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Encyclopedia > Dorothy Parker
Dorothy Parker

Parker in Los Angeles, mid 1930s
Born: August 22, 1893(1893-08-22)
Long Branch, New Jersey, U.S.
Died: June 7, 1967 (aged 73)
New York, New York, U.S.
Occupation: Author, Poet, Critic, Screenwriter
Literary movement: American modernism
Influences: Franklin Pierce Adams, Robert Benchley, Colette, Ring Lardner, Thackeray, Elinor Wylie
Influenced: Candace Bushnell, Maureen Dowd, Nora Ephron, Amy Sedaris, David Sedaris, Amy Sherman-Palladino

Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893June 7, 1967) was an American writer and poet, best known for her caustic wit, wisecracks, and sharp eye for 20th century urban foibles. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Map of Long Branch in Monmouth County Long Branch is a City in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... “NY” redirects here. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... For the album by the Kaiser Chiefs see Employment (album) Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... ... American Modernism is an artistic and cultural movement in the USA starting at the turn of the 20th Century with its core period between World War I and World War II. Characteristically, Modernist art has a tendency to abstraction, is innovative, aesthetic, futuristic and self-referential. ... Franklin Pierce Adams (November 15, 1881 – March 23, 1960), was an American columnist (under the pen name F.P.A.), writer, and wit, part of the famous Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889 – November 21, 1945) was an American humorist best known for his work as a newspaper columnist and film actor. ... Colette Colette [1] [2] was the pen name of the French novelist Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (January 28, 1873 – August 3, 1954). ... Ringgold Wilmer Lardner (March 6, 1885 - September 25, 1933) was an American sports columnist and short story writer best known for his satirical takes on the sports world, marriage, and the theatre. ... William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. ... Elinor (Hoyt) Wylie (September 7, 1885 – December 16, 1928) was an American poet and novelist who was popular before World War II. She was a contemporary of Edna St. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Maureen Dowd (born January 14, 1952) is a columnist for The New York Times. ... Nora Ephron Nora Ephron (born May 19, 1941 in New York City, New York) is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and novelist. ... Amy Sedaris (born March 29, 1961, in Endicott, New York) is an American actress, author, and comedian. ... Sedaris in 2005. ... Amy Sherman-Palladino (born Amy Sherman) is an American television writer and producer. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The poor poet A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... Look up Wit in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ...

Contents

Early life

Also known as Dot or Dottie, Parker was born Dorothy Rothschild at 732 Ocean Avenue in the West End village of Long Branch, New Jersey, [1] where her parents had a summer beach cottage. Parker wrote in her essay "My Hometown" that her parents got her back to their Manhattan apartment shortly after Labor Day so she could be called a true New Yorker. Her friends found her both a source of fun and of tragedy; she attempted suicide at least three times. Map of Long Branch in Monmouth County Long Branch is a City in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ...


Her mother died in West End when Dorothy was a month shy of turning five. She grew up on the Upper West Side, and attended Roman Catholic elementary school at the Convent of the Blessed Sacrament, despite having a Jewish father and Protestant stepmother. Her stepmother died when Dorothy was nine. Dorothy later went to Miss Dana's School, a finishing school in Morristown, New Jersey. Her formal education ended when she was 13. The Upper West Side is a neighborhood of the borough of Manhattan in New York City that lies between Central Park and the Hudson River above West 59th Street. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... A finishing school is a type of private school for girls that emphasizes cultural studies and prepares students especially for social activities. ... Nickname: Military Capital of the Revolution Location of Morristown in Morris County (L); Location of Morris County in New Jersey (R) Coordinates: Country United States State New Jersey County Morris Founded 1715 Incorporated 1865 Mayor Donald Cresitello (D; term ends December 31, 2009. ...


Her uncle, Martin Rothschild, died in the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912. Her father died a year later. In 1917, she met and married a Wall Street broker, Edwin Pond Parker II, but they were separated by his army service in World War I. Her family was not part of the Rothschilds' banking dynasty, and she had ambiguous feelings about her Jewish heritage given the strong anti-Semitism of that era. She joked that she married to escape her name, and she kept the name Parker after she and her husband divorced. When asked if there was a Mr. Parker, she responded: "There used to be." RMS Titanic was a British Olympic class passenger liner that became famous for her collision with an iceberg on 14 April 1912 and dramatic sinking on 15 April 1912. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... A Stock broker sells or buys stock on behalf of a customer. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage, which can be contrasted with an annulment which is a declaration that a marriage is void, though the effects of marriage may be recognized in such unions, such as spousal support, child custody and distribution of property. ...


