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Encyclopedia > Dorrigo, New South Wales

Dorrigo is a small town inland from the Mid North Coast of New South Wales, Australia, in Bellingen Shire Council. It is approximately 580 kilometres no rth of the state capital, Sydney, and 60 kilometres from the coastal city of Coffs Harbour. The town is situated on the Dorrigo Plateau, which is part of the Great Dividing Range, and has a population of 2400. Dorrigo is 760 metres above sea level. Dorrigo is noted for its high rainfall and frequent fogs. It is often said of Dorrigo that "The clouds roll down the streets." The Mid North Coast is a country region in the north east of the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Capital Sydney Government Const. ... Bellingen Shire Council is a Local Government Area on the Mid North Coast of New South Wales, Australia. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia with a metropolitan area population of over 4. ... Coffs Harbour jetty and harbour, including Muttonbird Island, looking north Location of Coffs Harbour in New South Wales (red) Coffs Harbour is a coastal city and Local Government Area in northern New South Wales, Australia. ... The Great Divide runs around the entire eastern and south-eastern edge of Australia The Great Dividing Range, also known as the Eastern Highlands, is Australias most substantial mountain range. ... In meteorology, precipitation is any kind of water that falls from the sky as part of the weather. ... Evening fog obscures Londons Tower Bridge from passers by. ...


The nearby Dorrigo National Park and New England National Park cater for persons interested in natural sights. The Dorrigo Steam Railway is currently being set up in the town as a museum and working exhibit. Cedar Falls, a waterfall on the Never Never Circuit. ... New England is a national park in New South Wales (Australia), 391 km north of Sydney. ... The Dorrigo Steam Railway and Museum has the largest collection of preserved railway vehicles and equipment from the railways of New South Wales. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...


The name of the area comes from the local aboriginal word "Dundurrigo" meaning "stringy bark" (a type of eucalypt). However there is a local tradition that the name comes from a Spanish general, Don Dorrigo. Regardless of the origin, over time the name has been shortened to simply "Dorrigo." See also, List of Indigenous Australian group names Indigenous Australians are the first human inhabitants of the Australian continent and its nearby islands. ... Eucalypts are tree species belonging to three closely related genera, Angophora, Corymbia and Eucalyptus. ... The word tradition comes from the Latin word traditio which means to hand down or to hand over. ...

Dorrigo Hotel, photograph by John Catsoulis
Dorrigo Hotel, photograph by John Catsoulis

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1077x808, 135 KB) Dorrigo Hotel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1077x808, 135 KB) Dorrigo Hotel. ...

History

The first European to discover the area was Richard Craig in 1830, who at the age of 18 escaped from the Moreton Bay Penal Colony and traveled south. He stayed with Aborigines living in the Clarence River area and expored the Dorrigo Plateau on hunting and fishing trips. This article is about the continent. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Moreton Bay from space, from a NASA photograph Moreton Bay is a large bay on the eastern coast of Australia 19 km from Brisbane, Queensland. ... The Grafton Bridge over the Clarence River showing Bascule span lifted to let shipping through. ... A hunt is an activity during which humans or animals chase some prey, such as wild or specially bred animals (traditionally targeted species are known as game), in order to catch or kill them, either for food, sale, or as a form of sport. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering animals not classifiable as insects which breathe in water or pass their lives in water. ...


By the early 1840s, redcedar cutters were working the Bellinger River, scouring each successive coastal valley in their northward rush for 'red gold,' as the valuable native redcedar was known. The precipitous escarpment halted their push upstream, and they soon moved on to more accessible redcedar supplies in other valleys. // Events and Trends Technology First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. War, peace and politics First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February... Redcedar is an alternative name for two North American species in the cypress family Cupressaceae: Eastern Redcedar or Eastern Juniper (Juniperus virginiana) Western Redcedar (Thuja plicata) It is also the name of an Australian species in the mahogany family Meliaceae: Australian Redcedar (Toona australis) Neither is a true Cedar (Cedrus... In geology, an escarpment is a transition zone between different physiogeographic provinces that involves an elevation differential, often involving high cliffs. ...


It was not until 1857, when Mr M.Cloggen settled at Bostobrick from the west, that pit sawyers were sent into the forests of the Dorrigo Plateau. then known as the Bostobrick Cedar Scrub. Later settlers penetrated the scrub to claim natural clearings at Little Plain (North Dorrigo), and Paddys Plains, utilising the native grasses as feed for their bullock teams. 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Bullock may refer to: bullock or ox, castrated male cattle Sandra Bullock, actress Alan Bullock, historian This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


After felling by axe, these rainforest giants were cut up into flitches using a double-handed cross saw over a deep pit. In this difficult and dangerous work the redcedar-cutters would draw straws for the "most distasteful task" of sawyer in the pit. Emerging from the gloomy rainforests after months of hard labour, sustained only by salt beef, damper, tea and sugar, they stood out from other outdoor bushworkers by being "as pallid as corpses". Rainforests are forests characterized by high rainfall, with definitions setting minimum normal annual rainfall between 1750 mm and 2000 mm. ... Look up sawyer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A cut of beef. ... For dampers in the sense of automotive suspension parts, see shock absorbers. ... Tea leaves in a Chinese gaiwan. ... Magnification of typical sugar showing monoclinic hemihedral crystalline structure. ...


