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Encyclopedia > Doune Castle
Doune Castle sited above the River Teith.
Doune Castle sited above the River Teith.

Doune Castle is an imposing Medieval castle in central Scotland, sited on a wooded bend where a tributary joins the River Teith, across a bridge from the village of Doune. It lies 8 miles (13 km) north-west of Stirling where the River Teith flows into the River Forth. Upstream, 8 miles (13 km) further north-west the town of Callander lies at the edge of the Trossachs mountain region of the Scottish highlands. It can be found at Grid reference NN728010. Doune Castle sited above the River Teith. ... Doune Castle sited above the River Teith. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... A tributary (or affluent or confluent) is a contributory stream, a river that does not reach the sea, but joins another major river (a parent river), to which it contributes its waters, swelling its discharge. ... A log bridge A bridge is a structure built to span a gorge, valley, road, railroad track, river, body of water, or any other physical obstacle. ... Doune is a burgh in the district of Stirling, Scotland, on the River Teith. ... A mile is a unit of distance (or, in physics terminology, length) currently defined as 5,280 feet, 1,760 yards, or 63,360 inches. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Stirling (Sruighlea in Gaelic) is a city in central Scotland. ... The River Forth meanders over fertile farmlands near Stirling The River Forth, 47 km (29 miles) long, is the major river draining the eastern part of the central belt of Scotland. ... Callander is a burgh in the region of Stirling, Scotland, on the River Teith. ... The Trossachs (Scottish Gaelic, Na Trosaichean) itself is a small woodland glen between Ben An to the north and Ben Venue to the south, with Loch Katrine to the west and Loch Achray to the east, but the name is used generally to refer to the wider area of wooded... The Scottish Highlands are the mountainous regions of Scotland north and west of the Highland Boundary Fault. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ...


The site is defended on three sides by the ground sloping steeply down to the rivers, and the approach from the north is defended by earthworks. The castle is entered through a narrow gateway and a 46 ft (14 m) long vaulted passageway that leads to a large central courtyard. Off this, steps lead up to the Great hall which is connected by arched servery hatches and a door to the massive kitchen. An enclosed staircase from the courtyard reaches the timber panelled Lord's hall and other apartments, which all together give a vivid impression of life in a medieval castle. A foot (plural: feet) is a non-SI unit of distance or length, measuring around a third of a meter. ... A kitchen is a room used for food preparation. ... Stairs, staircase, stairway, flight of stairs are all names for a construction designed to bridge a large vertical distance by dividing it into smaller vertical distances, called steps. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Lumber. ...

Contents


History

Approach from the north showing the entrance gateway.
Approach from the north showing the entrance gateway.

The castle was largely built at the end of the 14th century by Robert Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany whose brother King Robert III of Scotland became unfit to rule, and from 1388 Albany governed the Kingdom. The King's eldest son, in Albany's custody, died mysteriously in 1402. On Albany's death in 1420 control of the country and the castle passed to his son, Murdoch, but when King James I of Scotland returned in 1424 from captivity in England Murdoch was imprisoned for treason then beheaded. Approach to Doune Castle from the north showing the entrance gateway. ... Approach to Doune Castle from the north showing the entrance gateway. ... This 14th-century statue from south India depicts the gods Shiva (on the left) and Uma (on the right). ... Robert Stewart or Stuart, 1st Duke of Albany (c. ... Robert III (c. ... Events Beginning of prosecution of Lollards in England The Battle of Otterburn between England and Scotland A Chinese army under Xu Da sacks Karakorum Births September 14 - Claudius Claussön Swart, Danish geographer September 29 - Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, second son of Henry IV of England (d. ... Events September 14 - Battle of Homildon Hill. ... Events May 21 - Treaty of Troyes. ... Murdoch Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany (1362 – 24 May 1425) was a Scottish nobleman who inherited the Dukedom of Albany in 1420, but was convicted and executed for treason five years later. ... James I (December 10, 1394 – February 21, 1437) reigned as king of Scotland from April 4, 1406 until February 21, 1437. ... Events August 17 - Battle of Verneuil - An English force under John, Duke of Bedford defeats a larger French army under the Duke of Alençon, John Stuart, and Earl Archibald of Douglas. ... Treason also commonly refers to a book by Ann Coulter In law, treason is the crime of disloyalty to ones nation or state. ... Beheading. ...