After her limited schooling, she earned money by playing piano at a dancing school, among other things. She first sold a poem to Vanity Fair magazine in 1917, and some months later, she was hired as an editorial assistant for another Condé Nast magazine, Vogue. She moved to Vanity Fair as drama critic and staff writer following two years at Vogue. A short grand piano, with the top up. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... Editing may also refer to audio editing or film editing. ... Condé Nast Publications Inc is a worldwide magazine publishing company based in New York City. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


The Round Table years

In 1919, her career took off while writing theatre criticism for Vanity Fair, initially as a stand-in for the vacationing P.G. Wodehouse. At the magazine she met Robert Benchley, who became a close friend, and Robert E. Sherwood. They began lunching at the Algonquin Hotel, among the founding members of the Algonquin Round Table. They were soon joined by Franklin Pierce Adams and Alexander Woollcott (both newspaper columnists who published Parker's witticisms), Harold Ross, Harpo Marx and many others. Called English literatures performing flea, P. G. Wodehouse, pictured in 1904, became famous for his complex plots, ingenious wordplay, and prolific output. ... Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889 – November 21, 1945) was an American humorist best known for his work as a newspaper columnist and film actor. ... Robert Emmet Sherwood (4 April 1896–14 November 1955) American playwright, editor, and screenwriter. ... The Algonquin Hotel opened in 1902. ... The Algonquin Round Table was a group of New York City writers, critics, actors and wits that met from 1919 until about 1929, though its legacy endured long afterward. ... Franklin Pierce Adams (November 15, 1881 – March 23, 1960), was an American columnist (under the pen name F.P.A.), writer, and wit, part of the famous Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s and 1930s. ... Alexander Woollcott, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Alexander Humphreys Woollcott (January 19, 1887 – January 23, 1943) was a critic and commentator for The New Yorker magazine, and a member of the Algonquin Round Table. ... Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and founder of The New Yorker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death. ... This article is about Harpo Marx, brother of Groucho et al. ...

Marker at Parker's birthplace.
Marker at Parker's birthplace.

Parker's caustic wit as a critic initially proved popular, but she was eventually terminated by Vanity Fair in 1920 after her criticisms began to offend too often. In solidarity, both Benchley and Sherwood resigned in protest. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


When Harold Ross founded The New Yorker in 1925, she and Benchley were considered part of the staff, though at first they contributed little to the magazine. Parker was soon writing for The New Yorker as well. Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and founder of The New Yorker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ...


Parker became famous for her short, viciously humorous poems, many about the perceived ludicrousness of her many (largely unsuccessful) romantic affairs and others wistfully considering the appeal of suicide. She never considered these poems as her most important works. For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ...


Her greatest period of productivity and success came in the next 15 years. She published seven volumes of short stories and poetry: Enough Rope, Sunset Gun, Laments for the Living, Death and Taxes, After Such Pleasures, Not So Deep as a Well (collected poems) and Here Lies. After her death, the critic Brendan Gill noted that these titles "amounted to a capsule autobiography." Some of this work was originally published in The New Yorker, to which she also contributed acerbic book reviews, under the byline "Constant Reader"; these were widely read and later published in a collection under that name. (Her response to a moment of whimsy in A. A. Milne's The House at Pooh Corner: "Tonstant Weader fwowed up.") She wrote or co-wrote several plays as well, some well-reviewed, though none of lasting note. Gill wrote for The New Yorker for more than 60 years. ... Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was a British author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ...


Her best-known story, published in Bookman Magazine under the title "Big Blonde," was awarded the O. Henry Award as the most outstanding short story of 1929. Her short stories, though often witty, were also spare and incisive, and more bittersweet than comic. She eventually separated from her husband, and had affairs with reporter-turned-playwright Charles MacArthur, and with the publisher Seward Collins. The O. Henry Awards are yearly prizes given to short stories of exceptional merit. ... This article is in need of attention. ... Charles MacArthur (November 5, 1895 _ April 21, 1956) was an American playwright and screenwriter, born in Scranton, Pennsylvania. ... Seward Bishop Collins (April 22, 1899 – December 8, 1952) graduated from Princeton University and entered New Yorks literary life in 1926 as a bon vivant. ...


