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Encyclopedia > Douglas Wilder
Lawrence Douglas Wilder
Douglas Wilder

In office
January 14, 1990 – January 14, 1994
Lieutenant(s) Don Beyer
Preceded by Gerald L. Baliles
Succeeded by George F. Allen

Born January 17, 1931 (1931-01-17) (age 76)
Richmond, Virginia
Political party Democrat
Independent after governorsrhip
Spouse Eunice Montgomery (div.)
Alma mater Virginia Union University
Howard University
Religion Baptist

Lawrence Douglas Wilder (born January 17, 1931) is an American politician. He was the first African American to be elected as governor of a U.S. state, and the second of three to serve as governor.[1] Wilder served as Governor of Virginia from 1990 to 1994. He is currently Mayor of Richmond, Virginia, having taken office in 2005. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Lieutenant Governor is a constitutional officer of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Donald S. Beyer, Jr. ... Gerald L. Baliles (born 1940) was the Governor of Virginia from 1986 to 1990. ... George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952) is a Republican U.S. Senator from Virginia. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... Virginia Union University (VUU) is a historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... This is a list of the first man/woman/object etc. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This is a list of Governors of Virginia since Virginia became a U.S. state following the American Revolutionary War. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This is a List of mayors of Richmond, Virginia, arranged chronologically. ... Nickname: Motto: Sic dic Itur Ad Astra (Thus do we reach the stars) Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor L. Douglas Wilder (I) Area  - City 62. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Early Chilhood

Wilder was born in Richmond, Virginia, the seventh of eight children. The grandson of slaves, he was named after poet Paul Laurence Dunbar and abolitionist, speaker and author Frederick Douglass.[2] He attended racially segregated George Mason Elementary School and Armstrong High School, going on to Virginia Union University, where he graduated with a degree in chemistry in 1951. Wilder is a prominent life member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. an intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African Americans. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Paul Laurence Dunbar Paul Laurence Dunbar (June 27, 1872 – February 9, 1906) was a seminal American poet of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Oratory is the art of eloquent speech. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Frederick Douglass, ca. ... Racial segregation characterised by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home. ... For other persons named George Mason, see George Mason (disambiguation). ... Armstrong High School is a high school located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Virginia Union University (VUU) is a historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Wilder then served in the Korean conflict, earning a Bronze Star. After his service, he attended Howard University School of Law under the G.I. Bill, graduating in 1959 and co-founding the law firm Wilder, Gregory, and Associates. Combatants United Nations:  Republic of Korea,  Australia,  Belgium,  Luxembourg,  Canada,  Colombia,  Ethiopia,  France,  Greece,  Luxembourg,  Netherlands,  New Zealand,  Philippines,  South Africa,  Thailand,  Turkey,  United Kingdom,  United States Medical staff:  Denmark,  Australia,  Italy,  Norway,  Sweden Communist states:  Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,  Peoples Republic of China,  Soviet Union Commanders... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... Stamp commemorating the G.I. Bill or Servicemens Readjustment Act The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G. I.s) as well as one-year... A law firm is a business entity formed by one or more lawyers to engage in the practice of law. ...


On October 11, 1958, Wilder married Eunice Montgomery. Before divorcing in 1978, they had three children: Loren, Lynn, and Lawrence Douglas, Jr. is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ...


Wilder began his career in public office after winning a 1969 special election to the Senate of Virginia, becoming the first African American state Senator from Virginia since Reconstruction. In 1985, still holding office in the state Senate, he was narrowly elected Lieutenant Governor of Virginia on a Democratic ticket under then-Attorney General Gerald Baliles. Upon his election, Wilder became the first African American elected to statewide executive office in the South in the twentieth century.1 A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Historic Partisan Makeup of the Virginia State Senate The Senate of Virginia is the upper house of the Virginia General Assembly. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Gerald L. Baliles (born 1940) was the Governor of Virginia from 1986 to 1990. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


Governor of Virginia

Ascending from the office of Lieutenant Governor, Wilder was elected to succeed Baliles on November 8, 1989, defeating Republican Marshall Coleman by a spread of less than half a percent. The closeness of the margin prompted a recount, which certified Wilder's victory, and he was sworn in on January 13, 1990. In recognition of his landmark achievement, the NAACP awarded Wilder the Spingarn Medal for 1990. is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... J. Marshall Coleman is a Republican politician in Virginia who ran for several statewide offices from the late 1970s to early 1990s. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... An election recount takes place in the event that the initial vote tally during an election is extremely close, and that therefore a recount of the ballots is necessary to insure an accurate result. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... The Spingarn Medal is awarded annually by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for outstanding achievement by a Black American. ...


Wilder had a comfortable lead in the last polls before election. The unexpected closeness of the election, while likely due in part to the traditionally strong get out the vote efforts of Republicans, has also been observed in other elections involving African Americans and other minority candidates. Called the "Bradley effect", it entails white voters being more likely to tell pollsters that they will support a candidate than to actually vote for them. Get out the vote, sometimes GOTV, is a term used to describe two categories of political activity, both aimed at increasing the number of votes cast in one or more elections. ... The term Bradley effect or Wilder effect refers to a phenomenon which has led to inaccurate voter opinion polls in some American political campaigns between a white candidate and a non-white candidate. ...


