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Encyclopedia > Douglas Bader
Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader
21 February 19105 September 1982

Sir Douglas Bader
Place of birth Flag of England St John's Wood, London, England
Allegiance Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Royal Air Force
Years of service 19281946
Rank Group Captain
Battles/wars Second World War

Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader, CBE, DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar, FRAeS, DL, RAF (21 February 19105 September 1982); surname pronounced IPA: /ˈbɑːdɚ/) was a successful fighter pilot in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. Bader is upheld as an inspirational leader and hero of the era, not least because he fought despite having lost both legs in a pre-war flying accident. His brutally forthright, dogmatic and often highly opinionated views (especially against authority) coupled with his boundless energy and enthusiasm inspired adoration and frustration in equal measures with both his subordinates and peers. is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Douglas Bader Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... St Johns Wood is a district of North London, England in the City of Westminster, near Regents Park. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links Ensign_of_the_Royal_Air_Force. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A Group Captains sleeve/shoulder insignia Group Captain (Gp Capt in the RAF, GPCAPT in the RNZAF and RAAF, G/C in the former RCAF) is a senior commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... DSO medal The Distinguished Service Order (DSO) is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other Commonwealth countries, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. ... This article is about the awards given by various British Commonwealth countres. ... The Royal Aeronautical Society Founded in 1866 The Royal Aeronautical Society, aka. ... The Deputy Lieutenant is the deputy to the Lord Lieutenant of a county. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... An A-10 Thunderbolt II, F-86 Sabre, P-38 Lightning and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during an air show at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... “RAF” redirects here. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...

Contents

Early years

Bader was born in St John's Wood, London, the second son of Major Frederick Roberts Bader of the Royal Engineers and his wife Jessie. His first two years were spent with relatives in the Isle of Man as his father had returned to his posting in India shortly after the birth of his son, and was accompanied by his wife and eldest son. At the age of 2, Douglas joined his parents in India for a year before the family moved back to London. He went to Temple Grove Prep School, in Eastbourne, then to St Edward's School, Oxford, which was also attended by Guy Gibson and Adrian Warburton. His father fought in France during the First World War and died in 1922 of complications arising from shrapnel wounds that he suffered in 1917. His mother re-married shortly thereafter, to Reverend Ernest William Hobbs. Bader was subsequently brought up in the rectory of the village of Sprotborough, near Doncaster, West Riding of Yorkshire now South Yorkshire. St Johns Wood is a district of North London, England in the City of Westminster, near Regents Park. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. ... For other places with the same name, see Eastbourne (disambiguation). ... St Edwards School (also colloquially known as Teddies) is a co-educational independent boarding school (also known as a public school) in North Oxford, England. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... Photo from 617 Squadron The dambusters Photo submitted by Roger Shenton - (taken by John Kramer) Photo of the Dambusters Memorial at Woodhall Spa. ... Wing Commander Adrian Warby Warburton (10 March 1918 in Middlesborough - approximately 12 April 1944 over Germany) was an RAF pilot during the Second World War. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The Parish of Sprotbrough and Cusworth lies three miles to the north west of Doncaster town centre in South Yorkshire, England and is split by the A1 motorway. ... For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... The West Riding as an administrative county prior to its abolition in 1974. ... South Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region of England, in the United Kingdom. ...


Joining the RAF

Bader joined the RAF as a Cranwell cadet in 1928. He was an above-average pilot and an outstanding sportsman, he played rugby for Harlequin F.C. coming close to national team selection[1]. He played one first-class cricket match playing for the RAF cricket team against the Army cricket team at The Oval in July 1931; his batting scores were 65 and 1.[2] Commissioned as a pilot officer in 1930, Bader was posted to Kenley, Surrey, flying Gloster Gamecocks and soon after, Bristol Bulldogs. The Royal Air Force College (RAFC) is the Royal Air Force training and education academy which provides initial training to all RAF personnel who are preparing to be commissioned officers. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... Official website www. ... First-class cricket matches are those between international teams or the highest standard of domestic teams in which teams have two innings each. ... The Royal Air Force cricket team is a cricket side representing the British Royal Air Force. ... There have been several Army cricket teams to have played first-class cricket: British Army cricket team Indian Army cricket team New Zealand Army cricket team South Africa Army cricket team Sri Lanka Army Sports Club cricket team Category: ... The famous gasometers, which are now listed buildings. ... A Pilot Officers sleeve/shoulder insignia Pilot Officer (Plt Off in the RAF; PLTOFF in the RAAF and RNZAF, P/O in the former RCAF) is the lowest substantive commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries, ranking only above Acting... Kenley is a district in the south of the London Borough of Croydon. ... This article is about the English county. ... The Gloster Gamecock was a development of the Mk III Grebe. ... General History The Bristol Bulldog was a Royal Air Force (RAF) single-seat biplane fighter designed during the 1920s by the Bristol Aeroplane Company, with over three hundred Bulldogs produced, that arguably became the most famous aircraft during the RAFs inter-war period. ...