Hollywood

In 1934, she married Alan Campbell, an actor with hopes to be a screenwriter. He was reputed to be bisexual — indeed, Parker did some of the reputing by claiming in public that he was "queer as a billy goat" — but there is no substantial evidence for this. Though Campbell's screenwriting ability soon proved ephemeral at best, Parker had a natural aptitude for the work, and she soon began earning a serious living as a freelance screenwriter for various Hollywood film studios. She and Campbell moved to Hollywood and worked on more than 15 films (on a salary of $5200 a week, an enormous sum during the Depression).[citation needed] You might want Alan Campbell (pastor) Alan Campbell (screenwriter) Alan Campbell (politician) Alan Campbell (sculler) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... In human sexuality, bisexuality describes a man or woman having a sexual orientation to persons of either or both sexes (a man or woman who sexually likes both sexes; people who are sexually and/or romantically attracted to both males and females). ... The word queer has traditionally meant strange or unusual, but it is also currently often used in reference to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and asexual communities. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


With Robert Carson and Campbell, she wrote the script for the 1937 film A Star is Born, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing - Screenplay. Her marriage with Campbell was tempestuous; they divorced in 1947, remarried in 1950, and remained together on and off until his death in 1963 in West Hollywood. DVD cover showing stars Janet Gaynor and Fredric March. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... West Hollywoods logo illustrates the citys borders. ...


Parker was a longtime advocate of left-wing causes, a fierce civil libertarian and civil rights advocate, and a frequent critic of those in authority. During the 1930s she drifted increasingly towards the left, even declared herself a Communist, though she never joined the Communist party. She reported on the Loyalist cause in Spain for the leftist New Masses in 1937 and helped to found the Anti-Nazi League in Hollywood in 1936. Her former Round Table friends saw less and less of her. A glimpse of her attitudes towards government, fascism, and law enforcement can be found in her script additions to the Alfred Hitchcock film Saboteur, in which she also made a cameo appearance. In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Saboteur is a 1942 Universal film directed by Alfred Hitchcock with a screenplay written by Peter Viertel and Joan Harrison. ...


Later life

She also was heard occasionally on radio, including Information Please (as a guest) and Author, Author (as a regular panelist). She wrote for the Columbia Workshop, and both Ilka Chase and Tallulah Bankhead used her material for radio monologues. [2] Information Please was an American radio quiz show, created by Dan Golenpaul, which aired from May 17, 1938 to June 25, 1948. ... Ilka Chase (b. ... Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 - December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bon vivant. ...


Parker was listed as a Communist by the publication Red Channels in 1950, and was investigated by the FBI for her suspected involvement in Communism during the McCarthy era. As a result, she was placed on the Hollywood blacklist by the movie studio bosses. This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Red Channels Red Channels: The Report of Communist Influence in Radio and Television was an anti-communist pamphlet published in the United States. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... Protestors opposing the jailing of the Hollywood Ten in 1950 (from the 1987 documentary Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist). ...


From 1957 to 1962 she wrote book reviews [3] for Esquire, though these pieces were increasingly erratic due to her continued abuse of alcohol. One of these reviews had a huge impact on the career of the young Harlan Ellison. Reviewing his paperback short story collection Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-Up Generation (Regency, 1961), she described Ellison as "a good, clean, honest writer, putting down what he has seen and known and no sensationalism about it" and lavished praise on his story "Daniel White for the Greater Good," [4] commenting, "It is without exception the best presentation I have ever seen of present racial conditions in the South and of those who try to alleviate them. I cannot recommend it too vehemently... Incidentally, the other stories in Mr. Ellison's book are not so dusty, either." [5] This reaction from Parker was highly unusual as Ellison's collection was the only paperback Parker ever reviewed. Her favorable nod gave Ellison a foothold with both mainstream publishers and film producers, and shortly afterwards he headed for Hollywood. [6] Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ... Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, essays, and criticism. ... Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-Up Generation is an early collection of short stories by Harlan Ellison, originally published in paperback in 1961. ...


Parker resided in Hollywood with Campbell and worked on movie scripts; among her last was an unproduced film for Marilyn Monroe. Following Campbell's death in 1963, Parker returned to Manhattan. Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe Award-winning American actress, singer, model and pop icon. ...


Parker died of a heart attack[1] at the age of 73 in 1967 at the Volney residential hotel in New York City. In her will, she bequeathed her estate to the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. foundation. Following King's death, her estate was passed on to the NAACP. Her executrix, Lillian Hellman, bitterly but unsuccessfully contested this disposition. Her ashes remained unclaimed in various places, including her attorney Paul O'Dwyer's filing cabinet, for approximately 17 years. The NAACP eventually claimed Parker's remains and designed a memorial garden for them outside their Baltimore headquarters. The plaque reads, Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... “MLK” redirects here. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... Lillian Florence Hellman (June 20, 1905 – June 30, 1984) was a successful American playwright, linked throughout her life with many left-wing causes. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ...

