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Encyclopedia > Dorsal consonant
Places of articulation
Labial
Bilabial
Labial-velar
Labial-alveolar
Labiodental
Coronal
Linguolabial
Interdental
Dental
Alveolar
Apical
Laminal
Postalveolar
Alveolo-palatal
Retroflex
Dorsal
Palatal
Labial-palatal
Velar
Uvular
Radical
Pharyngeal
Epiglotto-pharyngeal
Epiglottal
Glottal
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Dorsal consonants are articulated with the back of the tongue against either the hard palate, or the flexible velum just behind it, or even against the uvula. So the term covers a wide range of pronunciations, including palatal, velar, and uvular consonants. Places of articulation (passive & active): 1. ... Labials are consonants articulated either with both lips (bilabial articulation) or with the lower lip and the upper teeth (labiodental articulation). ... In phonetics, a bilabial consonant is a consonant articulated with both lips. ... Labial-velar consonants are doubly articulated at the velum and the lips. ... The Yelî Dnye language of Rossel Island, Papua New Guinea, appears to be unique in having labial-alveolar and labial-postalveolar places of articulation, as illustrated below. ... In phonetics, labiodentals are consonants articulated with the lower lips and the upper teeth, or viceversa. ... Coronal consonants are articulated with the flexible front part of the tongue. ... Linguolabials are consonants articulated by putting the tongue tip or tongue blade against the upper lip. ... Interdental consonants are produced by placing the blade of the tongue against the upper incisors. ... Dentals are consonants such as t, d, n, and l articulated with either the lower or the upper teeth, or both, rather than with the gum ridge as in English. ... Alveolar consonants are articulated with the tongue against or close to the superior alveolar ridge, which is called that because it contains the alveoli (the sockets) of the superior teeth. ... An apical consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the apex of the tongue (i. ... A laminal consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the flattened end of the tongue. ... Postalveolar (or palato-alveolar) consonants are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge (the place of articulation for alveolar consonants) and the palate (the place of articulation for palatal consonants). ... In phonetics, alveolo-palatal are consonants articulated with the tip of the tongue between the alveolar ridge and the palate, but closer to the palate than for postalveolar consonants. ... Sub-apical retroflex plosive In phonetics, retroflex consonants are consonant sounds used in some languages. ... Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth). ... In phonetics, the labialised palatal approximant is a consonant with two constrictions in the vocal tract: with the tongue on the palate, and rounded at the lips. ... Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum). ... Uvulars are consonants articulated with the back of the tongue against or near the uvula, that is, further back in the mouth than velar consonants. ... Radical consonants are articulated with the root (base) of the tongue in the throat. ... A pharyngeal consonant is a type of consonant which is articulated with the root of the tongue against the pharynx. ... An epiglotto-pharyngeal consonant is a newly reported type of consonant, articulated with the epiglottis against the back wall of the pharynx. ... An epiglottal consonant is a consonant that is articulated with the epiglottis against the back of the pharynx. ... Glottal consonants are consonants articulated with the glottis. ... Phonetics (from the Greek word φωνή, phone = sound/voice) is the study of sounds (voice). ... The International Phonetic Alphabet. ... The International Phonetic Alphabet. ... Many animals have longer and more flexible tongues than humans. ... The palate is the roof of the mouth in humans and vertebrate animals. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The uvula is a small cone-shaped mass of tissue hanging down from the soft palate, near the back of the throat. ... Pronunciation refers to: the way a word or a language is usually spoken; the manner in which someone utters a word. ... Palatal consonants are consonants articulated with the body of the tongue raised against the hard palate (the middle part of the roof of the mouth). ... Velars are consonants articulated with the back part of the tongue (the dorsum) against the soft palate (the back part of the roof of the mouth, known also as the velum). ... Uvulars are consonants articulated with the back of the tongue against or near the uvula, that is, further back in the mouth than velar consonants. ...


The English pronunciation of the letter G – either before the vowels a, o and u, or before the letters l and r – is a dorsal consonant. Examples: the garden or to grab. Thus it is a voiced dorsal plosive.


The English pronunciation of the letter C – either before the vowels a, o and u, or before the letters l and r – is a dorsal consonant. Examples: the cake or to crawl. Thus it is a voiceless dorsal plosive. This consonant is also the pronunciation of the English letters k and q.


Both English approximants "y", e.g. in yellow and "w" e.g. in white are also dorsal consonants, palatal and velar labialised respectively. Approximants are speech sounds that could be regarded as intermediate between vowels and typical consonants. ...


The voiceless German /x/-sound (german: ach) is also a dorsal consonant. It is either a voiceless fricative palatal after the vowels i and e (german: ich) or a voiceless fricative velar after the vowels o and u (german: huch).


Other languages also include uvular consonants. These belong to the dorsal consonants as well. Uvulars are consonants articulated with the back of the tongue against or near the uvula, that is, further back in the mouth than velar consonants. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
sociology - Dorsal (365 words)
Examples of this include the dorsal fin, dorsal root ganglion, dorsal root, dorsal nerve, dorsum sellae, dorsal arch, dorsalis pedis arteries, dorsal ramus, dorsal respiratory group, dorsal venous arch, and dorsiflexion among others.
In linguistics, a dorsal consonant refers to hard sounds utilizing the tongue on the back of the mouth, such as palatal, velar, and uvular consonants.
In neurology, dorsal is an outdated term for the medial longitudinal fasciculus in the neural arch.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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