On 14 December 1931, while visiting Reading Aero Club, he attempted some low-flying aerobatics at Woodley airfield in a Bulldog, apparently on a dare. His plane crashed when the tip of the left wing touched the ground. Bader was rushed to the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading, where, in the hands of the prominent surgeon Leonard Joyce, both his legs were amputated - one above and one below the knee. Bader made the following laconic entry in his logbook after the crash: is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... Location within the British Isles Woodley is a town in the English county of Berkshire. ... The Royal Berkshire Hospital is a hospital in Reading, Berkshire in England. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... An adverb describing the tendency to convey an idea in the smallest possible number of words. ...

Crashed slow-rolling near ground. Bad show.
 
— Douglas Bader, [3]

In 1932, after a long convalescence throughout which he needed morphine for pain-relief, Bader was transferred to the hospital at RAF Uxbridge and fought hard to regain his former abilities now that he had a new pair of artificial legs. In time, his efforts paid off and was able to drive a specially modified car, play golf and even dance. This article is about the drug. ... RAF Uxbridge is a Royal Air Force station in Uxbridge in the London Borough of Hillingdon. ...


Bader got his chance to prove that he could still fly when, in June 1932, Air Under-Secretary Phillip Sasson arranged for him to take up an Avro 504 which he piloted competently. A subsequent medical examination proved him fit for active service, however, in April the following year, he received notification that the RAF had decided to reverse the decision on the grounds that this situation was not covered by the King's Regulations. In May, Bader was invalided out of the RAF, took an office job with the Asiatic Petroleum Company and, in 1935, married Thelma Edwards. This aircraft article has not been updated to WikiProject Aircrafts current standards. ...


Second World War

When war broke out in 1939, Bader used his RAF Cranwell connections to rejoin the RAF. Despite official reluctance on the part of the establishment to allow him to apply for an A.1.B. – full flying category status, his persistent efforts paid off. [4] Bader regained a medical categorisation for operational flying at the end of November the same year and was posted to the Central Flying School, Upavon, for a refresher course on modern types of aircraft. Starting with the Avro Tutor, Bader progressed through the Fairey Battle and Miles Master (the last training stage before experiencing Spitfires and Hurricanes). Bader retained the rank of Flying Officer, that which he held on his retirement in May 1933. [5] RAF Cranwell is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire close to the village of Cranwell, near Sleaford. ... The Central Flying School is the Royal Air Forces primary institution for the training of flying instructors. ... Upavon is a village in Wiltshire, England. ... The ‘’’Avro 621 Tutor’’’ is a two seat British training biplane from the interwar period. ... Fairey Battle The Fairey Battle was a light bomber of the Royal Air Force built by Fairey Aviation in the late 1930s. ... The Miles Master was a 2-seat monoplane trainer built by Miles Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force and Fleet Air Arm during World War II. It went through a number of variants according to engine availability and was even modified as an emergency fighter during the Battle of... The Supermarine Spitfire was a British single-seat fighter, which was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries during the Second World War, and into the 1950s. ... The Hawker Hurricane was a British single-seat fighter aircraft designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Bader's first operational posting was in February 1940 to No. 19 Squadron based at RAF Duxford, near Cambridge, where a close friend from Cranwell days, Squadron Leader Geoffrey Stephenson, was the Commanding Officer, and it was then that he got his first glimpse of a Spitfire. At 29 years of age, Bader was considerably older than his fellow pilots. It was thought that Bader's success as a fighter pilot was partly due to having no legs; pilots pulling high "G" in combat turns often "blacked out" as the flow of blood from the brain drained to other parts of the body - usually the legs. As Bader had no legs he could remain conscious that much longer and thus had an advantage over more able-bodied opponents. [citation needed] No. ... Duxford Aerodrome (IATA: QFO, ICAO: EGSU) is located 8 nautical miles (14. ... This article is about the city in England. ...