Wastage of this beautiful and durable timber was enormous, only the best parts of the tree being used. Faced with dwindling redcedar supplies, attention soon shifted to other valuable softwoods, such as rosewood, hoop pine and coachwood. Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use—from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use—as structural material for construction or wood... Despite being fairly hard, cedar is a softwood Softwood is the wood from conifers. ... Rosewood refers to a number of richly hued timbers, brownish with darker veining. ... Binomial name Araucaria cunninghamii Aiton ex D.Don Araucaria cunninghamii is a species of Araucaria known as Moreton Bay Pine, or Hoop Pine (confusing names, as it is not a pine). ... Binomial name Ceratopetalum apetalum Coachwood (Ceratopetalum apetalum), also called scented satinwood or tarwood, is a medium-sized hardwood tree, straight-growing with smooth, fragrant, greyish bark. ...


Government botanist J.H. Maiden focussed attention and expectation on the Dorrigo Forest Reserve after a visit in 1893, detailing the variety, size and quality of the species in this spectacular area of rainforest. Previously, there had been sporadic logging via 'Fernyface Shoot', where logs were shot over the Dorrigo mountain edge down into the valley, but by 1900 the newly built mountain road to Bellingen facilitated "the almost daily departure of horse and bullock waggons with loads of the Dorrigo timber wealth". Hoop pine was the next timber bonanza, and several tramways and timber shoots were established to remove the giant logs from the plateau forests. Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... Joseph Henry Maiden (25 April 1859–16 November 1925) was a botanist who made a major contribution to knowledge of the Australian flora, especially the Eucalyptus genus. ... 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Bellingen is a small town (pop 2800) on the Mid North Coast of New South Wales, Australia and the seat of Bellingen Shire Council. ... A railway yard in Portland, Oregon. ...


One of the most ambitious "pine lines" was the Syndicate tramway, used to transport hoop pine down the mountainside north of Dibbs Head to Gleniffer between 1912 and 1928. The onset of World War I and completion of the railway to Dorrigo in 1924, followed by The Depression, all combined to bring this grand scheme to a close. However, tramway relics remain as mute sentinels of the pioneer era on the Syndicate Ridge Walking Track in Dorrigo National Park. 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Great Depression was a global economic slump that began in 1929 and bottomed in 1933. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ...


The improved access from the coast, and the 1894 release of small dairy blocks, encouraged the closer settlement of the Dorrigo Plateau. Word quickly spread of the agricultural potential of the area's deep basalt soils, and with government regulations requiring selectors to improve the value of their land, farmers immediately set to work to clear the scrub for pasture. 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Dairy farm near Oxford, New York A dairy is a facility for the extraction and processing of animal milk (mostly from cows, sometimes from buffalo, sheep or goats) and other farm animals, for human consumption. ... Basalt Columnar basalt at Sheepeater Cliff in Yellowstone Basalt (IPA: ) is a common gray to black volcanic rock. ... Loess field in Germany Soil horizons are formed by combined biological, chemical and physical alterations. ... Scrubland is plant community characterized by scrub vegetation. ... Pastureland Pasture is land with lush herbaceous vegetation cover used for grazing of ungulates as part of a farm or ranch. ...


Rainforest clearing was backbreaking work. Trees were ringbarked or felled, and burnt in 'great conflagrations'. Rainforests are forests characterized by high rainfall, with definitions setting minimum normal annual rainfall between 1750 mm and 2000 mm. ...


"During the last twelve months it is estimated that fully 3,000 acres (12 km²) of timber have been committed to the flames so that at the present rate it will not be very long before the entire original scrub has disappeared." (Agricultural Gazette, 1911).


The 1917 Guide to the Dorrigo Shire extolled the plateau as "an enormous area of splendid, delightfully, watered agricultural and dairying lands, upon which are many smiling homesteads and herds of well-bred cattle and adds "notwithstanding wanton destruction of enormous areas of timber, magnificent supplies yet remain for posterity". Year 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


However, the luxuriance of the rainforest growth exaggerated the fertility of the underlying soils. Most of the valuable plant nutrients were derived from the rich and constantly recycled litter layer of the forest floor, and after forest clearing and subsequent burning, these nutrients were quickly depleted. Fertility is the ability of people or animals to produce healthy offspring in abundance, and of the earth to bear fruit. ... A nutrient is either element or compound necessary for or contributing to an organisms metabolism, growth, or other functioning. ...


It was a hard life for early settlers, with distant markets and decreasing soil fertility offering poor returns. However, many were successful and dairying, beef cattle and logging are still major industries of Dorrigo today. Look up Market in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle (often called cows in vernacular and contemporary usage, or kye as the Scots plural of cou) are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ...


The dairy industry became a mainstay of the area, and today, tourism is becoming more important. As of 2006, Dorrigo has Australia's last newspaper to be printed by letterpress, the Don Dorrigo Gazette and Guy Fawkes Advocate (founded 1910, printed on a pre-WWII German Heidelberg Zylinder Automat. 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Letterpress printing is the oldest printing technique, in which a raised surface is inked and then pressed against a smooth substance to obtain an image in reverse. ... 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


For further information:


Portal for the Dorrigo plateau


Bellinger Magic - a visitor guide to the Bellinger region


Coordinates: 30°20′S 152°43′E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Dorrigo - New South Wales - Australia - Travel - smh.com.au (1960 words)
Some sources disagreed with this explanation suggesting that the name 'Dorrigo' was an abbreviation of 'Dondorrigo' which was said to have been a local Aboriginal word for the stringy bark gum tree.
The cost of settlement was ten shillings a year for 40 acres and this attracted people eager to exploit both the wool and cattle prospects of the land and the rich stands of rosewood, silky oak, cedar, marble wood and Arctic beech.
The reputation of the Dorrigo Plateau as a place of great richness and fertility had spread so that by the early years of the twentieth century the area was being subdivided and hundreds of people were moving to the district.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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