Doune Castle then became a royal retreat and hunting lodge for monarchs including Mary Queen of Scots. Mary I of Scotland (Mary Stuart) (December 8, 1542 – February 8, 1587), better known as Mary, Queen of Scots, was Queen of Scots, monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland, from December 14, 1542 – July 24, 1567; and Queen Consort of France from July 10, 1559 – December 5, 1560. ...


In 1570, the first Lord Doune, Sir James Stewart was granted possession of the castle by James V. Lord Doune's grandson became the Earl of Moray by marrying the Regent Moray's daughter, and the Earls of Moray have owned it ever since.


During the Jacobite rising of 1745 Doune Castle became a prison for government supporters captured by the Jacobites, some of whom including the author John Home escaped by knotting together bedsheets and climbing from the kitchen window. Another prisoner was a Scottish minister John Witherspoon who later moved to the American colonies and became a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence. This article concerns the political movement supporting the restoration of the House of Stuart, not the earlier Jacobean period. ... // Events May 11 - War of Austrian Succession: Battle of Fontenoy - At Fontenoy, French forces defeat an Anglo-Dutch-Hanoverian army including the Black Watch June 4 – Frederick the Great destroys Austrian army at Hohenfriedberg August 19 - Beginning of the 45 Jacobite Rising at Glenfinnan September 12 - Francis I is elected... John Home (September 22, 1722 - September 5, 1808) was a Scottish poet and dramatist. ... John Witherspoon Statue, Princeton Dr John Witherspoon (February 5, 1723 – November 15, 1794), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is the document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ...


The castle is now owned by Historic Scotland and is open to the public [1]. Historic Scotland is the Scottish agency looking after historic monuments. ...


Doune castle in fiction

Waverley

The courtyard at the centre of Doune castle, with the steps up to the Great Hall to the right of the picture
The courtyard at the centre of Doune castle, with the steps up to the Great Hall to the right of the picture

In Walter Scott's first novel Waverley the protagonist Edward Waverley is under government escort when he is rescued by Highlanders, rushed across country and brought to Doune castle. Although the road is now tarmac, the village is pleasant rather than mean and the bridge is a bit wider and less ancient, the description is still good today; Download high resolution version (578x844, 93 KB)Doune Castle courtyard, Scotland photograph taken by User:Dave souza File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (578x844, 93 KB)Doune Castle courtyard, Scotland photograph taken by User:Dave souza File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Portrait of Sir Walter Scott, by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet (14 August 1771–21 September 1832) was a prolific Scottish historical novelist and poet popular throughout Europe during his time. ... Waverley is a novel by Sir Walter Scott. ...

On the opposite bank of the river, and partly surrounded by a winding of its stream, stood a large and massive castle, the half-ruined turrets of which were already glittering in the first rays of the sun. It was in form an oblong square, of size sufficient to contain a large court in the centre. The towers at each angle of the square rose higher than the walls of the building, and were in their turn surmounted by turrets, differing in height and irregular in shape. Upon one of these a sentinel watched, whose bonnet and plaid, streaming in the wind, declared him to be a Highlander, as a broad white ensign, which floated from another tower, announced that the garrison was held by the insurgent adherents of the House of Stuart.
Passing hastily through a small and mean town, where their appearance excited neither surprise nor curiosity in the few peasants whom the labours of the harvest began to summon from their repose, the party crossed an ancient and narrow bridge of several arches, and, turning to the left up an avenue of huge old sycamores, Waverley found himself in front of the gloomy yet picturesque structure which he had admired at a distance. A huge iron-grated door, which formed the exterior defence of the gateway, was already thrown back to receive them; and a second, heavily constructed of oak and studded thickly with iron nails, being next opened, admitted them into the interior court-yard. A gentleman, dressed in the Highland garb and having a white cockade in his bonnet, assisted Waverley to dismount from his horse, and with much courtesy bid him welcome to the castle.