Combat credos

Bader attributed his success to the belief in the three basic rules that had been tried and tested by earlier fighter pilots:

  • If you had the height, you controlled the battle.
  • If you came out of the sun, the enemy could not see you.
  • If you held your fire until you were very close, you seldom missed.

Quote; “Don't listen to anyone who tells you that you can't do this or that. That's nonsense. Make up your mind, you'll never use crutches or a stick, then have a go at everything. Go to school, join in all the games you can. Go anywhere you want to. But never, never let them persuade you that things are too difficult or impossible.”


Quote; "Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the obedience of fools."[6]


Quote; "I am not one of those who see war as a cricket match where you first give anything to defeat the opponent and then shake hands."


Battle of Britain

The following April, he left 19 Squadron to become a Flight Commander with No. 222 Squadron, also based at Duxford, commanded by another old friend of his, Squadron Leader Tubby Mermagen, and it was during this phase of Bader's flying career that he had his first taste of combat. While patrolling the coast near Dunkirk in his Spitfire at around 30,000 feet, he came across a Bf 109 in front of him, flying in the same direction and at approximately the same speed. Bader believed that the German must have been a novice, taking no evasive action even though it took more than one burst of gunfire to shoot him down. His second encounter was with a Dornier a day or two later, in which he narrowly avoided a collision while silencing the aircraft's rear gunner during a high-speed pass. Shortly after Bader joined 222 Squadron, it relocated to RAF Kirton-in-Lindsey, just south of the Humber. Categories: | ... For other uses of Dunkirk or Dunkerque, see Dunkirk (disambiguation). ... German Airfield, France, 1941 propaganda photo of the Luftwaffe, Bf 109 fighters on the tarmac The Messerschmitt Bf 109 was a German World War II fighter aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt in the early 1930s. ... Dornier logo. ... River Hull tidal barrier. ...


After flying operations over Dunkirk, he was posted to command No. 242 squadron as Squadron Leader at the end of June 1940; a Hurricane unit based at Coltishall, mainly made up of Canadians who had suffered high losses in the Battle of France and had low morale. Despite initial resistance to their new commanding officer, the pilots were soon won over by Bader's strong personality and perseverance, especially in cutting through red tape to make the squadron operational again. Upon the formation of No. 12 Group RAF, No. 242 squadron was assigned to the Group while based at RAF Duxford. No. ... A Squadron Leaders sleeve/shoulder insignia Squadron Leader (Sqn Ldr in the RAF, SQNLDR in the RNZAF and RAAF and S/L in the former RCAF) is a commissioned rank in some air forces. ... The Hawker Hurricane was a British single-seat fighter aircraft designed and predominantly built by Hawker Aircraft Ltd. ... RAF Coltishall is a Royal Air Force station near Norwich in eastern England. ... Combatants  France  United Kingdom  Canada  Czechoslovakia  Poland  Belgium  Netherlands  Luxembourg Germany Italy Commanders Maurice Gamelin, Maxime Weygand Lord Gort (British Expeditionary Force) Leopold III H.G. Winkelman Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group A) Fedor von Bock (Army Group B) Wilhelm von Leeb (Army Group C) H.R.H. Umberto di... No. ...


