation ports for France. It was also bombed by aeroplanes and zeppelins (the first bomb to be dropped on England fell near Dover Castle on Christmas Eve 1914) and shelled by passing warships. This forced residents to shelter in caves and dug-outs. The town became known as 'Fortress Dover' and was put under martial law. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Folkestone Harbour, picture taken from the golf court Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ... This is an article about Zeppelin airships. ...


In World War II this developed into sustained bombing and shelling by cross-channel guns, causing 3,059 alerts, killing 216 civilians, and damaging 10,056 premises. A series of underground caves and tunnels in the cliffs were used as air-raid shelters (and as a military base, coordinating Operation Dynamo, whose ships landed at Dover) during the war and Dover became a wartime symbol as part of East Kent's 'Hellfire Corner'. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... French troops rescued by a British merchant ship at Dunkirk British evacuation on Dunkirk beach Operation Dynamo (or Dunkirk Evacuation, the Miracle of Dunkirk or just Dunkirk) was the name given to the World War II mass evacuation of Allied soldiers from May 26 to June 4, 1940, during the...


Defences were constructed as a part of anti-invasion preparations. The defences included a large number of pillboxes, trenchworks, minefields.[2] Detail from a pillbox embrasure. ... Precast pillbox embrasure with shutter. ...


Education

And various primary schools including: Dover Grammar School for Boys is a selective secondary school located in Dover, United Kingdom. ... // Dover College is a co-educational public school in Dover, Kent, England. ... The Duke of York’s Royal Military School was originally founded in 1801 by Prince Frederick Augustus, Duke of York and Albany son of King George III and Queen Charlotte. ...

  • Melbourne School
  • Temple Ewell
  • River
  • Guston
  • Priory Fields
  • St Martin's
  • St Richard's
  • St Mary's
  • White Cliffs Primary College of the Arts (Formerly known as St Radigund's)
  • Aycliffe
  • Vale View
  • Whitfield
  • Shatterlocks Infants School
  • Barton Junior School
  • Charlton Primary School
  • Powell CP School

Sport

  • Dover Athletic F.C. are Dover's football team. They are a non-league side.
  • Dover Life Guard Club are Dover's competitive swimming club.
  • Dover Sharks R.F.C. are Dover's competitive Rugby Union team. They are non- league.
  • Dover Rowing Club are Dover's competitive Rowing club

Dover Athletic Football Club are an association football team that play in the town of Dover, Kent, England. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ...

Places of interest

Other interesting places: Dover Castle is situated at Dover, Kent and has been described as the Key to England due to its defensive significance throughout history. ... Dover Turret, also known as the Admiralty Pier Turret, is an enclosed armoured turret built in 1882 on the western breakwater of Dover harbour. ... First given earthworks during the American Civil War, the high ground west of Dover, now called Dover Western Heights, was properly fortified in 1804 when Lieutenant-Colonel William Twiss built the Citadel at the western end, North Centre Bastion to the north, and Drop Redoubt overlooking the town, with the... Fort Burgoyne, originally known as Castle Hill Fort, was built in the 1860s to guard the high ground northeast of Dover, England. ... The North Downs Way is a long-distance path in southern England. ... Roman Dover Dubris or Portus Dubris, Roman name for Roman-founded town of Dover, Kent, England. ... // Kent 802AD Kent - NASA satellite 2005 The Saxon Shore Way starts at Gravesend, Kent and traces the coast as it was in Roman times (note the changed coastline around Romney Marsh) as far as Hastings, East Sussex, 163 miles (262 km) in total. ...