(This extract is from the Project Gutenberg eBook version of Waverley. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net)


Monty Python and the Holy Grail

The east wall of Doune Castle where the opening scene of Monty Python and the Holy Grail takes place
The east wall of Doune Castle where the opening scene of Monty Python and the Holy Grail takes place

When Monty Python and the Holy Grail was filmed on location in Scotland in 1974, the producers had gained permission from the National Trust for Scotland to film scenes at several of their Scottish castles, as well as the permission of the (private) owner of Doune Castle (using a different location for each of the fictional castles shown in the film). As the date of filming neared, managers at the Trust became skittish and withdrew their permission to film at their properties, leaving the Pythons' producers with little time to find new locations. In desperation, they decided to use different sides of Doune Castle to depict the different castles in the film, relying on rather tight framing of shots to hide the illusion. The east wall of Doune Castle where the opening scene of Monty Python and the Holy Grail takes place photograph taken by mo This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The east wall of Doune Castle where the opening scene of Monty Python and the Holy Grail takes place photograph taken by mo This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a comedy film from 1975. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1974 calendar). ... The standard of the NTS The National Trust for Scotland, or NTS, describes itself as The conservation charity that protects and promotes Scotlands natural and cultural heritage for present and future generations to enjoy. ...

  • At the start of the film King Arthur and Patsy "ride" up (clip-clopping coconut shells) to the walls of Doune castle to ask for men to join Arthur's court, but a soldier on the battlements gets them into an argument as to how the king acquired coconuts in a temperate zone, and whether a swallow could have brought the coconut. Later, their dream of (only a model) Camelot is illustrated by the Knights of the Round Table doing a song and dance routine in the Great hall. Then John Cleese shouts down abuse in an outrageous French accent and cows etc. are hurled from the battlement, followed by a failed wooden rabbit of troy trick.
  • Shortly afterwards at "Castle Anthrax" Sir Galahad the chaste is chased by seductive "girlies" in Doune Castle's servery and kitchen.
  • An arranged marriage in a room at Doune Castle ("Swamp Castle") turns to mayhem when Lancelot arrives, attacking guards and guests on his way past a wedding dance in the courtyard and up the steps to the room.
  • The exception is at the end of the film, when Arthur and the knights get more outrageous French abuse from the battlements of Castle Stalker.
The south wall of Doune Castle rising above the river bank.
The south wall of Doune Castle rising above the river bank.

Doune Castle has become a place of pilgrimage for Monty Python devotees [2], who can walk about the castle recalling scenes from the film, sometimes with the aid of coconut shells from the custodian. Re-enactments go through slightly mangled versions of the plot. The special DVD version of Monty Python and the Holy Grail includes a documentary with Michael Palin and Terry Jones revisiting the sites used for filming, with suitable emphasis on Doune Castle. Binomial name Cocos nucifera L. The Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera), is a member of the Family Arecaceae (palm family). ... Genera Many, see text. ... Camelot is the name of the stronghold of the legendary King Arthur, from which he fought many of the battles that made up his life. ... John Cleese as Q in Die Another Day. ... Castle Anthrax is a fictional stone-built 8th century fortress a few days ride from Camelot visited by Sir Galahad the Chaste (Michael Palin) in the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail. ... Castle Stalker is a four storey tower house or keep picturesquely set on a small islet on Loch Laich, an inlet off Loch Linnhe. ... The south wall of Doune Castle rising above the river bank. ... The south wall of Doune Castle rising above the river bank. ... The Monty Python troupe in 1970. ... Michael Palin Michael Edward Palin (born May 5, 1943 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England) is an English comedian, actor and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python, as well as for his travel documentaries. ... Terry Jones Terence Graham Parry Jones (born February 1, 1942) is a British comedian and writer. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
CastleXplorer - Doune Castle (315 words)
Doune Castle lies south-east of Doune village on a promontory between the River Teith and the Ardoch Burn.
The castle reflects the importance of its owner and the large hall and kitchen are testimony to the level of entertaining that a man in his position would have had to provide.
Doune was garrisoned by government troops during the Jacobite risings of 1689 and 1715.
Doune Castle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1092 words)
The castle was largely built at the end of the 14th century by Robert Stewart, 1st Duke of Albany whose brother King Robert III of Scotland became unfit to rule, and from 1388 Albany governed the Kingdom.
In 1570, the first Lord Doune, Sir James Stewart was granted possession of the castle by James V. Lord Doune's grandson became the Earl of Moray by marrying the Regent Moray's daughter, and the Earls of Moray have owned it ever since.
Shortly afterwards at "Castle Anthrax" Sir Galahad the chaste is chased by seductive "girlies" in Doune Castle's servery and kitchen.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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