As a friend and supporter of his 12 Group commander Air Vice-Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory, Bader joined him as an active exponent of the controversial "Big Wing" theory. Bader was an outspoken critic of the careful "husbanding" tactics being used by 11 Group commander Keith Park, and Bader vociferously campaigned for an aggressive policy of assembling large formations of defensive fighters north of London ready to inflict maximum damage on the massed German bomber formations as they flew over South East England. As the battle progressed, Bader often found himself at the head of a composite wing of fighters consisting of up to five squadrons. Achievements of the Big Wing were hard to quantify, as the large formations often overclaimed aircraft shot down, but there is no doubt that Bader and Leigh-Mallory contributed to the departure of both Fighter Command commander Air Marshal Hugh Dowding and Air Vice Marshal Keith Park after the battle was over. Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory KCB, DSO and Bar (11 July 1892 - 14 November 1944) was a senior commander in the Royal Air Force in World War II and the highest-ranking British officer to die in the war. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Keith Rodney Park GCB, KBE, MC, DFC, DCL (June 15, 1892 - February 6, 1975) was a senior commander in the Royal Air Force in World War II. // Early Life and Army Career Park was born near Auckland, New Zealand. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Fighter Command was one of three functional commands that dominated the public perception of the RAF for much of the mid-20th century. ... Hugh Caswell Tremenheere Dowding, 1st Baron Dowding G.C.B., G.C.V.O., C.M.G. (24 April 1882 - 15 February 1970) was a British officer in the Royal Air Force. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Keith Rodney Park GCB, KBE, MC, DFC, DCL (June 15, 1892 - February 6, 1975) was a senior commander in the Royal Air Force in World War II. // Early Life and Army Career Park was born near Auckland, New Zealand. ...


Wing Leader

In 1941, Bader was promoted to Wing Commander and become one of the first "Wing Leaders." Stationed at Tangmere, Bader led his wing of Spitfires on sweeps and "circus" operations over northwestern Europe throughout the summer campaign. These were missions combining bombers and fighters designed to lure out and tie down German Luftwaffe fighter units that might otherwise serve on the Russian front. One of the Wing Leader's "perks" was permission to have their initials marked on their aircraft as personal identification, thus "D-B" was painted on the side of Bader's Spitfire. These letters gave rise to his radio call sign "Dogsbody." A Wing Commanders sleeve/shoulder insignia A Wing Commanders command flag Wing Commander is a commissioned rank in the Royal Air Force and the air forces of many other Commonwealth countries. ... RAF Tangmere was a Royal Air Force station. ... The Deutsche Luftwaffe or   (German: air force, literally Air Weapon, pronounced lufft-va-fa, IPA: ) is the commonly used term for the German air force. ...


During 1941 his wing was re-equipped with Spitfire VBs, which had two Hispano 20mm cannon and four .303 machine guns. However, Bader flew a Spitfire Va equipped with just eight .303 machine guns, as he insisted that these guns were more effective against fighter opposition. For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ...


Prisoner of war

By August 1941, Bader had claimed 22 German planes shot down, the fifth highest total in the RAF. On August 9, 1941 Bader was shot down and taken prisoner. Although he believed for years that he had collided in mid-air with a Messerschmitt Bf 109 over Le Touquet, recent research shows no "Bf 109 was lost to a collision that day and he may have been shot down by a Bf 109F of II/JG26 flown by Feldwebel Meyer.[7] As he tried to bail out, his right prosthetic leg became trapped in the aircraft, and he only escaped when the leg's retaining straps snapped. is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... German Airfield, France, 1941 propaganda photo of the Luftwaffe, Bf 109 fighters on the tarmac The Messerschmitt Bf 109 was a German World War II fighter aircraft designed by Willy Messerschmitt in the early 1930s. ... Le Touquet-Paris-Plage, commonly referred to as Le Touquet, is a coastal town and commune of the Pas-de-Calais département, in northern France. ...