  • Dover Transport Museum Dover Transport Mus Website
  • Dover Museum, and Bronze Age Boat Dover Museum Website
  • Kearsney Abbey
  • Russell Gardens
  • Samphire Hoe Nature Reserve
  • Cowgate Nature Reserve
  • Connaught Park
  • Seafront promenade
  • St Edmund's Chapel
  • Dover Port Dover Harbour Board

Famous Residents

  • Joss Stone: born Joscelyn Eve Stoker was born in Dover's Buckland Hospital in 1987 before moving to Ashill, Devon at the age of 8. Whilst in Dover she briefly attended St. Mary's CofE primary school.
  • Charlotte Bellamy: the actress who plays Laurel Potts in Emmerdale was born in Dover, but moved away when she was 18 months old.
  • Topper Headon: of 'The Clash' fame lived in Dover as a boy, and attended River Primary School and the Dover Boys' Grammar School. He now lives in River on the outskirts of Dover.
  • Shane Taylor: the actor was born and raised in Dover attending Dover's Astor College for the Arts where his father is the caretaker and groundsman.
  • Keith Thompson: writer of film 'Clubland/Introducing the Dwights' starring Brenda Blethyn (released June/July) born and raised in Dover.
  • Simon Cowell: of 'Pop Idol' & 'X Factor' fame attended Dover College during the 1970s.
  • Jeffrey Archer: of varied fame, taught as a Physical Education teacher at Dover College during the 1960s.

Joscelyn Eve Stoker (born 11 April 1987), best known by her stage name Joss Stone, is a BRIT Award- and Grammy Award-winning English soul, R&B, and blues singer, songwriter, and occasional actress who has sold over ten million albums worldwide. ... Joss Stone (b. ... Charlotte Bellamy (born in Kent, England) is an English actress is well known for her part in ITVs Emmerdale as Laurel Thomas. ... For the 1994 debut album by The Cardigans, see Emmerdale (album). ... Topper Headon Nicholas Bowen Headon (born May 30, 1955, in Bromley, Kent, England), better known as Topper Headon (because of his resemblance to the cartoon monkey), was the drummer for the English punk rock band The Clash. ... Shane Taylor (born March 13, 1974) is a British actor, born in Dover, England. ... The term Clubland can refer to several different things: Clubland is an area of London which contains a high number of Gentlemens clubs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Brenda Blethyn OBE (born 20 February 1946) is an English Golden Globe winning and Academy Award-nominated film, stage, television and voice actress, and writer. ... Simon Cowell (born 7 October 1959) is an English artist and repertoire (A&R) executive for Sony BMG in the United Kingdom, but is known as a judge on television programs such as Pop Idol, The X Factor, American Idol, Americas Got Talent and Britains Got Talent. ... Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born 15 April 1940) is a British best-selling author and politician. ... Physical education (PE) is the interdisciplinary study of all area of science relating to the transmission of physical knowledge and skills to an individual or a group, the application of these skills, and their results. ... // Dover College is a co-educational public school in Dover, Kent, England. ...

Health Care

Dover has one hospital, Buckland Hospital located in a former Victorian workhouse on Coombe Valley Road. The town once had 4 hospitals, Buckland, Royal Victoria, Isolation and the Eye Hospitals located at various points across the town plus the hidden Underground Hospital underneath Dover Castle which was a secret hospital for use during World War 2. Buckland Hospital is currently threatened with closure and a local campaign backed by the Dover Soul Website and various local organisations are trying to stop the cuts facing the hospital. Buckland Hospital also had a hospital radio station founded in 1968, the Gateway Hospital Broadcasting Service. The oldest hospital radio station in East Kent, the GHBS closed at the end of 2006. Former workhouse at Nantwich, dating from 1780 A workhouse was a place where people who were unable to support themselves could go to live and work. ... German soldiers at the Battle of Stalingrad World War II was the most extensive and costly armed conflict in the history of the world, involving the great majority of the worlds nations, being fought simultaneously in several major theatres, and costing tens of millions of lives. ...