During his tenure as governor, Wilder granted a controversial pardon to basketball star Allen Iverson. Iverson, then a popular high school sports figure, was convicted after being accused of assaulting a woman in bowling alley and sentenced to 15 years in prison. However, due to untenable evidence and Wilder's own judgment, which was not incongruous with what most of the nation felt was a racially motivated decision, after Iverson had served just five months, Governor Wilder granted Iverson clemency and released Iverson from his prison sentence. Allen Ezail Iverson (born June 7, 1975, in Hampton, Virginia[1]), nicknamed A.I. and The Answer, is an American professional basketball player for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association. ... A pardon is the forgiveness of a crime and the penalty associated with it. ...


During his term he oversaw 14 executions by the electric chair, including controversial case of Roger Keith Coleman and some botched electrocutions. The electric chair is an execution method in which the person being put to death is strapped to a chair and electrocuted through electrodes placed on the body. ... Coleman was featured on Time Magazine Roger Keith Coleman (November 1, 1958 – May 20, 1992) was a Grundy, Virginia, coal miner convicted and executed for the murder of his sister-in-law, Wanda McCoy. ...


Wilder left office in 1994 because Virginia does not allow governors to serve successive terms. He was succeeded by Republican George Allen. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... George Felix Allen (born March 8, 1952) is a former Republican United States Senator from the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the son of former NFL head coach George Allen. ...


Policies

Since the 1970s Wilder has supported the death penalty and has generally run on an "anti-crime" platform. In response to a waning budget balance during his period as governor, Wilder supported some of the most dramatic cuts in allocations for higher education in the United States. He came under scrutiny in the mid-1990s for his attacks on fellow Democrat Chuck Robb and his support of Republican Mark Earley. Wilder briefly considered running for President in 1992 and for the U.S. Senate in 1994. Since his tenure as governor, Wilder has declared himself an independent. Doug Wilder campaign poster for the Virginia State Senate The copyright status of this work is difficult or impossible to determine. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Look up budget in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... Charles Spittal Chuck Robb (born June 26, 1939) is an American politician. ... Mark L. Earley is an American politician. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States...


Mayor of Richmond

On May 30, 2004, Wilder announced his intention to run for Mayor of Richmond. Until recently, the Richmond City Council chose the mayor from among its 9 members. The move to change this policy succeeded in November 2003 when voters approved a mayor-at-large referendum, with roughly 80 percent voting in favor of the measure. Wilder was a leading proponent of the mayor-at-large proposal. is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


On November 2, 2004, Wilder received 79% of the vote (55,319 votes); R.C. "Rudy" McCollum Jr. received 11% (8,079 votes), Charles H. Nance received 8% (5,912), and Lawrence E. Williams Sr. received 2% (1,138). Free Socialist candidate, Silver Persinger ran as a write-in candidate in this election. Wilder is the first directly elected Mayor of Richmond in sixty years. Upon winning the election in November, Wilder communicated his intentions of aggressively taking on corruption in the city government by issuing several ultimatums to the sitting City Council even before he took office. He was sworn in on January 2, 2005. is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Direct election is a term describing a system of choosing political officeholders in which the voters directly cast ballots for the person, persons or political party that they desire to see elected. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


He is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition,[3] a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition is a coalition of mayors from 225 different United States cities, with a stated goal of making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Thomas Michael Menino (born December 27, 1942) is the current mayor of Boston, Massachusetts, United States and the citys first Italian-American mayor. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, founder of Bloomberg L.P., and the current Mayor of New York City. ...


Honors and awards

In 2004, Virginia Commonwealth University named its School of Government and Public Affairs in honor of L. Douglas Wilder. Wilder serves as an adjunct faculty member at the school. The Virginia Union University library, Norfolk State University's performing arts center and a Hampton University dormitory is also named after Mr. Wilder. Virginia Commonwealth University, or VCU, is a large public American research university with its main campuses located in downtown Richmond, Virginia. ... Virginia Union University (VUU) is a historically black university located in Richmond, Virginia. ... Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American University located in Hampton, Virginia. ...


Notes

  1. ^ The first African American governor in the U.S. state was P. B. S. Pinchback, who was not elected, but became Governor of Louisiana on December 9, 1872 upon the removal of his predecessor from office. Deval Patrick, the Governor of Massachusetts, is the second African American to be elected governor, and became the third African American governor overall.
  2. ^ Virginia Historical Society, [1]
  3. ^ Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members.

Pinckney Benton Stewart Pinchback (May 10, 1837 – December 21, 1921) was the first African American to become governor of a U.S. state. ... This is a list of Governors of [[Louisiana== First French Era == Sauvole de la Villantry 1699-1701 Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville 1701-1713 Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac 1713-1716 Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville 1716-1717 Jean-Michel de Lepinay 1717-1718 Jean... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Deval Laurdine Patrick (born July 31, 1956) is an American politician and the current Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

External links

  • Biography from the Richmond mayor's office
Preceded by
Richard Joseph Davis
Lieutenant Governor of Virginia
1986 – 1990
Succeeded by
Don Beyer
Preceded by
Jerry Baliles
Governor of Virginia
1990–1994
Succeeded by
George Allen
Preceded by
Rudolph C. McCollum, Jr.
Mayor of Richmond, Virginia
2005-present
Succeeded by
incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Douglas Wilder - MSN Encarta (267 words)
Douglas Wilder (1931- ) governor of Virginia (1990-1994), the first fl American to be elected a United States governor.
Wilder was born in Richmond, Virginia, and educated at Virginia Union University (1951) and Howard University Law School (1959).
Wilder was elected governor of the state in 1989.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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