More recently, in a Channel 4 documentary "Who Downed Douglas Bader?", aired on 28 August 2006, research by air historian Andy Saunders now suggests that he may have been a victim of ‘friendly fire’, shot down by one of his fellow RAF pilots after becoming detached from his own squadron.[8] RAF combat records indicate Bader may have been shot down by F/L "Buck" Casson of No. 616 Squadron RAF, who claimed a "Bf-109 whose tail came off and the pilot bailed out." Bader was flying at the rear of the German fighter formation, alone, and his squadron were the opposite side of the Germans. "Buck" only had a few seconds in which he saw Bader and mistook his Spitfire for a Bf 109. Ironically, Casson was also shot down and made prisoner that same day. Whether Bader devised the collision story to cover for a fellow pilot is left unresolved.[8] This article is about the British television station. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Bader was captured by German forces, who treated him with great respect. General Adolf Galland, a German flying ace, notified the British of his damaged leg and offered them safe passage to drop off a replacement. The British responded on 19 August 1941 with the 'Leg Operation'- an RAF bomber was allowed to drop a new prosthetic leg by parachute to St Omer, a Luftwaffe base in occupied France, as part of Circus 81 involving six Blenheim bombers and a sizeable fighter escort. The Germans were less impressed when, task done, the bombers proceeded onto their bombing mission to Gosnay power station near Bethune, although bad weather prevented the target being attacked. Adolf Dolfo Joseph Ferdinand Galland[1] (19 March 1912-9 February 1996) was a World War II German fighter pilot and commander of Germanys fighter force (General der Jagdflieger) from 1941 to 1945. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... A United States Army soldier plays table football with two prosthetic arms Jon Comer, professional skateboarder with a prosthetic leg. ... Saint-Omer, a town and commune of Artois in northern France, sous-préfecture of the Pas-de-Calais département, 42 miles west-north-west of Lille on the railway to Calais. ... The Bristol Blenheim is also the name of the main model produced by Bristol Cars since 1994. ... Béthune is a city and commune of northern France, sous-préfecture of the Pas-de-Calais département. ...


General Galland stated in an interview that the aircraft dropped the leg after bombing his (Galland's) airfield.


Bader tried to escape from the hospital where he was recovering, and over the next few years proved as big a thorn in the side of the Germans as he had been to the RAF establishment. He made so many attempts at escape that the Germans threatened to take away his legs. Initially held at Stalag Luft III at Sagan, his "goon-baiting" of the camp guards reached such heights that he was finally dispatched to the "escape-proof" Colditz Castle Oflag IV-C, where he remained until the spring of 1945 when it was relieved by the 1st US Army. When Bader subsequently arrived in Paris, true to form, he requested a Spitfire so that he could rejoin the fighting before the war was over, only to be refused. model of a Stalag Luft III compound Stalag Luft III (Stammlager Luft, or Permanent Camp for Airmen #3) was a German Air Force prisoner-of-war camp during World War II that housed captured air force personnel. ... CoA of Żagań Żagań (French and German Sagan) is a town in western Poland with 26,500 inhabitants (2004). ... Oflag IV-C (Oflag is the abbreviation for Offizierslager, officers camp) (often referred to as Colditz Castle because of its location) was one of the most famous German Army prisoner-of-war camps for officers in World War II. It was located in Colditz Castle situated on a cliff overlooking...


Postwar

After his return to England, Bader was given the honour of leading a victory flypast of 300 aircraft over London in June 1945 and was later promoted to Group Captain. He remained in the RAF until February 1946, when he left to take a job at Royal Dutch/Shell. Bader resumed playing golf, an enthusiasm developed after his amputation, achieving a handicap in the low single figures. The Red Arrows and Concorde conclude a special flypast over Buckingham Palace on 4 June, 2002 celebrating the Queens Golden Jubilee. ... Royal Dutch Shell plc is a multinational oil company of British and Dutch origins. ...


Never a person to hide his opinions, Bader also became controversial for his political interventions. A staunch conservative with traditional Victorian values, his trenchantly-expressed views on such subjects as juvenile delinquency, apartheid and Rhodesia's defiance of the Commonwealth (he was a staunch supporter of Ian Smith's white minority regime) attracted much criticism. His association with figures on the radical right fringes of British politics contributed to a perception that he was a closet extremist and racist - an impression that in the case of the politically unsophisticated Bader was almost certainly incorrect. A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... This article is about the former British colony of Southern Rhodesia, todays Zimbabwe. ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... The Rt Hon Ian Smith, Prime Minister of Rhodesia, 1964 (official portrait) Ian Douglas Smith GCLM ID (born 8 April 1919) was the Premier of the British Crown Colony of Southern Rhodesia from 13 April 1964 to 11 November 1965, and Prime Minister of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) from 11 November...


Following the death of his first wife, Thelma, Bader married Joan Murray.