Local Media

Newspapers

  • Dover Express owned by Kent Regional Newspapers (KRN)
  • Dover Mercury (founded 1998) owned by Kent Messenger Group (KM)
  • Dover & Deal Adscene (KRN)
  • Dover & Deal Extra (KM)

Local Radio

Dover has one local commercial radio station:

  • kmfm for Shepway & White Cliffs Country broadcasting to Folkestone on 96.4FM and Dover on 106.8FM. The station was founded in Dover as Neptune Radio in September 1997 but moved to Folkestone in 2003 consequently being rebranded as KMFM for Shepway and White Cliffs Country after a takeover by the Kent Messenger Group.
  • Gateway Hospital Broadcasting Service, a hospital radio station, closed at the end of 2006.

kmfm is the name of six Independent Local Radio stations and one digital station (on the Kent Digital Multiplex) owned by KM Radio Ltd, each broadcasting locally to a region of Kent. ... Dovers (UK) local radio station came to air as Neptune Radio on the 29th September 1997 at 7am after closing as a month long trial at 3am the same morning. ...

Internet

  • Dover Forum
  • Dover Ferries Forum
  • Dover New Dover Forums
  • [1] Dover Soul Forums
  • [2] Dover Soul community website

Earthquake

On 28 April 2007, a small earthquake occurred in Ashford, Folkestone, Dover and surrounding areas, towns and villages. The earthquake was 4.3 on the Richter scale. Eye witnesses said they felt their houses shake, or had a feeling of something crashing into their houses. At first, it was thought to be an explosion. [3] [4] is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Landsat image of the earthquakes epicentre, based on USGS location data which was later revised. ... Ashford may mean the following places: In Australia: Ashford, New South Wales Ashford, South Australia Electoral district of Ashford - a state electoral district in South Australia In Canada: Ashford, Quebec In the Republic of Ireland: Ashford, County Wicklow In the United Kingdom: Ashford, North Devon Ashford, South Hams, Devon Ashford... Folkestone Harbour, picture taken from the golf court Folkestone (IPA: ) is a coastal resort town in the Shepway district of Kent, England. ... The Richter magnitude test scale (or more correctly local magnitude ML scale) assigns a single number to quantify the size of an earthquake. ...


Mayors

  • Bob Markham (2007-2008) [Current Mayor]
  • Jan Tranter (2006-2007) (wife of Ken Tranter)
  • Ken Tranter (2005-2006)
  • Bob Markham (2004-2005)

The mayor's term runs from May to May and they are a member of Dover Town Council.


Twin Towns

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Huber Heights is a city located in Miami and Montgomery counties in Ohio. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the French city. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Croatia. ... Split Harbour Split (Italian: Spalato) is the largest and most important city in Dalmatia, the administrative center of Croatias Split-Dalmatia county. ...

References

Notes

  1. ^ KS01 Usual resident population: Census 2001, Key Statistics for urban areas. National Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  2. ^ Foot, 2006, p209-217.
  3. ^ USGS Data for Kent Earthquake 28th April 2007. USGS. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  4. ^ BGS Report for Kent Earthquake 28th April 2007. British Geological Survey. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is a scientific agency of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Geological Survey is a publicly-funded body which aims to advance geoscientific knowledge of the United Kingdom landmass and its continental shelf by means of systematic surveying, monitoring and research. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

General references

  • Foot, William (2006). Beaches, fields, streets, and hills ... the anti-invasion landscapes of England, 1940. Council for British Archaeology. ISBN 1-902771-53-2. 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Dover
  • Official Municipal Website of the Town of Dover
  • A list of Dover's Mayors
  • Dover Museum
  • Information about Port of Dover
  • DoverLife.co.uk - Information about the town for residents and visitors.
  • Dover Soul communit website includes Geography, places to visit, East Kent Radio History and history of the town
  • Unusual Dover Local Website for Dover - part of the Unusual Dover Media family
  • Dover-Kent.com - Paul Skelton
  • Channel Swimming
  • Dover Local Radio KM-fm 106.8fm
  • Wikimapia
  • Maps and aerial photos for 51°08′N 1°19′E / 51.13, 1.31
  • The Dover Promenade Railway
  • The Dover War Memorial Project - Dovorians in the two World Wars: information about casualties, articles, and memories
  • 1870 History of Dover

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

Bibliography

  • Statham (1899). History of Dover with a bibliography. 

Gallery

Dover Harbour, from the cliffs above.

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