Here lie the ashes of Dorothy Parker (1893 - 1967) humorist, writer, critic. Defender of human and civil rights. For her epitaph she suggested, 'Excuse my dust'. This memorial garden is dedicated to her noble spirit which celebrated the oneness of humankind and to the bonds of everlasting friendship between black and Jewish people. Dedicated by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. October 28, 1988.

Her home site was designated a national literary landmark by Friends of Libraries USA, and a bronze plaque marks the spot where the home once stood.[7]


Spoken word recordings

  • Men ( file info) — play in browser (beta)
    • A 30-second excerpt of Dorothy Parker's Men (Text of poem)
    • Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Image File history File links ParkerD-Men. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ...

References in popular culture

  • At the height of her fame, George Oppenheimer wrote a play based on Parker, Here Today (1932); the character based on her was portrayed by Ruth Gordon.
  • Alan Moore imagines a shooting and writing spree with the writer in the song "Me & Dorothy Parker" which has been recorded by the Flash Girls on their album Maurice & I.
  • Parker's image appeared on a 29¢ U.S. commemorative postage stamp in the Literary Arts series issued August 22, 1992, on what would have been Parker's 99th birthday.
  • Parker's name was used on a compendium of literary extracts about tattoos, Dorothy Parker's Elbow - Tattoos on Writers, Writers on Tattoos by Kim Addonizio and Cheryl Dumesnil, so named because she had a small star inked on the inside of her arm.
  • She is featured in the song "Dorothy Parker's Hair" by the Australian band Mental as Anything.
  • The television series Gilmore Girls was produced by Dorothy Parker Drank Here Productions, Amy Sherman-Palladino's production company .
  • Dorthy Parker was also mentioned by Rory Gilmore on an season 6 episode of Gilmore Girls. When Rory was given the less than clever response of "Whatever" by a rude bar waitress, Rory responded "Snappy comeback. Dorthy Parker know about you?".
  • Punk band The Mr T Experience recorded Parker's "Somebody's Song" poem on their 1996 album Love Is Dead.
  • Canadian musician Ron Hawkins refers to Dorothy Parker in a song titled "Out of the Black". Lyric: And just like Dorothy Parker would say, it's no shame to call it a day ...
  • The songs "Afternoon" and "Ballade at Thirty-Five" from No Promises, by Carla Bruni were adapted from the poems by Parker.[9]
  • Her name is used in the opening verse of the Al Stewart song "The Age of Rhythm", from the album "Between the Wars" (1995). The verse is, "Today I feel like Dorothy Parker / Today I've got the critical eye".