In 1976 Bader was knighted for his services to amputees and his public work for the disabled. His workload was exhausting for a legless man with a worsening heart condition, and, after a London Guildhall dinner honouring the 90th birthday of the Marshal of the Royal Air Force, Sir Arthur "Bomber" Harris, Bader died of a heart attack on 5 September 1982 at the age of 72. Bader had previously suffered a "minor heart attack" three weeks earlier after a golf tournament in Ayrshire. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Arthur Travers Harris, 1st Baronet GCB OBE AFC RAF (April 13, 1892 - April 5, 1984), commonly known as Bomber Harris by the press, and often within the RAF as Butcher Harris[1], was commander of RAF Bomber Command and later a Marshal of... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Ayrshire (Siorrachd Inbhir Àir in Scottish Gaelic) is a region of south-west Scotland, located on the shores of the Firth of Clyde. ...


Honours and tributes

Douglas Bader House in Fairford is now the headquarters for the RAF Charitable Trust
Douglas Bader House in Fairford is now the headquarters for the RAF Charitable Trust

Douglas Bader has a road named after him in Elm Park, Essex. Bader Way is a few minutes walk away from the old RAF base in Hornchurch.In Canford Heath, Poole Dorset is Bader Road and the pub now called the Fighter Pilot previously called the Pilot was opened by Douglas Bader. Also there is Bader Close, Kenley, Surrey - a few minutes away from the former RAF Kenley. There is also The Bader Way in Woodley, Reading. It is near a housing estate built on the site of the airfield where he had his famous crash and lost his legs. He also has a road named after him in Birmingham. The ironically named Bader Walk is situated in the housing estate near the Sentinel statue in Castle Vale. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... RAF Hornchurch was an airfield in the south of Hornchurch in what is now the London Borough of Havering. ... Hornchurch is a town in the London Borough of Havering in East London. ... Kenley is a district in the south of the London Borough of Croydon. ... RAF Kenley (or Kenley Aerodrome) was a station of the Royal Flying Corps in World War I and the RAF in World War II. Its active phase commenced in 1917 and ceased in 1959 when Fighter Command left the aerodrome for good. ... Location within the British Isles Woodley is a town in the English county of Berkshire. ... , Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... This article is about the British city. ... Sentinel, by Tim Tolkien Sentinel (grid reference SP13789065) is a 16m high sculpture by Tim Tolkien, installed upon a traffic island at the intersection of the Chester Road and the A47 Fort Parkway at the entrance to the Castle Vale estate in Birmingham, England. ... Castle Vale is an area of the City of Birmingham, in England, originally created as an overspill housing estate in the 1960s. ...


There is a Sir Douglas Bader Intermediate School in South Auckland, New Zealand. It is located on Bader Drive, near Auckland International Airport. There is also a Sir Douglas Bader seniors' apartment building in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. South Auckland is a common name for a part of Auckland, New Zealand. ... Auckland International Airport (IATA: AKL, ICAO: NZAA) is the largest and busiest international airport in New Zealand serving over 12 million passengers a year, which is expected to more than double in less than 15 years. ... For other places with the same name, see Edmonton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ...


Northbrook College Sussex at Shoreham-by-Sea Airport has a building named after him in which they teach aeronautical engineering and automotive engineering.


Bader's biography, Reach for the Sky, was written after the war by Paul Brickhill and became a best seller. A film of the same title was made in 1956 and starred Kenneth More as Bader. An animated version of Douglas Bader appeared in the Gargoyles television series, voiced by Charles Shaugnessy, in an episode titled "M.I.A." Reach For The Sky is the name of the biography of Douglas Bader, by Paul Brickhill, and also of a film of Baders story released in 1956, starring Kenneth More and directed by Lewis Gilbert. ... Paul Chester Jerome Brickhill (December 20, 1916 – April 23, 1991) was an Australian writer, whose World War II books were turned into popular movies. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Kenneth Gilbert More CBE, (20 September 1914 - 12 July 1982) was a successful British cinema, television and theatre actor. ... This article is about the animated series. ...


Two pubs have been named in Bader's honour. The first, the Douglas Bader, is located in the village of Martlesham Heath on the site of Martlesham Heath Airfield where Bader was briefly stationed in 1940. The second, the Bader Arms, is situated in the village of Tangmere, West Sussex near RAF Tangmere, where Bader was stationed in 1941. An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Map sources for Martlesham Heath at grid reference TM2547 Martlesham Heath village is situated 6 miles east of Ipswich, in Suffolk, England. ... Martlesham Heath Airfield was first used by the Royal Flying Corps in January 1917. ... RAF Tangmere was a Royal Air Force station. ...


The Douglas Bader Memorial Garden in Cupar, Fife was opened by Bader in 1982. Location within the British Isles The Royal Burgh of Cupar is a burgh in Fife, Scotland, and is Fifes former county town, although in 1975 the administration of the newly-created Fife Regional Council was moved to Glenrothes. ... This article is about the area in Scotland. ...


On many RAF Stations, including RAF Coltishall and RAF Coningsby there is a Junior Rank's barrack block named after Douglas Bader. RAF Coltishall is a Royal Air Force station near Norwich in eastern England. ... RAF Coningsby, is a Royal Air Force station in Lincolnshire, England. ...


Due to his lack of legs, Bader was referenced (as "Dougie Wougie Bader") in the Half Man Half Biscuit song "Arthur's Farm" - a play on the two legs bad/four legs good theme of the George Orwell novel, Animal Farm. Nigel Blackwell, singer, guitarist and songwriter Half Man Half Biscuit, often abbreviated to HMHB, are a UK rock band from Birkenhead, active sporadically since the mid-1980s, known for their satirical, sardonic and sometimes surreal songs. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... For other uses, see Animal Farm (disambiguation). ...


Bader's artificial legs are kept by the RAF Museum at their store at Stafford and are not on public display. , Stafford is the county town of Staffordshire in England. ...


References

Notes
  1. ^ Channel 4 History profile
  2. ^ Douglas Bader. CricketArchive. [1] Access date: 27 May 2007.
  3. ^ Brookes, Andrew. Crash! Military Aircraft Disasters, Accidents and Incidents. London: Ian Allen Ltd., 1991, p. 36. ISBN 0-7110-1965-7.
  4. ^ Brickhill 1954, p. 146.
  5. ^ Brickhill 1954, p. 150.
  6. ^ Brickhill 1954, p. 44. Note: (also quoted as "...for the obedience of fools and the guidance of wise men.") In Reach for the Sky, this quote is attributed to Harry Day, the Royal Flying Corps First World War fighter ace.
  7. ^ Caldwell, Don. JG26 War Diary, Volume 1, 1939-1942. London: Grub Street, 1996. ISBN 1-898697-52-3.
  8. ^ a b Douglas Bader by Steve Platt. Channel 4. Retrieved on 20 August 2007.
Bibliography
  • Bader, Douglas. Fight for the Sky: The Story of the Spitfire and Hurricane. Ipswich, Suffolk, UK: W.S. Cowell Ltd., 2004. ISBN 0-30435-674-3.
  • Brickhill, Paul. Reach for the Sky: The Story of Douglas Bader DSO, DFC. London: Odhams Press Ltd., 1954. ISBN 1-55750-222-6.
  • Burns, M. Bader: The Man and His Men. London: Cassell Military, 1998. ISBN 0-304350-52-4.
  • Register of Births. St Marylebone, sub-district of St John, London. Birth No. 44.
  • Vigors, Tim. Life's Too Short to Cry: The Inspirational Memoir of an Ace Battle of Britain Fighter Pilot . London: Grub Street Publishers, 2006. ISBN 1-904943-61-6.

CricketArchive is an archive of cricket related facts and figures. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Douglas Bader - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1838 words)
Bader is upheld as an inspirational leader and hero of the era, not least because he fought despite having lost both legs in a pre-war flying accident.
Bader was an outspoken critic of the careful 'husbanding' tactics being used by 11 Group commander Keith Park, and Bader vociferously campaigned for an aggressive policy of assembling large formations of defensive fighters north of London ready to inflict maximum damage on the massed German bomber formations as they flew over South East England.
Bader's artificial legs are on display at the RAF Museum at Stafford, although this is not a museum that is open to the public.
Douglas Bader (1930 words)
Bader was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Air Force in 1930 but after only 18 months he crashed his aeroplane and as a result of the accident had to have both legs amputated.
Bader was now promoted by Air Vice Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory and was given command of 242 Squadron, which had suffered 50 per cent casualties in just a couple of weeks.
Bader was freed at the end of the Second World War and when he returned to Britain he was promoted to group captain.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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