Ruth Gordon (October 30, 1896 – August 28, 1985) was an American actress and screenwriter who was perhaps best known for her role as the oversolicitous neighbor in Roman Polanskis adaptation of Ira Levins novel Rosemarys Baby, for which she won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Supporting... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mrs. ... Jennifer Jason Leigh (born February 5, 1962) is an American actress who has appeared in numerous films. ... For other uses, see The War of the Roses (disambiguation). ... Allen Kelsey Grammer (born February 21, 1955 in Saint Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands) is a six-time Emmy and a two-time Golden Globe-winning American actor who is best known for his two-decade portrayal of psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane, whom he played for nine years on Cheers... Frasier is an American situation comedy starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... Patrick Wayne Swayze (born August 18, 1952), is an American dancer, actor, singer and songwriter. ... To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar is a 1995 Hollywood film, starring Wesley Snipes, Patrick Swayze, and John Leguizamo. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Art Bergmann is a Canadian rock singer_songwriter, who was one of the key figures in Canadian punk rock in the late 1970s. ... The Proposition is a 2005 movie directed by John Hillcoat and written by Nick Cave. ... Guy Pearce in Memento (2000). ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Emily Anita Watson (born 14 January 1967) is an Oscar nominated English actress best known for her acclaimed debut film performance in Lars von Triers Breaking the Waves. ... John Vincent Hurt CBE (born January 22, 1940) is an Academy Award-nominated and BAFTA Award-winning British actor. ... Danny Huston is a Hollywood film director, the brother of actress Anjelica Huston, the son of legendary director John Huston, and the grandson of Academy Award-winning actor Walter Huston. ... For the restaurant chain, see Outback Steakhouse; for the station wagon, see Subaru Outback. ... Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Tattoo (disambiguation). ... Kim Addonizio (b. ... Just One of Those Things is a popular song, written by Cole Porter in 1935 for the musical High Society. ... Cole Albert Porter (June 9, 1891 – October 15, 1964) was an American composer and songwriter from Indiana. ... Ira Gershwin (6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article is about the 1967 film. ... Girl, Interrupted is a 1999 drama film about a womans 18-month stay at a mental institution, starring Winona Ryder and Angelina Jolie. ... Angelina Jolie (born June 4, 1975) is an American film actress, a former fashion model and a Goodwill Ambassador for the UN Refugee Agency. ... Gilmore Girls was an American television drama/comedy that began on October 5, 2000 and aired its final episode on May 15, 2007. ... Amy Sherman-Palladino (born Amy Sherman) is an American television writer and producer. ... Gilmore Girls was an American television drama/comedy that began on October 5, 2000 and aired its final episode on May 15, 2007. ... Jared Tristan Padalecki (born July 19, 1982) is an American actor. ... “Tussauds” redirects here. ... A wax figure of Luciano Pavarotti in Venetian Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Like the wax museum at the Venetian Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada, most wax museums allow visitors to pose for pictures with the figures. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Mr. ... No Promises is the second album by the Italian-French singer and model Carla Bruni. ... Carla Bruni Tedeschi (born Turin, Italy, 23 December 1968), is an Italian supermodel, songwriter and singer. ... Al Stewart (born Alastair Ian Stewart on September 5, 1945, Glasgow, Scotland), is a British singer-songwriter and musician. ...

Publications

  • 1926. Enough Rope
  • 1927. Sunset Gun
  • 1929. Close Harmony (play)
  • 1930. Laments for the Living
  • 1931. Death and Taxes
  • 1933. After Such Pleasures
  • 1936. Collected Poems: Not So Deep As A Well
  • 1939. Here Lies
  • 1944. The Portable Dorothy Parker
  • 1953. The Ladies of the Corridor (play)
  • 1970. Constant Reader
  • 1971. A Month of Saturdays
  • 1996. Not Much Fun: The Lost Poems of Dorothy Parker
  • 1999. Complete Stories

Movies

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

References

  1. ^ a b "Dorothy Parker, 73, Literary Wit, Dies", New York Times, June 8, 1967. 
  2. ^ Dunning, John. On The Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio. Oxford University Press, 1998. ISBN 0-19-507678-8
  3. ^ Itzkovitz, Daniel. "Dorothy Rothschild Parker (1893-1967)." Jewish Virtual Library
  4. ^ Ellison, Harlan. "Daniel White for the Greater Good."
  5. ^ Strickland, Galen. The Templeton Gate: Harlan Ellison
  6. ^ alt.fan.harlan-ellison FAQ, 1995
  7. ^ http://dorothyparker.com/nj/index.html
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ "The Supermodel School of Poetry", The New York Sun, February 2, 2007. 

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

Sources

  • Keats, John, 1970. You Might As Well Live: The Life and Times of Dorothy Parker. Simon and Schuster.
  • Meade, Marion, 1988. Dorothy Parker: What Fresh Hell is This? New York: Villard.
  • Fitzpatrick, Kevin C., 2005. A Journey into Dorothy Parker's New York. Berkeley, CA: Roaring Forties Press.
  • Addonizio, Kim, and Dumesnil, Cheryl, eds., 2002. Dorothy Parker's Elbow - Tattoos on Writers, Writers on Tattoos. New York: Warner Books.

External links

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Dorothy Parker - MSN Encarta (227 words)
Dorothy Parker (1893-1967), American writer, whose poems and short stories are characterized by a bitingly humorous and sardonic style.
Parker was a member of the Algonquin Round Table, a group of writers and artists that gathered regularly during the 1920s and 1930s at the Algonquin Hotel in New York City.
Parker's writings are concerned mainly with love and with the frustrations and contradictions of modern life.
The Academy of American Poets - Dorothy Parker (632 words)
Dorothy Parker was born to J. Henry and Elizabeth Rothschild on Aug. 22, 1893, at their summer home in West End, New Jersey.
Parker, who became a socialist in 1927 when she became involved in the Sacco and Vanzetti trial, was called before the House on Un-American Activities in 1955.
Parker was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1959 and was a visiting professor at California State College in Los Angeles in 1963.
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